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(Orlando Sentinel)   $1 billion in aid to Japan has reached... the pockets of the Red Cross   (orlandosentinel.com ) divider line
    More: Obvious, Red Cross, Japan, American Red Cross, Tokyo University, NHK, Fukushima, pockets, emergency management  
•       •       •

21848 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Apr 2011 at 5:32 PM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-04-03 09:52:25 PM  
Farker T 2011-04-03 09:40:16 PM
www.guzer.com


Face trials of piles with smiles.
================================================

// Thanks, that cost me another ciggy,
i bit it in half.
Niiice :)=======/=======~
 
2011-04-03 09:55:33 PM  

LavenderWolf: Grables'Daughter: LavenderWolf: threadjack: I just noticed from looking at my profile page when I confirmed my account creation date...

I have a greenlight! I totally missed it!

Congratulations!

This one, I assume?

No, it's from January 7. Stoner moment.


Oh.

/pats LavenderWolf on the head.
 
2011-04-03 09:59:44 PM  

farkMcFark: Your comment is profoundly ignorant.


Grables'Daughter: Am I missing something?


Well yes, I am trolling. But I don't think that money is what they need. Here's less of a troll. What about sending doctors, forgiving a huge chunk of their debt so they can have an easier time rebuilding (or delay all their debt payments for 5 years or something)?
 
2011-04-03 10:05:05 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: farkMcFark: Your comment is profoundly ignorant.

Grables'Daughter: Am I missing something?

Well yes, I am trolling. But I don't think that money is what they need. Here's less of a troll. What about sending doctors, forgiving a huge chunk of their debt so they can have an easier time rebuilding (or delay all their debt payments for 5 years or something)?


Why endanger anyone else by sending them over?
Japan is pretty self sufficient and by all accounts they have manged much better than anyone else faced with this much disaster and tragedy.
They are still getting hit with EQ's everyday and it isn't going to get much better.
 
2011-04-03 10:11:36 PM  
I won't donate to any charity who employees anyone who earns more than me.

I'm just a regular guy. I probably don't care much at all about whatever charity it is. If the guy or gal running it isn't willing to sacrifice more than me for their cause, I'm not giving them a penny.

I'll donate when the high ranking executives running the Red Cross all earn less than 50k. They produce nothing. They are, quite literally, worthless overhead. And they make millions!

Think about that the next time someone asks you for money.
 
2011-04-03 10:15:06 PM  
If you donate your blood directly to a local hospital, that eliminates the need for them to BUY THEIR BLOOD FROM THE RED CROSS.
 
2011-04-03 10:20:20 PM  

gilby_jr: If you donate your blood directly to a local hospital, that eliminates the need for them to BUY THEIR BLOOD FROM THE RED CROSS.


I hope you're trolling because if you actually believe that, you're a damn fool.
 
2011-04-03 10:20:26 PM  

AbbeySomeone: Why endanger anyone else by sending them over?
Japan is pretty self sufficient and by all accounts they have manged much better than anyone else faced with this much disaster and tragedy.


Well maybe we should wait until after the disaster and then spend this money on establishing an international disaster agency run by the Japanese specialists who figure this thing out. We can buy them some Thunderbirds technology and make them our de facto leaders in times of intense natural disasters.
 
2011-04-03 10:22:59 PM  

gilby_jr: If you donate your blood directly to a local hospital, that eliminates the need for them to BUY THEIR BLOOD FROM THE RED CROSS.


What is your point. All blood banks run extremely low margins on blood. Only large hospitals that can handle blood bank duties allow for this anyways because without moving enough blood you lose money. The red cross does not make significant money from blood.
 
2011-04-03 10:23:48 PM  

JSTACAT: What the Japanese people need more than anything is the removal of the Piles, all of them, immediately if not sooner.


www.drug3k.com

This will not remove them but will help shrink swelling and stop the itching and burning.
 
2011-04-03 10:24:56 PM  

ThisNameSux: gilby_jr: If you donate your blood directly to a local hospital, that eliminates the need for them to BUY THEIR BLOOD FROM THE RED CROSS.

I hope you're trolling because if you actually believe that, you're a damn fool.


Does the Red Cross sell your frozen plasma? (new window)

(The answer is YES.)
 
2011-04-03 10:26:11 PM  

gilby_jr: If you donate your blood directly to a local hospital, that eliminates the need for them to BUY THEIR BLOOD FROM THE RED CROSS.


copsandcourts.com

Also interested in buying blood from the Red Cross.
 
