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(The Consumerist)   Borders employees discuss the stupidity of consumers in regards to their "liquidation sales"   (consumerist.com) divider line 146
    More: Amusing, liquidation, list prices, LiveJournal, stupidity, consumers  
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26681 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Feb 2011 at 1:25 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-02-24 04:14:26 PM  
Wow, is this thread full of fail. I realize everyone has an opinion and likes to have their say but it really is OK to not know everything, keep your mouth shut when appropriate, and recognize when you've been corrected by those who actually do fully understand the issue. Seriously, you'll survive losing the occasional argument.

Borders' inventory control system goes all the way back to punch card days and even into the early 90s you could come across a book on the shelf that still have a card inside. The current stickers tell you what store the book is from (in the case of returns), what section it's shelved in, on what date it was received, how many were received, and whether or not it's a new release. This isn't information that you can get just by eye-balling the publisher's ISBN.

And I'm not even going to start on the MSRP argument.
 
2011-02-24 04:24:00 PM  
Anecdotal experience isn't necessarily *wrong*. I'll agree it can be misleading sometimes, but I'd need to see some proof of the allegation of selling books *above* their printed cover price. Above what it costs Borders to buy the book, certainly; that's the usual retail model, though I think people would be surprised at how little the markup is on some items. The per unit cost on printed materials scales weirdly.


Here is how books are priced:

Cover price. Pretty much any backstock (that isn't a bargain reprint) from nearly every publisher is sold at cover price.

Discount/Sale price. Varies based on market, chain, and interest. Hot titles and high-volume stuff gets steeper discounts based on the competition, and on the fact that the per-unit cost is lower.

*Rarely* will publishers issue a price change, but I've seen it happen, usually due to a misprint. Most often we'd get the books pre-stickered from the warehouse, but sometimes we'd get a notice directly from the publisher saying "Put the enclosed sticker over the old price and barcode", along with a sheet of stickers. Occasionally these came from Corporate as well, but that was usually for stuff that was actually published by Borders (usually classics and reprints thereof). There was some mainstream title that had this happen, I recall, because when you scanned it the ISBN was wrong and referred to a different title. LOTS of stickering. (I suspect that nowadays that happens even more often, since there are fewer people checking the process from start to finish.)

It was actually far MORE common, though still relatively rare, to get a markdown sticker for some products.

And of course, mass-market paperbacks are usually stripped and pulped -- the covers are sent back to prove that the book went unsold, and the book itself is sent off to be recycled. (So if you have a book with no front cover, you're probably looking at a stolen item.) The paperbacks that they expected to be around for a while were generally not pulped, nor were many of the smaller press items.

The discounting, however, was always annoying. Best seller hardbacks were 25% off, or 30% off if there was another bookstore competing nearby. The discount would go away once the title wasn't being pushed by the NYT Bestseller list. Eventually the remainder hardbacks came into the bargain bins for slightly above cost, though more often that was a special printing on cheaper paper.

At one point I had more than a dozen friends who worked at major chain bookstores. None of them could ever remember marking UP a book, EVER. The publisher typically is the only one who marks up the price of a book; nearly everything is discounted.
 
2011-02-24 04:27:56 PM  

raerae1980: As an employee of a now closing store, I want to point out that the livejournal account linked in the article is where employees go to rant, so if you, a customer, are offended or insulted easily, do not visit the site. We do not hate all of you...just most of you. Especially if you are a pig that leaves crap all over the sales floor.


You're soon to be unemployed in a horrible economy. I have a well paying job with no chance of losing it.

I win.
 
2011-02-24 04:32:04 PM  
In the beginning, Borders was a great idea. Borders used to have a better selection than Barnes and Noble. It was worthwhile to go there if a book was in stock, because you could have the book immediately instead of waiting for Amazon.

You could search for a book in a store's inventory online and save a trip if they didn't have what you wanted in stock. The in-store search terminals were great; I didn't have to talk to an employee to find a book if I didn't want to. They did everything that B&N didn't, but B&N has managed to better adapt to the changing market than Borders.

However, Amazon is cheaper than Borders even if you factor in sales tax and shipping (for those without Amazon Prime). Amazon also has a much larger selection.
 
2011-02-24 04:32:13 PM  

raerae1980: Remember, they are closing my store and laying me off.


I do hope that you find something else, something good, really soon. Good luck.
 
