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(Slate)   16 watt LED bulb mimics a 75 watt incandescent's spectrum, is cheaper than alternatives, and has a great design   (slate.com) divider line 137
    More: Cool, LEDs, LED lamp, fluorescences, incandescent light bulb, kilowatt hours, CFLs, spectrum, collective investment scheme  
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10779 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Jul 2011 at 12:33 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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ZAZ [TotalFark]
2011-07-09 12:22:59 PM
Does it turn on when the switch is turned on, or does it have to struggle to wake up? I have a CFL paired with a real light bulb in a two-bulb fixture so it turns on when I turn it on.

warm, yellowish, comforting glow

You just made me not want one.
 
2011-07-09 12:27:13 PM

ZAZ: Does it turn on when the switch is turned on, or does it have to struggle to wake up? I have a CFL paired with a real light bulb in a two-bulb fixture so it turns on when I turn it on.


I can't remember the brand but I just bought some "dimmable" florescent bulbs that come on pretty quick.

I was going to go for the LED but couldn't seem to find any with better than 40W (equivalent) in Lowe's. They're about $5-$6 apiece which is pretty good. It was cool to finally see affordable LEDs on the shelf. I may go this weekend and buy a couple of the "recessed" LED light packages.
 
2011-07-09 12:39:32 PM

ZAZ: Does it turn on when the switch is turned on, or does it have to struggle to wake up? I have a CFL paired with a real light bulb in a two-bulb fixture so it turns on when I turn it on.


LEDs are solid state. Theoretically, they should hit full luminescence faster than filament bulbs. There's a tiny bit of lag on filament bulbs as the filament heats up. This doesn't happen with LEDs.

We're talking about microseconds here, so you won't notice the difference.
 
2011-07-09 12:40:55 PM
Just like CFLs, I'm guessing that this bulb will burn out in about the same time that incandescent bulbs do. When you look into why it burned out so fast, it will turn out that you weren't supposed to use it in a ceiling fixture because it would get too hot, or you weren't supposed to turn it on and off often as in a bathroom, or it wasn't supposed to go outside like a porch light because it would get too cold, or it wasn't supposed to go in a lamp because blahbedy blibbidy boo.

These new bulbs are apparently great if you put them in some fictional place where they never get cold or hot or have to be turned on or off.
 
2011-07-09 12:43:13 PM
The color of CFLs is nicer and more pleasant to be around than incandescents. In fact, all my incandescents are of the "white" variety so as to minimize that yellowish tinge.
 
2011-07-09 12:43:30 PM

2chris2: Just like CFLs, I'm guessing that this bulb will burn out in about the same time that incandescent bulbs do. When you look into why it burned out so fast, it will turn out that you weren't supposed to use it in a ceiling fixture because it would get too hot, or you weren't supposed to turn it on and off often as in a bathroom, or it wasn't supposed to go outside like a porch light because it would get too cold, or it wasn't supposed to go in a lamp because blahbedy blibbidy boo.

These new bulbs are apparently great if you put them in some fictional place where they never get cold or hot or have to be turned on or off.


Yeah, that's why we use them in HEADLIGHTS. Can't imagine a less hospitable environment.
 
2011-07-09 12:53:42 PM
LEDs like the cold. In a cold environment they snap on quickly. The real advantage of LEDs over CFLs is the life time. CFLs have a life time around 50,000 hours. That means 5 years of continuous running. If you use it intermittently it should last you ten years.
 
2011-07-09 12:55:01 PM

2chris2: Just like CFLs, I'm guessing that this bulb will burn out in about the same time that incandescent bulbs do. When you look into why it burned out so fast, it will turn out that you weren't supposed to use it in a ceiling fixture because it would get too hot, or you weren't supposed to turn it on and off often as in a bathroom, or it wasn't supposed to go outside like a porch light because it would get too cold, or it wasn't supposed to go in a lamp because blahbedy blibbidy boo.

These new bulbs are apparently great if you put them in some fictional place where they never get cold or hot or have to be turned on or off.


