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(Time)   Indiana to stop teaching cursive. Children will now learn to sign their names using TXT MSGS   (newsfeed.time.com) divider line 258
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5259 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Jul 2011 at 4:02 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-07-06 10:08:04 PM
Meh, cursive is outdated. People have a hard enough time reading the hen scratch kids are churning out these days.
 
2011-07-06 10:14:46 PM

basemetal: Meh, cursive is outdated.


While I certainly agree that learning to type well is far more relevant in 2011, what if they have to read something written in cursive? Like maybe in history class?

Maybe the last generation to use cursive will use it as a secret language to keep the kids off their lawn.
 
2011-07-06 10:32:34 PM

ambassador_ahab: While I certainly agree that learning to type well is far more relevant in 2011, what if they have to read something written in cursive? Like maybe in history class?


I'm sure they could familiarise themselves with a caligraphy font or two.
 
2011-07-06 10:45:05 PM
I'm left-handed. I would be perfectly happy with cursive being eradicated.
 
2011-07-06 10:48:11 PM

UNC_Samurai: I'm left-handed. I would be perfectly happy with cursive being eradicated.


I'm left handed too, but what did that have to do with learning cursive? Never had an issue myself.

Personally I see no issue with this as I can't think of a person who uses it regularly anymore unless you're well over age 30 (and honestly, cursive isn't that hard to read if you've never studied it).
 
2011-07-06 10:48:50 PM

UNC_Samurai: I'm left-handed


I also "bat on the other side" if you catch my drift, and I haven't written anything in cursive since I was like 13 or 14.
 
2011-07-06 10:50:43 PM
Makes sense, Indiana students can already count to potatoe.
 
2011-07-06 10:59:09 PM
My oldest is 13 and wasn't taught cursive in elementary. When I asked him if he thought he should maybe learn it on his own, he scoffed at his dinosaur old man. Unfortunately for him, his 7th grade Spanish teacher would only speak Spanish and write instructions in cursive. She didnt seem to care that 1/3 of the class came from an advanced elementary who didnt waste time on that type thing.
Yeah yeah- end CSB

/in Indiana
//he taught himself cursive in about 2 days. It's not rocket surgery
 
2011-07-06 11:02:26 PM

dugitman: My oldest is 13 and wasn't taught cursive in elementary. When I asked him if he thought he should maybe learn it on his own, he scoffed at his dinosaur old man. Unfortunately for him, his 7th grade Spanish teacher would only speak Spanish and write instructions in cursive. She didnt seem to care that 1/3 of the class came from an advanced elementary who didnt waste time on that type thing.
Yeah yeah- end CSB

/in Indiana
//he taught himself cursive in about 2 days. It's not rocket surgery


[excellent!]
 
2011-07-06 11:09:25 PM

dugitman: /in Indiana


I grew up in Indianapolis. They made me learn it in like 2nd grade, but that was a while ago.
 
2011-07-06 11:28:50 PM
Are the little farkers going to be signing documents with a big "X"?
 
2011-07-06 11:42:04 PM
Learning to read cursive would be fairly straight forward.

It's the meaningless and seemingly endless learning of how to "properly" writing cursive that was a load of crap in elementary school.

FirstNationalBastard: Are the little farkers going to be signing documents with a big "X"?


In another 50 to 100 years paper signatures will hopefully be a thing of the past (they're damn near worthless right now if someone is willing to lie).

What purpose does it serve? If "OMG HOW WILL THEY SIGN THEIR NAME!?" is your best argument, then time to give it the Ol'Yeller treatment. It's all about opportunity cost. What could they be teaching the kids instead of drilling them on an archaic, outdated method of stylized writing that they will almost never need?
 
2011-07-06 11:50:21 PM
As someone who can both touch type AND write cursive, I'll be getting a kick out of these replies...

Sid_6.7: Learning to read cursive would be fairly straight forward.

It's the meaningless and seemingly endless learning of how to "properly" writing cursive that was a load of crap in elementary school.


