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(Austin Statesman)   City council votes 5-2 to allow a bunch of foreigners to drive like maniacs on the streets of Austin, TX   (statesman.com) divider line 50
    More: Cool, Formula One, FIA, Grand Prix, sliced bread, Bernie Ecclestone, quality controls  
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1535 clicks; posted to Sports » on 30 Jun 2011 at 11:59 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



50 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2011-06-30 12:08:20 PM  
Won't be on the streets, but on a purpose-built track that will maximize people's ability to see the most technologically advanced cars in the world follow each other in a single-file line from start to finish.
 
2011-06-30 12:16:22 PM  
And I'll be there to watch the parade! Can't wait !
 
2011-06-30 12:27:43 PM  
At a cost of $250 million dollars in direct state subsidies to race organizers over 10 years.

They also claim that on race day, 130,000 people will be in attendance and that 97,500 of them will come from outside Texas. McCombs, who knows numbers well enough to have earned his way onto the Forbes 400 list, states as fact that these fans spend on average $220 each day on food and beverages. Wow! Double wow! The top-end Austin restaurants must be salivating at the prospect of that kind of spending.

There is just one little, teensy-weensy problem with this. People who spend $220 a day on eating and drinking tend to like nice hotels, what the lodging industry calls "amenity-filled" hotel rooms. Austin has only 6,000 such rooms, according to the Austin Convention and Visitors Bureau. So even if every one of those rooms is occupied by a couple, where will the other 85,500 out-of-town guests sleep?

Austin does have another 24,000 less elegant hotel rooms, from budget inns to fleabags, but even at two to a room that leaves about 35,000 fans sleeping in their SUVs and sports cars or driving an hour to San Antonio to find a room for the night.

.
.
.

Collecting $135 in sales taxes (assuming $660 for food and drink and $1,500 for three hotel nights) at a cost of $25 million is indeed economic development -- for Ecclestone. For Texas taxpayers it is grand prix robbery. The public does not know this, however, because these simple facts have not made it into the pages of the Austin American-Statesman or into that city's leading broadcast programs


Source
 
2011-06-30 02:18:22 PM  

Misch: At a cost of $250 million dollars in direct state subsidies to race organizers over 10 years.


So? You can bet your ass I will be there, already making plans to fly in early and see other places in texas that I havent had a chance to visit.

I would say a once a year event pays off more than an event that is every weekend or every night like they do with sports stadiums and never make a penny back.
 
2011-06-30 02:24:38 PM  
@ Misch: So build more hotels. You want the community to be a tourism destination, you gotta setup the infrastructure.

Alternative argument: People will commute much farther than you give them credit for. Look at where a lot of these races are held all over the world: The tracks are most often a LONG ways out from city centers and only connected to the main travel hubs by a single road and/or rail system. It's like a two-hour drive to the Chinese circuit from Shanghai proper, and over an hour to Seipang in Malaysia. When the German Grand Prix is held at Hockenheim, the nearest "convention" cities (i.e. a city with enough hotels to host 75,000+ people) are Frankfurt and Stuttgart, both a SERIOUS distance away.

As a result, every luxury hotel room in the nearby big cities are filled with the well-heeled and their entourages, and every mom-and-pop 10-room inn within 100 miles is booked for at least a week.

In short, Formula 1 races are a BIG deal.

/The REALLY rich bastards will commute in from someplace else anyway and arrive to the track by helicopter.
 
2011-06-30 02:32:58 PM  
www.filehurricane.com
"Oh, forget it... it's more of a San Antonio idea."
 
2011-06-30 02:41:20 PM  

Herbie555: @ Misch: So build more hotels. You want the community to be a tourism destination, you gotta setup the infrastructure.


Infrastructure's already in place. San Antonio is only an hour south of Austin, and will be able to accommodate quite a bit of the crowd. Come on down, see the Alamo! Drink on the Riverwalk! Go to Sea World! Spend your tourist dollars! Pay the hospitality tax!
 
2011-06-30 02:43:37 PM  

chechcal: Won't be on the streets, but on a purpose-built track that will maximize people's ability to see the most technologically advanced cars in the world follow each other in a single-file line from start to finish.


They aren't the most advanced anymore. They keep killing technology to give the smaller teams opportunities to be competitive, but keep changing rules mid-stream in the process. It's the worst of both worlds.


