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(Dallas News)   Texas: puts an innocent man in jail for 18 years. He gets out, so they refuse to pay him the $1.44 million state law says they owe him. Then they attach his wages for child support he owes. Why does he owe it? Texas: puts an innocent man in jail   (dallasnews.com) divider line 315
    More: Asinine, IOU  
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26311 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 May 2011 at 9:51 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-05-05 03:19:16 AM  
What do you expect from a state that wants to secede and is pissed we didn't give them a space shuttle as a going away present.
 
2011-05-05 03:22:53 AM  

lisarenee3505: bartink: lisarenee3505: FTA - This newspaper has credited Abbott for modernizing the state's child support collection efforts. That modernization should include the application of basic common sense in a case such as this.

Haha, as if any one or anything in Texas is capable of "common sense." Now I know that there are probably a lot of Texas residents who would cry foul at my assertion... "hey, I live in [Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Houston], so I'm not like those ignorant country-bumpkins (yes, Ft. Worth counts as bumpkin) who give our state a bad name!"

I got news for ya Big-City-Dweller Texan, just based on the fact that you choose to live in that backwards-ass retarded theocratic state proves that you have no more common sense than the reddest of necks in the Lone Star State.

Say what you want about my home of Oklahoma, but at least we don't allow a bunch of religious nuts to control our public school system, and we don't repeatedly vote complete douchebags with Rod Blagojevich Hair (and ethics) into office as governor.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Right. You don't have a state rep that just apologized for say blacks are lazy. Please. Oklahoma sucks.
------------------------------------------------------------

Okay, you got me there. Sally Kern is a complete idiot and, in all seriousness, someone needs to beat that biatch to death with an axe handle before she can further embarrass the great state of Oklahoma. But she is ONE stupid biatch who doesn't really affect the whole state, whereas the Texas State School Board has power over the entire youth of Texas, and has set about to pound a course of ignorant theocratic rhetoric intro the heads of every single school-child in the state.

Yes, Oklahoma has its share of idiotic politicians (Kern, Inhofe, Coburn), but Texas gave us George W. Bush and a decade of war based on outright lies. I'm sorry, but nothing trumps that. You can talk shiat about Oklahoma as much as you want, but it will never change the absolute, universal FACT that Texas is the worst, most nationally-damaging state in the Union. Personally, I sincerely wish that they would secede from the USA, just so the rest of us would be free of their blight.

/born and raised in TX
//got out as soon as I could


Oklahoma? dude, you must have been raised in el paso to think anywhere in Oklahoma was better. that or your poor as dirt or just plain insane. sorry, those are facts.
 
2011-05-05 03:23:22 AM  

lisarenee3505: Say what you want about my home of Oklahoma, but at least we don't allow a bunch of religious nuts to control our public school system


Don't be too smug about that particular issue, your state's education committee BARELY defeated a bill (by 1 vote) that would have promoted intelligent design in science classrooms. Most other states have never had such a bill come to vote.


lisarenee3505: Texas is the worst, most nationally-damaging state in the Union.


That I can agree on. Maybe we could relocate Austin before we kick Texas out, though, that town seems okay. The rest of Texas can suck it and GTFO. They already think they're their own country anyway.
 
2011-05-05 03:23:43 AM  
Texas is the state with the highest number of prisoners found to be innocent following DNA testing, according to the Innocence Project, a national organization working to exonerate wrongfully convicted people... More troubling is the fact that almost 50 percent of all executions in 2008 were performed in Texas. Human rights advocates find it troubling that Texas not only leads the nation in executions by a wide margin, but it also leads the nation in wrongful convictions. Link (new window)

Not like they really had trials, but if Nazi Germany had DNA testing things might have been even worse.
 
2011-05-05 03:26:17 AM  

Alien Robot: Before you criticize Texas, does your state even allow for any compensation for the wrongly imprisoned?