2011-04-03 10:26:34 PM  
JSTAhemmorhoid (It's Lying Outta My Itchy Asshole Performance Art, see!?) 2011-04-03 09:25:42 PM


I FAIL AT LIFE

Ya know, I look at you as a vaguely entertaining & funny weirdo, but "ZOMG 20 millyunz of Japs R coming here 2 liv 4 free" makes you sound like a blatant pile of f*ck and lie.

They aren't emigrating over here.

And since I ain't gonna waste a post just on biatching you out...

Japan Society

These folks will accept tax-deductible donations, 100% of which will go to the following organizations:

Tokyo Volunteer Network for Disaster Relief (Japanese only)
JEN (ジェン) (English)
ETIC (English)
Japan NPO Center (English)
 
2011-04-03 10:26:49 PM  
Hmm,

Should probably call it the red star of david. Would be more fitting.
 
2011-04-03 10:29:44 PM  
I didnt read the whole thread, but fark the Red Cross. When my grandfather was in WWII and Korea, he would come off the front lines to find the Red Cross waiting with hot coffee and doughnuts...for a price.

And when I was in the Air Force, the RC would constantly hound units for blood drives. I didnt think anything of it till an administrator from the base hospital made the rounds saying that they were in need of blood, and that the RC sells the blood that you give freely to hospitals starting at $300 bucks a pint for O+.

Seriously, fark the Red Cross.
 
2011-04-03 10:30:11 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: I won't donate to any charity who employees anyone who earns more than me.

I'm just a regular guy. I probably don't care much at all about whatever charity it is. If the guy or gal running it isn't willing to sacrifice more than me for their cause, I'm not giving them a penny.

I'll donate when the high ranking executives running the Red Cross all earn less than 50k. They produce nothing. They are, quite literally, worthless overhead. And they make millions!

Think about that the next time someone asks you for money.


I'm gonna say this again because you may have missed it the first time...The Salvation Army is a worthwhile charity. I know that they are hard core Christian but they give it back to the communities that they serve. I am pretty much a hard core agnostic, means that I don't know what is true so I suspect everyone, but the "Sali" keeps it local and real. The other option that you might consider is giving to a local food bank as that should translate into an immediate benefit for those in need in your commmunity. Maybe you know someone who could use some help? Invite them over for potluck. That message about "charity beginning at home" is talking to you brother.
 
2011-04-03 10:32:37 PM  

Farker T: ExperianScaresCthulhu: Farker T: ZoeNekros: Farker T: Can they not donate blood?

Anyone who has had homosexual intercourse may not donate, gay or not.


Wow. Did not know that.

What about pathological liars who've had homosexual intercourse?

yeah, dude. when you go in to donate in the US (at least the times I was in, many moons ago) that's one of the first questions. it's so important, it's on the wall of some sites.

- you can't be gay.
- you can't be a man who has engaged in anal intercourse (to catch all the 'not gay but I... ' dudes
- you can't have travelled to haiti; haiti barred you for life from ever donating.
- you can't have exchanged sex for cash or goods.


Well, that last one pretty much excludes all adult females. ;-)


This all sounds so 1980's - back then they called AIDS the "Four H Club", because it was primarily affecting Haitians, Homosexual, Hemophiliacs and Heroin users. I honestly thought we were beyond that.


have you ever donated? again, my days were many moons ago. i know that there's been some major noise here in the states to remove the gay ban. i don't know if it's ever been done, though. Reading ZoeNekros, looks like the ban is still there.


No, I've never donated - mostly because the thought that my blood might possibly end up in some Jehovah's Witness really creeps me out.


Why?

Gays are the number cause of the spread of the hiv virus back in the 1980's and today.

About half of the aids fiends are gay the other half are straight (usually poor minorities in the inner city) but when you think that gays are only like 5% of the population that 50% of the aids makes it shocking how many gays really have aids. Aids is and always will be a gay disease the facts support it the science support it.
 
2011-04-03 10:35:14 PM  

Proletariat In Charge: I didnt read the whole thread, but fark the Red Cross. When my grandfather was in WWII and Korea, he would come off the front lines to find the Red Cross waiting with hot coffee and doughnuts...for a price.

And when I was in the Air Force, the RC would constantly hound units for blood drives. I didnt think anything of it till an administrator from the base hospital made the rounds saying that they were in need of blood, and that the RC sells the blood that you give freely to hospitals starting at $300 bucks a pint for O+.