Misch:

Go to the Indy 500 some time and look for quality lodging close by that track. Indianapolis motor speedway used to host this event. The only year they didn't have a successful turnout on race day was the year some drivers were pussies and didn't plan tires properly for the drastic tarmac changes the course posed.
 
2011-06-30 02:48:43 PM  

Gonz: Infrastructure's already in place. San Antonio is only an hour south of Austin, and will be able to accommodate quite a bit of the crowd. Come on down, see the Alamo! Drink on the Riverwalk! Go to Sea World! Spend your tourist dollars! Pay the hospitality tax!


Ding ding! I bet nobody in the hospitality industry anywhere between San Antonio and Austin thinks spending $250M over ten years (from a fund designated for boosting tourism, etc.) is a bad investment.
 
2011-06-30 02:58:04 PM  

Herbie555: Gonz: Infrastructure's already in place. San Antonio is only an hour south of Austin, and will be able to accommodate quite a bit of the crowd. Come on down, see the Alamo! Drink on the Riverwalk! Go to Sea World! Spend your tourist dollars! Pay the hospitality tax!

Ding ding! I bet nobody in the hospitality industry anywhere between San Antonio and Austin thinks spending $250M over ten years (from a fund designated for boosting tourism, etc.) is a bad investment.


Hell, even places further north, like Waco/Killeen/Temple, stand to benefit. You could even make Houston the base for your vacation, though there's not nearly as much interesting between Houston/Austin as there is SA/Austin.
 
2011-06-30 03:16:25 PM  
I dont think Misch realizes how big an event F1 is, its not like other sports teams who need to fill the stadium the other 300 days a year, people will drive a few days just to be part of the spectacle. Im really just surprised its austin, figured it would be some place like miami, long beach, or even new york. Bernie tried to extort money and ended up with austin? Im sure its a nice place but just doesnt seem to have a history of auto racing nor the pretty scenery like a monaco as those of us who have watched the international feed have observed.
 
2011-06-30 03:29:58 PM  

steamingpile: I dont think Misch realizes how big an event F1 is, its not like other sports teams who need to fill the stadium the other 300 days a year, people will drive a few days just to be part of the spectacle. Im really just surprised its austin, figured it would be some place like miami, long beach, or even new york. Bernie tried to extort money and ended up with austin? Im sure its a nice place but just doesnt seem to have a history of auto racing nor the pretty scenery like a monaco as those of us who have watched the international feed have observed.


Yeah, before they announced the track at Austin, there were rumors that it would be held in New York. I kinda wish it was there instead of Texas.
 
2011-06-30 03:33:07 PM  

Electriclectic: Herbie555: Gonz: Infrastructure's already in place. San Antonio is only an hour south of Austin, and will be able to accommodate quite a bit of the crowd. Come on down, see the Alamo! Drink on the Riverwalk! Go to Sea World! Spend your tourist dollars! Pay the hospitality tax!

Ding ding! I bet nobody in the hospitality industry anywhere between San Antonio and Austin thinks spending $250M over ten years (from a fund designated for boosting tourism, etc.) is a bad investment.

Hell, even places further north, like Waco/Killeen/Temple, stand to benefit. You could even make Houston the base for your vacation, though there's not nearly as much interesting between Houston/Austin as there is SA/Austin.


Are you kidding, there's Wenzel's Bakery.
 
2011-06-30 03:33:46 PM  
Whoops, I meant Hruska's in Ellinger.
 
2011-06-30 03:38:28 PM  

Maud Dib: Electriclectic: Herbie555: Gonz: Infrastructure's already in place. San Antonio is only an hour south of Austin, and will be able to accommodate quite a bit of the crowd. Come on down, see the Alamo! Drink on the Riverwalk! Go to Sea World! Spend your tourist dollars! Pay the hospitality tax!

Ding ding! I bet nobody in the hospitality industry anywhere between San Antonio and Austin thinks spending $250M over ten years (from a fund designated for boosting tourism, etc.) is a bad investment.

Hell, even places further north, like Waco/Killeen/Temple, stand to benefit. You could even make Houston the base for your vacation, though there's not nearly as much interesting between Houston/Austin as there is SA/Austin.

Are you kidding, there's Wenzel's Bakery.


