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(Mother Nature Network)   It appears the lumberjacks are losing their never-ending war with the forests. There are now more trees in the world than there were 100 years ago   (mnn.com) divider line 132
    More: Sad, forests  
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8860 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Feb 2011 at 11:44 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-02-09 10:10:05 AM
So, the hippies can stop finally stop crying now? (new window)
 
2011-02-09 10:15:59 AM
How about 1000 years ago?
 
2011-02-09 10:16:43 AM
The bad news is that most of them are in the tree museum.

/Where they charge $1.50 just to see 'em.
 
2011-02-09 10:19:14 AM
There are now more trees in the world United States than there were 100 years ago.

Still good news though.
 
2011-02-09 10:24:05 AM

ne2d: There are now more trees in the world United States than there were 100 years ago.

Still good news though.


It is. Sensible logging practices have really made a difference. Growing trees to cut them down and actually build something like a house is a good way to lock up carbon, rather than have it decay back into CO2.

Ireland is another good story of success. I can't find the exact figures, but they have increased their forest cover from about 1% to 10% in the last 50 or so years.

/Just stay out of old growth.
 
2011-02-09 10:30:40 AM

Teknowaffle: ne2d: There are now more trees in the world United States than there were 100 years ago.

Still good news though.

It is. Sensible logging practices have really made a difference. Growing trees to cut them down and actually build something like a house is a good way to lock up carbon, rather than have it decay back into CO2.

Ireland is another good story of success. I can't find the exact figures, but they have increased their forest cover from about 1% to 10% in the last 50 or so years.

/Just stay out of old growth.


Part of the problem (at least in eastern NC) is there are more trees, but they're smaller and they're pine. If you look at English accounts of the area from the 16th through the 18th century, The "Pine State" was far more deciduous than evergreen. But since pine trees grow like weeds, and we've found markets for the wood for centuries, I now have to uncover my house and car from a layer of thick yellow pine tree jizz every spring.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2011-02-09 10:34:27 AM
We moved our farmland from former forests (East) to former non-forests (Midwest).
 
2011-02-09 10:38:50 AM

UNC_Samurai: Teknowaffle: ne2d: I now have to uncover my house and car from a layer of thick yellow pine tree jizz every spring.


There is one tree on my mom's street that jizzes like crazy with no warning in the spring. Some rich jackass moved in across the street, and parked his brand new BMW under it overnight. Woke up to ookie gookie sap all over it.
 
2011-02-09 10:40:48 AM
The rain forests are still falling at the same rate though, and they're far more important than temperate forests.
 
2011-02-09 10:42:30 AM
Great, we can't win the war on drugs or the war on terror and now we're losing the war on trees. Sad times indeed.
 
2011-02-09 10:48:50 AM

UNC_Samurai: Part of the problem (at least in eastern NC) is there are more trees, but they're smaller and they're pine.


This. A hundred years ago, there was nothing but old growth lumber, and today, most of the wood that we buy is cheap plantation grown crap.
 
2011-02-09 11:11:54 AM
I'm naming my next band Pine Tree Jizz.
 
2011-02-09 11:14:00 AM
dnrfa

What trees did they count? All of them including saplings? Or are did they focus on trees 10 years or older?
 
2011-02-09 11:23:34 AM
Not that it makes a difference on the CO2 to O2 front, but I wonder what percentage of these are "weed trees" like eastern cottonwood poplars, grown specifically for harvesting.
 
2011-02-09 11:30:08 AM

m1ke: Great, we can't win the war on drugs or the war on terror and now we're losing the war on trees. Sad times indeed.


But at least by spreading the wealth, the War on Poverty is at a stand still...wait...that's not what's happening at all.
 
2011-02-09 11:47:03 AM
love the sad tag subby. laughed.
 
2011-02-09 11:47:06 AM

GAT_00: The rain forests are still falling at the same rate though, and they're far more important than temperate forests.


racist.
 
2011-02-09 11:47:49 AM

GAT_00: The rain forests are still falling at the same rate though, and they're far more important than temperate forests.


Ah, man...you had to go and play the 'forest' card.
 
2011-02-09 11:48:04 AM

Kirk's_Toupee: dnrfa

What trees did they count? All of them including saplings? Or are did they focus on trees 10 years or older?


Pine cones count, too. Each one is chock fulla trees.
 
2011-02-09 11:50:00 AM
Trees grow fast places that get enough rain. My grandparents own some land in PA that's rocky and pretty marginal for farming. Some fields were left fallow about 40 years ago and now they've got poplar trees more than a foot thick all over the place. The oaks are smaller, but they're still over 50 feet tall.
 
2011-02-09 11:52:33 AM
Yeah there are more trees, but they are all much smaller than they were 100 years ago. What passes for a big tree these days is kinda sad.
 