"So how do exonerees get compensated? The sad news is most probably don't. According to the Innocence Project's Web site, 22 states currently have statutes under which innocent convicts are ensured some restitution


Although The Innocence Project website^ says 27, that's still farked up. Are the wrongfully convicted supposed to sue before they get anything? Is that it?
 
2011-05-05 03:31:43 AM  

lisarenee3505: bartink: lisarenee3505: FTA - This newspaper has credited Abbott for modernizing the state's child support collection efforts. That modernization should include the application of basic common sense in a case such as this.

Haha, as if any one or anything in Texas is capable of "common sense." Now I know that there are probably a lot of Texas residents who would cry foul at my assertion... "hey, I live in [Austin, San Antonio, Dallas, Houston], so I'm not like those ignorant country-bumpkins (yes, Ft. Worth counts as bumpkin) who give our state a bad name!"

I got news for ya Big-City-Dweller Texan, just based on the fact that you choose to live in that backwards-ass retarded theocratic state proves that you have no more common sense than the reddest of necks in the Lone Star State.

Say what you want about my home of Oklahoma, but at least we don't allow a bunch of religious nuts to control our public school system, and we don't repeatedly vote complete douchebags with Rod Blagojevich Hair (and ethics) into office as governor.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Right. You don't have a state rep that just apologized for say blacks are lazy. Please. Oklahoma sucks.
------------------------------------------------------------

Okay, you got me there. Sally Kern is a complete idiot and, in all seriousness, someone needs to beat that biatch to death with an axe handle before she can further embarrass the great state of Oklahoma. But she is ONE stupid biatch who doesn't really affect the whole state, whereas the Texas State School Board has power over the entire youth of Texas, and has set about to pound a course of ignorant theocratic rhetoric intro the heads of every single school-child in the state.

Yes, Oklahoma has its share of idiotic politicians (Kern, Inhofe, Coburn), but Texas gave us George W. Bush and a decade of war based on outright lies. I'm sorry, but nothing trumps that. You can talk shiat about Oklahoma as much as you want, but it will never change the absolute, universal FACT that Texas is the worst, most nationally-damaging state in the Union. Personally, I sincerely wish that they would secede from the USA, just so the rest of us would be free of their blight.

/born and raised in TX
//got out as soon as I could


George W. Bush was brought to you by the great state of Connecticut, confused elderly voters in Florida, a 5 seat majority of the Supreme Court, Diebold, you name it. Just don't put all the blame for that giant disaster on Texas. Even I think that's an unfair burden to shoulder alone.
 
2011-05-05 03:34:46 AM  

fish shure: If Rick Perry is actually on board, isn't the fastest way to solve this problem to get a gubernatorial pardon on the grounds of innocence? Seems like it would satisfy the statute:

"(2) a verified copy of the pardon or court order justifying the application for compensation;"

And $80,000 per year is indeed pretty good for post-exoneration payments. Illinois pays $20,000 per year I think (we have a LOT of wrongfully convicted people), but the rule of thumb in successful civil lawsuits after you get out is closer to $1M per year.


This is part of the problem. Pardons can only be granted to people who have been convicted of crimes. As his conviction was thrown out, he no longer meets that qualification, and even if he did pardon implies guilt which wouldn't qualify either.
 
2011-05-05 03:34:50 AM  

jadedlee: Yeah, the problem is Texas executes more people and has a higher rate of overturned convictions than any other state.


Because Texas has large numbers of people working to overturn wrongful convictions from a large population. If your state is run by people who are so cock-sure of themselves that they can do no wrong that they dare not accept any criticism of their justice system, then few if any wrongfully-convicted prisoners' sentences will get overturned. The innocent rot away in prison instead. Yes, it would be better to live in a state where there are no overzealous prosecutors and mistakes are not made, but there's no such state like that in the US.

Also compensation is great in theory but if it's unattainable in this case after everything involved then it's more for show than for justice, and that might be even more cruel.

[notsureifserious.jpg]

So you think it better to not give compensation to anyone than to deny it to some? WTF?
 
