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(space.com)   On August 27, Mars will be closer to Earth than ever in recorded human history   (space.com) divider line 85
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7473 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jul 2003 at 1:30 PM (11 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2003-07-20 10:47:38 AM
Strange, my submitted link approved number didn't go up for this one.
 
2003-07-20 11:07:24 AM
It's not up on Fark yet, Nancy.
 
2003-07-20 12:52:35 PM
The number goes up as soon as it is greenlighted, not when it hits the main page.
 
2003-07-20 01:34:21 PM
as opposed to unrecorded history?

I got nuthin.
 
2003-07-20 01:34:42 PM
That's good news for this weirdo.
<====
 
2003-07-20 01:36:03 PM
It's definately a greenlight increase. I've used the "Submitted Link Approved" number in the past to determine if my link has been accepted or not. My profile changes before it shows on the main page.
 
2003-07-20 01:37:54 PM
Seems pretty neat.. but for how long can we have possibly been noting the distance to mars? Maybe 100 years at the most?
 
2003-07-20 01:38:27 PM
Perfect opportunity for a Martian invasion.
Uuuuulllaaaaa!
 
2003-07-20 01:39:16 PM
And we've been accurately recording for what, 50 years?

/never read the article threadjack
 
2003-07-20 01:42:10 PM
An omen of dooooooooooooom!

Muahahahahahaaaaa.....(cough hack cough....)
 
2003-07-20 01:42:24 PM
Perfect time to launch a couple of Mars rovers...

oh yea.
 
2003-07-20 01:44:30 PM
The chances of anything coming from Mars,
are a million to one, they said
 
wil [TotalFark]
2003-07-20 01:44:54 PM
I wonder if anyone will rebroadcast War of the Worlds to celebrate?
 
2003-07-20 01:44:59 PM
Obviously this is due to human intervention, pollution and consumerism. We need an international treaty to control interplanetary climate and orbiatchange.
 
2003-07-20 01:49:13 PM
Good, maybe Calvin and Hobbes can go back with the camera this time.
 
eps
2003-07-20 01:55:45 PM
how old is recorded history ?
 
2003-07-20 01:55:52 PM
Yet across an immense ethereal gulf, minds that to our minds as ours are to the beasts in the jungle, intellects vast, cool and unsympathetic, regarded this earth with envious eyes and slowly and surely drew their plans against us.
 
2003-07-20 01:57:02 PM
 
2003-07-20 01:57:09 PM
Here they come.

 
2003-07-20 01:58:12 PM



Ack ack.....ACK ACK!
 
2003-07-20 02:00:07 PM
I believe that 5 million years ago, Mars was invested by an intergalactic space plague that thrived by consuming oxygen. This means that the virus ate everything that had oxygen molocules in its make up. The oxygen in the martian water, animals, and plants was all consumed by the virus which lead to current Mars being a dehydrated, oxygenless wasteland. What's more, the virus is probably lying dormant in the martian soil, just waiting for an earthling spaceprobe to pick it up and return with it to Earth where it will reawaken.
 
eps
2003-07-20 02:02:03 PM
a wise man once said...

as mars gets closer, so do the martians

be careful kids.
 
2003-07-20 02:02:36 PM
Sounds like a great time to explore outer space with a crew of aliens, sentient robots, and space unicorns!
 
2003-07-20 02:02:40 PM
And then?
 
2003-07-20 02:05:29 PM
The Jovian Lizards are going to kick our ass!
 
eps
2003-07-20 02:05:55 PM
smoke the cheba cheba

what ?, oh yeah sorry, mars, it's big, red and getting closer, lets celebrate

and remeber your tin foil hats otherwise the government will take away your cheba
 
2003-07-20 02:11:01 PM
Falcion Seems pretty neat.. but for how long can we have possibly been noting the distance to mars? Maybe 100 years at the most?

nick4753 And we've been accurately recording for what, 50 years?

Wow. you two are farking morons. I'm amazed by the stupidity of those statements. Seriously. I've been reading fark for a long time so my standards are pretty damn low but I am still in awe of the complete lack of intelligence shown by your comments.
 
2003-07-20 02:12:34 PM
Give me one good reason to care.
 
2003-07-20 02:15:13 PM
IT'S A SIGN OF THE APOCOLYPSE!!!!
REPENT!!!!!

sorry about that, I have gas.
 
eps
2003-07-20 02:15:29 PM
Give me one good reason to care.

Cheba
 
eps
2003-07-20 02:16:58 PM
Wow. you two are farking morons. I'm amazed by the stupidity of those statements. Seriously. I've been reading fark for a long time so my standards are pretty damn low but I am still in awe of the complete lack of intelligence shown by your comments.

I guess what you are saying is that we can work out where mars was 4000 years ago and it is now closer than it was then ?, or am I a moron too.
 
2003-07-20 02:17:31 PM
PlaidKing

Knowledge for the sake of knowledge, especially when it is about the real world around us, is always a good thing. If you had a look at mars through a good telescope, especially now when you can see more detail than ever, might actually amaze you. You never know until you try.
 
VYV
2003-07-20 02:18:41 PM
insert entire two-record-set worth of "War of The Worlds" comment here.

/sheesh
 
2003-07-20 02:21:33 PM
 
2003-07-20 02:22:19 PM
I'm just worried about the Klingon's near Uranus.