2011-02-09 11:53:14 AM

GAT_00: The rain forests are still falling at the same rate though, and they're far more important than temperate forests.


New Jungles Prompt a Debate on Rain Forests


These new "secondary" forests are emerging in Latin America, Asia and other tropical regions at such a fast pace that the trend has set off a serious debate about whether saving primeval rain forest - an iconic environmental cause - may be less urgent than once thought. By one estimate, for every acre of rain forest cut down each year, more than 50 acres of new forest are growing in the tropics on land that was once farmed, logged or ravaged by natural disaster.
 
2011-02-09 11:53:46 AM
www.cairnsunlimited.com
Trees this planet needs.

Trees this planet has.

Even if there is more of the 2nd kind, not the same thing.
 
2011-02-09 11:55:35 AM
btw, I should have italicized that - it was a direct quote from TFA
 
2011-02-09 11:55:39 AM

kregh99: Trees this planet needs.


Why?

 
2011-02-09 11:57:24 AM
how much more old growth?
 
2011-02-09 11:57:44 AM
Do you know how I know that subby is from the US?

Article says 'United States' and subby translates that to 'the world'.

More trees in the US is a good thing. Too bad there are less trees in the real, actual world that there were 100 years ago. Dumbass.
 
2011-02-09 11:58:04 AM
Why the hell does this have the Sad tag?
 
2011-02-09 11:59:53 AM

Bith Set Me Up: Why the hell does this have the Sad tag?


Because lumberjacks are losing a war. Please do try and keep up.
 
2011-02-09 12:00:34 PM
There is certainly a difference between the 100-200 year old trees on my property and the pine you see them harvesting.

Some so called trees are more like limbs, but it not like you need that much to grind it into sawdust and press it together. They may also get the occasional 2x4 out of one tree it if they are lucky. They were begging to have access to cut down my black walnut, hickory and Oaks, but there are so few around here anymore. It also means that much of the wildlife likes to come through here too. The other morning I had a dozen deer in my yard for instance hanging around and doing deer like activities.
 
2011-02-09 12:01:28 PM

CheekyMonkey: Do you know how I know that subby is from the US?

Article says 'United States' and subby translates that to 'the world'.

More trees in the US is a good thing. Too bad there are less trees in the real, actual world that there were 100 years ago. Dumbass.


Is it too late to start building a bubble over the nation to keep all of that sweet, sweet oxygen all to ourselves? I certainly don't want to share it with a bunch of Swedes that only concerned with what their subways look like!

If we don't get this bubble project started soonl, the Russians will surely beat us to it. Mr. President, we can ill afford a bubble gap!
 
2011-02-09 12:01:47 PM
What's the big deal of it's a few more or a few less? It's not like we're in danger of running out of oxygen.
 
2011-02-09 12:02:04 PM

limeyfellow: There is certainly a difference between the 100-200 year old trees on my property and the pine you see them harvesting.

Some so called trees are more like limbs, but it not like you need that much to grind it into sawdust and press it together. They may also get the occasional 2x4 out of one tree it if they are lucky. They were begging to have access to cut down my black walnut, hickory and Oaks, but there are so few around here anymore. It also means that much of the wildlife likes to come through here too. The other morning I had a dozen deer in my yard for instance hanging around and doing deer like activities.


deer-like activities? Dying of starvation, spreading disease, getting in the way of your car?
 
2011-02-09 12:02:47 PM
The trees can be kept equal...
www.faqs.org
www.futurecamping.com
karlkuemmerling.com

And
www.xtremeoutdoorhunts.com

HOT!
 
2011-02-09 12:03:02 PM

Bith Set Me Up: Why the hell does this have the Sad tag?


Sarcasm, I think.
 
2011-02-09 12:03:13 PM
kregh99 Quote 2011-02-09 11:53:46 AM
www.cairnsunlimited.com
Trees this planet needs.

Trees this planet has.

Even if there is more of the 2nd kind, not the same thing.


THIS! THIS! THIS!
 
2011-02-09 12:03:26 PM

limeyfellow: There is certainly a difference between the 100-200 year old trees on my property and the pine you see them harvesting.

Some so called trees are more like limbs, but it not like you need that much to grind it into sawdust and press it together. They may also get the occasional 2x4 out of one tree it if they are lucky. They were begging to have access to cut down my black walnut, hickory and Oaks, but there are so few around here anymore. It also means that much of the wildlife likes to come through here too. The other morning I had a dozen deer in my yard for instance hanging around and doing deer like activities.


Like smoking and throwing cat calls to the ladies? I've seen it too and it disgusts me.
 
2011-02-09 12:07:33 PM
m1ke: Great, we can't win the war on drugs or the war on terror and now we're losing the war on trees. Sad times indeed.

The lumberjacks are clearly too busy wearing womens' clothing and hanging around in bars, and thus aren't properly focused on the battle.