After I posted, I thought to myself, well, you could take a tour of Blue Bell's factory in Brenham...
 
2011-06-30 03:58:57 PM  
Problem with Texas is the weather. Or rather the summer weather. Hot muggy air saps power from normally aspirated engines and causes sky high track temps which eat tires. Now you could have the race in spring or fall, before or after the summer heat however, that creates the issue of people going. How many people will be able to make the trip while their kids are in school?

It would be sweet if some American city was willing to deal with the headache of a street course, would mean having some very very well maintained roads but so be it. Granted I'm not sure Bernie would go for a street course. Doubt it since plenty of people would be able to watch without paying for a ticket and also gate crashing at street courses can be pretty easy to pull off. That is if you want to go where the seats are, most of the track has no seats so you might not even need to really gate crash to get a nice view. And Bernie just isn't gonna have that.

/no I don't like Bernie, why do you ask?
 
2011-06-30 04:02:39 PM  

chechcal: Won't be on the streets, but on a purpose-built track that will maximize people's ability to see the most technologically advanced cars in the world follow each other in a single-file line from start to finish.


Pretty much came here to say this. Oh boy! Another oval track auto racing event!

/call me when there's an F1 road/city rally in a US city
//I won't hold my breath
 
2011-06-30 04:04:24 PM  

Herbie555: Ding ding! I bet nobody in the hospitality industry anywhere between San Antonio and Austin thinks spending $250M over ten years (from a fund designated for boosting tourism, etc.) is a bad investment.


Doesn't matter what the hospitality industry thinks.

According to the Statesman: "According to state laws, the trust fund is to be funded by taxes generated by the event itself and not cost taxpayers anything"

And that $250 million is just the tip of the iceberg. There's infrastructure costs, police personnel, etc.

The organizers estimate 97,500 out-of-state visitors out of the 130,000 people who will attend the race on that weekend. They estimate that each of those 97,500 people will spend $220 per day on food and $500 on hotels each day of the 3 day weekend to generate the $135 in sales and occupancy taxes that would be needed to "make $25 million" for the state.

Do you spend $220 a day on food, even when traveling? Do you spend $500 for a hotel room? Austin only has 6,000 of these "amenity-filled" hotel rooms. 2 people per room, and that's 12,000 people housed. Still have 85,500 to house. Where are the rest of these people staying that they're paying $500 a night?

Sorry, but Texas is subsidizing a billionaire and isn't going to get its money back. I don't believe that they'll even get it back when you factor in velocity of money.
 
2011-06-30 04:08:44 PM  

Misch: Herbie555: Ding ding! I bet nobody in the hospitality industry anywhere between San Antonio and Austin thinks spending $250M over ten years (from a fund designated for boosting tourism, etc.) is a bad investment.

Doesn't matter what the hospitality industry thinks.

According to the Statesman: "According to state laws, the trust fund is to be funded by taxes generated by the event itself and not cost taxpayers anything"

And that $250 million is just the tip of the iceberg. There's infrastructure costs, police personnel, etc.

The organizers estimate 97,500 out-of-state visitors out of the 130,000 people who will attend the race on that weekend. They estimate that each of those 97,500 people will spend $220 per day on food and $500 on hotels each day of the 3 day weekend to generate the $135 in sales and occupancy taxes that would be needed to "make $25 million" for the state.

Do you spend $220 a day on food, even when traveling? Do you spend $500 for a hotel room? Austin only has 6,000 of these "amenity-filled" hotel rooms. 2 people per room, and that's 12,000 people housed. Still have 85,500 to house. Where are the rest of these people staying that they're paying $500 a night?

Sorry, but Texas is subsidizing a billionaire and isn't going to get its money back. I don't believe that they'll even get it back when you factor in velocity of money.


Montreal pulled those types of figures easily at this year's race, and in terrible weather. Do you have any kind of idea how much money moves around the Paddock Club?
 
2011-06-30 04:11:49 PM  

WhyteRaven74: Problem with Texas is the weather. Or rather the summer weather. Hot muggy air saps power from normally aspirated engines and causes sky high track temps which eat tires. Now you could have the race in spring or fall, before or after the summer heat however, that creates the issue of people going. How many people will be able to make the trip while their kids are in school?

