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(CNN)   NASCAR still coping with Dale Earnhardt's death, the North's victory   (cnn.com) divider line 85
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1195 clicks; posted to Sports » on 12 Feb 2011 at 7:02 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-02-12 12:49:04 AM  
3
 
2011-02-12 02:01:18 AM  
Feb. 18, 2001... the day real NASCAR died.
 
2011-02-12 03:04:53 AM  
I don't follow NASCAR but I do remember where I was when I learned Dale Earnhardt died.

I had just gotten out of work in my old job in Orlando, Florida and the clerk said "Did you hear about the race?"

I knew there was some important car race that day.

"Dale Earnhardt broke his neck right after he decided not to use the new neck-protector helmet."

/Wasn't that what happened that day?
 
2011-02-12 03:43:49 AM  
Interestingly, if you read the medical report, he didn't die from "internal decapitation." He died because he hit his head too hard. Blunt force trauma.
 
2011-02-12 03:46:01 AM  

Sun God: Interestingly, if you read the medical report, he didn't die from "internal decapitation." He died because he hit his head too hard. Blunt force trauma.


Weren't there also, supposedly, seat belt problems? And his chin caught the steering wheel, because he wore the open faced helmet?
 
2011-02-12 03:58:56 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: Sun God: Interestingly, if you read the medical report, he didn't die from "internal decapitation." He died because he hit his head too hard. Blunt force trauma.

Weren't there also, supposedly, seat belt problems? And his chin caught the steering wheel, because he wore the open faced helmet?


It's been a while, but I think you are correct. Someone else can link to the medical report, but if I recall, the first person on scene looking in the car, knew he was dead.
 
2011-02-12 07:08:30 AM  
Seriously. Let it go already...
 
2011-02-12 07:33:09 AM  

TemperedEdge: Seriously. Let it go already...




OMFG THIS !!!!
 
2011-02-12 07:37:59 AM  

TemperedEdge: Seriously. Let it go already...

Really? The guy was 49, he wouldn't even be to a normal mans retirement age today. Fark dude, are you that disconnected that you can't see the value in his life forcing NASCAR to implement better safety measures?

//26 years old and I barely watch any racing.
 
2011-02-12 07:59:56 AM  
I always hated Earnhardt back in the day, but there's no denying that NASCAR was 10x more fun to watch back then.
 
2011-02-12 08:00:33 AM  
Wasn't he the most hated guy in NASCAR for a while?
 
2011-02-12 08:07:52 AM  
NASCAR thread??? Time for more shameless plug.

Farkers Racing Fantasy League (new window)


Group ID# 4450
Password: parker
 
2011-02-12 08:08:56 AM  

snuffy: 3

FirstNationalBastard: Feb. 18, 2001... the day real NASCAR died.


Yep both of these. The last of the old guard. He was one of the guys responsible for helping bring NASCAR out of the south and I'll admit I shed a tear the day he died. I can remember our Talladega trips and the stands were like a sea of people wearing 3 and Earnhardt t-shirts and hats. I wonder sometimes if we weren't more fans of the man and the car than we were of NASCAR. One of my last trips we sat next to a group of guys who made the trip down from New York and New Jersey. They loved the 3 car. Every time it came round they would scream "here she comes, here comes that black biatch!" They were a blast. We all ate together at Applebees in Rainbow City later. Good guys and a damn good time.

/Dale Earnahrdt was bigger than NASCAR
 
2011-02-12 08:13:53 AM  
I remember watching the crash on the TV in the upper corner of the computer room. I was thinking "yah, he's ok." Only to find out later that that wasn't the case.

But yah, let it go already.
 
2011-02-12 08:37:37 AM  
Um, the north didn't win. We're still subsidizing the southern states with our tax dollars.
 
2011-02-12 08:46:24 AM  

marfar: TemperedEdge: Seriously. Let it go already...
Really? The guy was 49, he wouldn't even be to a normal mans retirement age today. Fark dude, are you that disconnected that you can't see the value in his life forcing NASCAR to implement better safety measures?


You've missed the point. Granted, Earnhardt's death led to massive safety overhauls and made the sport safer. But the whole point is that NASCAR and its fans aren't able to let go of the number 3. The last time I was down in the south, people were still buying Earnhardt merchandise all over the place. It's a bizzare cult of personality going on down there. This is something that you didn't see in F1 when Ayrton Senna died, it's a strictly NASCAR phenomenon.