Don't know what you are buying, but I had a set of early CFLs that lasted over 11 years in a receccessed sockets. (In fact, I moved them from one house to another when we moved). I have another in a ceiling fan that is nearly always on. It is over 6 years old.

But then I don't buy the cheapest chinese CFL out there. The only CFLs that I have had to replace 'early' were from a socket that ended up being improperly grounded.

I expect more good things from LEDs.

Bet you still have a nice CRT monitor. Those CCD and LED backlights in the new fangled flat panels go bad just as a quickly, right?
 
2011-07-09 12:56:43 PM
There is a *huge* variation in the color and startup time of 60w and 75w-equivalent CFL bulbs. When my dad was looking into CFLs 7-8 years ago, he bought approximately 6 different brands of CFLs, and they all had slightly different color, and some took longer than others to turn on from the time one flicked the switch. I also had to experiment a bit when the first package of CFLs that I bought for my house turned out to be overly blue/cool. After a few attempts to different brands/models, though, I finally found my perfect CFLs that are warm (not yellow like incandescents, but still pretty warm) and that have no turn-on lag. I replaced the most frequently-used incandescent bulbs (~30 of them) in my house with these CFLs about 4 years ago. Since then, I've had two burn out. I do have three bulbs that are 75 w equivalent that still have a little start-up lag (about 1/2 second from switch to light), and these bulbs also have a noticeable, non-linear light output ramp-up (~10 seconds). The 60 w equivalents are, dare I say, perfectly acceptable to me.

I should note that I first looked into CFLs because our (wife+my) bedroom would get very warm from the 4 60w incandescent bulbs in the ceiling fan. The CFLs produce *much* less heat. Again, though, make sure you shop around before deciding to buy 50 CFLs of the same type! The color and start-up lag (preferably the lack thereof) can vary significantly from brand-to-brand! Don't blast CFLs because you bought a brand/type that made a buzz and looked blue...

/ Oops, TFA was about LED bulbs...
// The vast majority of my CFLs are performing well, so I don't need to replace them with LEDs.
/// The local BWWs just added some CFLs for the tables under the projector screens, but the manager apparently didn't shop around much, as they are distractingly blue and harsh
 
2011-07-09 01:02:55 PM

2chris2: Just like CFLs, I'm guessing that this bulb will burn out in about the same time that incandescent bulbs do. When you look into why it burned out so fast, it will turn out that you weren't supposed to use it in a ceiling fixture because it would get too hot, or you weren't supposed to turn it on and off often as in a bathroom, or it wasn't supposed to go outside like a porch light because it would get too cold, or it wasn't supposed to go in a lamp because blahbedy blibbidy boo.

These new bulbs are apparently great if you put them in some fictional place where they never get cold or hot or have to be turned on or off.


LEDs are the best option in all off those scenarios. They don't putout heat, can be turned on and off more (think HDD indicators), and work better in the cold.
 
2011-07-09 01:05:02 PM

wingnut396:

Don't know what you are buying, but I had a set of early CFLs that lasted over 11 years in a receccessed sockets. (In fact, I moved them from one house to another when we moved). I have another in a ceiling fan that is nearly always on. It is over 6 years old.

But then I don't buy the cheapest chinese CFL out there. The only CFLs that I have had to replace 'early' were from a socket that ended up being improperly grounded.

I expect more good things from LEDs.

Bet you still have a nice CRT monitor. Those CCD and LED backlights in the new fangled flat panels go bad just as a quickly, right?



I got a couple CFL bulbs from my electric company, which was trying to encourage people to switch to them some years ago. Neither of them lasted very long. Although, since my heat has always been electric heat, and I have to heat my home about 10 months out of the year, incandescent bulbs don't actually waste energy since they are just as efficient as my home's heating system.

And, I do still have a CRT monitor. It is also 100% efficient at heating my home, just like my light bulbs and heating system.
 
2011-07-09 01:06:07 PM
Yep, author of the article has done no research to speak of. LED bulbs that screw into a regular socket, etc, etc, have been available for years. Instant-on CFLs in different colors and temperatures, also available for years. And using a standard incandescant bulb will lead to you being exposed to more mercury (from coal mining and power plant emissions) during its lifetime than a CFL bulb even if you do break the bulb and clean it up yourself.

