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(Local10 WPLG)   Guess who made $63 million last year selling information from every licensed driver "in the name of public safety." Go ahead, guess   (local10.com) divider line 54
    More: Florida, Lauderhill  
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18197 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jul 2011 at 10:05 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



54 Comments   (+0 »)
   

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2011-07-20 08:25:53 AM  
It's not just Florida. Within days of registering my car in Texas after I had moved down here, I was flooded with extended warranty offers.
 
2011-07-20 08:35:55 AM  
"Per federal mandate, there are companies that are entitled to this information. Insurance companies, for example, are entitled to this information. Employers are entitled to this information," said Ann Howard of the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.

The state is currently selling this information to companies including Lexus Nexus and Shadow Soft. Those companies gather data on people and then sell that data. The companies must sign contracts with state claiming they won't harass people.


If the companies are entitled to the information per federal law, then how could such an agreement with the state possibly withstand a challenge in court? The contract is nothing but political cover.
 
2011-07-20 08:39:07 AM  
Only judges and law enforcement officers can request their personal information not be sold.

Some citizens are more equal than others.
 
2011-07-20 09:41:35 AM  

JohDHJ: It's not just Florida. Within days of registering my car in Texas after I had moved down here, I was flooded with extended warranty offers.


That doesn't necessarily mean anything, they cold call and send mail to anyone they can get a number or address for. After all, most people do own a car.
 
2011-07-20 10:07:48 AM  
Frank Stallone
 
2011-07-20 10:09:00 AM  
Only judges and law enforcement officers can request their personal information not be sold.

Ahhhhh, to be above the law and "special"....
 
2011-07-20 10:09:15 AM  
The state does not sell Social Security numbers or driver's license numbers, and a Florida judge said what the state is doing is legal.

It may be legal but it's still f**cked up!

1. require people to have a license to drive
2. sell their info
3. PROFIT!!!!!
 
2011-07-20 10:09:21 AM  
Florida: The Blowing-Sunshine-Up-Your-Ass State.
 
2011-07-20 10:11:51 AM  

Pair-o-Dice: The state does not sell Social Security numbers or driver's license numbers, and a Florida judge said what the state is doing is legal.

It may be legal but it's still f**cked up!

1. require people to have a license to drive
2. sell their info
3. PROFIT!!!!!


I think in this case it should be an option. If you pay for your license, they cannot sell it. If you don't care if they sell that info, you get it for free.
 
2011-07-20 10:12:13 AM  
Hello Mr. Smith, we saw you recently bought a Land Rover. Would you like to buy our pretentious asshole insurance?
 
2011-07-20 10:12:20 AM  
Wait till they sell the entire state to China: people, judges, law enforcement and all.

No way? Just think Louisiana Purchase.
 
2011-07-20 10:12:23 AM  
Subby, you have to let us guess!
 
2011-07-20 10:14:07 AM  
This won't be a problem in the eyes of policy makers until it gets someone killed. BOHICA
 
2011-07-20 10:16:34 AM  
Non-story. This is only bad when the federal government does it. It is perfectly OK for a state to trample the rights of the induvidual because of "state's rights". It is "socialism" if the federal government tries to stop them.
 
2011-07-20 10:17:45 AM  
You know the common statist saying:

"if you have nothing to hide..."
 
2011-07-20 10:19:38 AM  
Can we just sell Florida to another country without their knowing and be done with the shiatstain? I suggest selling it to Cuba.
 
2011-07-20 10:19:40 AM  
So states are getting in on the Facebook way of doing things hmm
 
2011-07-20 10:21:02 AM  
FTA: The state is currently selling this information to companies including Lexus Nexus and Shadow Soft.

Lexus Nexus? Is that like the luxury version to Lexis Nexis, the Toyota of information services?
 
2011-07-20 10:21:46 AM  
wait until the government sells your health information in the interest of lowering costs for everyone!
 
2011-07-20 10:23:59 AM  
Link (new window)

Old news.
 
2011-07-20 10:24:38 AM  
Facebook?
 