Seriously, fark the Red Cross.


Okay, so apparently your grandparents were correct:

Military Services
Coffee and Donuts
The Red Cross sold coffee and donuts instead of giving them away to military personnel during World War II.
This unfortunate policy came into being because service agencies in Britain helping British military personnel were less well-financed than the American Red Cross. Thus, these agencies were forced to charge British military members for the same items that American service members were getting free from the American Red Cross.

To avoid further embarrassment to the British, who were playing host to thousands of U.S. troops, the U.S. Secretary of War requested that the American Red Cross begin charging American service members for such items as coffee and donuts in its canteens. The Red Cross interpreted this request as a wartime demand and complied so that it could continue aiding U.S. troops. However, the Red Cross sold items at or below cost and never profited a penny from these sales.

Since the end of World War II, the American Red Cross has not charged military personnel-not in the Korean, Vietnam, or Persian Gulf conflicts, for example.


Source - the Red Cross website (new window)

/virgule
 
2011-04-03 10:36:46 PM  

sillydragon:
That'd be one of my friends that saved the day by giving me some couch space for a while. My housemate ended up with a friend of his for a while. If you're looking to donate, I agree with randomjsa, Doctors Without Borders is supposedly pretty good.


Ok, so you didn't really need the money to get a roof over your head. Plus you were renting anyway, so it's not like it was your house that got damaged.

If you're renting, I assume that the roof missing is valid excuse for breaking a lease.

So you think they should have covered your entire months rent, right? When you presumably had income for the rent in the first place, and didn't really need to pay two rents at the same time?
 
2011-04-03 10:37:46 PM  

Cman1982: Farker T: ExperianScaresCthulhu: Farker T: ZoeNekros: Farker T: Can they not donate blood?

Anyone who has had homosexual intercourse may not donate, gay or not.


Wow. Did not know that.

What about pathological liars who've had homosexual intercourse?

yeah, dude. when you go in to donate in the US (at least the times I was in, many moons ago) that's one of the first questions. it's so important, it's on the wall of some sites.

- you can't be gay.
- you can't be a man who has engaged in anal intercourse (to catch all the 'not gay but I... ' dudes
- you can't have travelled to haiti; haiti barred you for life from ever donating.
- you can't have exchanged sex for cash or goods.


Well, that last one pretty much excludes all adult females. ;-)


This all sounds so 1980's - back then they called AIDS the "Four H Club", because it was primarily affecting Haitians, Homosexual, Hemophiliacs and Heroin users. I honestly thought we were beyond that.


have you ever donated? again, my days were many moons ago. i know that there's been some major noise here in the states to remove the gay ban. i don't know if it's ever been done, though. Reading ZoeNekros, looks like the ban is still there.


No, I've never donated - mostly because the thought that my blood might possibly end up in some Jehovah's Witness really creeps me out.

Why?

Gays are the number cause of the spread of the hiv virus back in the 1980's and today.

About half of the aids fiends are gay the other half are straight (usually poor minorities in the inner city) but when you think that gays are only like 5% of the population that 50% of the aids makes it shocking how many gays really have aids. Aids is and always will be a gay disease the facts support it the science support it.



Except in Africa and Haiti, of course.
 
2011-04-03 10:39:33 PM  

Farker T: Cman1982: Farker T: ExperianScaresCthulhu: Farker T: ZoeNekros: Farker T: Can they not donate blood?

Anyone who has had homosexual intercourse may not donate, gay or not.


Wow. Did not know that.

What about pathological liars who've had homosexual intercourse?

yeah, dude. when you go in to donate in the US (at least the times I was in, many moons ago) that's one of the first questions. it's so important, it's on the wall of some sites.

- you can't be gay.
- you can't be a man who has engaged in anal intercourse (to catch all the 'not gay but I... ' dudes
- you can't have travelled to haiti; haiti barred you for life from ever donating.
- you can't have exchanged sex for cash or goods.


Well, that last one pretty much excludes all adult females. ;-)


This all sounds so 1980's - back then they called AIDS the "Four H Club", because it was primarily affecting Haitians, Homosexual, Hemophiliacs and Heroin users. I honestly thought we were beyond that.


have you ever donated? again, my days were many moons ago. i know that there's been some major noise here in the states to remove the gay ban. i don't know if it's ever been done, though. Reading ZoeNekros, looks like the ban is still there.