Article's complete crap. LED bulbs are pretty cool, though. Still not cheap enough, but they're getting there -- it's clearly a question of volume. You can get a brighter LED flashlight for your dollar than an LED household lightbulb, and that's because LED flashlights currently outsell LED household bulbs by a huge margin.
 
2011-07-09 01:07:16 PM

ZAZ: Does it turn on when the switch is turned on, or does it have to struggle to wake up? I have a CFL paired with a real light bulb in a two-bulb fixture so it turns on when I turn it on.

warm, yellowish, comforting glow

You just made me not want one.


instant on with LEDs
 
2011-07-09 01:15:36 PM

RandomAxe: Yep, author of the article has done no research to speak of. LED bulbs that screw into a regular socket, etc, etc, have been available for years. Instant-on CFLs in different colors and temperatures, also available for years. And using a standard incandescant bulb will lead to you being exposed to more mercury (from coal mining and power plant emissions) during its lifetime than a CFL bulb even if you do break the bulb and clean it up yourself.


Situation:

1. I live in the pacific northwest, where we have hydroelectric power.
2. I have to heat my home at least 10 months out of the year.
3. My home's heating system is electric (not a heat pump), which is no more efficient than my oven or my computer or my light bulbs at heating the house.

So, can anyone explain to me why I would want to switch away from incandescent bulbs, which are dirty cheap, light and heat the house at the same time, and produce no pollution?
 
2011-07-09 01:19:15 PM
DO NOT TREAD ON MAH LIBERTEE TO WASTE ENERGEE!
 
2011-07-09 01:22:36 PM
My CFL lamps come on a little bit when first energized, as if to say "yeah, I'm working on it", but don't get to full brightness for a minute or two.

No big deal.
 
2011-07-09 01:33:41 PM
2chris2:
3. My home's heating system is electric (not a heat pump), which is no more efficient than my oven or my computer or my light bulbs at heating the house.


That's simply not true. Heat from a light bulb is not even as good as a purpose designed resistance heating system as far as efficiency goes, but admittedly it's close.

But that begs the question, why in the world are you depending on electric resistance heating if you live in a climate where you need to run the heat 10 month's a year?

Resistance is a piss poor way of heating anything. It is not as efficient as heat from a quality heat pump, much less a good gas/propane furnace, which is what you should have if you run the heat 10 months a year; I'm in upstate NY and I don't run the heat that much.

I travel a fair amount and the only place I see semi routine use of electric resistance heating as a sole source of heat is Florida south of Orlando, and even there most have heat pumps.. Heck my family in GA all have gas furnaces.

So yes, incandescent light are a piss poor way to heat your house, and the other 2 months of year what heat they provide just works against you...
 
2011-07-09 01:35:07 PM
I'll ask the same question I ask in every one of these threads:

What is the name of Christ are you people doing that makes you go through so many f*cking light bulbs? Throwing rocks at them?

Seriously, I change 1 maybe 2 light bulbs a year in my house, tops. The way people talk on these light bulb threads makes it sound like they make weekly trips to the store just to replenish their light bulb supply, and spend half of their disposable income, in a never ending battle against the forces of electricity.

Do some of you people just spend hours a day flipping your lights on and off, testing them to destruction?
 
2011-07-09 01:38:47 PM
I'm rather disappointed in the lack of info about LED bulbs. I've bought several already to try and test them out in terms of output, color, and price. There doesn't seem to be a universal guide for them.

I've been extremely happy with the ones I have though. Much much better than CFLs.
 
2011-07-09 01:43:14 PM

2chris2: 3. My home's heating system is electric (not a heat pump), which is no more efficient than my oven or my computer or my light bulbs at heating the house.

So, can anyone explain to me why I would want to switch away from incandescent bulbs, which are dirty cheap, light and heat the house at the same time, and produce no pollution?


Because it's kind of silly to heat your house with a hot element positioned at the ceiling, rather than near the floor?