/Dale Earnhardt is the white Tupac Shakur
 
mjg
2011-02-12 09:02:01 AM  
Sometimes those tough feelings keep circling round, round and around.
 
2011-02-12 09:38:15 AM  

SoxSweepAgain: I don't follow NASCAR but I do remember where I was when I learned Dale Earnhardt died.

I had just gotten out of work in my old job in Orlando, Florida and the clerk said "Did you hear about the race?"

I knew there was some important car race that day.

"Dale Earnhardt broke his neck right after he decided not to use the new neck-protector helmet."

/Wasn't that what happened that day


I'm by no means a NASCAR fan, but I was living in Daytona at the time. In fact, I was at work when it happened. About a mile away from the Speedway.

The day that Earnhardt died, I had grown men coming in crying. It was one of the weirdest things I'd seen. Big burly tough guys weeping. Of course, weird and strangely moving as that was. It was nothing compared to 9/11 a couple of months afterwards.
 
2011-02-12 09:49:36 AM  
Old joke time:

What do Dale Earnhardt and Pink Floyd have in common? Their last big hit was The Wall

Ok, now that I've got that out of the way, there was a similar article on Boston.com today, which gave way to the newest "sort of want" pic.

i1045.photobucket.com
 
2011-02-12 09:55:59 AM  
Earnhardt and Richard Petty were the crown jewels of that sport for a couple of decades, and NASCAR was iconic in the South. But in the 90's, the France family got dollar signs stuck in their eyes and followed the same ridiculous path as hockey, expanding into cities many would argue they had no business going, and far more would argue they sacrificed tracks they had less business leaving behind. Now the sport is ebbing, there's some real financial concerns, and the most boring driver ever has won 5 straight times. There will be three races in North and South Carolina this year - two at Charlotte and one in Darlington. Hell, they leave Daytona and go to Phoenix and Las Vegas before getting back to a track where people still really care. Meanwhile, Rockingham is a test track and trees grow in the stands at Wilkesboro.

I was never a big NASCAR fan, but growing up in North Carolina, and being a sports fan in general, you can't help but see and hear people on a daily basis who just don't care anymore.

This is your legacy, Brian France. At least Max Moseley had the decency to get caught in a Nazi S&M Hooker scandal and get drummed out of his racing circuit.
 
2011-02-12 10:03:13 AM  
He really intimidated the hell out of turn 4.
 
2011-02-12 10:12:25 AM  
"He would not gracefully slide into a senior citizenship of driving to the Wal-Mart in a Grand Marquis with plastic flowers waving from the antenna."

He would more likely not be driving a Chevy.
 
2011-02-12 10:17:38 AM  
Dale Earnhardt is a hard guy to explain outside of racing. In other sports, you hate a guy because he's your rival (think how many people would become fans of Tom Brady if only he played for their team). Earnhardt was more of a villain across the board. You didn't like him if he played dirty against your driver...and it was highly likely he had. But his persona was developed around him being the "bad guy."

He was an aggressive and sometimes dirty driver. Like Ayrton Senna, he would intimidate his opponent into making a mistake, or eventually he would force the issue himself. Then he'd usually come away with a cocky grin, and make some remark like "I didn't mean to wreck him, I just wanted to rattle his cage a little." Behind that aggression, he was a supremely talented wheelman. He had a feel for the handling of a car, and he had the nerve to drive the car to its limits but not beyond. I remember seeing Earnhardt sniff victory with a crash-damaged car in the pack at Talladega, and of course his last victory - where he charged from 18th to the lead in three laps at Talladega in 2000 - was classic Earnhardt, going exactly where he needed to to get to the front.

But at the same time, he was a sort of folk hero, as lots of old-school NASCAR drivers were. He dropped out of school young, went through a couple marriages and a few not-so-glamorous jobs and some second-rate race teams while working like hell to get to the top. He was a blue-collar guy whose daddy raced fast cars for a living, and he chased the same dream, accomplishing more than his father did in his own short life. And off the track, he never changed, spending time down on the farm (wasn't there a race where he had messed up a shoulder screwing around with a tractor?). Not to say he was an uneducated hick. He was a sharp businessman, too, and a successful team owner at the lower level, winning a few championships in the Truck and Busch Series with Ron Hornaday and Dale Jr. at the wheel.

