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(WTOP)   James Madison chess pieces unearthed at Va. estate   (wtop.com) divider line 46
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5218 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Feb 2011 at 10:48 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
 
2011-02-03 10:46:30 AM
Elitist. Real Americans play "Hungry, Hungry Hippos"
 
2011-02-03 10:52:39 AM
What's gonna happen to chess-piece-face?
 
2011-02-03 10:55:27 AM
Since I'm sitting in the middle of Colonial Williamsburg wearing a cocked hat, waistcoat, breeches and stockings this very moment, Im sure to get a kick out of this thread.
 
2011-02-03 10:57:16 AM
This thread is useless without pics of Dolly Madison chest pieces.
 
2011-02-03 10:58:24 AM
New from the Bradford Mint: The War of 1812 chess set!
 
2011-02-03 11:00:14 AM
founding fathers played chess

teatards play bingo and lotto
 
2011-02-03 11:01:04 AM
They were carved in prison out of a horse apple.
 
2011-02-03 11:02:53 AM
Were thay hand made by slaves using ivory?
 
2011-02-03 11:05:40 AM
As a Farker who did his undergrad archaeology field work at Montpelier, this is relevant to my interests.

/coolest thing I ever found was a nail
//and a black widow spider
 
2011-02-03 11:08:36 AM
Did they find any 200-year-old Zingers?
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2011-02-03 11:12:48 AM
I forget, what way does the James Madison move?
 
2011-02-03 11:14:22 AM
I obviously read the headline too quick. I couldn't figure out why anyone would care about Cyclops's (from the X-Men) chess set.


/I tell you how to cyclops rock...
 
2011-02-03 11:14:27 AM
"Democracy is the most vile form of government... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention: have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property: and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths." - James Madison

Source:http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/james_madison.html

Isn't it great that we don't live under that kind of government?
 
2011-02-03 11:20:38 AM
What kind of a news article about the chess pieces would not have even one pix of one piece of it? Answer: a Farked one.
 
2011-02-03 11:21:20 AM
Were his pawns black?
 
2011-02-03 11:21:43 AM
In the James Buchanan chess set, he plays the Queen.
 
2011-02-03 11:25:40 AM

Bermuda59: I forget, what way does the James Madison move?


It takes 13 weak pieces and turns them into one large, powerful piece that dominates the board.
 
2011-02-03 11:27:40 AM
Pics or it did not happen!
 
2011-02-03 11:29:46 AM

BKITU: Bermuda59: I forget, what way does the James Madison move?

It takes 13 weak pieces and turns them into one large, powerful piece that dominates the board.


I prefer the James Monroe pieces that write a manifesto on how every board in the hemisphere is already his property.
 
2011-02-03 11:30:42 AM
portions of two pawns from his chess set.

Was one of them this guy?

i51.tinypic.com

/I guess you could also make a case for John Marshall, but that guy rocked.
 
2011-02-03 11:33:30 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: BKITU: Bermuda59: I forget, what way does the James Madison move?

It takes 13 weak pieces and turns them into one large, powerful piece that dominates the board.

I prefer the James Monroe pieces that write a manifesto on how every board in the hemisphere is already his property.


What about the John Tyler piece that gets promoted after 1 move?
 
2011-02-03 11:33:37 AM
Were his pawns black?

Well, his vice president was George Clinton.
 
2011-02-03 11:47:15 AM
So wait, did he bury his chess set in his backyard or something?
 
2011-02-03 11:58:43 AM

nobodyUwannaknow: founding fathers played chess

teatards play bingo and lotto


le yawn
 
2011-02-03 12:01:25 PM

BKITU: Mr. Coffee Nerves: BKITU: Bermuda59: I forget, what way does the James Madison move?

It takes 13 weak pieces and turns them into one large, powerful piece that dominates the board.

I prefer the James Monroe pieces that write a manifesto on how every board in the hemisphere is already his property.

What about the John Tyler piece that gets promoted after 1 move?


Or the William Henry Harrison piece that is forfeited halfway through its first move.
 
2011-02-03 12:05:38 PM

bdMurray: BKITU: Mr. Coffee Nerves: BKITU: Bermuda59: I forget, what way does the James Madison move?