It would be sweet if some American city was willing to deal with the headache of a street course, would mean having some very very well maintained roads but so be it. Granted I'm not sure Bernie would go for a street course. Doubt it since plenty of people would be able to watch without paying for a ticket and also gate crashing at street courses can be pretty easy to pull off. That is if you want to go where the seats are, most of the track has no seats so you might not even need to really gate crash to get a nice view. And Bernie just isn't gonna have that.

/no I don't like Bernie, why do you ask?


The reason the USGP will be in June instead of March or October is because the only other race on this continent, the Canadian GP, is also in June.
 
2011-06-30 04:26:12 PM  

germ78: chechcal: Won't be on the streets, but on a purpose-built track that will maximize people's ability to see the most technologically advanced cars in the world follow each other in a single-file line from start to finish.

Pretty much came here to say this. Oh boy! Another oval track auto racing event!

/call me when there's an F1 road/city rally in a US city
//I won't hold my breath


Why do you assume it's an oval? Well, it's not. Also, F1 NEVER races on ovals.
 
2011-06-30 04:30:03 PM  
Bet they didn't even bother asking Arizona.
 
2011-06-30 04:36:43 PM  

King Something: The reason the USGP will be in June instead of March or October is because the only other race on this continent, the Canadian GP, is also in June.


I'm thinking having a race in June and having people get fried in the sun isn't going to go over well. It's not unusual for the temps to be near 100 in June in Austin, that's going to be very hard on the fans. Also the drivers.
 
2011-06-30 05:15:15 PM  
On the one hand, I really want to go to this race, Austin is a great place to visit (and not too far for me,) and I want a US GP to succeed.

On the other hand, the track may suck and we won't know until it's too late, the deal was a BS buddy-buddy thing, and there are tons of other cities and tracks in this country that wouldn't be nearly as wishy washy and divided about it as this article implies Austin's populace is.
 
2011-06-30 05:21:45 PM  

srtpointman: Bet they didn't even bother asking Arizona.


I'm pretty sure they wouldn't want Fernando Alonso stuck in a tent city for the crime of speaking Spanish and not having his papers on him at all times.
 
2011-06-30 05:26:36 PM  

Jensaarai: srtpointman: Bet they didn't even bother asking Arizona.

I'm pretty sure they wouldn't want Fernando Alonso stuck in a tent city for the crime of speaking Spanish and not having his papers on him at all times.


Heh, worse yet Sergio Perez is actually FROM Mexico. Super-mega-bad worse than that is that Pastor Maldonado is from Venezuela, so is clearly a terrorist.
 
2011-06-30 05:28:28 PM  
The track layout doesn't look too hideous, at least for a Tilke-track. And it'll be good to have the USGP on a purpose-built F1 circuit for the first time in...well, however long it's been since they ran the Glen (no, Indy doesn't count).

I've actually been quite enjoying the series this year, despite Vettel's dominance. Most of the races have been actually very competitive, with lots of on-track action, or lots of tasty strategy. Valencia was a poor showing, but it always is.

The big problem for F1 in the US remains though: there's already two well-established national series with large followings. IndyCar was weaker, but is gaining strength again, and NASCAR is still a powerful draw, especially in the south. Anywhere else F1 goes you don't really have that element of competition.
 
2011-06-30 05:32:43 PM  
In a move sure to further convince Misch that this track is a losing endeavor, the Circuit of the Americas also just announced a five-year deal to host two rounds (each year) of the Australian V8 Supercars series.

Closing this deal was almost certainly contingent on getting the track done in time, which was absolutely contingent on getting the state money via Austin's approval. So even though no state funds will be spent on this race series, the state picks up another benefit of investing in the track and the Formula One agreement.

Link (new window)
 
2011-06-30 05:38:32 PM  
Hmmm there any chance this might be a night race? That would resolve some of the heat issue.
 
2011-06-30 05:42:48 PM  

Kurohone: NASCAR is still a powerful draw, especially in the south. Anywhere else F1 goes you don't really have that element of competition.


From what I understand, F1 and NASCAR are not competing for the same demographic at all, even though they're both motor sports. It's like saying Nieman Marcus and Kmart are competitors because they're both retail stores.
 
2011-06-30 05:48:18 PM  

Renart: Kurohone: NASCAR is still a powerful draw, especially in the south. Anywhere else F1 goes you don't really have that element of competition.