2011-02-24 04:37:36 PM  

unlikely: raerae1980: Remember, they are closing my store and laying me off.

I do hope that you find something else, something good, really soon. Good luck.


Thanks. I'm about finished with grad school, so I have that going for me.
 
2011-02-24 05:18:42 PM  

Voiceofreason01: The floor employees don't set prices or policy, but they do have to talk to you when you accuse them of stealing because prices have changed, they have to deal with you when you throw a fit on the sales floor and start yelling and they have to clean up the mess when you try to hide books, puts things in the wrong places and drops stuff on the floor. And on top of it all many of them are losing their jobs, so it's hard to blame them for being a little upset about having to take your petty crap.


ITT: Borders employees having meltdowns.
 
2011-02-24 05:25:08 PM  
mugwump867 2011-02-24 04:14:26 PM


Borders' inventory control system goes all the way back to punch card days and even into the early 90s you could come across a book on the shelf that still have a card inside. The current stickers tell you what store the book is from (in the case of returns), what section it's shelved in, on what date it was received, how many were received, and whether or not it's a new release. This isn't information that you can get just by eye-balling the publisher's ISBN.

BUT - Does it tell you if the book has been in the bathroom?
 
2011-02-24 05:36:55 PM  

Kahabut: raerae1980: floor9: unlikely: The crazy difference: I'm not bankrupt.
IndyMBA: Even when looking at the "sale" price we could still get the same items cheaper on Amazon.
sirgrim: They might be dumb but you work at Borders.

Do you even know, little register biscuit?



I love it when I pick up a new expression for the insult dictionary.
 
2011-02-24 05:42:40 PM  

sirgrim: They might be dumb but you work at Borders.


vudukungfu: The real news is people geet excited over a book sale.
ANd the people selling them use comments like "Are store..."?


Yep, but cheer up, all those poor kids and dumb folk working entry level retail will soon be unemployed! but you're right, lets not lose sight of the big picture here; whilst staring into the face of unemployment and still having to play nice with the rabid hordes of black-friday'esque morons, they are tetchy and their spelling isnt so great.
 
2011-02-24 05:45:29 PM  
Raerae1980 might be wrong, but at least she's hot.
 
2011-02-24 05:55:09 PM  
fark the Borders in Rockford.
/Douchebags
//all of em
 
2011-02-24 05:55:10 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: It's a lot of fun. I browse my favorite authors new works, and then I get to see reviews, and "what other people bought" or "recommendations" from Amazon, and that usually translates into me discovering new authors and new books that I'll enjoy. Also, I get to instantly look up the author on wikipedia, and check out any film adaptations on IMDB.


Then after you do all that you get shafted on shipping fees and have to wait to get your book (unless you get the craptacular e-book version, I suppose) instead of walking out of the store with it in your hand? No thanks, not for me. Give me an in-person book shopping experience any day.

It's too bad that's seemingly going to be limited to B&N or nothing, though.

fark that, maybe I'll just watch more TV instead.

/why yes, sour grapes.
 
2011-02-24 07:19:46 PM  

MythDragon: In other news, Haynes is having their largest sale ever! This weekend only! (until next weekend, when THAT one wil be the largest sale ever)


Was thinking this exact same thing while reading these comments. Haynes has their biggest sale in history every week and an even bigger one every month.
 
2011-02-24 07:21:06 PM  

unlikely: raerae1980: Borders can not legally charge MORE for that book.

This is not accurate.
Borders can legally charge a billion bucks a copy for that book.
If people choose to shop elsewhere instead, that's their gig.

There are advantages to a brick-n-mortar store, and had Borders used their position to make bank on those advantages, they'd be as deep in the black as B&N. Instead, they chose to assume they could keep operating like they were the only place a person could get a book, and that model was their undoing.


No they can't. Educate yourself. Book chains are not allowed, by law, to sell new books for any higher price than set by the publishers. They get bulk buy discounts from publishers & that is how they made profit. Used books are a different story. They can charge whatever they want.
 
2011-02-24 07:24:32 PM  

raerae1980: floor9: raerae1980: Of course Borders cannot compete with Amazon on pricing.

That much is obvious.

raerae1980: Borders can not legally charge MORE for that book.

I didn't say that they are. I'm saying that when you sell a given book for $30, then raise the price to the MSRP of $50, then advertise a "liquidation sale" of "40% off" and mark the book back down to $30, don't be surprised when people call you on it.

