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(Some Tesla Guy) Video The coolest way to erase a CD that you'll see all day   (strangebeaver.com) divider line 48
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14837 clicks; posted to Video » on 19 Apr 2011 at 3:42 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-04-19 03:44:18 PM  
the hell... just microwave it...
 
2011-04-19 03:48:24 PM  
Reminds me of a story I heard once, don't recall where.

A guy landed a military contract to erase thousands of hard drives. His competitors couldn't understand how he could DoD wipe delete thousands of hard drives so cheaply.

When he bid on the contract he asked "Do you needs the drives back?" When he received a confirmed "No", he decided to just melt the drives down.

/CSB?
 
2011-04-19 03:56:11 PM  

kungfu jesus with a side of lime: the hell... just microwave it...


That.
 
2011-04-19 03:59:06 PM  

kungfu jesus with a side of lime: the hell... just microwave it...


This is so much more awesome
 
2011-04-19 04:00:11 PM  

kungfu jesus with a side of lime: the hell... just microwave it...


^
 
2011-04-19 04:04:15 PM  

kungfu jesus with a side of lime: the hell... just microwave it...


snap it in half, faster.
 
2011-04-19 04:10:12 PM  
It's alive... IT'S ALIVE!
 
2011-04-19 04:10:19 PM  
London-accented Tesla?

www.martynpedler.com

Approves, innit guv?
 
2011-04-19 04:21:47 PM  
But how am I suppose to generate the 1.21 gigawatts to... oh, nvm.
 
2011-04-19 04:31:15 PM  
You can't ERASE a CD.

Oh. Well. I guess you can. Huh. How about that.
 
2011-04-19 04:35:06 PM  
How do you say that? "cuh'D? What's a Cuh'D?
 
2011-04-19 04:49:42 PM  

kungfu jesus with a side of lime: the hell... just microwave it...


I was doing that years ago while drinking.

All was good and I was having much fun destroying AOL CDs when I suddenly noticed I had microwaved a CD I really cared about.

Use caution when destroying CDs.
 
2011-04-19 04:57:16 PM  
will microwaving a cd fry the microwave?
 
2011-04-19 04:57:47 PM  

Barbigazi: How do you say that? "cuh'D? What's a Cuh'D?


Chud?
 
2011-04-19 05:05:10 PM  
tricycleracer:

Reminds me of a story I heard once, don't recall where.

A guy landed a military contract to erase thousands of hard drives. His competitors couldn't understand how he could DoD wipe delete thousands of hard drives so cheaply.

When he bid on the contract he asked "Do you needs the drives back?" When he received a confirmed "No", he decided to just melt the drives down.

/CSB?


The DOE uses industrial-grade chipper-shredders for old hard drives and CDs.

Quick, easy, and (I'm sure) fun!
 
2011-04-19 05:17:40 PM  
Hell, I just throw em against the wall.

This was is much cooler looking though.
 
2011-04-19 05:21:50 PM  

kungfu jesus with a side of lime: the hell... just microwave it...


Not as cool.
 
2011-04-19 05:41:55 PM  
img846.imageshack.us

Wotever gets the job done, Errol, I don't bloody care 'ow ye do it. Jes get on an erase it, eh?
 
2011-04-19 05:47:49 PM  
I was expecting a microwave, but that is much cooler.
 
2011-04-19 05:48:32 PM  

The Flexecutioner: will microwaving a cd fry the microwave?


No. It does leave a strange odor though. I wouldn't do it using the same microwave I cooked out of though.
 
2011-04-19 05:54:08 PM  
Happy Hours : No. It does leave a strange odor though. I wouldn't do it using the same microwave I cooked out of though.

You overcooked it.
 
2011-04-19 06:10:37 PM  

lordargent: Happy Hours : No. It does leave a strange odor though. I wouldn't do it using the same microwave I cooked out of though.

You overcooked it.


DING!
 
2011-04-19 06:36:27 PM  

maxheck: tricycleracer:

Reminds me of a story I heard once, don't recall where.

A guy landed a military contract to erase thousands of hard drives. His competitors couldn't understand how he could DoD wipe delete thousands of hard drives so cheaply.

When he bid on the contract he asked "Do you needs the drives back?" When he received a confirmed "No", he decided to just melt the drives down.

/CSB?

The DOE uses industrial-grade chipper-shredders for old hard drives and CDs.

Quick, easy, and (I'm sure) fun!


While both of these would certainly destroy the data, neither complies with DOD7 standards.

/not saying that they didn't render the data destroyed, but government regulations are stupid like that
 
2011-04-19 07:05:08 PM  
CatJumpJohn:

While both of these would certainly destroy the data, neither complies with DOD7 standards.

/not saying that they didn't render the data destroyed, but government regulations are stupid like that


It certainly does comply if it's done AFTER the wipe.