Other than that, yes, your zero-emission power source, your location that requires heat ten months out of the year, and your choice of an expensive-to-operate furnace do make you a poster child for continued use of incandescents. Enjoy them in good health.
 
2011-07-09 01:45:25 PM

studebaker hoch: My CFL lamps come on a little bit when first energized, as if to say "yeah, I'm working on it", but don't get to full brightness for a minute or two.

No big deal.


Yeah, considering you're using a fraction of the electricity and are saving money by using the bulb, it's really not much of a compromise. But I guess some people are just picky/crazy/resistant to change.
 
2011-07-09 01:46:13 PM
$20 for a 60 watt bulb?

Still way too expensive to be an acceptable alternative to the Edison bulb or CLFs.

Unless it's as cheap or cheaper than currently available CFLs (at WalMart or Kroger or Home Depot or where ever), then this will never gain market acceptance.

/knowing your market... you can't explain that.
 
2011-07-09 01:47:23 PM

dforkus: 2chris2:
3. My home's heating system is electric (not a heat pump), which is no more efficient than my oven or my computer or my light bulbs at heating the house.

That's simply not true. Heat from a light bulb is not even as good as a purpose designed resistance heating system as far as efficiency goes, but admittedly it's close.

But that begs the question, why in the world are you depending on electric resistance heating if you live in a climate where you need to run the heat 10 month's a year?

Resistance is a piss poor way of heating anything. It is not as efficient as heat from a quality heat pump, much less a good gas/propane furnace, which is what you should have if you run the heat 10 months a year; I'm in upstate NY and I don't run the heat that much.

I travel a fair amount and the only place I see semi routine use of electric resistance heating as a sole source of heat is Florida south of Orlando, and even there most have heat pumps.. Heck my family in GA all have gas furnaces.

So yes, incandescent light are a piss poor way to heat your house, and the other 2 months of year what heat they provide just works against you...


Uh, I'm as big a conservationist as they come, and I'm gonna have to side with Chris here. I'm on co-op hydro up her in the NW. We're running our dam at 1/3rd capacity and still generating more electricity than we can use. It's so bad that utilities have been paying each other to take the excess power. Why the hell would we burn fossil fuels for heat when we have more renewable electricity than we can use?
 
2011-07-09 01:54:04 PM

dforkus:
That's simply not true. Heat from a light bulb is not even as good as a purpose designed resistance heating system as far as efficiency goes, but admittedly it's close.

But that begs the question, why in the world are you depending on electric resistance heating if you live in a climate where you need to run the heat 10 month's a year?

Resistance is a piss poor way of heating anything. It is not as efficient as heat from a quality heat pump, much less a good gas/propane furnace, which is what you should have if you run the heat 10 months a year; I'm in upstate NY and I don't run the heat that much.

I travel a fair amount and the only place I see semi routine use of electric resistance heating as a sole source of heat is Florida south of Orlando, and even there most have heat pumps.. Heck my family in GA all have gas furnaces.

So yes, incandescent light are a piss poor way to heat your house, and the other 2 months of year what heat they provide just works against you...


In live in Western washington, on the coast. Because we've always had cheap electric power, lots of homes (and most that I've lived in) have had electric resistance heating, because it's cheap to install. I've usually had electric baseboard heating.

And actually, the house may well be heated more than 10 months out of the year. Even now, in July, the heat still comes on at night. I leave the lights shut off during the day during the summer, as there's plenty of light coming in the windows and no need for the heat.
 
2011-07-09 01:58:24 PM

ZAZ: warm, yellowish, comforting glow

You just made me not want one.


If you want that bluish mercury-vapor glow, you're in luck. LEDs with a higher color temperature (bluer light) are actually easier to make with high brightness and efficiency.

For me, the warm light is a big plus. Blue light in the evening screws up the circadian rhythm, so I want dimmer, yellower light toward bedtime. I got a Philips 7-watt dimmable LED bulb that's about equivalent to a 40-watt incandescent, and much brighter than the 25w incandescent it replaced. I can crank it down to near-invisibility if I want -- much better than "dimmable" CFLs, which seem to go down to about 50% brightness and then wink out.