2011-05-05 03:53:14 AM  

TheWhoppah: veryunoriginal: This is Texas, the same state that executed this man for murdering his family in a fire.

That man murdered his own three young children in a fire. Twin infants and a two year old. There were four empty bottles of charcoal starter fluid right outside the front door, a fact the biased New Yorker article failed to mention. Contrary to what you were led to believe, even the "expert" quoted for that story did not conclude that the fire was not arson. Not even close. He concluded that four of the 12 clues of arson could have alternate explanations. Anti-death penalty zealots hand picked certain sentences from the report and jumped up and down claiming that man was innocent. He wasn't.


The New Yorker article specifically mentions a container of lighter fluid on the front porch. It also mentions a charcoal grill on the front porch, a fact your biased write-up failed to mention.

Imagine that, finding empty containers of ligher fluid near a charcoal grill.
 
2011-05-05 04:00:14 AM  

Alien Robot: jadedlee: Yeah, the problem is Texas executes more people and has a higher rate of overturned convictions than any other state.

Because Texas has large numbers of people working to overturn wrongful convictions from a large population. If your state is run by people who are so cock-sure of themselves that they can do no wrong that they dare not accept any criticism of their justice system, then few if any wrongfully-convicted prisoners' sentences will get overturned. The innocent rot away in prison instead. Yes, it would be better to live in a state where there are no overzealous prosecutors and mistakes are not made, but there's no such state like that in the US.

Also compensation is great in theory but if it's unattainable in this case after everything involved then it's more for show than for justice, and that might be even more cruel.

[notsureifserious.jpg]

So you think it better to not give compensation to anyone than to deny it to some? WTF?


I think it better to not have a compensation law which is arbitrary and unenforceable which only exists to make people feel better. The law is barely two years old, how many serious cases have even been applicable? If it doesn't apply to this case, which is a severe and worse - intentional - miscarriage of justice, I don't understand how it addresses the problem. If the governor, the special prosecutor, the judge, basically all involved agree this guy is innocent and months later this still isn't resolved and he has to sue then the law is seriously broken. It needs to be fixed or its no better than the flawed arbitrary system that results in so many faulty convictions.

If the question is do I believe in compensation, of course. What I meant is given the choice between a more equitable justice system and a more generous compensation system, I would take more equitable justice. Compensation is necessary and should be considered part of justice, but it will never make people whole. I'd rather there were fewer wrongly convicted people in the first place. Money is not a suitable replacement for depriving someone of freedom and human dignity, but in some cases it's the best we can do.
 
2011-05-05 04:29:47 AM  

TheWhoppah: veryunoriginal: This is Texas, the same state that executed this man for murdering his family in a fire.

That man murdered his own three young children in a fire. Twin infants and a two year old. There were four empty bottles of charcoal starter fluid right outside the front door, a fact the biased New Yorker article failed to mention. Contrary to what you were led to believe, even the "expert" quoted for that story did not conclude that the fire was not arson. Not even close. He concluded that four of the 12 clues of arson could have alternate explanations. Anti-death penalty zealots hand picked certain sentences from the report and jumped up and down claiming that man was innocent. He wasn't.


And now that I read Hurst's report, I can safely conclude you are completely full of shiat.

"A contemporary fire origin and cause analyst might well wonder how anyone could make so many critical errors in interpreting the evidence"

"Most of the conclusions reached by the Fire Marshall would be considered invalid in light of current knowledge"

It is "impossible to visually identify accelerate patterns" after a flashover.

"The finding of multiple origins was inappropriate even in the context of the state of the art in 1991."

"The fire marshal alleged that the charring of wood under the aluminum threshold was caused by a liquid accelerant burning under the threshold. This phenomenon is clearly impossible."

"The idea that crazed glass is an indicator of the use of a liquid accelerant is now classified by fire investigation as an Old Wives Tale."

"The identification of the presence of an accelerant based on brown rings on a cement floor is baseless speculation."

Yeah, "alternate explanations", my ass. He flat-out said the investigator was full of shiat. Just like you are.
 