No, I've never donated - mostly because the thought that my blood might possibly end up in some Jehovah's Witness really creeps me out.

Why?

Gays are the number cause of the spread of the hiv virus back in the 1980's and today.

About half of the aids fiends are gay the other half are straight (usually poor minorities in the inner city) but when you think that gays are only like 5% of the population that 50% of the aids makes it shocking how many gays really have aids. Aids is and always will be a gay disease the facts support it the science support it.


Except in Africa and Haiti, of course.


Can't really count them. They skew any result for any disease.
Most backwards people on the planet.
 
2011-04-03 10:42:37 PM  

Bennie Crabtree: Why would anyone give "aid" to the world's 2nd largest national economy?


The same reason they gave aid to the US after Katrina.
 
2011-04-03 10:50:42 PM  
A lot of people in this thread keep on bringing up the Charity Navigator, which I had never heard of before. I decided to do a little research and I found that the guy who bankrolled this organization made his money, previous to this venture, as an ad man - working mainly for the medical and pharmaceutical industries.

Color me skeptical of an outfit founded and run by a guy who made his bones in marketing that purports to analyze and "advertise" the supposed efficiency of charities.

Also of note - one of the VPs of Charity Navigator was a Red Cross director and manager in New Jersey (another red flag).
 
2011-04-03 10:57:50 PM  
Cman1982 2011-04-03 10:32:37 PM

Gays are the number cause of the spread of the hiv virus back in the 1980's and today.

About half of the aids fiends are gay the other half are straight (usually poor minorities in the inner city) but when you think that gays are only like 5% of the population that 50% of the aids makes it shocking how many gays really have aids. Aids is and always will be a gay disease the facts support it the science support it.
==================================================================

Yet, there are people, some in the highest places of government, that have passed laws mandating that these practices are taught to elementary school students, complete with physical simulations.
Even worse, these people want to legitimise it even to defile and destroy the family unit.

I wonder what God thinks about all that? hmmm?
mebbe..like,
Fuku-Shima!
and that aint all folks,
that was just the slopwater from the morning mess hall.
Wait till you meet the Horse regiment, all girded to do their jobs.
 
2011-04-03 11:02:10 PM  

mandingueiro: People need to donate to "the Human Fund". Their motto is "money for people"


I work for an import/export company that assisted in founding that charity.
 
2011-04-03 11:02:58 PM  
I prefer to give first to Doctors Without Borders. THEN the Red Cross.
 
2011-04-03 11:04:15 PM  

JSTACAT: Cman1982 2011-04-03 10:32:37 PM

Gays are the number cause of the spread of the hiv virus back in the 1980's and today.

About half of the aids fiends are gay the other half are straight (usually poor minorities in the inner city) but when you think that gays are only like 5% of the population that 50% of the aids makes it shocking how many gays really have aids. Aids is and always will be a gay disease the facts support it the science support it.
==================================================================

Yet, there are people, some in the highest places of government, that have passed laws mandating that these practices are taught to elementary school students, complete with physical simulations.
Even worse, these people want to legitimise it even to defile and destroy the family unit.

I wonder what God thinks about all that? hmmm?
mebbe..like,
Fuku-Shima!
and that aint all folks,
that was just the slopwater from the morning mess hall.
Wait till you meet the Horse regiment, all girded to do their jobs.


I don't even know what your are talking about in your post. Please retype it so I can understand.
 
2011-04-03 11:07:23 PM  

divx88: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: No surprise. I've seen the Red Cross in action after smaller scale disasters. While all the other charities that showed were handing out free food and supplies to the needy without heed to the cost, the Red Cross people were charging for sandwiches, ignoring those without cash in hand who asked for help and focused their energy on obtaining more donations from everyone else.

They're good for blood drives, but nothing else.

They're good at selling you back your blood too.


Now that's not true. You can't sell blood, as it's considered an organ. you can, however, charge for processing, storage, handling testing fees.

/Blood bank worker.
 
2011-04-03 11:08:47 PM  

Grables'Daughter: ThisNameSux: gilby_jr: If you donate your blood directly to a local hospital, that eliminates the need for them to BUY THEIR BLOOD FROM THE RED CROSS.

I hope you're trolling because if you actually believe that, you're a damn fool.

Does the Red Cross sell your frozen plasma? (new window)

(The answer is YES.)