/Butthead
 
2003-07-20 02:25:56 PM
Emperor-Jay I believe that 5 million years ago, Mars was invested by an intergalactic space plague that thrived by consuming oxygen. This means that the virus ate everything that had oxygen molocules in its make up. The oxygen in the martian water, animals, and plants was all consumed by the virus which lead to current Mars being a dehydrated, oxygenless wasteland. What's more, the virus is probably lying dormant in the martian soil, just waiting for an earthling spaceprobe to pick it up and return with it to Earth where it will reawaken.

OK I'll play along. A virus requires a living host. Virii don't "eat" anything themselves, they just take over the host. I think you must mean bacteria. At any rate, what happened to the oxygen? It's hard to create or destroy an element. The sun can do it, and we can do it in gigantic super colliders. But living creatures can't do it. Bacteria could maybe lock the oxygen up in some other molecule - the way so much carbon is locked up in coal and oil here on Earth. But they can't just eat it and poof it's gone.

Nice try though.
 
VYV
2003-07-20 02:29:28 PM
no one would have believed, in the last years of the nineteenth century, that human affairs were being watched from the timeless worlds of space. No one could have dreamed we were being scrutinized, as someone with a microscope studies creatures that swarm and multiply in a drop of water. Few men even considered the possibility of life on other planets and yet, across the gulf of space, minds immeasurably superior to ours regarded this earth with envious eyes and, slowly and surely, they drew their plans against us.
 
2003-07-20 02:31:02 PM
enave

OK, I admit I'm no microbiologist. But I can't help but feel that something destroyed all the oxygen in Mars' atmoshpere, thrus leading to the planet's desicrated appearence.
 
2003-07-20 02:31:57 PM
I'm just waiting till we get really close to Uranus...

/obligatory
 
2003-07-20 02:32:56 PM
eps I guess what you are saying is that we can work out where mars was 4000 years ago and it is now closer than it was then ?, or am I a moron too.

Not at all. You're using your brain and you're exactly right. We can know with an accuracy of probably a few meters exactly where the Earth was and were Mars was millions of years ago - and predict where it will be millions of years from now.

I really shouldn't have called Falcion and nick4753 morons.
 
2003-07-20 02:33:26 PM
InternetSecurityGuard: That quote made my morning, thank you.
 
2003-07-20 02:40:37 PM
enave

Hey, maybe it was this guy:

 
VYV
2003-07-20 02:40:47 PM
At midnight on the twelfth of August, a huge mass of luminous gas erupted from Mars and sped towards Earth. Across two hundred million miles of void, invisibly hurtling towards us, came the first of the missiles that were to bring so much calamity to Earth. As I watched, there was another jet of gas. It was another missile, starting on it's way.
And that's how it was for the next ten nights.

A flare, spurting out from Mars-bright green, drawing a green mist behind it-a beautiful, but somehow disturbing sight. Ogilvy, the astronomer, assured me we were in no danger. He was convinced there could be no living thing on that remote, forbidding planet.

"The chances of anything coming from Mars are a million to one", he said.
"The chances of anything coming from Mars are a million to one-but still they come!"
 
2003-07-20 02:41:22 PM
Emperor-Jay OK, I admit I'm no microbiologist. But I can't help but feel that something destroyed all the oxygen in Mars' atmoshpere, thrus leading to the planet's desicrated appearence.

Then may I suggest that you search google for:
mars climate oxygen

I found some nice information from NASA here. A partial quote from the site:

The great difference between past and present Mars leads to the obvious question of what happened to change it so dramatically. The reasons are widely debated, but the broad consensus is that unlike Earth, which still has a hot, molten interior that powers its magnetic field and geologic activity, the interior of Mars cooled and solidified at least two billion years ago.

The cooling of Mars interior set off a chain of effects that resulted in a loss of its protective magnetic field and much of its atmosphere


No evil viruses needed!

As to the planet's desicrated appearence, I think it's kind of beautiful.
 
2003-07-20 02:52:16 PM
I believe it's closer than it's been for 57000 years or thereabouts,

BTW, NASA also reports that the Face on Mars is now using binoculars, and appears to have what one anonymous scientist described as a "Puny Hu-man" expression.

Be afraid. Be very afraid.
 
2003-07-20 02:52:24 PM
Desicrated? Or maybe decimated?

I admit I didn't read this whole thread, haha, not even the article, but I don't understand how lack of an atmosphere on Mars proves that there once *was* an atmosphere, enave.
 
2003-07-20 02:55:47 PM
I'm sorry, I think my comment was meant for Emperor Jay, not enave. I'm an idiot, when I haven't had enough coffee.
 
2003-07-20 02:57:10 PM
altazakin I don't understand

Why am I not surprised?

Ah, here it is: I admit I didn't read this whole thread, haha, not even the article

Yes, well I am shocked - SHOCKED - that you don't understand.
 
2003-07-20 02:57:50 PM
Wow
 
2003-07-20 03:00:23 PM
I was wondering why the hell there appeared to be a particularly bright star in the sky for the past six months. I mean, I knew it was a planet, but I didn't remember mars being that bright before. I was wondering if maybe it was venus. It must be mars and it's brighter because it's closer.
 
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