Our only hope:

www.rankopedia.com
 
2011-02-09 12:09:02 PM
In the White Mountain range of New Hampshire, it is amazing the extent to which it was once logged. Not much old growth left anywhere.

Over the last few years, the eastern pines have been breaking through the canopies. I'm kind of jealous that my grandkids might get a chance to walk amid a forest of 100' trees.

Guess I should head out west where some old growth forest still exists.
 
2011-02-09 12:13:19 PM
Just don't mention the word surplus or the Republicans are going to want to spend that too.
 
2011-02-09 12:14:24 PM

ZAZ: We moved our farmland from former forests (East) to former non-forests (Midwest).


This. I've seen pictures of my very very forested CT town from the late 1800s and it looks barren, because all the land had been cleared for farming before railroads made it more economical to grow crops in the richer soils of the midwest.
 
2011-02-09 12:14:45 PM

Wittenberg Dropout: Just don't mention the word surplus or the Republicans are going to want to spend that too.


Dude, you got your paries mixed up.
 
2011-02-09 12:15:33 PM
And parties too.

Other people have respectable nemesis'
Holmes had Moriarty
West had Loveless
Luke had Vader
Batman - The Joker (among others)
Superman - Luther (among others)
Bond - Goldfinger (among others)
Me? I get spelling and typos

What did I do when they were passing out nemesis'? I said "Why would I want a nemesis?"
They didn't tell me you had to have one until after all the good ones were taken.
Some of those bastards went back and got more than one too.
So I end up with the only two nemesis left spelling and typos.

Damn you Nemesis! Damn you!
 
2011-02-09 12:17:11 PM

Kirk's_Toupee: dnrfa

What trees did they count? All of them including saplings? Or are did they focus on trees 10 years or older?


The number's been growing since the 40s, and they don't cut down saplings for wood.
 
2011-02-09 12:17:19 PM
I blame the Ents.
 
2011-02-09 12:17:36 PM

timujin: Not that it makes a difference on the CO2 to O2 front, but I wonder what percentage of these are "weed trees" like eastern cottonwood poplars, grown specifically for harvesting.


Most of New England repopulated with hardwoods like sugar maple, red/white oak, black ash, white ash, beech, yellow birch, hickory, etc.
 
2011-02-09 12:19:29 PM
Can't prove it by me. The rich, old growth forests I grew up with in my city have mostly been plowed under and houses stuck in their place.

Areas previously made of vast acres of wild woods and palmettos with a rich selection of wild life and associated trees, like Oak, Cabbage Palm and others, are cleared and being used for farming.

The problem I have with the program, which is on the surface, successful, is that they use mainly fast growing White Pine. You won't see them planting a grove of slow growing Oaks, Cedar, Walnut or Birch. They don't even toss in a small percentage of slow growth hard woods when they replant a harvested forest.

That's why trying to buy anything made of real hardwood these days means you'd better take out a loan. Most 'hard wood' desk and all are made of a pine base, covered with thin sheets of Oak, Maple or Walnut.

There's these guys harvesting an old logging lake where there are hundreds of logs that sank to the bottom about 100 years ago. They haul out the logs, like Maple, dry them in a kiln and then usually slice them into thin sheets for sale. They make about $10,000 a tree! Some are sectioned up for people who want hardwood logs or beams for historical restoration.

There's a big demand for hard wood, especially old growth woods and the National Parks are constantly under fire to allow 'limited' logging of the last, ancient trees.

However, at least they've done something right by replanting. I recall the big squabbles years ago about clear cut logging, the damage it did to the area, the ugly scars it left on the land and the loss of animal habitat.

Some young folks starting out with a good chunk of land would do well to plant it with hard woods and leave it alone. In about 20 or 30 years, they'd have a gold mine there. Especially if they grew things like 'Tiger or Burled' Oak, Mahogany and Walnut.

I gave up watching 'Logging reality shows' on TV. You'd swear the guys were gluttons for punishment and in danger every minute of the working day. I watched a logging show from Europe, where one man in a special machine cut down, stripped bark and branches from the trees, sectioned them up and stacked them for removal. All in a fraction of the time seen on the previous shows.

Question: Why is it, what with inexpensive furniture being made from pressed wood or partial board, usually covered with a plastic imitation wood grain, in this day and age, that they can't use water proof glue in the mix? All of you have probably had something made from pressed wood at one time or another and discovered what happens when it gets wet. It swells up and crumbles.
 
2011-02-09 12:21:10 PM
i.imgur.com

/never did trust trees, never will
 
2011-02-09 12:21:24 PM
Actually, I take that back, MUCH of NE is hardwood now. But most of Maine is fir and birch. Which is like half of NE.
 
2011-02-09 12:22:07 PM
There is nothing wrong with using pine as the starter forest. That's what nature does. Pine grows relatively quickly and dies relatively quickly. It protects slower growing saplings.
 
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