2011-05-05 04:52:16 AM  

TheWhoppah: Without the explicit finding of innocence the Comptroller is limitted in what she can do, even if she knows right from wrong.


Then the architecture of the law is as useless as titties on a fish. See how that works?
 
2011-05-05 06:17:39 AM  

LeafyGreens: One of the best parts of living in Texas, aside from the taquerias, was listening to the Huntsville prison show on Saturday nights. Inmates would call in, often those on death row, and talk to loved ones.

It was really stirring; guilty or not, everyone deserves a voice.


That IS moving...but creepy enough that it doesn't increase AT ALL my desire to move to Texas, which is pretty much pegged at zero...

San Antonio's Riverwalk was nice, though.
 
2011-05-05 06:35:21 AM  
This is why I don't think fires in Texas are an aberration. They are a natural feature of hell.
 
2011-05-05 06:58:25 AM  

jadedlee: I think every reasonable person with an ounce of compassion wants to see this man get paid, but you're looking in the wrong place. Like I just posted, the bulk of the work on this case was done by journalism students on behalf of the Innocence Project. Yes, you'll have a lawyer who headed that team and could be liable, but what are you thinking? Let's bankrupt the organization that helps innocent people for free so that they can't help anyone else! Something something good deeds unpunished.


It isn't even clear that there was malpractice here.
 
2011-05-05 07:09:37 AM  

Beer It's What's For Dinner: TheWhoppah: veryunoriginal: This is Texas, the same state that executed this man for murdering his family in a fire.

That man murdered his own three young children in a fire. Twin infants and a two year old. There were four empty bottles of charcoal starter fluid right outside the front door, a fact the biased New Yorker article failed to mention. Contrary to what you were led to believe, even the "expert" quoted for that story did not conclude that the fire was not arson. Not even close. He concluded that four of the 12 clues of arson could have alternate explanations. Anti-death penalty zealots hand picked certain sentences from the report and jumped up and down claiming that man was innocent. He wasn't.

The New Yorker article specifically mentions a container of lighter fluid on the front porch. It also mentions a charcoal grill on the front porch, a fact your biased write-up failed to mention.

Imagine that, finding empty containers of lighter fluid near a charcoal grill.



But four of them, man? I mean, four? I've got three empties laying around my grill like all goodhearted people might accumulate, but four almost certainly implies the influence and perhaps worship of the Devil.
 
2011-05-05 07:12:14 AM  
An excellent example of how we have let laws, rules, etc replace common sense.

robert
 
2011-05-05 07:36:33 AM  
I can't believe the original prosecutor has set up a website saying this is all a vast conspiracy against him.

What the fark.
 
2011-05-05 08:25:52 AM  

jst3p: $5,420 - Total to be collected by the state (to be paid to the mother of his now-grown children for expenses she incurred between 1998 and 2002)

$5400 for 5 years of child support!?!? I wish.


Its possible he paid what he could when he was in jail through some means or another, with $5400 being the difference in paid versus owed.
 
2011-05-05 08:28:41 AM  
Texas...the weather is nice, but the people are retarded.
A stupid populace tends to elect stupid leadership.
 
2011-05-05 08:58:15 AM  

Genta: "because the court did not use the words "actual innocence" in its release order, Comptroller Susan Combs said the state should not pay"


innocent until proven guilty?

so if he's let out because it cant be proven that he was guilty... then he's actually innocent. theres no half innocent in american law as far as i know.


American Law ≠ Texas Law
 
2011-05-05 09:02:16 AM  

1-phenylpropan-2-amine: $1.4m - $5k. Problem?


Yes...the problems is...they would have to pay him. They don't have any problem taking it away from you, but if you expect them to pay up to you, it's gonna be a fight.
 
2011-05-05 09:10:43 AM  

TheWhoppah: veryunoriginal: This is Texas, the same state that executed this man for murdering his family in a fire.