In all seriousness, I can understand phasing out all the emphasis on cursive handwriting. But people (even youngish people!) still do write notes in cursive in the modern workplace, so there's a need to know how to read it. Of course, the main way to learn to read it is to learn to write it - so I say they should still teach cursive. They don't need to require kids to write everything in it for years to improve their handwriting, but enough to be able to read cursive is still useful.

More than that though, I wonder - are modern elementary schools teaching touch-typing, then? Because it seems to me that a horde of fairly young people has come up through American schools without officially learning to type, and they're pretty abysmally slow at it, despite supposedly being the computer generation. But maybe that's some odd in between group and now they teach typing to kids?

/if you have to think about the keyboard at all, you're too slow
//cleaning out the house I found a bunch of my own notes from university - all written in cursive, as it happens
 
2011-07-06 11:54:18 PM

Sid_6.7: In another 50 to 100 years paper signatures will hopefully be a thing of the past (they're damn near worthless right now if someone is willing to lie).


Also though I gotta admit, my own signature is pretty horrifically "hey! I learned cursive in English as a foreign language class!!!" style extremely legible but noticeably foreign, probably bad for a signature as it's not hard to read. Many years after I got used to that and established it as my signature I found out that plenty of my friends just write the Chinese characters versions of their name as their signature and it works just fine since it's a pen mark unique to them, and I kinda wish I'd done that now.
 
2011-07-07 12:24:46 AM

itazurakko: Sid_6.7: In another 50 to 100 years paper signatures will hopefully be a thing of the past (they're damn near worthless right now if someone is willing to lie).

Also though I gotta admit, my own signature is pretty horrifically "hey! I learned cursive in English as a foreign language class!!!" style extremely legible but noticeably foreign, probably bad for a signature as it's not hard to read. Many years after I got used to that and established it as my signature I found out that plenty of my friends just write the Chinese characters versions of their name as their signature and it works just fine since it's a pen mark unique to them, and I kinda wish I'd done that now.


I sign in Hebrew.

After learning cursive over two months in elementary school and being able to write it quite illegibly (unless I wrote real..........slow...........), I had a history teacher in 7th grade who wrote in small caps. It was like a light bulb - immediately, I could read my handwriting.

In college I was complimented several times for my neat handwriting. By women!!!
 
2011-07-07 12:31:08 AM
I thought he taught archaeology?
 
2011-07-07 01:57:21 AM
I'm on board with this.

If your concern is how kids will sign their name, teach them to sign their name in cursive. That's maybe a week's worth of half hour writing classes. Ta-da.

Also, delay it until after elementary school. Why does an 8-year old with crappy motor skills need to learn to write crappy cursive?
 
2011-07-07 02:04:15 AM

ambassador_ahab: UNC_Samurai: I'm left-handed

I also "bat on the other side" if you catch my drift, and I haven't written anything in cursive since I was like 13 or 14.


I'm with you guys - I'm also a sinister lefty and I've always hated cursive.
 
2011-07-07 02:33:19 AM
And the dumbing down continues.

Thank God, it will give them more time to teach diversity.
 
2011-07-07 03:34:55 AM
Cursive has always been stupid. My signature is not in cursive and it never has been. I refused to use it in school unless I was forced to by some annoying teacher, but even then I'd curse that cursive.

It's outdated, useless, hard to read, and a pain in the ass. Kill it dead and never let us talk of it again.
 
2011-07-07 04:04:24 AM
Two kids. Montessori. They learned cursive from age 3. My five-year-old writes in better cursive than I do.


Neither can type worth a shiat though.
 
2011-07-07 04:11:16 AM
Nobody actually reads what anyone from Indiana has to say anyway, so they've got that going for them. ;)

My writing is half cursive, half printing. Not sure why. Sloppy habbits I guess.
 
2011-07-07 04:17:07 AM
Lots of hate for something so simple. Is there some sort of hand eye coordination problem with the majority of farkers? Personally don't really care whether they teach it or not, just don't understand the strong stance on it.
 
2011-07-07 04:18:50 AM
How do you people take notes in college? I relied on a combination of cursive (cause I can't write in block letters fast enough) and a voice recorder.

Maybe you can get away with a laptop in things like business or psychology, but what about science and math?