He was a villain you could love to hate. He knew it, and he was content with that. He was a badass behind the wheel, and yet those who were close to him knew that the Intimidator façade was his game face. And unlike some of the other old guard (DW, anyone?), he had the clout and respect that he could offer an honest dissenting opinion to NASCAR without risking his career.

I remember when he died. I was watching the 500 in my dorm room, and when he crashed, I broke into a slow clap. I liked Dale, but after seeing him do something similar (a pretty epic save, actually, but it took him out of contention) in the IROC race that week, I said, "Nice work, Dale...you had third place locked down and just threw it away." I went to dinner with my friends thinking he'd tough out a broken arm or something like he had always done before. When I got home, the messages on my computer told me otherwise.

NASCAR hasn't been the same since. We have villains, but Kyle Busch's phenomenal talent is overshadowed by his immaturity, and others are just retaliatory. And no one has stepped into the elder-statesman role. Jeff Gordon says he doesn't want it, Jeff Burton can never disagree with NASCAR, Mark Martin doesn't really play politics...and really, who else is there? That's why the NASCAR community struggles to cope with Earnhardt's death. He took a role no one else had, and no one else seems to want or command the respect for.
 
2011-02-12 10:22:10 AM  

UNC_Samurai: At least Max Moseley had the decency to get caught in a Nazi S&M Hooker scandal and get drummed out of his racing circuit.




Moseley was the head of the FIA, which is the the governing body to F1, WRC, TCC and many other forms of motorsport.

This douche is the head of F1:

i1045.photobucket.com
 
182
2011-02-12 10:33:23 AM  
@UNC_Samurai NASCAR is ebbing from all-time highs because the economy is in the crapper. I agree with the points on Rockingham and N. Wilkesboro, but NASCAR has always been at it's most boring when someone wasn't dominating. Maybe, if Stewart, Gordon or Jr. were in Johnson's shoes it would make a little difference but not much.
 
2011-02-12 10:55:05 AM  
The South WILL rise again and it will all be part of the 2012 uprising! Our army will be lead by Zombie Earnhardt and all of you carpetbagging northern agressors will pay with your souls. YOU'LL ALL DIE A HORRIBLE DEATH!
 
2011-02-12 11:13:36 AM  

marfar: TemperedEdge: Seriously. Let it go already...
Really? The guy was 49, he wouldn't even be to a normal mans retirement age today. Fark dude, are you that disconnected that you can't see the value in his life forcing NASCAR to implement better safety measures?

//26 years old and I barely watch any racing.


Yeah, and I'll never let JFK's death go either until the real story is out.
 
2011-02-12 11:19:06 AM  
Wow. 10 years. I was watching that race on TV. IIRC, it was Ken Schrader who got to the car first and although Ken never actually said as much, I think he knew DE was dead.

I forget the actual injuries DE died from. Probably a basilar skull fracture, which is most common, but one of the contributing factors was that DE's seatbelt wasn't installed properly. He also didn't wear a full face helmet, which I think came into play as well.

To me, DE was a great driver, but not a folk hero or anything like that. I can understand how people thought of DE as a hero and were devastated, but I never really felt that. He was race car driver who I didn't know personally.

I do think DE's death changed NASCAR in both good and bad ways. The increased safety work was needed, but at the same time there hasn't been a villian or hero of DE's calibre since. I can't get the same kind of worked up over Jimmy Johnson, Jeff Gordon or Kyle Busch, as I did when DE was being Dale (like when he took out Terry Labonte at Bristol).
 
2011-02-12 11:21:14 AM  

pwn3d781: NASCAR hasn't been the same since. We have villains, but Kyle Busch's phenomenal talent is overshadowed by his immaturity, and others are just retaliatory. And no one has stepped into the elder-statesman role. Jeff Gordon says he doesn't want it, Jeff Burton can never disagree with NASCAR, Mark Martin doesn't really play politics...and really, who else is there? That's why the NASCAR community struggles to cope with Earnhardt's death. He took a role no one else had, and no one else seems to want or command the respect for.