That man murdered his own three young children in a fire. Twin infants and a two year old. There were four empty bottles of charcoal starter fluid right outside the front door, a fact the biased New Yorker article failed to mention. Contrary to what you were led to believe, even the "expert" quoted for that story did not conclude that the fire was not arson. Not even close. He concluded that four of the 12 clues of arson could have alternate explanations. Anti-death penalty zealots hand picked certain sentences from the report and jumped up and down claiming that man was innocent. He wasn't.


Cite your evidence or shutup.
 
2011-05-05 09:19:43 AM  

Baron-Harkonnen: Have you guys ever coughed up a chunky, white piece of...something...that smelled like the pure essence of bad breath in solid form?


Tonsilloliths
(new window)

/ you're welcome.
 
2011-05-05 09:20:19 AM  
Texas:
Tough on Crime
week un Ejykayshun
 
2011-05-05 09:54:22 AM  
Remember, Texas also gave us LBJ, who thought space exploration was pretty neato, and that a central project of a self-governed people should be the elimination of poverty. He had plenty of faults otherwise, but he's an older-school type of Texan worth remembering.

However, if they do secede, Texas could become THE new hotspot for sex tourism. We'll just build a wall around parts of Austin and airlift in supplies.
 
2011-05-05 10:24:12 AM  
Step 1: Give Texas to Mexico and Florida to Cuba
Step 2: ???
Step 3: No profit, but I would be happier.
 
2011-05-05 10:28:59 AM  

mongbiohazard: So I have a crazy little question... Why isn't former Burleson County District Attorney Charles Sebesta in jail now for what he did? They make it pretty clear what he did wasn't an accident. Whether he believed the guy was really guilty or not, deceiving the courts in order to unfairly railroad him through... It seems like they could cite some laws the former DA broke if they wanted to. Let's start with perjury, for one.


The cool thing is prosecutors have absolute immunity for their actions. So they can like put you in jail on trumped up charges if they don't like the way you tie your shoes. Exaggerating? No.
 
2011-05-05 10:32:00 AM  

jst3p: $5,420 - Total to be collected by the state (to be paid to the mother of his now-grown children for expenses she incurred between 1998 and 2002)

$5400 for 5 years of child support!?!? I wish.


Gotta keep 'em in their place.
 
2011-05-05 10:37:57 AM  
Regarding the Willing

TheWhoppah: veryunoriginal: This is Texas, the same state that executed this man for murdering his family in a fire.

That man murdered his own three young children in a fire. Twin infants and a two year old. There were four empty bottles of charcoal starter fluid right outside the front door, a fact the biased New Yorker article failed to mention. Contrary to what you were led to believe, even the "expert" quoted for that story did not conclude that the fire was not arson. Not even close. He concluded that four of the 12 clues of arson could have alternate explanations. Anti-death penalty zealots hand picked certain sentences from the report and jumped up and down claiming that man was innocent. He wasn't.


To further point out how moronic you have made yourself look, I dug a little deeper into this man's life and death.

A fire scientist, Craig Beyler, did a thorough examination of the entire investigation and trial. The read is very interesting and clearly points out that the two people involved in Willingham's arson investigation were incompetent at best.

FTFR:

CONCLUSIONS
The investigations of the Willis and Willingham fires did not comport with either the modern standard of care expressed by NFPA 921, or the standard of care expressed by fire investigation texts and papers in the period 1980-1992. The investigators had poor understandings of fire science and failed to acknowledge or apply the contemporaneous understanding of the limitations of fire indicators. Their methodologies did not comport with the scientific method or the process of elimination. A finding of arson could not be sustained based upon the standard of care expressed by NFPA 921, or the standard of care expressed by fire investigation texts and papers in the period 1980-1992.
 
