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(Some Guy)   In the latest example of the dumbing down of America, 'Twilight' is required reading in a college lit course   (thedailywh.at) divider line 147
    More: Stupid, Bram Stoker, Mary Shelley  
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5335 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Feb 2011 at 5:21 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-02-01 08:05:40 PM

theoutlaw: What the hell is that supposed to mean?


Sounds like they are discussing how (science/fantasy?) fiction has changed from the 1800s (when it wasn't popular) to the most popular form today. Twilight and Harry Potter would both be good examples of the popular modern form.

It's not "read for enjoyment" class, you're going to get some stinkers if you are critically reviewing different eras.
 
2011-02-01 08:06:10 PM

bhcompy: exempli gratis: I had to read Discworld, Enders Game and A Clockwork Orange for HS lit class - a curriculum comprised of the three dullest, most poorly written novels ever.

Ender's Game isn't dull, but it is a boy's book and it should be read and examined by middle schoolers rather than high schoolers, if at all. Girls hate it regardless.


I have a female friend who loves Ender's Game. Perhaps she's atypical, haven't tried to get many girls to read it. But if I had to pick a mormon writer, I'd go with Card over Meyer any day.
 
2011-02-01 08:06:51 PM

Non-evil Monkey: Twilight, for all it's faults, was popular. I think reading a book for the purpose of trying to figure out how such an apparently low-quality book was able to become so wildly popular has serious academic value.

And no the answer is not "because people are idiots". That might be true, but why this book of all low-quality books (and there are many) became so popular is not a question you should ignore. Especially if you plan on writing for a living.


This

("the answer" is not... "an answer" certainly is)
 
2011-02-01 08:07:34 PM

FurbyGoneFubar: bhcompy: exempli gratis: I had to read Discworld, Enders Game and A Clockwork Orange for HS lit class - a curriculum comprised of the three dullest, most poorly written novels ever.

Ender's Game isn't dull, but it is a boy's book and it should be read and examined by middle schoolers rather than high schoolers, if at all. Girls hate it regardless.

I have a female friend who loves Ender's Game. Perhaps she's atypical, haven't tried to get many girls to read it. But if I had to pick a mormon writer, I'd go with Card over Meyer any day.


Oh, for sure. I'm just saying that it's a book that's written for things that boys like to do, like save the universe and beat other kids while doing it.
 
2011-02-01 08:11:06 PM
you are all very lucky you didnt grow up in canada and have to read an assload of farley mowat books.
 
2011-02-01 08:12:38 PM

bhcompy: exempli gratis: I had to read Discworld, Enders Game and A Clockwork Orange for HS lit class - a curriculum comprised of the three dullest, most poorly written novels ever.

Ender's Game isn't dull, but it is a boy's book and it should be read and examined by middle schoolers rather than high schoolers, if at all. Girls hate it regardless.


I was trolling farkers who hate classic literature; should have known they'd quit halfway through the thread.
 
2011-02-01 08:13:56 PM

theoutlaw: According to the class schedule, they spent three weeks on Twilight and wrote an essay on it.

From the schedule:
'fiction's transformation from (around 1800) a low and somewhat marginal literary form to (today) our culture's dominant literary mode.'

What the hell is that supposed to mean?

/If my professor turned around and told us we had to read Twilight, I think we could actually have him removed.


Putting aside the Twilight issue, it's absolutely true that fiction (and the novel) was not a respected literary form at first. Only poetry was considered literature.
 
2011-02-01 08:15:07 PM

exempli gratis: I was trolling farkers who hate classic literature; should have known they'd quit halfway through the thread.


Very well, 10/10
 
2011-02-01 08:17:04 PM

GreenAdder: We read the novelization of the film adaptation of "V for Vendetta" in my composition class


I can see reading the original graphic novel, and comparing and contrasting its ideas to the ideas in the movie, but what is the point in reading the novelization? It's just a crappy copy of a copy.
 
2011-02-01 08:30:12 PM
Given that this is for a schooling-related story, shouldn't the tag be FAIL?
 
2011-02-01 08:33:01 PM
Does it have Reasoning With Vampires (new window) as an accompanying study site?

I hate Twitlight series so much.

/No. That is not in error.
 
2011-02-01 08:49:20 PM
Heavenly shades of night are falling...
It's twilight TIME!
Out of the mist your voice is calling...
It's twilight TIME!
When purple colored curtains mark the end of day
I'll hear you, my dear, (and you'll know I'll say)
It's twilight TIME! (can't touch this y'all)

s3.amazonaws.com
 
2011-02-01 09:01:23 PM
mikeintulsa.files.wordpress.com

Subby must have missed that this is at OSU, so calling it a "college" course isnt really appropriate.
 
2011-02-01 09:09:37 PM
you haven't read Twilight until you've read it in it's original Klingon.
 
2011-02-01 09:17:34 PM

Mad_Radhu: GreenAdder: We read the novelization of the film adaptation of "V for Vendetta" in my composition class

I can see reading the original graphic novel, and comparing and contrasting its ideas to the ideas in the movie, but what is the point in reading the novelization? It's just a crappy copy of a copy.


She intentionally chose it because it was light and could be read in a weekend. It wasn't a literature class, but a composition class. Our task wasn't to analyze the book's prose (no doubt written by some hack under the influence of the best hooch $10 could buy). We were supposed to analyze the characters and their actions.
As stated previously, you don't need a masterpiece to work from when you're doing this. One could easily to this using "The Star-Bellied Sneetch" or "Doom: Repercussions of Evil." You could even do it using the sad sexual vampire fantasies of a bored Mormon housewife.
 