[CSB mode on]

I did some work for the DOE that required them to wipe the drives in my laptops when I was done. Most sites would hold on to the drives at least overnight and mail them back to me, but at SRS they had some genius with his own lab and a very obviously custom rack of equipment... He basically took the logic board off of the drive and connected the raw hardware to his machine; Had my drives back to me within 2 hours.

I really wanted to get a chance to talk to that guy more.

[CSB mode off]
 
2011-04-19 07:25:51 PM  

tricycleracer: Reminds me of a story I heard once, don't recall where.

A guy landed a military contract to erase thousands of hard drives. His competitors couldn't understand how he could DoD wipe delete thousands of hard drives so cheaply.

When he bid on the contract he asked "Do you needs the drives back?" When he received a confirmed "No", he decided to just melt the drives down.

/CSB?


Back in 1990, my brother-in-law showed me the recently-declassified specs for a hard-drive array his company (Sun) had developed under contract to the NSA. It was about the size of a VHS player; he said it cost about $11,000 a unit and could hold 60 gigabytes of data.

I had trouble believing this (I had just bought a 110-megabyte hard drive for about $600 and this sounded like science fiction).

When I asked him why they needed such huge storage capacity, he said they were using them in "black" data rooms. Once a piece of equipment entered the room it was never allowed to leave except as slag -- they apparently keep an incinerator capable of completely melting down hard drives right there in the room.
 
2011-04-19 07:40:09 PM  
That strong accent melted my panties.
 
2011-04-19 08:56:41 PM  
img846.imageshack.us

Hence the expression, "As greedy as a pig."
 
2011-04-19 09:28:21 PM  
Do the laser pits in the aluminum print through to the plastic?
 
2011-04-19 10:18:57 PM  

studebaker hoch: Do the laser pits in the aluminum print through to the plastic?


[nitpicking]No. And this doesn't erase the CD, it removes the reflective coating. The data is burned into a dye layer embedded in the disk. If the disk wasn't heated too much in the process, electroplating a reflective coating on the disk might restore it.[/nitpicking]

/not that anyone is likely to try...
 
2011-04-20 12:15:33 AM  
You're no good ta me alive, are you Turkish?
 
2011-04-20 02:26:40 AM  

NukkenFutz: lordargent: Happy Hours : No. It does leave a strange odor though. I wouldn't do it using the same microwave I cooked out of though.

You overcooked it.

DING!


OH, ZAP!
 
2011-04-20 08:22:50 AM  
www.dvdreview.com

"No wonder I keep having to rebuy CELINE DION'S GREATEST HITS!"
 
2011-04-20 08:33:55 AM  
once in a place I worked a woman came into our room with a box of CDs asking if we knew how to destroy them since they had proprietary data on them and we said "yes, we'll take care of it". a co-worker and I snapped them in half and kept the cases.
/our boss charged her dept. $100 for "data destruction"
//took us less than 5 minutes to do the job
 
2011-04-20 08:37:37 AM  
I worked in a radio station in college and we had a bulk tape eraser. I've always wondered if that would wipe a hard drive completely
/I liked how an A+ test question on destroying a HD gave "smash it with a hammer" as a choice
//it was the correct answer
 
2011-04-20 09:26:53 AM  

NYRBill: I worked in a radio station in college and we had a bulk tape eraser. I've always wondered if that would wipe a hard drive completely
/I liked how an A+ test question on destroying a HD gave "smash it with a hammer" as a choice
//it was the correct answer


A bulk eraser would do a number on a standard hard drive, and
probably render it unusable because it would wipe out not just the
data but the factory performed low-level formatting. I'm no
expert, though, so the data could still be recoverable with
specialized forensic equipment, but it wouldn't be easy.
 
2011-04-20 09:41:21 AM  
We had a customer whos server was being retired. When retiring we wipe the drives with pdwipe. Well this moonbat didn't trust that all the data would be gone after this and wanted us to destroy the disks and send him proof.

So, as we were bored as hell, we cracked open the drives, took out the platters and used an angle grinder on them.

We mailed him back a jar of dust/shards.

He was pleased.

/cool story bro
 
2011-04-20 10:20:22 AM  
Geeves00: We had a customer whos server was being retired. When retiring we wipe the drives with pdwipe. Well this moonbat didn't trust that all the data would be gone after this and wanted us to destroy the disks and send him proof.

So, as we were bored as hell, we cracked open the drives, took out the platters and used an angle grinder on them.

We mailed him back a jar of dust/shards.
He was pleased.


Nice. I'm more fond of Thermite myself :)
 
2011-04-20 11:10:55 AM  

CatJumpJohn: maxheck: tricycleracer:

Reminds me of a story I heard once, don't recall where.

A guy landed a military contract to erase thousands of hard drives. His competitors couldn't understand how he could DoD wipe delete thousands of hard drives so cheaply.

When he bid on the contract he asked "Do you needs the drives back?" When he received a confirmed "No", he decided to just melt the drives down.

/CSB?