Well, Name, I guess I'm not such a fool after all.
/in the industry
 
2011-04-03 11:20:49 PM  

LoneCoon: divx88: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: No surprise. I've seen the Red Cross in action after smaller scale disasters. While all the other charities that showed were handing out free food and supplies to the needy without heed to the cost, the Red Cross people were charging for sandwiches, ignoring those without cash in hand who asked for help and focused their energy on obtaining more donations from everyone else.

They're good for blood drives, but nothing else.

They're good at selling you back your blood too.

Now that's not true. You can't sell blood, as it's considered an organ. you can, however, charge for processing, storage, handling testing fees.

/Blood bank worker.


See above.

From the Red Cross website:

Q: "Does the Red Cross sell your frozen plasma?"
A: "Yes."
 
2011-04-03 11:23:48 PM  
its more about supplies and aid than the money directly.
 
2011-04-03 11:44:17 PM  

Grables'Daughter: Proletariat In Charge: I didnt read the whole thread, but fark the Red Cross. When my grandfather was in WWII and Korea, he would come off the front lines to find the Red Cross waiting with hot coffee and doughnuts...for a price.

And when I was in the Air Force, the RC would constantly hound units for blood drives. I didnt think anything of it till an administrator from the base hospital made the rounds saying that they were in need of blood, and that the RC sells the blood that you give freely to hospitals starting at $300 bucks a pint for O+.

Seriously, fark the Red Cross.

Okay, so apparently your grandparents were correct:

Military Services
Coffee and Donuts
The Red Cross sold coffee and donuts instead of giving them away to military personnel during World War II.
This unfortunate policy came into being because service agencies in Britain helping British military personnel were less well-financed than the American Red Cross. Thus, these agencies were forced to charge British military members for the same items that American service members were getting free from the American Red Cross.

To avoid further embarrassment to the British, who were playing host to thousands of U.S. troops, the U.S. Secretary of War requested that the American Red Cross begin charging American service members for such items as coffee and donuts in its canteens. The Red Cross interpreted this request as a wartime demand and complied so that it could continue aiding U.S. troops. However, the Red Cross sold items at or below cost and never profited a penny from these sales.

Since the end of World War II, the American Red Cross has not charged military personnel-not in the Korean, Vietnam, or Persian Gulf conflicts, for example.

Source - the Red Cross website (new window)

/virgule


Interesting information. I'll admit to never bothering to look it up myself. And we all know that there is no hate like old people hate. My grandmother wouldn't spit on an RC worker if they were on fire.

And I have read in this thread that the RC doesn't profit much on selling blood since most local hospitals cant move or store large amounts of the stuff. I have followed the idea of donating directly to hospitals instead of the RC since that talk from the base hospital admin. You can get around the logistical problems of the hospital if you simply go and donate in the name of someone in need at the hospital. You can personally knock $300/pint off of their hospital bill.
 
2011-04-04 12:34:37 AM  

LoneCoon: divx88: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: No surprise. I've seen the Red Cross in action after smaller scale disasters. While all the other charities that showed were handing out free food and supplies to the needy without heed to the cost, the Red Cross people were charging for sandwiches, ignoring those without cash in hand who asked for help and focused their energy on obtaining more donations from everyone else.

They're good for blood drives, but nothing else.

They're good at selling you back your blood too.

Now that's not true. You can't sell blood, as it's considered an organ. you can, however, charge for processing, storage, handling testing fees.

/Blood bank worker.


Great! So being in the business, you know it's better for you in the long run to sell your blood than to give it. You'll know then that regardless how much you've *given* to the Red Cross, if you ever happened to need it they have no problem selling it to you ... selling being whatever you want to call it.
 
2011-04-04 12:38:41 AM  

ExperianScaresCthulhu: Uchiha_Cycliste:
I donated platelets in high school and was able to do it every week or every other week. It took about an hour and a half, usually you sat in a dentist like chair and watched a movie. I suspect they mean it's easier in that you don't really feel like you gave fluids, and the platelets return in a few days. Donating whole blood can leave you feeling a little worse for the wear.

Thank you. And thank you for donating.

I remember seeing those chairs. They were always full, here in Albuquerque when I went. The needles were a little bigger, if I remember correctly.