The best part of that last paragraph was that you never mentioned the (hack ptoooi) 48 as a possibility.
 
2011-02-12 11:27:54 AM  
"The sport had seen a thousand worse-looking wrecks in which everyone walked away angry but unmarked"

I have wondered just why that wasn't the case with Dale Sr.'s death and I'm even a NASCAR fan.

"Mandatory now is a head and neck restraint system that might have saved Earnhardt from his fatal basilar skull fracture. And the pace quickened on installing so-called "soft wall" technology at tracks, barriers that absorb more of the force of a collision"

I've also wondered, about a lot of things, why someone has to be hurt or killed for people to wake up and realize that something is a problem instead of knowing it's a problem before it's too late
 
2011-02-12 11:31:37 AM  

pwn3d781: Dale Earnhardt is a hard guy to explain outside of racing.


Well said, all of it. I really think that Kyle is becoming the next Dale Sr., if only in the way that he is a polarizing figure.

I wasn't a fan in 2001, but my step father was a huge Sr. fan and he still wears his gear. He tried to latch onto Jr. for a few years, but gave up and is now a Stewart fan.

We went to Daytona in 2007 and he got a little teary when he saw the track, as it was his first time there. I still remember a bunch of fans going quiet and holding up three fingers in Dale's honor during the third lap. It was touching, but a bit surreal.
 
2011-02-12 11:36:02 AM  

pwn3d781: Dale Earnhardt is a hard guy to explain outside of racing. In other sports, you hate a guy because he's your rival (think how many people would become fans of Tom Brady if only he played for their team). Earnhardt was more of a villain across the board. You didn't like him if he played dirty against your driver...and it was highly likely he had. But his persona was developed around him being the "bad guy."

He was an aggressive and sometimes dirty driver. Like Ayrton Senna, he would intimidate his opponent into making a mistake, or eventually he would force the issue himself. Then he'd usually come away with a cocky grin, and make some remark like "I didn't mean to wreck him, I just wanted to rattle his cage a little." Behind that aggression, he was a supremely talented wheelman. He had a feel for the handling of a car, and he had the nerve to drive the car to its limits but not beyond. I remember seeing Earnhardt sniff victory with a crash-damaged car in the pack at Talladega, and of course his last victory - where he charged from 18th to the lead in three laps at Talladega in 2000 - was classic Earnhardt, going exactly where he needed to to get to the front.

But at the same time, he was a sort of folk hero, as lots of old-school NASCAR drivers were. He dropped out of school young, went through a couple marriages and a few not-so-glamorous jobs and some second-rate race teams while working like hell to get to the top. He was a blue-collar guy whose daddy raced fast cars for a living, and he chased the same dream, accomplishing more than his father did in his own short life. And off the track, he never changed, spending time down on the farm (wasn't there a race where he had messed up a shoulder screwing around with a tractor?). Not to say he was an uneducated hick. He was a sharp businessman, too, and a successful team owner at the lower level, winning a few championships in the Truck and Busch Series with Ron Hornaday and Dale Jr. at the wheel.

He was a villain you could love to hate. He knew it, and he was content with that. He was a badass behind the wheel, and yet those who were close to him knew that the Intimidator façade was his game face. And unlike some of the other old guard (DW, anyone?), he had the clout and respect that he could offer an honest dissenting opinion to NASCAR without risking his career.

I remember when he died. I was watching the 500 in my dorm room, and when he crashed, I broke into a slow clap. I liked Dale, but after seeing him do something similar (a pretty epic save, actually, but it took him out of contention) in the IROC race that week, I said, "Nice work, Dale...you had third place locked down and just threw it away." I went to dinner with my friends thinking he'd tough out a broken arm or something like he had always done before. When I got home, the messages on my computer told me otherwise.

NASCAR hasn't been the same since. We have villains, but Kyle Busch's phenomenal talent is overshadowed by his immaturity, and others are just retaliatory. And no one has stepped into the elder-statesman role. Jeff Gordon says he doesn't want it, Jeff Burton can never disagree with NASCAR, Mark Martin doesn't really play politics...and really, who else is there? That's why the NASCAR community struggles to cope with Earnhardt's death. He took a role no one else had, and no one else seems to want or command the respect for.