But, we're not doing that so stop spreading lies. Where are you getting this? If the book cover says $30, Borders cannot bump that price up to $50 then discount it. The publishing industry doesn't work that way.


You don't understand what he's saying.

The MSRP is $50, and Borders usually sells it for $30, below MSRP. When liquidation time comes around they mark the book back up to the MSRP of $50, then put a big fat discount sticker on it that marks it back down to $30. So they claim to be discounting something for liquidation that's always been discounted at that price. This confuses people and they think they're getting this discount because of the liquidation, when in fact it's just the normal price.

I don't know if any of that is actually true, but that's what he was trying to say.
 
2011-02-24 07:31:22 PM  
I work for an online bookstore store...we sell new books, but we have a huge (3 million+) inventory of used books. I have to say, buying used is really the way to go. I have a serious reading habit and a lot of the stuff I like to read is moderately expensive non-fiction. My employee discount obviously helps, but I would never be able to buy all the books I want to read brand new from places like Borders or Barnes & Noble. Plus, why waste resources on a new book when you can read a perfectly good used one? If these people flocking to Borders really want a deal, they should get online.
 
2011-02-24 07:39:11 PM  
"We are trained to flip out over a series of trigger words to the point where without those words, without that perception of a deal (but not an actual deal) people don't spend. I can't believe that all the people there buying today would be doing so if they literally could not afford to. They have the money now, why didn't they have it a few months ago? Because we weren't having a liquidation sale then."

Consumer illogic, precisely and accurately, right there.

/Oh consumer nation, what bright new futures will you take the rest of the nation to?
 
2011-02-24 07:44:18 PM  
I'm not convinced that people look at the price. They look at the percentage and then impulsively buy. Meanwhile, the week before the liquidation, the price was half the cover price. Now just 20%. I see it at another bookstore, Half Price books has 50% off sale on one item. Uh the books are super cheap anyway so you may save a dollar or two.
 
2011-02-24 07:44:20 PM  
maybe these high and mighty Borders employees ought to reflect on the fact that in 2 weeks their "stupid" customers will still be employed and they will not.
 
2011-02-24 08:17:43 PM  

CaliNJGuy: maybe these high and mighty Borders employees ought to reflect on the fact that in 2 weeks their "stupid" customers will still be employed and they will not.


Riiiiiggghhttt. High and mighty, eh? We make minimum wage and have to clean toilets. Get real. Don't act like pigs when in the store and employees won't hate you. Simple. We don't hate all of you.
 
2011-02-24 08:20:22 PM  

raerae1980: NO, I'm not a corporate shrill. The opposite, in fact.


The word is "shill", corporate shill. Shrill is a biotch coont shrew that yells in a high-pitched voice.
 
2011-02-24 08:28:45 PM  
I went into a Borders once.

I asked where the Jeff Foxworthy "You Might Be A Redneck" section was.

The guy there said "Across the mall, at the Barnes and Noble".

I cried for a week.
 
2011-02-24 10:22:08 PM  

Frazzled: mugwump867 2011-02-24 04:14:26 PM


Borders' inventory control system goes all the way back to punch card days and even into the early 90s you could come across a book on the shelf that still have a card inside. The current stickers tell you what store the book is from (in the case of returns), what section it's shelved in, on what date it was received, how many were received, and whether or not it's a new release. This isn't information that you can get just by eye-balling the publisher's ISBN.

BUT - Does it tell you if the book has been in the bathroom?


Shudder. Even 17 years later I can still picture the horror that awaited me for my first "Code Brown."

/Store #14.
 
2011-02-24 10:42:26 PM  

jvowles: fanbladesaresharp:
The costs of retail are increasingly those of transporting stock back and forth to meet the demand of the increasingly short-sighted and "value-minded" consumer.


really, really good assessment of the business. thank you.

I work for the "competition" brick and mortar book store. Honestly, I'm heartbroken about Borders. Our closest Borders is getting shut down, and I'm saddened for my fellow booksellers.

Everyone keeps saying "but I can get this on Amazon for so much less!!" Yes, yes you can. But why do people act shocked at the disparity between online pricing and prices in-store? Everything you see on a shelf was shipped there. And not for free. Stores eat the cost of paying hourly employees, paying management, paying the lease to the mall, paying utilities, etc... this cost is reflected in the cost of the books. If you want it RIGHT NOW, and want knowledgeable, trained help in finding the correct book for you, great, pay more and buy it in the store. If you know exactly what you want, and don't mind waiting to have it shipped, great, you will save some money. Whether one shopping experience is better or worse than the other depends entirely on your perspective.
 
