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(Boston Globe)   MIT grad's invention turns brewery waste to fuel. "Saving the earth, one beer at a time"   (boston.com) divider line 81
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12776 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Feb 2011 at 5:30 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-02-13 09:32:34 PM
I can see the next summer thriller coming out of this.

He discovered the truth certain parties don't want released. Can Budweiser keep him alive or will Big Oil's goons get to him before he can publish?

Coming Summer 2012: Trouble Brewing
 
2011-02-13 09:34:46 PM

ultraholland: stay the fark away from my Vegemite


Don't worry, Your Vegemite is perfectly safe. It is made of the leftover yeast in the process which builds up after fermenting the wort.

This process uses the spent grains from the mash and is really not all that innovative.

The bioreactor itself may be very interesting but not enough details are really given to determine that.
 
2011-02-13 09:36:07 PM

doglover: Finally, and end to Marmite. HUZZAH!


They're using the spent grains which are typically used for animal feed. Marmite is made from the yeast.

Gawdzila: Great for home brewers, not such an efficient idea for breweries that don't grow their own ingredients (or whose suppliers aren't down the street).


If the brewery is near almost any animal farm they're fairly set.
 
2011-02-13 10:16:48 PM

ThematicDevice: Gawdzila: Great for home brewers, not such an efficient idea for breweries that don't grow their own ingredients (or whose suppliers aren't down the street).

If the brewery is near almost any animal farm they're fairly set.


?? I was responding to the idea of composting it and using it to grow hops and barley. An animal farm isn't going to do that. Besides, I can't imagine why anyone would expect a brewery to be anywhere near a farm. A lot of them are in town: in business parks, warehouses, or even pizza joints.

In any case, even for a brewer that is near a farm that can grow hops or barley for them, it would restrict them to using whatever grows in their home climate.
 
2011-02-13 10:29:34 PM

FreakinB: Cerebral Knievel: here at Legend Brewery

Legend Brewery in Richmond? I was in Richmond for one night on a road trip last year since one of my friends that was with me is a UVA alum and has a lot of friends there. We went to Legend for dinner/drinks. Good stuff.


yes, that's the place sir. or madam, If you saw a very large gentleman with a huge beard mulling over a laptop in the smoking room,or if you took the tour, that was me.

Bonzo_1116: Cerebral Knievel:
I also slide them a five gallon bucket of yeast slurry to throw on the heap to aid digestion.



Does that actually help? I thought it was bacteria in most compost heaps, not yeasts? I'd be afraid of out-competing my main bugs with yeast, because yeast conk out at higher temps like you'd find in a heap...

Unless they use the yeast for kick-starting a heap.


I actually I have no idea to tell you the truth, my feelings on the matter is " it couldn't hurt?"
if anything it adds to the decaying biological mass, I cant imagine that the brewing yeast is going to lend its self to digesting a biomass like that, its pretty specialized in what it does, so if anything its a big easily digestible nutrient source for the mulch bed
 
2011-02-13 10:40:20 PM
Doesn't New Belgium Brewery already do this in their methane cogeneration plant?
 
2011-02-13 10:47:00 PM

EducatedBum: gensolo: I think we all know how the last MIT graduate and his crazy shenanigans went. Running around with a crowbar and all...

I still have headcrabs from it...


Say what?

lh6.googleusercontent.com
 
2011-02-13 11:05:27 PM

Gawdzila: Besides, I can't imagine why anyone would expect a brewery to be anywhere near a farm.


Every single one of Humboldt County's FIVE breweries has a farm nearby.

Funny you should muse...

For what it's worth, Humboldt County's population hovers around 125k. I can't imagine a brewery per capita rate anywhere else in this country. Three of those five have sizable distribution: Lost Coast, Eel River, and Mad River brewing companies. Six Rivers and Redwood Curtain breweries are considerably smaller operations.
 
2011-02-13 11:06:32 PM

Cerebral Knievel: FreakinB: Cerebral Knievel: here at Legend Brewery

Legend Brewery in Richmond? I was in Richmond for one night on a road trip last year since one of my friends that was with me is a UVA alum and has a lot of friends there. We went to Legend for dinner/drinks. Good stuff.

yes, that's the place sir. or madam, If you saw a very large gentleman with a huge beard mulling over a laptop in the smoking room,or if you took the tour, that was me.


Heh, awesome. We were there at night so we didn't take the tour. Actually, we were on the deck outside so I don't even think I entered the building except to use the men's room. So I don't think I saw you, except maybe in passing. But I enjoyed it and you guys contributed to the fact that the only night I ever spent in Richmond was pretty fun, so cheers!
 
2011-02-13 11:09:09 PM

namatad: anaerobic methane digester
how is this an invention or even news?

Link (new window)

this is so old jesus is laughing at the green light


This is so old, Nebuchadnezzar has it on 8-track.
 