From what I understand, F1 and NASCAR are not competing for the same demographic at all, even though they're both motor sports. It's like saying Nieman Marcus and Kmart are competitors because they're both retail stores.


You'd be surprised.

/A Nationwide series NASCAR race on a Tilkedrome the Saturday before would be a bit hilarious.
 
2011-06-30 06:04:39 PM  

Misch:
Where are the rest of these people staying that they're paying $500 a night?


I'm not sure...my brother will fly down and we'll stay at a friend's house in Westlake.

/V8 Supercars AND MotoGP
//Three sweet events only hours from the house
///Suck it haters
 
2011-06-30 06:11:21 PM  
leavingaustin.com
Race Mascot is ready. Keep it weird Austin.
 
2011-06-30 06:16:54 PM  
Montreal pulled those types of figures easily at this year's race, and in terrible weather. Do you have any kind of idea how much money moves around the Paddock Club?

Came in to point this out to the doubters. Remember when Montreal dropped its grand prix in 2008 (saying it was costing them too much money) but then made a deal (new window) to bring in back in 2010? Obviously it must have been quite noticable when it was gone and they realized it was well worth it for them to bring it back.

(The city of) Austin isn't quite ready for their first F1 race yet...but this could cause another boom to both their pride and (a later one to their) infrastructure that would be most welcome.

/went to school in Austin
//yep, I'll be attending the race in 2012
 
2011-06-30 06:24:56 PM  

Jensaarai: Renart: Kurohone: NASCAR is still a powerful draw, especially in the south. Anywhere else F1 goes you don't really have that element of competition.

From what I understand, F1 and NASCAR are not competing for the same demographic at all, even though they're both motor sports. It's like saying Nieman Marcus and Kmart are competitors because they're both retail stores.

You'd be surprised.

/A Nationwide series NASCAR race on a Tilkedrome the Saturday before would be a bit hilarious.


The pile-up from the crash on the first right turn would be impressive.
 
2011-06-30 06:29:03 PM  
From what I understand, F1 and NASCAR are not competing for the same demographic at all, even though they're both motor sports. It's like saying Nieman Marcus and Kmart are competitors because they're both retail stores.

You'd be surprised.

/A Nationwide series NASCAR race on a Tilkedrome the Saturday before would be a bit hilarious.


They do have NASCAR races on road courses, which imo are the most interesting ones to watch. NASCAR also races on the same circuit in Montreal that F1 does.

It is normally indeed a completely different demographic. Went to the Atlanta 500 the same year as I went to the Montreal Grand Prix... the crowd was seriously like comparing GQ models to trailer-park residents. In Atlanta we found it bizarre watching the patrons in front of us (that weren't wearing shirts and had plumber butts) made fun of other patrons that were wearing ties while shirtless and wearing blu-jean shorts. When walking around the track/concessions in Montreal it felt like you were walking by supermodels.

However this is in Texas, so at least for the first year or so all bets are off as to who shows up.
 
2011-06-30 07:02:15 PM  

germ78: Jensaarai: Renart: Kurohone: NASCAR is still a powerful draw, especially in the south. Anywhere else F1 goes you don't really have that element of competition.

From what I understand, F1 and NASCAR are not competing for the same demographic at all, even though they're both motor sports. It's like saying Nieman Marcus and Kmart are competitors because they're both retail stores.

You'd be surprised.

/A Nationwide series NASCAR race on a Tilkedrome the Saturday before would be a bit hilarious.

The pile-up from the crash on the first right turn would be impressive.


Kinda funny, since it was the former F1 champ who was roundly criticized by the NASCAR fans and drivers for farking up in turn 1 (a right hander) at Road America less than a week ago :P
 
2011-06-30 07:22:47 PM  

Jensaarai:
Kinda funny, since it was the former F1 champ who was roundly criticized by the NASCAR fans and drivers for farking up in turn 1 (a right hander) at Road America less than a week ago :P


Didn't see the race but if you mean Montoya, he was never a "F1 Champion"... he did win a few races, but never the title (what is needed to be "Champion" in F1).
 
2011-06-30 08:36:46 PM  
That's 'Furiners'. Lern to speak Texican.


/Hope it does well, actually.
 