2011-02-24 10:43:21 PM  

Katred00: I work for an online bookstore store...we sell new books, but we have a huge (3 million+) inventory of used books. I have to say, buying used is really the way to go. I have a serious reading habit and a lot of the stuff I like to read is moderately expensive non-fiction. My employee discount obviously helps, but I would never be able to buy all the books I want to read brand new from places like Borders or Barnes & Noble. Plus, why waste resources on a new book when you can read a perfectly good used one? If these people flocking to Borders really want a deal, they should get online.


Yeah, this. It seems like within six months you can pick up a used copy of practically any new release on Amazon/AbeBooks/etc. for half of even Amazon's discount price for a new copy. Since I've always got at least a six-month backlog of books I'm meaning to read anyway, I rarely buy new books any more - I just put them on my wish list at Amazon and wait till cheap used copies start showing up.

Nobody seems to mention it, but this as much as anything is the reason that I don't buy new books from brick-and-mortar bookstores nearly as much as I used to...and I'm not sure there's anything at all Borders could have done about that.

/still pissed that the one Borders within 150 miles is closing, leaving the "pile of Bibles and suck" B&N as the only local bookstore
 
2011-02-24 11:25:23 PM  

Braindeath: Are store is staying open and we had lines that were worse tham xmas.


Someone that illiterate shouldn't be working in a bookstore, unless they're the janitor.

//no offense to janitors
 
2011-02-25 12:06:44 AM  

sisterinarms: No they can't. Educate yourself. Book chains are not allowed, by law, to sell new books for any higher price than set by the publishers. They get bulk buy discounts from publishers & that is how they made profit. Used books are a different story. They can charge whatever they want.


Maybe by contract, but not by law. I can not prove a negative - if you have a reference to a salient law I will accept that, but so far as I know that would violate all sorts of FTC rules.
 
2011-02-25 12:58:50 AM  

raerae1980: Thanks. I'm about finished with grad school, so I have that going for me.


Cool and congratulations. What field?

(checks your profile...)

Oh cool! Potesne legere linguam latinam et graecam? Studui poetas scriptoresque aetatis argentae. Cure ut valeas, et multas fortunas tibi.
 
2011-02-25 01:42:15 AM  

unlikely: sisterinarms: No they can't. Educate yourself. Book chains are not allowed, by law, to sell new books for any higher price than set by the publishers. They get bulk buy discounts from publishers & that is how they made profit. Used books are a different story. They can charge whatever they want.

Maybe by contract, but not by law. I can not prove a negative - if you have a reference to a salient law I will accept that, but so far as I know that would violate all sorts of FTC rules.


Upon re-reading your post, I'm betting that if they are under such a constraint it is because of some clause in their bulk buy agreement. I'd believe that.

Or as I said before, I'll believe law if you have a citation, but I'm still skeptical.
 
2011-02-25 02:43:29 AM  

floor9: raerae1980: I need to see proof of this.

Tell you what. Feel free to cite for us the federal statute that bars a company from selling an item over MSRP. The moment you do, I will alert the Federal Trade Commission that they need to update their opinions:

http://www.ftc.gov/bc/antitrust/manufacturer_requirements.shtm

Q: One of my suppliers marks its products with a Manufacturer Suggested Retail Price (MSRP). Do I have to charge this price?

A: The key word is "suggested." A dealer is free to set the retail price of the products it sells. A dealer can set the price at the MSRP or at a different price, as long as the dealer comes to that decision on its own. However, the manufacturer can decide not to use distributors that do not adhere to its MSRP.


I bet the source of this misunderstanding is that it's part of the contract with publishers. Borders can charge anything it wants, but if it goes above or below contractually agreed prices, they're in breach and legally now owe damages (though it might involve a court case to get them). That has absolutely nothing to do with federal pricing laws and everything to do with contract law.
 
2011-02-25 03:03:08 AM  
These are probably the same customers who inundate the grocery stores whenever there's a snowstorm in the forecast.
 
2011-02-25 03:14:13 AM  
On a more general topic, I think the abject failure of the "savior" of B&M bookstores is rather sad: I would have loved to walk into a store, pick up an interesting looking book, and be able to get any part of the series or the entire set printed out right there. In glorious full hardback size, or in mass market if that's what I wanted. No shipping, no waiting, instant access for only a small premium.