You must be new here... because I'm not used to seeing such a thoughtful, eloquent, and well stated dissertation (especially in a NASCAR thread).

I never liked Earnhardt, but I did respect his abilities- and I, too, watched the race that day and the one other thing that sticks in my mind about the race was Earnhardt blowing past a rookie driver (Kahne?) who'd been blocking him, and Dale hanging his left hand out the window at 180+ to give him the single-digit salute as he went by. And really, I think that one little incident summed up Dale Earnhardt more than anything- he was an absolute maniac about being a WINNER, and would do whatever it took to get there. I guess the closest to that in the series nowadays is Smoke, but he doesn't have that same connection with the fans- I think it's fair to say that nobody does, and the sport has suffered for it. Well, that, and the fact that Brian France clearly has no passion or love for the actual sport of racing itself, only for the almighty damn dollar.

/RIP Dale
//Don't forget Adam Petty, Kenny Irwin, and Tony Roper
 
2011-02-12 11:39:27 AM  

fatalvenom: UNC_Samurai: At least Max Moseley had the decency to get caught in a Nazi S&M Hooker scandal and get drummed out of his racing circuit.



Moseley was the head of the FIA, which is the the governing body to F1, WRC, TCC and many other forms of motorsport.

This douche is the head of F1:


Jeezus, between Vettel and Dick-lestone, you can almost SMELL the vinegar oozing out of that picture.

/at least Alonso didn't win the WDC last year
 
2011-02-12 11:51:08 AM  

H31N0US: Wasn't he the most hated guy in NASCAR for a while?


I remember people actually celebrating his death on a few message boards at the time. And I'm not talking a minority of the posters... the overwhelming tone was "good farking riddance."
 
2011-02-12 11:52:40 AM  

Sun God: FirstNationalBastard: Sun God: Interestingly, if you read the medical report, he didn't die from "internal decapitation." He died because he hit his head too hard. Blunt force trauma.

Weren't there also, supposedly, seat belt problems? And his chin caught the steering wheel, because he wore the open faced helmet?

It's been a while, but I think you are correct. Someone else can link to the medical report, but if I recall, the first person on scene looking in the car, knew he was dead.


You're referring to Ken Schrader. The video of his pit road interview just after the accident is really gut wrenching in.

The fact that people blamed him for the death makes it even more so.

It wasn't just the death of Dale Earnhardt that changed NASCAR, it was NASCAR's attempt to pin the blame on Bill Simpson and anybody else they could think of. It had been evident sice JD MCDuffie's death at least that they were really just paying lip service to safety.
 
2011-02-12 12:22:38 PM  

pestluvr: I remember people actually celebrating his death on a few message boards at the time. And I'm not talking a minority of the posters... the overwhelming tone was "good farking riddance.


I thought Id feel that way about it but what I felt was different from that. It put the racing in perspective and made me appreciate that all the competitors are needed to have a race. Even the ones I dont like.

I knew these things already of course, but only in the same way that I knew Saturn has rings before I saw the rings of Saturn myself in a telescope I pointed at Saturn. They were just schoolbook facts before and after I had unshakable faith and belief in them.

Having said that the most ridiculous part of it are the people who think his death should have somehow been prevented. Its always easier to save somebody after he is already dead I guess.
 
2011-02-12 01:07:33 PM  

one0nine: Jeezus, between Vettel and Dick-lestone, you can almost SMELL the vinegar oozing out of that picture.



Well what makes that picture pure WIN is the story behind it. Supposedly the Red Bull team "customized" a walker for Bernie's 80th birthday. Notice the front wing at the bottom.

It was kinda of a good-natured "eff you" to the old bag-o-shiat.
 
2011-02-12 01:13:29 PM  

pestluvr: H31N0US: Wasn't he the most hated guy in NASCAR for a while?

I remember people actually celebrating his death on a few message boards at the time. And I'm not talking a minority of the posters... the overwhelming tone was "good farking riddance."


You must visit some weird NASCAR boards because that was such a minority sentiment it's an almost unbelievable statement.
 
2011-02-12 01:20:47 PM  

vegaswench: pwn3d781: Dale Earnhardt is a hard guy to explain outside of racing.

Well said, all of it. I really think that Kyle is becoming the next Dale Sr., if only in the way that he is a polarizing figure.