2011-07-20 10:24:58 AM  
Welcome to Rick Scott's corporate world Florida.
/doh! that's me
 
2011-07-20 10:28:41 AM  
I need a new tinfoil hat.
 
2011-07-20 10:30:14 AM  
PA must do this as well. Otherwise how the heck would insurance companies know all my vehicle information before I tell them. How did Subaru know I bought one used from a non-Subby dealership. How did the local Subaru Dealer know I owned one when I have never had service done with them on that car.
 
2011-07-20 10:31:32 AM  
This is absolute bullshiat. There would be heads rolling if everyone knew this was happening.
 
2011-07-20 10:32:09 AM  

nekom: That doesn't necessarily mean anything, they cold call and send mail to anyone they can get a number or address for. After all, most people do own a car.


They knew the year, make, and model of my car. This happened only after I registered it in Texas.
 
2011-07-20 10:35:43 AM  
Florida resident here. Every day I throw away a couple of letters from car insurance companies wanting me to switch to them. By the end of the year it will be way over 500 pieces of mail. I bet they sold my name and phone number to the political parties as well, because I've been getting a lot of automated calls on my land line as well.

Notice that the nameless and faceless bureaucrat who thought up this scam and the judge who protected it are not named. Those are the names that need to be made public, for safeties sake.
 
2011-07-20 10:36:46 AM  

EyeballKid: Can we just sell Florida to another country without their knowing and be done with the shiatstain? I suggest selling it to Cuba.


I don't know, maybe Spain would want it back, give them a call.
 
2011-07-20 10:38:23 AM  

JohDHJ: nekom: That doesn't necessarily mean anything, they cold call and send mail to anyone they can get a number or address for. After all, most people do own a car.

They knew the year, make, and model of my car. This happened only after I registered it in Texas.


Well if they knew all that, that's different. Most of the mailings I get don't mention any kind of car, just that "OMG Your car warranty may be expiring!", even at times when I have had no vehicle with a warranty of any sort.
 
2011-07-20 10:39:15 AM  
My first job out of college was doing report writing against the license database for license healthcare workers. This includes names, addresses, phone number, pass/fail of various license test, degrees, etc. to any individual or company the requested them and yes Lexis Nexis got a CD of the data every month. Florida has really broad public records law and essentially any information they collect that is not SSN or financial they can give to anyone who requests it. A lot of states are like this and there is a big market out there of people getting this information for free and then process it into targeted mailing lists they the then turn around and sell to various marketing companies.
 
2011-07-20 10:40:16 AM  
I use to work at Lexis Nexis, there is a good chance they already had that info on us and much more.
 
2011-07-20 10:41:39 AM  
from TFA:
There are 15.5 million registered drivers in Florida, and the state charges companies 1 cent per electronic file.

file or record? (seriously, who writes this crap?)

so even at a penny per record... that's $155K for the whole set and they sold the whole set to over 400 companies?
 
2011-07-20 10:47:16 AM  
Only judges and law enforcement officers can request their personal information not be sold.


Yup. "Do as I say, not as I do" at its finest.

Some are more equal than others.
 
2011-07-20 10:52:19 AM  
Other than the number of cars owned data and your date of birth (which people give out all the bloody time) how is this different from what you can find in a dead tree phonebook or even the most cursory Google search?

Most people have some kind of social media account where they've already given all this information out. And just because you didn't realize "public records" means "public", it's nothing to get in a tizzy over.

/and I'm huge on privacy issues
 
2011-07-20 11:00:21 AM  

H31N0US: Only judges and law enforcement officers can request their personal information not be sold.


Yup. "Do as I say, not as I do" at its finest.

Some are more equal than others.


There's a reasonable argument the people who arrest and sentence violent criminals to jail just *might* be at greater risk of being targeted by violent criminals. You may have a point about civil judges but what about the family law judge who just terminated custody because that parent is a raving lunatic?

I don't like the us/them mentality of most LEO types these days but this is a reasonable precaution.

/we should put cameras in their shiny nickel badges though ...
 