2011-02-13 11:19:47 PM

TwowheelinTim: Gawdzila: Besides, I can't imagine why anyone would expect a brewery to be anywhere near a farm.

Every single one of Humboldt County's FIVE breweries has a farm nearby.

Funny you should muse...

For what it's worth, Humboldt County's population hovers around 125k. I can't imagine a brewery per capita rate anywhere else in this country. Three of those five have sizable distribution: Lost Coast, Eel River, and Mad River brewing companies. Six Rivers and Redwood Curtain breweries are considerably smaller operations.


Maybe it has a high per capita rate, but it doesn't have much population. I live in San Diego, which has a lot of breweries. I'm not a beer buff and I've never been on a brewery tour, but I can think of at least two breweries off the top of my head that aren't near a farm (Port and Lost Abbey). Stone is near there too, but I couldn't say for sure about their location.
 
2011-02-13 11:37:32 PM

mrlewish: There is no net gain here folks. What they did is turn their waste into a movable marketable commodity. They could of always burned the leftover grain to power some of their equipment (and probably did).. but they can probably get their power from a power plant that can do it cheaper thus allowing them to turn the previously burned waste product into fuel.


Comparative advantage. How does it work?
 
2011-02-13 11:49:25 PM

TwowheelinTim: Gawdzila: Besides, I can't imagine why anyone would expect a brewery to be anywhere near a farm.

Every single one of Humboldt County's FIVE breweries has a farm nearby.

Funny you should muse...

For what it's worth, Humboldt County's population hovers around 125k. I can't imagine a brewery per capita rate anywhere else in this country. Three of those five have sizable distribution: Lost Coast, Eel River, and Mad River brewing companies. Six Rivers and Redwood Curtain breweries are considerably smaller operations.


I fell in love with 6 Rivers this summer- I was there in Arcata for work for 3 weeks in May. They had a beer w/cayenne in it- pretty dang good. The white reggae band was pretty good too.

/Discovered Lost Coast's French dip sandwich
//Yum, beat when accompanied with Downtown Brown
 
2011-02-13 11:54:45 PM

Gawdzila: ?? I was responding to the idea of composting it and using it to grow hops and barley. An animal farm isn't going to do that. Besides, I can't imagine why anyone would expect a brewery to be anywhere near a farm. A lot of them are in town: in business parks, warehouses, or even pizza joints.


A large brewery will be moving truckload after truckload of grain into their brewery. These trucks do not need to leave empty, and the associated transportation firm will likely agreed to a discounted outbound price to move the spent grains. As a result the grains can be sold to any supplier of animal farm even remotely close to their location.
 
2011-02-14 12:05:25 AM

Notabunny: culebra: You could also just process it aerobically (compost it) and use the results to grow more barley and hops.

I support this post


is this in new orleans? has to be, J Poggi's house? Bywater?
 
2011-02-14 02:31:12 AM
We should make alcoholics anonymous illegal. More alcoholics = more free energy!

/amidoinitrite?
 
2011-02-14 04:58:14 AM

mrlewish: A simple compression of the material with a small particulate sieve can probably get rid of 98% of the water.


Unless that's a molecular sieve, you are wasting potential fuel with that method. There is still digestible material dissolved in the water.

And you do have to dry it 100% before burning, even if the fire itself has to do the last bit of it... and that just wastes the energy. Burning a solid usually requires that the solid be vaporized first, and you won't reach the required temperature if there is water steaming off and taking all the heat with it.
=Smidge=
 
2011-02-14 05:34:40 AM

Gawdzila: ultraholland: stay the fark away from my Vegemite

Don't worry, I'm sure they can save a few jars worth for the 10 people in the world that will eat that horrendous stuff.


With a crew of 20 on our site we go through 3 x 250g jars a week in our site shed. Its damn popular around here. Breakfast of champions.
 
2011-02-14 06:57:30 AM

culebra: You could also just process it aerobically (compost it) and use the results to grow more barley and hops. Not sexy enough I guess.


They are claiming that anaerobic methane production reduces their carbon footprint dramatically. right.
 
2011-02-14 07:42:58 AM

FreakinB: Cerebral Knievel: FreakinB: Cerebral Knievel: here at Legend Brewery

Legend Brewery in Richmond? I was in Richmond for one night on a road trip last year since one of my friends that was with me is a UVA alum and has a lot of friends there. We went to Legend for dinner/drinks. Good stuff.

yes, that's the place sir. or madam, If you saw a very large gentleman with a huge beard mulling over a laptop in the smoking room,or if you took the tour, that was me.

Heh, awesome. We were there at night so we didn't take the tour. Actually, we were on the deck outside so I don't even think I entered the building except to use the men's room. So I don't think I saw you, except maybe in passing. But I enjoyed it and you guys contributed to the fact that the only night I ever spent in Richmond was pretty fun, so cheers!