They ARE bigger needles, as they process a lot more blood. Also, after a while I *did* have minor track marks. I was told by the red cross person that the machines that filter out the platelets are only about 1/3 efficient, also that when they did a double take (a few times) that they were actually filtering all of my blood. I preferred it to whole blood donations for several reasons: a) I could do it every other week, or every week if they needed it that badly, b) they were constantly in need and c) they measured my hematocrit for me. One of their pre-screening tests is to make sure you are not anemic which they accomplish one of two ways, my throwing blood in a test-tube with a solution in it and observing the color, or putting some blood in a little tube and spinning the shiat out of it in a machine. The latter method resulted in an objective, numerical measure of my crit, which was useful as a bike racer (xc and road) and as a CC runner. It was win-win I got to track my training, they got platelets, I got cookies and juice AND I got to watch a movie, and sometimes I would ride the 8 miles to the RC, so I got some training in. I really gotta start that again. =/
 
2011-04-04 12:41:34 AM  

Grables'Daughter: LoneCoon: divx88: Diogenes Teufelsdrockh: No surprise. I've seen the Red Cross in action after smaller scale disasters. While all the other charities that showed were handing out free food and supplies to the needy without heed to the cost, the Red Cross people were charging for sandwiches, ignoring those without cash in hand who asked for help and focused their energy on obtaining more donations from everyone else.

They're good for blood drives, but nothing else.

They're good at selling you back your blood too.

Now that's not true. You can't sell blood, as it's considered an organ. you can, however, charge for processing, storage, handling testing fees.

/Blood bank worker.

See above.

From the Red Cross website:

Q: "Does the Red Cross sell your frozen plasma?"
A: "Yes."


Every single blood bank sells frozen recovered plasma because it is useless for normal transfusions. They sell for about sixty or so dollars for 1/3 liter. It is how they make up for paying close to 250 dollars per unit for testing. Blood only gets paid for when used. All the plasma that is used for transfusions is different.
 
2011-04-04 12:42:45 AM  
I gave money to the (American) Red Cross because they were offering 500 frequent flier miles. Yes, I'm a donation whore.
 
2011-04-04 12:58:52 AM  
You say this like im suppose to be surprised
 
2011-04-04 01:03:45 AM  
Does anybody know how much the Japanese donated to Katrina victims, or even Pear Harbor?.......just askin.
 
2011-04-04 01:13:02 AM  

TopNotched: Does anybody know how much the Japanese donated to Katrina victims, or even Pear Harbor?.......just askin.


some money (link pops to a likely hit).
 
2011-04-04 01:20:16 AM  

ukexpat: United Way


Yeah, United Way sucks.

My wife used to have a low-wage job working on staff at a non-profit drug rehab center. She was paid $8 an hour to do a job that would have paid at least twice that much at a for-profit place.

That's just $8/hour to dispense medication, give unlicensed counseling (after hours, when the licensed therapists have gone home for the night and a client needed to talk to someone), perform the general clerical work of the center, mediate disputes (after hours), administer drug tests, give first aid, and act as a security guard when psycho ex-boyfriends, drug dealers and pimps come knocking to get their girlfriends, customers and whores out of rehab so they can go back on the streets.

After paying for health insurance and taxes, the job paid pretty much gas money for the car to drive there and back and helped her chip in for a few bills and household expenses.

So, what do they want on top of that? Lots and lots of pressure to give generously to the United Way. How much do you want taken out of every paycheck? It's annual fundraising drive time! Can you donate $500, what about just $250, or a measly $100?

No.

She got so much grief from her superiors for refusing to donate to the United Way, they started giving her worse and worse shifts and assignments. It eventually got so bad she nearly had a breakdown and quit outright, realizing that $8/hour was nowhere near enough to put up with that job.

It didn't help that the United Way was a major donor to the rehab center, so that's where they got a large chunk of their budget from. So, essentially they wanted her to give her paycheck back to them in an inefficient fashion.
 
2011-04-04 01:26:43 AM  
Thinking that your red-cross donation will go to victims is as retarded as thinking your "Susan Komen" donation will go to cancer research.
 
2011-04-04 01:29:26 AM  
The Red Cross is the only non-profit organization congressionally mandated to respond to disasters. They do not receive one cent of federal money. This is intentional because their mission statement does not allow them to discriminate against anyone who needs their assistance and they don't want the politicians getting involved in how they provide aid.

I have been donating blood, plasma, money and time to the Red Cross for over 5 years. I was in the Algiers section of New Orleans after Katrina while we gave out food to people who told us they hadn't seen any other assistance a month after the event. At the time the local authorities told us not to go there because it wasn't safe.

I regularly go to people locally who have lost their homes to fires and help them with their immediate food and shelter needs. We can't provide as much assistance as we used to because our budget is so tight. Close to 30% of the staff in the local office has been laid off over the last few years; all the work has been picked up by volunteers.