I wasn't a fan in 2001, but my step father was a huge Sr. fan and he still wears his gear. He tried to latch onto Jr. for a few years, but gave up and is now a Stewart fan.


Before Earnhardt died, every kid who ever strapped into a go cart got visions of Earnhardt in their mirror as they crossed the line. It was the ultimate racing dream. No one else, just Earnhardt. It was about beating the most intimidating challenge in all of racing. The man could beat you so many ways.
Busch has taken the "bad guy" image, but he's not intimidating at all. Stewart could beat most anyone in any car, even if his had square wheels, but he's still not as intimidating. Gordon-Johnson? Are you kidding? All are winners for sure, but none of them have what it takes to become a legend like Earnhardt did.
Even Petty before him didn't conjure up the "If you've beaten him you've earned your stripes" image. To me, that is the biggest thing NASCAR lost with his death.
 
2011-02-12 01:34:10 PM  
To be fair, Earnhardt was never a "folk hero" to me. But I can see how he could be for fellow Southerners. He was a blue-collar middle-class guy who got an opportunity and made the most of it. He had his lean years, and he had his championships, all in an era that was far more competitive than when Petty won his seven.

mikaloyd, I'm no fan of Jimmie, but I just can't see him as an elder statesman. As long as the system works in his favor, he's not going to interfere with the NASCAR line. He'll probably beat Earnhardt's championship total, but he lacks the charisma and the drive that people saw in Earnhardt. Jimmie is polished and corporate and says what's situationally appropriate; Earnhardt would tell it like it is.

vegaswench, I think you're right on the subject of Kyle. His on-track antics are no different from Dale's; the difference is in his personality. Earnhardt came off as hard-edged and aggressive; when Kyle doesn't get his way, he looks childish. Of course, Kyle IS young. The Earnhardt we all remember was in his forties, matured by two divorces and years of driving crap for J.D. Stacy and Bud Moore (and even Childress at first). Kyle's had top-flight stuff and no struggles, and he's still young. Life hasn't really set in for him yet.

I feel for Junior. He was thrust into a role where he had to shoulder his father's fans and his father's legacy without being able to create his own. He's probably the most willing to speak out when he feels he must, but his lack of results on the track of late (and his legion of detractors) sort of water down the message.
 
2011-02-12 01:40:58 PM  

fatalvenom: Old joke time:

What do Dale Earnhardt and Pink Floyd have in common? Their last big hit was The Wall

Ok, now that I've got that out of the way, there was a similar article on Boston.com today, which gave way to the newest "sort of want" pic.


Always felt bad for Mikey. This other thing kinda took away from his win.
 
2011-02-12 01:45:31 PM  

Billified: Before Earnhardt died, every kid who ever strapped into a go cart got visions of Earnhardt in their mirror as they crossed the line. It was the ultimate racing dream. No one else, just Earnhardt. It was about beating the most intimidating challenge in all of racing. The man could beat you so many ways.
Busch has taken the "bad guy" image, but he's not intimidating at all. Stewart could beat most anyone in any car, even if his had square wheels, but he's still not as intimidating. Gordon-Johnson? Are you kidding? All are winners for sure, but none of them have what it takes to become a legend like Earnhardt did.
Even Petty before him didn't conjure up the "If you've beaten him you've earned your stripes" image. To me, that is the biggest thing NASCAR lost with his death.


Very well said. Busch and Stewart would wreck their own mothers to win, no doubt. But Earnhardt would wear you down. He'd race you hard on the track, or he'd pressure you from behind, and let you make the fatal error instead. If not, he'd use the bumper - ask Terry Labonte twice. Never mind how he intimidated off the track, sitting out Happy Hour practice or making comments in the garage area.

Plus, there were the times he seemed superhuman. The Talladega charge in 2000, setting pole speed at Watkins Glen in 1996 with a broken sternum, climbing back into a rolled car at Daytona in 1997 because "hey, all four wheels are still on it, see if she cranks." Even the Bristol race in '95...Earnhardt went to the back after wrecking Rusty Wallace, he was mired mid-pack with overheating trouble after crashing with Derrike Cope on a restart, and still fought his way close enough to spin Terry Labonte in the last corner of the last lap. I saw someone say this once about Mark Martin: you don't have to like him, but it's hard not to respect him.
 