It takes 13 weak pieces and turns them into one large, powerful piece that dominates the board.

I prefer the James Monroe pieces that write a manifesto on how every board in the hemisphere is already his property.

What about the John Tyler piece that gets promoted after 1 move?

Or the William Henry Harrison piece that is forfeited halfway through its first move.


Or the Grover Cleveland piece that, once captured, gets to return four moves later?
 
2011-02-03 12:05:56 PM

neversubmit: "Democracy is the most vile form of government... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention: have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property: and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths." - James Madison

Source:http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/james_madison.html

Isn't it great that we don't live under that kind of government?


Yes, it is. Madison's criticisms of a pure democracy appear in the Federalist #10, the source of your quotation. There he contrasts pure democracy, which we don't have, with a constitutional republic, which we do, but which has become more or less synonymous with "democracy" in the last 200+ years.

/not sure if serious.
 
2011-02-03 12:17:21 PM
Chess? [eyeroll]

Washington was into hot-rods.

cache.gawkerassets.com

And he'll kick you apart.
 
2011-02-03 12:25:55 PM

Celephais: neversubmit: "Democracy is the most vile form of government... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention: have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property: and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths." - James Madison

Source:http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/james_madison.html

Isn't it great that we don't live under that kind of government?

Yes, it is. Madison's criticisms of a pure democracy appear in the Federalist #10, the source of your quotation. There he contrasts pure democracy, which we don't have, with a constitutional republic, which we do, but which has become more or less synonymous with "democracy" in the last 200+ years.

/not sure if serious.


Who me serious? Nope, I wouldn't know a madisonian scholar if it bit me. Do they bite? However this guy seems serious -

Among Madisonian scholars, there is a consensus that "the Constitution was intrinsically an aristocratic document designed to check the democratic tendencies of the period," delivering power to a "better sort" of people and excluding those who were not rich, well born, or prominent from exercising political power (Lance Banning). The primary responsibility of government is "to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority," Madison declared. That has been the guiding principle of the democratic system from its origins until today. (new window)
 
2011-02-03 12:53:28 PM
Bermuda59: I forget, what way does the James Madison move?

It takes 13 weak pieces and turns them into one large, powerful piece that dominates the board.

I prefer the James Monroe pieces that write a manifesto on how every board in the hemisphere is already his property.

What about the John Tyler piece that gets promoted after 1 move?

Or the William Henry Harrison piece that is forfeited halfway through its first move.

Or the Grover Cleveland piece that, once captured, gets to return four moves later?


Or the James K. Polk piece that depicts Napoleon standing on a tree stump and considers the other end of the board its manifest destiny.
 
2011-02-03 12:53:57 PM
Your move, Jefferson.
 
2011-02-03 01:08:11 PM
Wait, should I be excited about this? Did Glenn Beck decide that Madison is a 'real American' Founding Father or an evil proto-progressive?
 
2011-02-03 01:26:18 PM

neversubmit: Celephais: neversubmit: "Democracy is the most vile form of government... democracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention: have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property: and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths." - James Madison

Source:http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/j/james_madison.html

Isn't it great that we don't live under that kind of government?

Yes, it is. Madison's criticisms of a pure democracy appear in the Federalist #10, the source of your quotation. There he contrasts pure democracy, which we don't have, with a constitutional republic, which we do, but which has become more or less synonymous with "democracy" in the last 200+ years.

/not sure if serious.

Who me serious? Nope, I wouldn't know a madisonian scholar if it bit me. Do they bite? However this guy seems serious -

Among Madisonian scholars, there is a consensus that "the Constitution was intrinsically an aristocratic document designed to check the democratic tendencies of the period," delivering power to a "better sort" of people and excluding those who were not rich, well born, or prominent from exercising political power (Lance Banning). The primary responsibility of government is "to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority," Madison declared. That has been the guiding principle of the democratic system from its origins until today. (new window)


Ah, Chomsky. It's worth noting that linguistics is his field, not history. His political views tend to the Socialist / Anarcho-syndicalist, not that there's anything wrong with that, but it does say something about the lens through which he's viewing and reinterpreting American history.
 