2011-07-20 11:15:18 AM  
Damn these federal entitlement programs.
 
2011-07-20 11:18:38 AM  

DubyaHater: Florida: The Blowing-Sunshine-Up-Your-Ass State.


Place sucks. Trying to get out as fast as I can. Living where there are enough people stupid enough to elect Rick Scott governor makes me sick.

And yes, I am a native.
 
2011-07-20 11:34:49 AM  
Well, I can understand why they would avoid selling judges and LEO's information. There are people that would no doubt use that info for some swift street justice.

This whole thing is pretty messed up though. How long until other states follow suit? Who am I kidding they probably all already do this. Florida was just stupid enough to tell someone about it.
 
2011-07-20 11:47:23 AM  
Every time you swipe a card, someone's making money off of your personal info.
 
2011-07-20 11:55:02 AM  
a Florida judge said what the state is doing is legal.

OF COURSE a Florida judge says it's legal. It's being done by the Florida LAWMAKERS.

Anything the lawmakers make a law saying they can do, is legal.
 
2011-07-20 11:57:54 AM  

JohDHJ: nekom: That doesn't necessarily mean anything, they cold call and send mail to anyone they can get a number or address for. After all, most people do own a car.

They knew the year, make, and model of my car. This happened only after I registered it in Texas.


That information is available at any DMV in Texas, although they do charge a few dollars. (and only when their computers are functioning)

PublicData.com has info from every state.
 
2011-07-20 12:11:38 PM  

Pancoaifo: There's a reasonable argument the people who arrest and sentence violent criminals to jail just *might* be at greater risk of being targeted by violent criminals. You may have a point about civil judges but what about the family law judge who just terminated custody because that parent is a raving lunatic?

I don't like the us/them mentality of most LEO types these days but this is a reasonable precaution.


Special privileges = some are more equal than others
 
2011-07-20 12:19:30 PM  

generallyso: Pancoaifo: There's a reasonable argument the people who arrest and sentence violent criminals to jail just *might* be at greater risk of being targeted by violent criminals. You may have a point about civil judges but what about the family law judge who just terminated custody because that parent is a raving lunatic?

I don't like the us/them mentality of most LEO types these days but this is a reasonable precaution.


Special privileges = some are more equal than others


Some are more at risk = special protections
 
2011-07-20 12:33:56 PM  

ghare: DubyaHater: Florida: The Blowing-Sunshine-Up-Your-Ass State.

Place sucks. Trying to get out as fast as I can. Living where there are enough people stupid enough to elect Rick Scott governor makes me sick.

And yes, I am a native.


I know the feeling. I am a Florida native myself. That's why I moved to a more progressive state like Virginia.
 
2011-07-20 01:21:40 PM  

Pancoaifo: Some are more at risk = special protections


Why not allow all women to be exempt as they are, as a group, more likely to be victims of stalking.
 
2011-07-20 01:36:19 PM  
Rick Scott: The bald-headed, lying shyster POS. Happy? This bastard should be in jail.
 
2011-07-20 02:45:19 PM  

Plan D: Pancoaifo: Some are more at risk = special protections

Why not allow all women to be exempt as they are, as a group, more likely to be victims of stalking.


Well, then all gingers, brunettes, blondes, midgets, talls, skinnies, fatties, whites, blacks, yellows, reds and purple polka dots should be protected too since they arrest violent criminals and sentence them to prison and all.

Surely all violent criminals give up after running a block and say, "fair cop, guv" ...
 
2011-07-20 02:46:24 PM  

Pancoaifo: Some are more at risk = special protections


So we all agree that this kind of information could end up risking the safety of individuals.
 
2011-07-20 03:16:55 PM  

fireclown: Pancoaifo: Some are more at risk = special protections

So we all agree that this kind of information could end up risking the safety of individuals.


Cracked open a phonebook lately?

Outrage then, whar?
 
2011-07-20 04:35:20 PM  
"Only judges and law enforcement officers can request their personal information not be sold."

Violation of Equal Protection clause? Or is that considered "quaint" these days?
 
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