2011-06-30 08:38:52 PM  

tdude: Jensaarai:
Kinda funny, since it was the former F1 champ who was roundly criticized by the NASCAR fans and drivers for farking up in turn 1 (a right hander) at Road America less than a week ago :P

Didn't see the race but if you mean Montoya, he was never a "F1 Champion"... he did win a few races, but never the title (what is needed to be "Champion" in F1).


As much as I'm reluctant to defend him, Montoya won the Grand Prix of Monaco. For better or worse, that puts one in the most elite tier of drivers in the history of the world, on par with the greatest of the great.

That said, I was not referring to that particular former-F1 driver and current NASCAR laughingstock, but rather Jacques Villeneuve -- 11 F1 time winner, former Indianapolis 500 winner (bullshiat,) and former Formula 1 champion. He already failed at Daytona so hard they kicked him out of a high level NASCAR Cup ride, but he participated in the second level NASCAR series road race (that's right, not even the highest level turn-right NASCAR affair that weekend,) and took out two top contenders via sheer idiocy.

He'll be lucky if they even let him race at Uncle's racetrack if they still go there next year.

(Seriously, the guy should just retire. He's sunk so far he's letting me make trollish jokes about how F1 guys can't handle the left turn brigade. Heh.)
 
2011-06-30 08:55:25 PM  

Jensaarai: former Indianapolis 500 winner (bullshiat,)


Also CART champion.
 
2011-06-30 09:29:05 PM  

IamSoSmart_S_M_R_T: Misch:
Where are the rest of these people staying that they're paying $500 a night?


I'm not sure...my brother will fly down and we'll stay at a friend's house in Westlake.

/V8 Supercars AND MotoGP
//Three sweet events only hours from the house
///Suck it haters


Well, that settles it. Time to make plans to go to Austin.
 
2011-07-01 12:21:03 AM  

Jensaarai: tdude: Jensaarai:
Kinda funny, since it was the former F1 champ who was roundly criticized by the NASCAR fans and drivers for farking up in turn 1 (a right hander) at Road America less than a week ago :P

Didn't see the race but if you mean Montoya, he was never a "F1 Champion"... he did win a few races, but never the title (what is needed to be "Champion" in F1).

As much as I'm reluctant to defend him, Montoya won the Grand Prix of Monaco. For better or worse, that puts one in the most elite tier of drivers in the history of the world, on par with the greatest of the great.

That said, I was not referring to that particular former-F1 driver and current NASCAR laughingstock, but rather Jacques Villeneuve -- 11 F1 time winner, former Indianapolis 500 winner (bullshiat,) and former Formula 1 champion. He already failed at Daytona so hard they kicked him out of a high level NASCAR Cup ride, but he participated in the second level NASCAR series road race (that's right, not even the highest level turn-right NASCAR affair that weekend,) and took out two top contenders via sheer idiocy.

He'll be lucky if they even let him race at Uncle's racetrack if they still go there next year.

(Seriously, the guy should just retire. He's sunk so far he's letting me make trollish jokes about how F1 guys can't handle the left turn brigade. Heh.)


Oh. Not surprised. Yea, Jacques sucks. He barely won the title (was a bit controversial.. Michael was disqualified that year) and had his share of run ins in F1.
 
2011-07-01 01:11:26 AM  

WhyteRaven74: Problem with Texas is the weather. Or rather the summer weather. Hot muggy air saps power from normally aspirated engines and causes sky high track temps which eat tires. Now you could have the race in spring or fall, before or after the summer heat however, that creates the issue of people going. How many people will be able to make the trip while their kids are in school?


Screw the kids, Im going to see some foreign titties!!! But seriously, screw them, me and the GF already decided that would be the weekend he would get to know his father better.

Still, I wish it was in Miami or Long Beach, those would be more fun, although I would probably keep getting hit by the GF for the head being on a swivel.

Misch: Do you spend $220 a day on food, even when traveling? Do you spend $500 for a hotel room? Austin only has 6,000 of these "amenity-filled" hotel rooms. 2 people per room, and that's 12,000 people housed. Still have 85,500 to house. Where are the rest of these people staying that they're paying $500 a night?


Ummm yeah, Im probably the last one to ask, last trip to savannah we spent almost $1200 for a 4 night stay with one at a cheap hotel in tybee, if we had stayed in savannah it would have easily topped that mark. And $220 on food is not unheard of, 3 meals a day, all eating out and while away we eat a nice dinner every night, it may not be $220/day but it is awfully damn close, now add in all the snacks, alcohol, and treats/presents to take back home then its well over $220/day.