Maybe indie stores will pick up the slack, but I see zero investment in the technology in the future with B&N pushing the Nook and Amazon pushing the Kindle. It would take a major sea change to get it into the hands that would actually be interested in selling it.

I may do everything on a PC these days, I finally even broke down and got an iPhone, but goddam it I still prefer reading a book over a Kindle, as useful as they can be. Once I'm done reading and ready to reread and review, I tend to flip through it like crazy.

Your Average Witty Fark User: You're soon to be unemployed in a horrible economy. I have a well paying job with no chance of losing it.

I win.


You'll be helping pay for his unemployment. Why would you gloat over that?

Katred00: I work for an online bookstore store...we sell new books, but we have a huge (3 million+) inventory of used books. I have to say, buying used is really the way to go. I have a serious reading habit and a lot of the stuff I like to read is moderately expensive non-fiction. My employee discount obviously helps, but I would never be able to buy all the books I want to read brand new from places like Borders or Barnes & Noble. Plus, why waste resources on a new book when you can read a perfectly good used one? If these people flocking to Borders really want a deal, they should get online.


Because authors and publishers don't get paid for used books. And there are a fair number of people who are willing to directly support the creative economy rather than the aftermarket economy. People who have lots of money also consider it a false economy to waste time sifting through used books in highly variable condition for a tiny savings.

I don't blame you though. Before my current career I bought almost everything used or on clearance, except for items I specifically collected. Being broke always wins. I also accept that the economic model is changing - I buy more from digital clearinghouses and Steam than any retail stores, or buy directly from creators, and I don't know if I could even bring myself to pay for movies now that subscriptions are available.
 
2011-02-25 03:17:53 AM  
Wow, lot of assholes coming out of the woodwork here.
 
GBB
2011-02-25 06:10:10 AM  
Customers are stupid, plain and simple.

Florida runs an annual tax-free holiday for back-to-school items and one for hurrican supplies. Tax at the store I worked was 6.5%. The week before tax-free week we had batteries on a 10% off sale; regular price during the tax-free week and back to 10% off for the week following. Would you like to take a guess at when we sold the most batteries? That's right, when customers were saving the 6.5% in tax.
 
GBB
2011-02-25 06:20:24 AM  

sisterinarms: No they can't. Educate yourself. Book chains are not allowed, by law, to sell new books for any higher price than set by the publishers. They get bulk buy discounts from publishers & that is how they made profit. Used books are a different story. They can charge whatever they want.


I'm wondering if what you really mean is that during the liquidation, prices cannot be set to some ridiculous "fake" price then given an arbitrary discount to lure in customers. Say the book has an MSRP of $50, normally sells for $30, but during liquidation the price tag will say $100 and 70% off!
 
2011-02-25 07:47:33 AM  
People are just stupid in general. For example; I was at an auction for some reason. Sixty bucks for used monitors when just the other day I'd seen up much cheaper at a place that'd at least give you a goddamn repair warranty with the cost.
 
2011-02-25 07:55:12 AM  
BTW, I am enjoying the trolls indicating that the front line employees at Borders or any business have any actual control over what goes on in the place.

The only thing shat upon more then front line employees are the walls and urinals in the public restrooms.

P.S. More reasons why the big chains are suffering. Never enough employees, even when the computer says they have the book they have no idea where the fark it is and the comic books? Put in shelving units way too small so they fall forward and get bent. As TVTropes might say, did not do the research indeed.
 
2011-02-25 08:25:00 AM  
Yes, there is nothing stupider than people buying products at a discount. STFU Border's employee's and get your ass to the unemployment line where you belong.
 
2011-02-25 10:16:45 AM  

The Whore Of Mensa: Everyone keeps saying "but I can get this on Amazon for so much less!!" Yes, yes you can. But why do people act shocked at the disparity between online pricing and prices in-store?


I don't see anybody acting shocked. You can talk about the value of shopping at Borders all you want, but the fact remains that consumers don't see value there -- only the employees do.