Furthermore, what the hell are you going to do when the apocalypse comes? How will you communicate? Throw your netbooks and iphones at each other?
 
2011-07-07 04:22:18 AM
[who_farking_cares.gif]

My middle school pounded cursive into our heads and then required us to turn in every assignment except math in cursive for three years.

After that I used cursive a couple of times when taking the SAT, to copy out a no-cheating pledge where the instructions said, "Do not print." And that's all.
 
2011-07-07 04:22:38 AM

woodchucker: Maybe you can get away with a laptop in things like business or psychology, but what about science and math?


My second year organic chemistry was 6-7 sides of a page densely packed with a mix of cursive and chemical reactions... really hurt the hands to keep up.

I suppose the answer to your question would be to provide all the notes in some electronic format.
 
2011-07-07 04:24:22 AM
The hell with cursive. They way I see it, kids are still being taught to read and write two ways anyway: Hand print, and typing text. Does anyone honestly have a valid explanation for why we ever needed cursive to be mandotory?

Seriously, waste of fricking time. There are many far more industrious things you could be teaching during that time.
 
2011-07-07 04:26:38 AM
I say, take it out of elementary, and help students develop a signature when they're old enough to need one.

I wouldn't have minded if we'd had penmanship as an elective later on, though. I'd like to learn copperplate.

woodchucker: How do you people take notes in college? I relied on a combination of cursive (cause I can't write in block letters fast enough) and a voice recorder.


Scribble in class, rewrite after if it's really bad.
 
2011-07-07 04:28:51 AM
My handwriting sucks and I live in Indianapolis, so I am getting a kick out of these replies.

/Well, I don't get many chances to use the meme, so what did you expect?
 
2011-07-07 04:30:00 AM

ElQue: ambassador_ahab: UNC_Samurai: I'm left-handed

I also "bat on the other side" if you catch my drift, and I haven't written anything in cursive since I was like 13 or 14.

I'm with you guys - I'm also a sinister lefty and I've always hated cursive.


left handed
love cursive writing
get complimented by my students who wish they could write like I do
 
2011-07-07 04:34:14 AM
For everyone asking about note taking- I can type at talking speed (or rather, quite nearly). I brought my computer with my to my college courses, and never had an issue with note taking. Instead of learning to handwrite illegible notes, how about learning to type extremely fast? It's all muscle memory, after all.
 
2011-07-07 04:47:33 AM
Cursive has a single advantage: preventing a bunch of blots of ink from occurring every time you lift an antique quill or fountain pen from the paper to move it to the next letter.

Utterly useless since the invention of the pencil and ballpoint and other modern pens.
 
2011-07-07 04:48:49 AM

Generation_D: Makes sense, Indiana students can already count to potatoe.


Yeah they can probably spell potato too.
 
2011-07-07 04:52:21 AM
My signature is an untelligible wave of scratch that takes .2 seconds to complete.

I havent used cursive (script) since the 3rd grade.
 
2011-07-07 05:01:56 AM

o5iiawah: untelligible


also, spelling

/the more illegible the signature, the easier it is to forge
 
2011-07-07 05:04:09 AM

ambassador_ahab: I also "bat on the other side" if you catch my drift,


NTTAWWT

bel4sucks: Generation_D: Makes sense, Indiana students can already count to potatoe.

Yeah they can probably spell potato too.


That's the joke.

Look up former vice presidents from Indiana.

/from Indiana. Can write in cursive, but no one can read it.
//Hell, can't even read my printed letters either.
 
2011-07-07 05:05:20 AM

Bigdogdaddy: Nobody actually reads what anyone from Indiana has to say anyway, so they've got that going for them. ;)

My writing is half cursive, half printing. Not sure why. Sloppy habbits I guess.


Yeah, me too. I can't even read it sometimes.
 
2011-07-07 05:05:23 AM
As a lefty who can't read my own cursive OR printed writing, I'm getting a kick out of this.
 
2011-07-07 05:08:19 AM

SwiftFox: Cursive has a single advantage: preventing a bunch of blots of ink from occurring every time you lift an antique quill or fountain pen from the paper to move it to the next letter.