F1 is a different kind of fan and most will spend pretty close to that much and the state is expecting some of that too, that is the reason for the grants.
 
2011-07-01 01:38:03 AM  

eddie_irvine: germ78: chechcal: Won't be on the streets, but on a purpose-built track that will maximize people's ability to see the most technologically advanced cars in the world follow each other in a single-file line from start to finish.

Pretty much came here to say this. Oh boy! Another oval track auto racing event!

/call me when there's an F1 road/city rally in a US city
//I won't hold my breath

Why do you assume it's an oval? Well, it's not. Also, F1 NEVER races on ovals.


Exactly.

F1 is not Nascar,

Once that point is driven home to the trailer parks, then we may proceed.

FWIW, I will be there, cost does not matter.

F1 is the shiznit for real racers, the technology ALONE is enough to want to see them.
 
2011-07-01 03:47:02 AM  

slyde: F1 is the shiznit for real racers, the technology ALONE is enough to want to see them.


And yet, if F1 ever ran on an oval -- any oval on the NASCAR circuit, the lie of the "real racers" would be exposed.

Well, either that, or skill would play a part, meaning ovals take skill.

Funny how F1 fans manage to hold both beliefs at the same time.

/Cognitive dissonance is fun!
 
2011-07-01 05:56:22 AM  
Jensaarai: And yet, if F1 ever ran on an oval -- any oval on the NASCAR circuit, the lie of the "real racers" would be exposed.

The Indy 500 counted towards the world driver's championship from 1950 to 1960 and after that a few F1 driver's and cars showed up at Indy. Jim Clark won the Indy 500 in 65 the same year he won the F1 driving championship. The next year Graham Hill, father of Damon, won the Indy 500, four years after his first F1 championship and two years before his second. So there's precedent for F1 drivers racing on ovals while in F1. To say nothing of all the F1 drivers who've gone to Indy cars. And Mario Andretti who went from Indy cars to F1 and back.
 
2011-07-01 10:37:18 AM  
If New Yorkers & Californians count as foreigners, then this has been happening for 15 years in Austin already.
 
2011-07-01 11:44:26 AM  

Jensaarai: slyde: F1 is the shiznit for real racers, the technology ALONE is enough to want to see them.

And yet, if F1 ever ran on an oval -- any oval on the NASCAR circuit, the lie of the "real racers" would be exposed.

Well, either that, or skill would play a part, meaning ovals take skill.

Funny how F1 fans manage to hold both beliefs at the same time.

/Cognitive dissonance is fun!


Anyone with a checkbook can run an oval. I have, and I do. It takes no special talent or skill, just money. All racing is the same in that respect.
Going in circles numerous times does not impress.
 
2011-07-02 05:58:06 AM  

Jensaarai: tdude: Jensaarai:
Kinda funny, since it was the former F1 champ who was roundly criticized by the NASCAR fans and drivers for farking up in turn 1 (a right hander) at Road America less than a week ago :P

Didn't see the race but if you mean Montoya, he was never a "F1 Champion"... he did win a few races, but never the title (what is needed to be "Champion" in F1).

As much as I'm reluctant to defend him, Montoya won the Grand Prix of Monaco. For better or worse, that puts one in the most elite tier of drivers in the history of the world, on par with the greatest of the great.

That said, I was not referring to that particular former-F1 driver and current NASCAR laughingstock, but rather Jacques Villeneuve -- 11 F1 time winner, former Indianapolis 500 winner (bullshiat,) and former Formula 1 champion. He already failed at Daytona so hard they kicked him out of a high level NASCAR Cup ride, but he participated in the second level NASCAR series road race (that's right, not even the highest level turn-right NASCAR affair that weekend,) and took out two top contenders via sheer idiocy.

He'll be lucky if they even let him race at Uncle's racetrack if they still go there next year.

(Seriously, the guy should just retire. He's sunk so far he's letting me make trollish jokes about how F1 guys can't handle the left turn brigade. Heh.)


The problem with your theory is that both Jarno Trulli and Olivier Panis also won the Monaco Grand Prix, and neither are anywhere near being great, let alone greatest of the greats.
 
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