Only problem is, it doesn't get redder at lower levels like incandescents do, and I find I miss that. Most people probably will see it as an advantage, though.

One day, I'm sure, you'll be able to buy LED bulbs that emulate incandescent dimming, with warmer light at lower levels.
 
2011-07-09 01:58:35 PM
ZAZ 2011-07-09 12:22:59 PM Does it turn on when the switch is turned on, or does it have to struggle to wake up? I have a CFL paired with a real light bulb in a two-bulb fixture so it turns on when I turn it on. warm, yellowish, comforting glow You just made me not want one.
================================================================

A) Yes, LEDs are instant unlike CFLs. This is noticeable in many LED applications, like remote controls.

B) LEDs, like CFLs and Incandescants, are sold in warm white and cool white. Warm white is that yellowish crap. Just buy a cool white.

Also, this is 16 watts for a 75 watt replacement which is worse than a CFL. WTF are they doing?

/Hint: Buy a zetalux (for 60 watters) or evolux (for 100 watters). They're very good and extremely cheap compared to the competition.
 
2011-07-09 01:58:47 PM
In case anyone's curious, here's mid July on the washington coast:

i52.tinypic.com

Now, at some point during August, it will get really hot here and the temperature might actually reach 80.
 
2011-07-09 02:01:02 PM
The more important question: do they flicker?

/Want to insta-trigger a severe migraine in someone you know is migraine prone? Make them look at LED Christmas lights.
 
2011-07-09 02:01:41 PM

2chris2: In case anyone's curious, here's mid July on the washington coast:

[i52.tinypic.com image 469x175]

Now, at some point during August, it will get really hot here and the temperature might actually reach 80.


Dude, burn all the electricity you want, we'll gladly send you more.
 
2011-07-09 02:03:44 PM

sigdiamond2000: I'll ask the same question I ask in every one of these threads:

What is the name of Christ are you people doing that makes you go through so many f*cking light bulbs? Throwing rocks at them?

Seriously, I change 1 maybe 2 light bulbs a year in my house, tops. The way people talk on these light bulb threads makes it sound like they make weekly trips to the store just to replenish their light bulb supply, and spend half of their disposable income, in a never ending battle against the forces of electricity.

Do some of you people just spend hours a day flipping your lights on and off, testing them to destruction?


This.

I switched to CFLs about 7 years ago, forced my parents to adopt them about 5 years ago and I've never seen one go dead. I run the lights day and night and my electric bill all but disappears in the winter (gas furnace/water heater). The best part is being able to have about 7500 lumens in the bathroom for shaving etc. without it getting hot as fark within a couple of minutes. Hell, I've got two of them in outdoor fixtures and they weren't even bothered by temps occasionally getting into the negatives at night during the dead of winter.

If your CFLs are going dead within a year or two, either you're buying bad bulbs or your light sockets aren't wired correctly.
 
2011-07-09 02:04:20 PM
2chris2 2011-07-09 12:40:55 PM Just like CFLs, I'm guessing that this bulb will burn out in about the same time that incandescent bulbs do. When you look into why it burned out so fast, it will turn out that you weren't supposed to use it in a ceiling fixture because it would get too hot, or you weren't supposed to turn it on and off often as in a bathroom, or it wasn't supposed to go outside like a porch light because it would get too cold, or it wasn't supposed to go in a lamp because blahbedy blibbidy boo.
=================================================================

You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole? Good for you!

LEDs do not suffer from the switching problem that CFLs do. In fact, dimmable leds work by turning the LED on and off a bazillion times. No, it doesn't harm the life.

LEDs can't be hot though, they will shortcircuit pretty quick. Make sure they're not inside a fixture that can't get airflow. And don't put them outside if you live in the deep south.

/Also, remember that LEDs don't burn out. They dim overtime. The '50000' hours is how long it'll last before it hits 50% of its original brightness (as least, that's the number they're SUPPOSED to put).
 
2011-07-09 02:07:15 PM
Things change over time people.

/you'll get over it.
 
2011-07-09 02:07:27 PM

jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?


No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.
 
2011-07-09 02:22:42 PM

rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.


Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...
 
2011-07-09 02:25:15 PM
I light my house with seal blubber lamps so I'm getting a kick out of this thread
 
2011-07-09 02:26:24 PM

dforkus: rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.

Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...


not by a mile but as long as it rains/snows we have eletricity
 
2011-07-09 02:28:17 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com

Laughs at the new bulb's girly-bulb shenanigans.
 
2011-07-09 02:28:30 PM
FTFA:

The Switch bulb also has an average lifespan of 20,000 hours-20 years.

If this even remotely true, it would be great. But if they are anything like CFL's, they just pulled the number out of the air.

CFL's seem particularly sensitive to power fluctuations. My house has old wiring, and the CFL's usually don't even last as long as incandescent bulbs.
 
2011-07-09 02:31:37 PM

rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.


My power is hydro, but it's not cheap. Even though we have to have all of our petroleum fuels shipped on barges, it's still far cheaper to heat with a Toyo kerosine stove than it is to use electricity here. (My local power utility wants to raise electricity rates by 30% to reimburse themselves for building a second dam that no one wanted and the city told them was a stupid idea.)
 
2011-07-09 02:34:14 PM

whither_apophis: I light my house with seal blubber lamps so I'm getting a kick out of this thread


Hey, seal blubber is renewable!
 
2011-07-09 02:34:21 PM

whither_apophis: dforkus: rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.

Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...

not by a mile but as long as it rains/snows we have eletricity


Not much consolation to the salmon that can't get past Grand Coulee.
 
2011-07-09 02:34:26 PM

dforkus: rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.

Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...


The difference is that the majority of the environmental damage a hydro plant is going to incur has already been done during construction with very little additional damage during the run of the plant. Combustion-based electrical generation continues to damage the environment for as long as the plant is in operation.
 
2011-07-09 02:35:23 PM
Americans and their farking lightbulbs.
 
2011-07-09 02:35:45 PM

Torsoheap: whither_apophis: dforkus: rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.

Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...

not by a mile but as long as it rains/snows we have eletricity

Not much consolation to the salmon that can't get past Grand Coulee.


Dude, CFLs and LEDs aren't gonna make the Grand Coulee dam go away. Maybe think before you type?
 
2011-07-09 02:37:10 PM

Torsoheap: whither_apophis: dforkus: rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.

Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...

not by a mile but as long as it rains/snows we have eletricity

Not much consolation to the salmon that can't get past Grand Coulee.


What, no way to let them get up on a side stream?
 
2011-07-09 02:43:11 PM

Marine1: Torsoheap: whither_apophis: dforkus: rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.

Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...

not by a mile but as long as it rains/snows we have eletricity

Not much consolation to the salmon that can't get past Grand Coulee.

What, no way to let them get up on a side stream?


It's almost like nobody thought of that:

xroads.virginia.edu
 
2011-07-09 02:59:07 PM
Moved into my apartment 3 years ago. Switched out the bulbs for CFLs then. Haven't changed one yet.

LEDs will probably be awesome by the time I need to.

Incandescent are the new buggy whips.
 
2011-07-09 03:02:08 PM

Torsoheap: whither_apophis: dforkus: rohar: jake3988: You're attacking it because you're an ignorant asshole?

No, he's stating that he has no use of it. And he's right. For those of us in the NW, we have more renewable electricity than we can use. Getting efficient doesn't help anyone around here.

Right, because hydroelectricity is 100% environmentally benign...

not by a mile but as long as it rains/snows we have eletricity

Not much consolation to the salmon that can't get past Grand Coulee.


They barely get that far but since you're also on the side of salmon restoration please write your congresscritter to help remove the Snake River dams

/end dam related threadjack
//have a bunch if CFLs, none have gone out in 5+ years
///LEDs look ridiculous on Audis
////Sodium and halides in the basement... er forget that last one
 
2011-07-09 03:11:02 PM

whither_apophis: LEDs look ridiculous on Audis


The headlights don't look bad at all, the running lights are just stupid. Like some kind of farked up mascara.
 
2011-07-09 03:14:29 PM
Rad! Now make them affordable.
 
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