Utterly useless since the invention of the pencil and ballpoint and other modern pens.


I don't understand the hate. It's faster, INFINITELY faster than print, and it looks better. I hasten to say, as long as you have to WRITE cursive is advantageous. If you have to type, that's another ball of wax. But so long as those kids are taking notes, in say, notebooks, and not on their laptops or iPads or what have you, they should learn cursive. I don't see how they'd even be able to keep up with anything HS and Above without it.

/Print is slow.
//Cursive is better.
 
2011-07-07 05:08:58 AM

o5iiawah: My signature is an untelligible wave of scratch that takes .2 seconds to complete.

I havent used cursive (script) since the 3rd grade.


Same here. I stopped using cursive early on, when I realized I could print faster than write in script.
 
2011-07-07 05:09:59 AM
I do the initial weeding for workstudy student employee hiring at my library. Once had a kid fill out the online application in txtspk. Then he stopped in, wondering why we never called him.

Get to wade through 400-500 applications every summer for the fall semester. We hit the 250 mark today, and classes don't start until the end of next month... The rush won't start for another few weeks yet. I'm predicting we get close to 600 this year. I only need to hire about 35.
 
2011-07-07 05:12:08 AM

itazurakko: Many years after I got used to that and established it as my signature I found out that plenty of my friends just write the Chinese characters versions of their name as their signature and it works just fine since it's a pen mark unique to them, and I kinda wish I'd done that now.


I used to think that a signature had to be in cursive... So I worked hard to try and have a fairly decent signature. Looked like total crap.
Then I noticed everyone around writing their signature however they felt like it, sometimes even having a little drawing instead of an actual letter configuration. So I switched over to just writing my name for a while.

Now that I`ve lived in Japan for so long, all my signatures are my name in Japanese. I just do the same thing even when I`m out of the country. Never had anyone question it or even try to read it. My husband tried to come up with some cool looking "international" signature, but ended up tossing in favor of just scribbling out his name in Japanese as usual no matter where we are.
 
2011-07-07 05:23:18 AM
To be perfectly honest, I never really did see the point of cursive.
 
2011-07-07 05:24:28 AM
I was taught cursive in first grade and then informed that I would only use cursive for assignments after that. So, even after my classmates went back to using print to write because the teachers didn't really care, I still used cursive. I never really stopped until I hurt my hand a few years back and couldn't write in cursive for a while.

Every time I had to take those retarded standardized tests I would get marked down in the written sections for using cursive because cursive was not 'standardized'. The people grading my scores were too dumb to read cursive, and I was the middle school/high school student, not the high school dropout that shouldn't have had a job that required basic reading skills. To this day I'm still pissed about that.

/seriously, if your child is too dumb to learn cursive, maybe they should be in the special classes instead
//it takes a day or two to learn cursive, and very little practice to maintain the skill
/but god forbid the precious little snowflakes be required to do any actual work
 
2011-07-07 05:25:37 AM

Bigdogdaddy: Nobody actually reads what anyone from Indiana has to say anyway, so they've got that going for them. ;)


indianapolis-indiana.funcityfinder.com

frowns on your shenanigans.
 
2011-07-07 05:27:22 AM
Cursive looks like Arabic.
Is that what we want taught in our schools?
Why do cursivites love terrorists?
 
2011-07-07 05:31:12 AM

basemetal: Meh, cursive is outdated. People have a hard enough time reading the hen scratch kids are churning out these days.


I have enough trouble reading adults' cursive. It's really galling when an adult hands you an illegible mass of squiggles and then regards you as a uncouth swine for not being able to read it.
 
2011-07-07 05:31:30 AM

siyuntz: To be perfectly honest, I never really did see the point of cursive.


That's because there hasn't been a point to it since the ink well and quill disappeared.
 
2011-07-07 05:31:51 AM
Tamyu, did you see incest once?
 
2011-07-07 05:33:45 AM

Researcher: It's faster, INFINITELY faster than print, and it looks better.


absolutely
when you have to write an essay in 40 mins for an exam it's the only way you can do it
 
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