We work with a lot of partner organizations, including the Salvation Army, Southern Baptist Convention, St. Vincent DePaul and other local groups. They can provide some of the types of aid that we can't, e.g. replacement clothing and furniture. We don't charge anyone any money for our disaster relief services. Anyone who tells you otherwise is a liar.

What happens after major events like the Haiti earthquake or Japan tsunami is that lots of people give money dedicated to that specific disaster. That's great; the Red Cross tries to use those donations responsibly. But it also means that there is less money available for smaller, but still large impact events. There aren't a ton of people giving money for the floods, fires and tornados that happen every year. But the Red Cross will still respond.

We also provide coffee and snacks to other disaster responders. When there's a big search and rescue event going on, there's a good chance the Red Cross will be there giving coffee and food to the local authorities and volunteers participating. Did I mention they don't charge a penny for any of this and that anyone who says otherwise is a liar? Ask any fire-fighters you know in your community what they think of the Red Cross. I bet the majority will praise them. Some won't because, in the end, each chapter's service depends on the volunteers they can attract and the budget they have to work with. I'm lucky enough to be in Portland, OR, which is one of the better supported chapters in the country.

Yes, there is inefficiency in the system; it's almost all volunteer driven. That's why my wife is helping the local chapter update their certification database. Yes, there have been problems with volunteers who out of ignorance or malice misused resources. That's why I do training for new volunteers. But look at the numbers- the Red Cross spends a hell of a lot less on overhead, admin and fundraising than some of the other NGOs people are praising in this thread. There are a lot of good groups out there: Doctors Without Borders and Mercy Corps are a couple of my other favorites. Each fills a specific niche. If you want your money to be spent in a very specific way in very limited circumstances, if you put the time and effort into researching it you can probably find a group who can do that and do it well. If you want to donate to a very large organization that responds to most any scale of disaster using mainly volunteers, well, the Red Cross is pretty darn good.

If you want to biatch and moan and cynically disparage anyone who wants to help someone else- welcome to fark. I come to this site for the witty banter and occasional insight that sometimes emerges. I know better than to use it as a guide for where to donate time or money; I'll do that research on my own and disregard the anecdotal stories people make up on the internet to try to make a point. So should you if you are serious about making an informed contribution.
 
2011-04-04 01:29:44 AM  
The Red Cross is one of the most evil, life sucking, horrible organizations I have ever had the displeasure to work with or experience. They should never be given any donations ever. Why not just hand money to the wealthy and the lawyers that represent them.
 
2011-04-04 01:30:07 AM  

Grables'Daughter: gilby_jr: If you donate your blood directly to a local hospital, that eliminates the need for them to BUY THEIR BLOOD FROM THE RED CROSS.

Also interested in buying blood from the Red Cross.


OMGOSH. Totally skipped over this. Thanks for the Laughter Out Loud!
 
2011-04-04 01:38:23 AM  

jwbchuckd: The problem with blood donations around 9/11 was that there was so many donors with diseases. Some days it would take hours doing the requisite paperwork for them. These people didn't want to give money or help so they donated whole blood. They didn't listen when everyone said don't come in to donate. Cops had to be called several times when people were deferred because we stopped their god given right to spread disease. The worst thing is that platelets donations were down and no one would donate those.


This.

/monthly platelet donor
//yes, you can donate more frequently than whole blood
 
2011-04-04 01:43:10 AM  
There is some crazy misinformation happening here on the internet.

I work with the American Red Cross: Oregon Trail Chapter (Serves Portland, OR as well as the coast. OTC is also the lead chapter for the other states chapter)

Our emergency services department has four paid staff (making 40-60K), our outreach department has two paid staff. These staff members are generally working 50 hour weeks if there is "no disaster" activity outside of single family fires. On the chapter side (not Biomed) 95% of the work force are volunteers. 92% of your donation goes to clients (not fundraising, admin, etc.). I am a volunteer, I put in about 70 hours a month (I have to work 40 hours per week for a bank as well to eat, live, all that jazz). We are not a religious organisation and we do not receive funding from the government excluding some specific grants we receive for a specific purpose (Ex. We operate the City of Portland's emergency warming center).