The DOE uses industrial-grade chipper-shredders for old hard drives and CDs.

Quick, easy, and (I'm sure) fun!

While both of these would certainly destroy the data, neither complies with DOD7 standards.

/not saying that they didn't render the data destroyed, but government regulations are stupid like that



DoD regulations are stupid for other reasons, too. One pass with 0s is sufficient to make data unrecoverable.
 
2011-04-20 11:36:54 AM  
i279.photobucket.com
 
2011-04-20 03:36:48 PM  
"Your feeble skills are no match for the power of the Dark Side..."
 
2011-04-20 03:40:17 PM  

NYRBill: once in a place I worked a woman came into our room with a box of CDs asking if we knew how to destroy them since they had proprietary data on them and we said "yes, we'll take care of it". a co-worker and I snapped them in half and kept the cases.
/our boss charged her dept. $100 for "data destruction"
//took us less than 5 minutes to do the job


I'd suspect snapping in half would not be enough to deter a determined data thief. I'd say complete destruction would be much safer.
 
2011-04-20 03:41:47 PM  

tricycleracer: Reminds me of a story I heard once, don't recall where.

A guy landed a military contract to erase thousands of hard drives. His competitors couldn't understand how he could DoD wipe delete thousands of hard drives so cheaply.

When he bid on the contract he asked "Do you needs the drives back?" When he received a confirmed "No", he decided to just melt the drives down.

/CSB?


Thermite is awesome like that. Still, we're talking a few thousand kilos of thermite for that many HDDs.
 
2011-04-20 10:26:18 PM  
chupathingie : [nitpicking]No. And this doesn't erase the CD, it removes the reflective coating. The data is burned into a dye layer embedded in the disk. If the disk wasn't heated too much in the process, electroplating a reflective coating on the disk might restore it.

Um, I think you're mixing up your CD technologies there and kinda creating a mesh of the two.

1) Retail CDs, come out of a press, data is stored in bumps on the plastic layer, then a reflective coating is put on top. There is no dye (almost all commercially pressed CDs look silver, the only reason to add dye would be to make the CD look a different color). Laser light reflects differently off of the bumps (vs off of the 'lands') and the pickup detects this.

2) Burnable CDs, the plastic layer is flat, there is a reflective layer and a dye layer. Lasers cause the dye to become opaque. Opaque parts reflect light differently and the pickup detects this.

Summary: commercial CDs use no dye, recordable CDs have no bumps.
 
2011-04-20 10:28:56 PM  
chupathingie : [nitpicking]No. And this doesn't erase the CD, it removes the reflective coating. The data is burned into a dye layer embedded in the disk. If the disk wasn't heated too much in the process, electroplating a reflective coating on the disk might restore it.

Nevermind, I read this a few more times.

I don't recall what layer the dye is on, and don't really know how heat would affect it.

/if the dye isn't affected by microwaving, I guess you could technically carefully glue some aluminum foil onto the CDR :P
 
2011-04-20 10:52:53 PM  

lordargent: chupathingie : [nitpicking]No. And this doesn't erase the CD, it removes the reflective coating. The data is burned into a dye layer embedded in the disk. If the disk wasn't heated too much in the process, electroplating a reflective coating on the disk might restore it.

Nevermind, I read this a few more times.

I don't recall what layer the dye is on, and don't really know how heat would affect it.

/if the dye isn't affected by microwaving, I guess you could technically carefully glue some aluminum foil onto the CDR :P


In addition...
I'm pretty sure the thermal propagation from vaporizing the foil layer would fark the hell out of any hypothetic microscopic pits in the plastic layer anyways.
 
2011-04-21 04:54:14 AM  

aelat: One pass with 0s is sufficient to make data unrecoverable.


By normal standards, maybe. Computer forensic technicians can recover just about anything. The only surefire way is physical destruction of the mechanism.

/ The thermite idea sounds like fun.
 
2011-04-21 10:27:48 AM  

Elrond Hubbard: aelat: One pass with 0s is sufficient to make data unrecoverable.

By normal standards, maybe. Computer forensic technicians can recover just about anything. The only surefire way is physical destruction of the mechanism.

/ The thermite idea sounds like fun.


You do realize that data can be recovered from a partial platter.
They have to stripped. physically destroyed and dispersed into remote secure facilities, with 24 hour guard, remote sensors, cameras, motion detectors, and of course be earthquake, tsunami, tornado, hurricane, blizzard, dust storm proof.
 
2011-04-21 12:33:31 PM  

Elrond Hubbard: aelat: One pass with 0s is sufficient to make data unrecoverable.

By normal standards, maybe. Computer forensic technicians can recover just about anything. The only surefire way is physical destruction of the mechanism.

/ The thermite idea sounds like fun.


With much older hard drives and an electron microscope, you have a small chance at recovering a few bits here and there.

With any modern hard drive, a single pass with 0s will make all data unrecoverable.

Granted, thermite would be 100000x more fun.
 
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