Benefits / drawbacks of Amazon:
+ Generally 30% - 50% cheaper than Borders
+ Massive selection
- Typically takes several days for delivery

Benefits / drawbacks of Borders:
+ You can browse the books in person
- More expensive than Amazon - frequently twice as much
- No way to check inventory before driving to the store
- Long lines
- Poorly-organized stores
- Nonsense like this "liquidation"
- Unhelpful (and apparently, whiny) employees

There are folks who still enjoy shopping and buying in retail stores. But their numbers are not sufficient to support the current market, as we've seen here.
 
2011-02-25 11:47:36 AM  

floor9: - No way to check inventory before driving to the store


That's actually not true. You can do that on the Borders website. That being said though, I can't stand Borders and drive 25 minutes to Boulder just to go to Barnes and Noble to browse so I can then purchase the book for from Amazon for my Kindle.
 
2011-02-25 12:44:27 PM  
Question for the idiot saying it is illegal to sell above the MSRP:

If I buy a first edition book from a no-name author that later becomes the next Hemmingway, I won't be able to sell it for more than $9.99 later?
 
2011-02-25 03:17:19 PM  

Braindeath: Are store is staying open and we had lines that were worse tham xmas.

Myself, I don't read those damn books you bastards want to buy.


Is that the new "I don't even own a TV"?
 
2011-02-25 05:33:53 PM  
No one is reading this but anyways...here in Cowtown, we had 2 choices for new books, Hastings which sucked eggs (dirty store, badly lit, nothing I evar wanted to read and that includes trashy romance novels) and the simple fact that each time I did want to purchase something, they had 1 and I do mean 1 cashier on staff to process not only purchases, but returns, rentals, etc. Haven't been there for years. Our only other remaining bookstore is now the the BookRack which will order new and put you on a waitlist for used books and call you when they come in. Upside? Personal service, folks that care. Downside? Having to wait 10 bds to get a new book in-that being said, they can usually get it in for a few bucks cheaper than Amazon. Requires a 10 minute drive, but worth it, at least to me.

/mourns the passing of Borders, no matter how much they sucked that Cowtown will yet again lapse into a period of being known as a town of no-nothings, yay
//I dont know nothing neither for the record
 
2011-02-25 06:01:48 PM  

floor9: The Whore Of Mensa: Everyone keeps saying "but I can get this on Amazon for so much less!!" Yes, yes you can. But why do people act shocked at the disparity between online pricing and prices in-store?

I don't see anybody acting shocked. You can talk about the value of shopping at Borders all you want, but the fact remains that consumers don't see value there -- only the employees do.

Benefits / drawbacks of Borders:
+ You can browse the books in person
- More expensive than Amazon - frequently twice as much
- No way to check inventory before driving to the store
- Long lines
- Poorly-organized stores
- Nonsense like this "liquidation"
- Unhelpful (and apparently, whiny) employees

There are folks who still enjoy shopping and buying in retail stores. But their numbers are not sufficient to support the current market, as we've seen here.


I agree on your last point. We still have loyal "in-store" customers, but obviously a lot of the market has moved online.

Have to point out a few things-- I don't work for Borders. When I talk about "brick and mortar" I mean the big box book business: Borders, BN, etc. And my referring to people's surprise at online prices is also to do with reactions I have experienced in store, not just in this thread ("what! this book is fourteen dollars online!" and so on). People are savvy enough to look online for books, but haven't all caught on that books are often priced differently in our store.

to answer a few of the negatives, at least on behalf of our company (the competition big box bookstore):

long lines-- sorry if you've encountered that. technically, our policy is: more than five people in line per cashier, call for backup. Question is: will backup come? Depends which manager is working, but also if we are short that day. Hours have gotten tighter and tighter in recent years. Companies try to skimp on hours, and get four people to cover the work of six or eight.


no way to check inventory-- we offer an online inventory check. let us know you want to reserve something, we take it off the shelf, send you an email, it's held for you. if it isn't on the shelf, we let you know, also.

Unhelpful (and apparently, whiny) employees-- kind of hope you're only referring to Borders, and not my store. :) I'm sure you've encountered bad employees in the past-- there are bad employees in every industry. But please don't paint us all with the same brush. Plenty of us spend our days at work trying to make the best shopping experience for our customers.
 
2011-02-25 06:23:39 PM  

Loaf's Tray: Braindeath: Are store is staying open and we had lines that were worse tham xmas.

Myself, I don't read those damn books you bastards want to buy.

Is that the new "I don't even own a TV"?


No, that was me mocking someone who works at a bookstore but can't correctly use the word our or than, but it could be if you want to it to be.
 
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