We do "sell" blood that is donated, we have to cover the staff, testing, etc. We are able to get away with a slight markup due to the nature of our organisation, this money is then moved to sustaining operations and services for clients (moved to Emergency Services from biomed). The same applies to "Health and Saftey" classes taught by the ARC (CPR, First Aid, etc.) and sales of product (First Aid Kits, Radios, etc.). The "profit" is moved to Emergency Services to allow Emergency Services (and outreach) to continue providing services.

Oregon spends 16.9 Million per year in ES to keep services up and going (including rent, vehicles, paid staff, computers, everything). We belive that everyone must be equal, because of this we have fairly standardized relief on a day to day basis (4 people = $X of food, etc.). The amount of services we provide is directly related to how much is brought in, a few years ago we used to help buy furniture, pay deposits on new apartments, etc. Today we can only help get somewhere to stay for a bit, some food, and clothing and then we work with "partner" organisations to get them more (admittedly we have to improve this and we know it). Our budget has been shrinking, and like any company would we have made cuts to our staffing and sadly our services to fit (we cut out 6 paid positions three years ago). This has however made the % of funds that go to the client raise! This year we are facing a budget shortfall again, so we'll see what happens.

We do not charge for disaster relief ever, all Red Cross relief operations are an outright gift to the client We even have signs that say this, we do not charge for somewhere to sleep, we do not charge for food, we do not charge for supplies. We go to help these people when they need it. We open shelters for those who lose their home. We provide warmth for those who need it. We feed those who are looking for the lost. We do everything we can.

We do love the media (I am not a media man myself) but they need to without donations we have nothing to give. Staying in the public eye drives donations and brings in donors, its a necessary evil.

Money is being given to the Japan Red Cross from american donations, the amount being donated is based on requests from Japan and ICRC (this means that if not all is requested then money may stay for future disasters in the US) Money was given to Japan ASAP (before donations really started pouring in) this is because we use money from past donations from other disasters. JRC may not have distributed funds yet (but they are still providing services that cost money) and I can understand that they don't even understand the severity and amounts that the family's are going to need and just throwing money around is not going to help.

On an additional note (as made above) some older people hate the American Red Cross because "we charged" them money during the war. Please read the following for an explanation,

"Military Services
Coffee and Donuts
The Red Cross sold coffee and donuts instead of giving them away to military personnel during World War II.
This unfortunate policy came into being because service agencies in Britain helping British military personnel were less well-financed than the American Red Cross. Thus, these agencies were forced to charge British military members for the same items that American service members were getting free from the American Red Cross.

To avoid further embarrassment to the British, who were playing host to thousands of U.S. troops, the U.S. Secretary of War requested that the American Red Cross begin charging American service members for such items as coffee and donuts in its canteens. The Red Cross interpreted this request as a wartime demand and complied so that it could continue aiding U.S. troops. However, the Red Cross sold items at or below cost and never profited a penny from these sales.

Since the end of World War II, the American Red Cross has not charged military personnel-not in the Korean, Vietnam, or Persian Gulf conflicts, for example." (Thanks Grables'Daughter)

I mean come on people, stop just bashing an organisation because its big and a few people get paid "lots" (even though when compared to the private sector for an organisation of this size it would be very low).
 
2011-04-04 01:47:21 AM  

Memoryalpha: and no doubt every penny of it will go...to administration costs.

The only thing I donate to the red cross is blood, and if there were another group available, they'd get that.


Find a local university hospital.

I donate platelets monthly at Stanford Blood Center ^ here in the SF bay area. Not only does it go to patients, they also use the blood products for various research studies.
 
2011-04-04 01:47:35 AM  

monkeyinafez: The Red Cross is the only non-profit organization congressionally mandated to respond to disasters.


That's weird timing, I posted a big long blurb just after you did!

(Also OTC is like the best chapter ever, amirite?)
 
2011-04-04 02:07:59 AM  

lohphat: Memoryalpha: and no doubt every penny of it will go...to administration costs.

The only thing I donate to the red cross is blood, and if there were another group available, they'd get that.

Find a local university hospital.

I donate platelets monthly at Stanford Blood Center ^ here in the SF bay area. Not only does it go to patients, they also use the blood products for various research studies.


I should check them out, what's been holding back recently is I can't go straight to aphresis, they say they need to donate whole blood first and get my crit checked first, then I can come back at some point much later, after they have checked my blood/levels.
 
2011-04-04 02:29:48 AM  
I am immediately ceasing all charity donations because the Red Cross did not imediately throw the money out of the windows of choppers in the affected areas....

God the western media are douchebags.
 
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