And cheers to you as well!
I'm glad we were able to contribute!
 
2011-02-14 08:16:17 AM

Animatronik: They are claiming that anaerobic methane production reduces their carbon footprint dramatically. right.


If you compost it aerobically, it releases CO2 anyway but in a useless form. What they are doing is processing it anaerobically, which creates methane that they can then burn instead of buying methane from the local utility.

So they reduce their carbon footprint by re-using carbon they already took in as grain to displace carbon they would otherwise buy as fossil fuel natural gas.
=Smidge=
 
2011-02-14 08:24:39 AM

namatad: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: namatad: anaerobic methane digester
how is this an invention or even news?


FTA: "But PurposeEnergy says its digester is the first in the world to extract energy from the spent grain and then re-use it in the brewery, and all in one place"

That's like saying "we've known about internal combustion for decades, how is the release of the new Ferrari news?"

lol
ferrari??

first brewery to use old tech is still not an invention
any factory in the world which has plant waste can use a digester and use the methane onsite

yah, I stand my ground, this is YAWNNNNNNNNNNNNNNN so boring

ferrari??bwehahahahahaha
maybe yugo


Says the guy with the handle that's oh so clever because it's spelled backwards.

When you do something half as cool as this, let us know.
 
2011-02-14 09:29:04 AM

Cerebral Knievel: almost all of the spent grain here at Legend Brewery goes directly to a cattle farmer.


If you're still monitoring this thread, I'd love to chat with you. EIP.

/homebrewer
 
2011-02-14 09:46:10 AM
Big deal. Budweiser has been turning urine into beer for years now.

I was at Ballast Point brewery a few months ago, and the farmers come get their spent grains for free.

Spent grains really stink after 2-3 days, my compost bin is pretty ripe after dumping 12# in there.
 
2011-02-14 10:05:21 AM
What you have here is a 300,000 return per year on a 4 million dollar investment . Based on the article about 13% ROI very good in this economy that is the news part here.
 
2011-02-14 10:08:28 AM
7.5 % ROI good in this economy that's the news. Plus some green advertising to those people who can not think for them selves.
 
2011-02-14 11:10:47 AM

DaBishop: Cerebral Knievel: almost all of the spent grain here at Legend Brewery goes directly to a cattle farmer.

If you're still monitoring this thread, I'd love to chat with you. EIP.

/homebrewer


Yep, I'm set up for email notifications of the thread. I just cranked out a thousand cases of maibock and will hit you up later today
 
2011-02-14 01:09:10 PM

Bonzo_1116: The gloppy solids from the bottom. That's what I mean, porbably should have said spent mashed grains.


Actually, if you're referring to the gloppy solids from the bottom, the term is "lees".

And I've stopped homebrewing. Never terribly happy with my results, and I've pretty much stopped drinking beer since I've discovered Cider! So, what's the point?

I *will* be fermenting some Cider this year. The local Farmer's Markets are starting to carry unpasteurized ciders, so I'll have some wild yeasts to work with. Gotta put all those fermenting vessels and bottles and carboys to *some* good use, amirite?

I'm thinking of adding some Ginger, Clove and Cardamom to the first batch. Spicy!
 
2011-02-14 01:18:13 PM
This deserves a "hero" tag about as much as I do for taking my recycling in.

If it's in a fermenting vessel, the "glop" in the bottom is termed "trub." As in the sentence "The trub in the bottom of the fermenter after I fermented my Founders Breakfast Stout clone was about two inches thick."

I believe "lees" is a term connected to the residue in the bottom of a wine container.
 
2011-02-14 02:14:10 PM

Bennie Crabtree: This is so old, Nebuchadnezzar has it on 8-track


Heh, Imhotep has it on an Edison cylinder.
 
2011-02-14 03:17:03 PM

rico567: This deserves a "hero" tag about as much as I do for taking my recycling in.

If it's in a fermenting vessel, the "glop" in the bottom is termed "trub." As in the sentence "The trub in the bottom of the fermenter after I fermented my Founders Breakfast Stout clone was about two inches thick."

I believe "lees" is a term connected to the residue in the bottom of a wine container.


Trub is usually the precipitated protien glop at the bottom of your whirlpool or, at the very bottom of yer fermintation vessel.
In my case, with the big conical tanks, its that big plug that looks like a turd before the yeast slurry starts to flow out of the tank.
CSB time!
One day, many years ago when we were just a wee little brewery and bottling by hand, I was yeast dumping while a part timer from the kitchen was helping out with the bottles.
I had a nice tank turd coming out, so collected some in my hands walked up behind the kid. When he turned around I had it eye level and shouted out "HEY! Look what I almost stepped in!"
I swear that poor kid jumped back 10 feet!

Ahh brewing, such a romantic profesion.
 
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