2011-05-05 10:43:49 AM  

tomerson: Farkin Texas. Succeed from the union already. Good riddance.


i48.photobucket.com
 
2011-05-05 10:49:31 AM  
Sorry America,...our bad.
www.dvorak.org


Oh shiat,...sorry again America.
www.historycommons.org


Ah Fark it.
www.nashvillescene.com
 
2011-05-05 10:50:59 AM  
Texas, The Lone Star Stoned Tard State
 
2011-05-05 10:53:39 AM  
Please dont be black...clicks link
Do'h.
Man this blows
 
2011-05-05 10:58:57 AM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Graves was convicted in 1994 of assisting Robert Carter in multiple murders in 1992. There was no physical evidence linking Graves to the crime, and his conviction relied primarily on Carter's testimony that Graves was his accomplice. Two weeks before Carter was scheduled to be executed in 2000, he provided a statement saying he lied about Graves's involvement in the crime. He repeated that statement minutes before his execution.

So basically the only evidence linking him to the crime was the actual murderer, who eventually admitted to lying. Jesus christ, give this guy double what he's owed.


And this was in 2000, so the guy spend another 11 years in prison after his only accuser recanted his testimony. I'm betting the original prosecutor fought against the guys release from back then.
 
2011-05-05 11:04:53 AM  

Inibrius: TheWhoppah: Repeat.

Bullshiat. In the eyes of the law, innocent = not guilty. She's just being a coont because it doesn't SAY 'innocent' on the paperwork.


I call Bullshiat on your Bullshiat. There are three designations now and have been for some time.

Guilty, Not Guilty, and Innocent.

Innocent =/= Not Guilty.

I love this state, but sometimes this bullshiat gets overwhelming. Pay the man already and be done with it. I don't see how this could end well for anyone who opposes that.
 
2011-05-05 11:09:04 AM  
Dear Texas:

Go! What are you waiting for, an invitation? Here it is! Now go!
 
2011-05-05 11:22:08 AM  

vd61: Brainwash: SphericalTime: Texas should have a tag on Fark. It's like the evil version of Florida.

And also, wow, that is totally farked up.

This was my exact thought after reading the headline.


Thirded. Let's get a texas tag


Something similar to the old "no intel inside" bumper stickers I used to see

Seriously, his kids are grown and not in need of the support. Seems I read somewhere that he is back with his wife anyway once he was released... why can't she get the support order vacated?
They are going to wish all they had to pay was 1.4 million after all of this is over.
 
2011-05-05 11:33:10 AM  
Cases like this are why you should always do as much crime as you can - then even if you do get wrongfully convicted of something, you're still ahead of the game.

/criminal logic
 
2011-05-05 11:35:14 AM  
Hate speech, my ass.
 
2011-05-05 01:09:13 PM  
 
2011-05-05 01:18:21 PM  

mongbiohazard: So I have a crazy little question... Why isn't former Burleson County District Attorney Charles Sebesta in jail now for what he did? They make it pretty clear what he did wasn't an accident. Whether he believed the guy was really guilty or not, deceiving the courts in order to unfairly railroad him through... It seems like they could cite some laws the former DA broke if they wanted to. Let's start with perjury, for one.


It was a different time, you understand. It was a different time. 1982 or 83.

/NASSA
 
2011-05-05 01:19:13 PM  
I hate this craphole of a state I live in
 
2011-05-05 01:22:52 PM  
Criminal prosecution in Texas is deeply flawed.

I could go on, but that's really not necessary.

And Sharon Keller (Texas Court of Criminal Appeals) is a goddam idiot.
 
2011-05-05 01:23:24 PM  

Mart-tiiiin: mongbiohazard: So I have a crazy little question... Why isn't former Burleson County District Attorney Charles Sebesta in jail now for what he did? They make it pretty clear what he did wasn't an accident. Whether he believed the guy was really guilty or not, deceiving the courts in order to unfairly railroad him through... It seems like they could cite some laws the former DA broke if they wanted to. Let's start with perjury, for one.

It was a different time, you understand. It was a different time. 1982 or 83.

/NASSA


Damnit. Crappy math messed up my homage.
 
2011-05-05 01:27:38 PM  
Not to excuse anybody, but Texas isn't the only state that sticks people in prison for crimes it hasn't really proved they committed. All the other states do it, too. And they're just about as assholish about being proven wrong as Texas is.