2011-02-03 01:35:05 PM
I believe I already read something like this in a Katherine Neville book
 
2011-02-03 01:37:45 PM
Celephais: and what of Lance Banning a Madisonian scholar, he is the one that matters in that he is the lens Dr. Chomsky is looking though.
 
2011-02-03 02:06:51 PM

neversubmit: Celephais: and what of Lance Banning a Madisonian scholar, he is the one that matters in that he is the lens Dr. Chomsky is looking though.


Meh. He did his doctorate at Wash U, so he was probably a communist anyway.

/had an ex-girlfriend that went to Wash U. She's still a communist.
 
2011-02-03 02:18:26 PM

ne2d: So wait, did he bury his chess set in his backyard or something?


Yeah, just because you find a chess set, why does that mean it was Madisons? And even granting that it was Madison's how does that prove he played against Jefferson with that set?

This is potentially interesting but probably unprovable tourist bait.
 
2011-02-03 02:32:05 PM

Dr.Gonzo7719: neversubmit: Celephais: and what of Lance Banning a Madisonian scholar, he is the one that matters in that he is the lens Dr. Chomsky is looking though.

Meh. He did his doctorate at Wash U, so he was probably a communist anyway.

/had an ex-girlfriend that went to Wash U. She's still a communist.


But was she hot? I need to know so I can tell if this is a good thing or a bad thing.
 
2011-02-03 02:57:20 PM

neversubmit: Celephais: and what of Lance Banning a Madisonian scholar, he is the one that matters in that he is the lens Dr. Chomsky is looking though.



In his book Neoliberalism Chomsky attributes that quote to Banning but google tells me it is actually from Gordon Wood's "The Creation of the American Republic Reconsidered".

From the little I've read, Banning seems to make an academic's good faith effort at impartiality, trying dilligently to answer questions like "Why was the James Madison of the 1780s so different than the one of the 1790s?

Wood and Chomsky seem more interested in questions like "Can Socialism inform our understanding of the motives of America's founding fathers?"
 
2011-02-03 03:00:34 PM

dan1101: ne2d: So wait, did he bury his chess set in his backyard or something?

Yeah, just because you find a chess set, why does that mean it was Madisons? And even granting that it was Madison's how does that prove he played against Jefferson with that set?

This is potentially interesting but probably unprovable tourist bait.


Archaeology does not work that way. You've seen Raiders a few too many times.
 
2011-02-03 03:17:13 PM
Go Dukes!!

/didn't play much chess while attending the University named in his honor -
 
2011-02-03 04:48:27 PM
Celephais Funny your name and position. I like your sense of humor. You remind me of an old friend who is a Professor of History although I've lost touch with them.

Anyway the first quote "the Constitution was intrinsically an aristocratic document designed to check the democratic tendencies of the period" is as you say from Wood's book but the other quote about government responsibility "to protect the minority of the opulent against the majority," is as best as I can tell it is wholly Madison's although it does seem as if Madison meaning is somewhat different than Chomsky's take. I cannot tell where or if Dr. Banning comes into it.
 
2011-02-03 06:07:46 PM

bdub77: Were his pawns black?

Well, his vice president was George Clinton.


Get the funk out of here!

newfunkcast.sevenyards.com
/virginia planters represent
 
2011-02-03 06:39:36 PM

neversubmit: Dr.Gonzo7719: neversubmit: Celephais: and what of Lance Banning a Madisonian scholar, he is the one that matters in that he is the lens Dr. Chomsky is looking though.

Meh. He did his doctorate at Wash U, so he was probably a communist anyway.

/had an ex-girlfriend that went to Wash U. She's still a communist.

But was she hot? I need to know so I can tell if this is a good thing or a bad thing.


Yeah, she was hot enough for me. She didn't give head, though. The communist thing I could deal with, I like arguing politics (and she didn't mind I was a Republican), but no head? fark that.
 
2011-02-03 07:15:45 PM
neversubmit: Anyway the first quote "the Constitution was intrinsically an aristocratic document designed to check the democratic tendencies of the period" is as you say from Wood's book but the other...

What did I say, what did I tell you? You would be back here, regurgitating Gordon Wood...
 
2011-02-03 11:46:53 PM

Bermuda59: I forget, what way does the James Madison move?


Any way it farking wants to.
 
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