2011-02-12 01:46:52 PM  

fatalvenom: UNC_Samurai: At least Max Moseley had the decency to get caught in a Nazi S&M Hooker scandal and get drummed out of his racing circuit.



Moseley was the head of the FIA, which is the the governing body to F1, WRC, TCC and many other forms of motorsport.

This douche is the head of F1:


I'm still waiting for someone to prove that Bernie isn't on Ferrari's payroll.

/screw team orders
//you know damn well McLaren's drivers will
 
mjg
2011-02-12 01:47:54 PM  
Earnhardt, being the best NASCAR driver, could not beat the worst Formula 1 driver.
 
2011-02-12 01:57:50 PM  

H31N0US: Wasn't he the most hated guy in NASCAR for a while?


No, he was quite popular but the people who didn't like him really hated him. He was an aggressive old school racer and if you pulled for any other driver there was a good chance he had flat out knocked your driver aside a few times.

Now it's nearly impossible to get anyone to say a bad thing about him but when he was alive he was very polarizing.
 
2011-02-12 02:09:40 PM  

Cloudchaser Sakonige the Red Wolf: "The sport had seen a thousand worse-looking wrecks in which everyone walked away angry but unmarked"

I have wondered just why that wasn't the case with Dale Sr.'s death and I'm even a NASCAR fan.

"Mandatory now is a head and neck restraint system that might have saved Earnhardt from his fatal basilar skull fracture. And the pace quickened on installing so-called "soft wall" technology at tracks, barriers that absorb more of the force of a collision"

I've also wondered, about a lot of things, why someone has to be hurt or killed for people to wake up and realize that something is a problem instead of knowing it's a problem before it's too late


Wrecks are decieving. The most spectacular looking ones, where the car flips and rolls aren't that dangerous. The car is bleeding off speed and force as it goes. Earnhardt's wreck was bad because he wedged straight into the wall held in place by the other car. going from 180 MPH to dead stop in a second or 2 is harsh. The HAANS device and closed face helmets that could probably have saved Earnhardt's life existed and were being used by some drivers already. Dale refused to use them because they restricted his vision while driving.
 
2011-02-12 02:12:49 PM  
Link (new window)

My contribution
 
2011-02-12 02:17:50 PM  

Digitalstrange:
Wrecks are decieving. The most spectacular looking ones, where the car flips and rolls aren't that dangerous. The car is bleeding off speed and force as it goes. Earnhardt's wreck was bad because he wedged straight into the wall held in place by the other car. going from 180 MPH to dead stop in a second or 2 is harsh. The HAANS device and closed face helmets that could probably have saved Earnhardt's life existed and were being used by some drivers already. Dale refused to use them because they restricted his vision while driving.


Also, some people have said that it was Earnhardt's reluctance to accept the newer safety devices that kept the majority of the drivers from accepting them.

Earnhardt was the leader of the garage. He was the head dog old guy. If Earnhardt didn't need this newfangled stuff, why did they?

After his brain stem got pulled apart, everyone else saw the light. Then NASCAR finally made the HANS device mandatory, but not until one more death in October 2001.

If they had done that and made some other rudimentary safety devices (like the kill switch) mandatory BEFORE Earnhardt's death, the whole string of deaths in 2000 and 2001 probably wouldn't have happened. But, slow reacting NASCAR had to have their biggest star killed in their biggest race in the first race of a brand new, high profile TV contract to finally do something about safety.
 
2011-02-12 02:23:35 PM  
What's worse to watch on TV: WNBA, poker, NASCAR, or competitive eating?
 
2011-02-12 02:43:33 PM  
I still feel sorry for the Simpson family, because NASCAR did everything in their power to try to lay ALL the blame at the feet of the seatbelt manufacturer.

And, even when it was discovered by independent investigators that the seatbelt did not cause the death in any capacity, NASCAR still felt like assigning some blame to the Simpsons (D'oh!). It is LIKELY that the seatbelts were installed improperly, because that's how Earnhardt liked them for comfort purposes... however, I don't think this was necessarily "proven" as fact, simply ascertained by how Dale typically wore the belts, and the position that they were discovered after the crash...
 
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