So while the Texas bashing is kind of amusing, it's pointless. Prosecutorial misconduct happens everywhere. They've just kind of perfected it in Texas. Or they're just really proud of it.
 
2011-05-05 01:56:25 PM  

TheWhoppah: Repeat.

This exact story has been posted to Fark.com at least twice before so all y'all with short memories must think this sort of thing happens all the time in Texas.


Shut the fark up. Not all of us read Fark 24/7 like you do. Maybe we missed it the first time. If you've seen it before, then close it and read something else, you mindless fark.
 
2011-05-05 01:57:52 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: Prosecutorial misconduct happens everywhere.


And, in a free society, it cannot be tolerated!

The assholishness of Texas is that they have a admitted criminal prosecutorial misconduct and they have a law to compensate the victims of it. But in this case, they are refusing to pay up because the judge didn't use the word that some dumbass comptroller thinks he should have used.

So I'm going to continue bashing that billy-bob bullshiat state. I lived there for while once and couldn't wait to get away. There's a serious secessionist movement there. Let them go and when the U.S. government moves the eight huge military bases there to someplace else, we will hear some texas-sized whining all the way to Maine.
 
2011-05-05 02:06:44 PM  

Fibro: Craig Beyler


Craig Beyler was hired not to find out what happened but to "prove" it wasn't arson. He looked at 10 year old photographs and said that it MIGHT NOT be arson. The Fire Marshall is long dead but Beyler didnt even bother to request an interview with the guy who was the Deputy Fire Marshall who assisted the Fire Marshall in actually sifting through the charred remains of the house. Why?

That Deputy is now a full-blown expert with the same credentials as Beyler. He said that even in retrospect and even using the latest credentials that the fire was definatly arson.

But don't take my word for it, read Willingham's own explanation of the fire and what happened that day. He changed his story half a dozen times but no matter which one you believe the basic facts are:
1. He was napping and the 2 year old woke him up yelling about smoke.
2. He told her "get out of the house" and left her to fend for herself.
3. He walked down the hall past the room where the twin babies were sleeping.
4. He exited the house before there was any smoke or flame visible from the outside.
5. He watched it burn without trying to save the three children.

That was Willingham's story. He said he didn't start the fire but he made zero effort to save the children.

So you can disbelieve the expert that actually investigated the fire in favor of the one that only looked at old photos. And you can ignore the jailhouse confession. And you can ignore the empty bottles of charcoal lighter. And you an ignore the fact he wanted his wife to abort the twins and punched her in the stomach. And you can ignore the fact that he move his car away from the burning house "so the paint wouldn't get scorched" but didnt try re-enter to help the kids. And you can ignore the testimony of neighbors that said he was standing in the yard looking in the windows in a curious way five minutes before smoke started billowing. And you can ignore the later confession to his ex wife.

But how the fark do you ignore that he calmly walked out of the house WITHOUT EVEN TRYING to save his own children?!?

Sorry but you have been scammed by a yellow journalist telling half the story. You are just like all those republicans that wanted soooo hard to believe Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. You are pathetic.
 
2011-05-05 02:11:37 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: Not to excuse anybody, but Texas isn't the only state that sticks people in prison for crimes it hasn't really proved they committed. All the other states do it, too. And they're just about as assholish about being proven wrong as Texas is.

So while the Texas bashing is kind of amusing, it's pointless. Prosecutorial misconduct happens everywhere. They've just kind of perfected it in Texas. Or they're just really proud of it.


Nebraska just released a guy last year who was on death row for 22 years. DNA proved he didn't kill the victim, witnesses had testified at the trial he was nowhere near the scene, and he wasn't a known acquaintance of the victim. The man who testified against him was there, and was arrested for being an accomplis, said he was told to implicate the man or HE would be charged with the murder.

The freed man might get $220,000.00 if a bill is passed in the Legislature, but its passage is doubtful.

So no, Texas isn't the only state pulling this crap.
 
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  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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