2011-02-01 09:18:41 PM
I had a professor in college who was pretty much a modernized hippie turned feminist, but yet she was pretty awesome. The class that I took with her was a class about contemporary American lit. No we didn't read Twilight, but we did read some awesome books like Tales of the City, The Witches of Eastwick, and a few others that made me glad that I was an English major. At the same time she was teaching the second part of world lit at the college and one of the books that she was using was Twilight. She told us, most of us being Juniors and Seniors, that the kids in the class never read the other books, but when it came to this book, the entire class read it. I think that if I ever get my PHD, I will not even touch this book or even think about it when I am picking books for my classes.
 
2011-02-01 09:23:26 PM

itsfullofstars: OSU


It's a 200 level honors course at THE Ohio State University... not sure why you have a photo of a fat Sooner there.
 
2011-02-01 09:23:29 PM

Weirdnjfan1: I had a professor in college who was pretty much a modernized hippie turned feminist, but yet she was pretty awesome.


That sounds like my calculus prof. She was also the faculty advisor for NoRML.
 
2011-02-01 09:26:36 PM

gingerer: you haven't read Twilight until you've read it in it's original Klingon.


What the... Why? Do the demographics overlap like that at all? I think I need a Venn Diagram...
 
2011-02-01 09:37:21 PM
I've taught a horror course. Twilight isn't horror. I get miffed to see people teaching "horror fantasy" courses who have so little knowledge of the genre apart from the well-known novels, Dracula, Frankenstein, Jekyll and Hyde.

Most of the good stuff is short fiction but there are still plenty of novels to choose from that are far from "minor". Suzy McKee Charnas's The Vampire Tapestry or Kim Newman's Anno Dracula kick the shiat out of Twilight. It's too bad the students in this class are going to come out of it thinking there isn't anything between the same old blah *classics* and Meyer' worstsellers.

/hate seeing my subject get treated so
//farking amateur horror profs, mutter mutter...
 
2011-02-01 09:44:56 PM
I had to read one of those Harry farking Potter books for a freshman college class. Like this, it was just a publicity stunt to get a little attention on the local news.

When class finally started, our professor said "So, nobody read this, right?" and we ditched the whole thing.
 
2011-02-01 10:01:07 PM
If I were a college student assigned to essay the Twilight books, I would take all the passionate comments here and craft a narrative about how the popularity of this book makes people swell with joy, say "meh," or cringe. And all of those criticisms would probably be--I'm thinking, but may be wrong--legitimate sources; no library visits needed. Then I'd check Wikipedia just to be sure.

I read all of the books within a month and thoroughly enjoyed the diversion.

Never a book snob: if it reads well, it reads well.
 
2011-02-01 10:29:18 PM
I suspect that if it's required study it might be in relation to the banality in common society along with Gustave Flaubert.
 
2011-02-01 11:22:26 PM
i've said it before, but the WORST books i've ever read were for school, both high school and college. i can't imagine that teen romance fluff like twilight could possibly be worse than "serious" fiction like ethan frome or native son. i've had deeper emotional resonance from dungeons and dragons novelizations than anything by that hack james fenimore cooper.

remember, mark twain wrote about how terrible cooper was an an author. but cooper was popular in his day, so that's why people still read his books. they aren't good, they were just popular at the time.

in a hundred years, they'll be teaching stephen king, stephanie meyer, and dan brown right alongside shakespeare and faulkner.
 
2011-02-01 11:40:11 PM
I've said it before, I'll say it again.

I will never forgive my 8th Grade school for forcing us to read The Outsiders

Tripe.

Utter, horrible crap. A gangster book written by a teen aged white girl.
 
2011-02-02 02:25:50 AM

hasty ambush: While having a marketabled skill most likely being employed with relatively little student loan debt.


As a welder.
 
2011-02-02 02:28:38 AM

enderthexenocide: in a hundred years, they'll be teaching stephen king, stephanie meyer, and dan brown right alongside shakespeare and faulkner.


To be fair, stephen king is actually a decent author as long as you never read the last half of any of his novels (or in the case of dark tower the last half of the series).
 
2011-02-02 04:50:55 AM

Genevieve Marie: Glockenspiel Hero: Genevieve Marie: Rev.K: Wow, submitter. Really, wow.

It took me all of about 3 seconds to think of how Twilight could be used in a college lit course without dumbing down the content.

Have you actually read the books?

I have.

I can see it as a reading exercise on sexism and abuse in relationships, but other than that...

I mean, those books are truly awful.

So? It sold a bazillion copies. Clearly people enjoy it. Why? How did the topics and themes in the book resonate with current culture? Did similar literature exist in previous years, and was that successful? (etc etc etc)

I serve on the committee that approves courses at my college. (Just got out of a meeting in fact) There are plenty of interesting questions about stuff like this out there, and dissecting them is a key part of analysis.

Today we went over some random seminar courses: One covered the impact of advertising. Another uses The Simpsons to discuss psychology. Yet another goes into the different conceptions of physical beauty around the world. Should these be included in a college curriculum?

They absolutely should be included. They're relevant and interesting. But look at the context here- they're not dissecting this as a book without literary merit that has popular influence, they're reading it alongside Mary Shelley and including it as an "important, influential narrative".

I can see this being discussed in a women's studies class, a psychology class, a marketing class, or in a religious studies class as part of an examination on religion in modern American culture. But I can't defend it being taught alongside good novels as an equal.


Nobody SAYS it's being taught as an equal, you twit. That's what everyone is TELLING you. It's a "compare and contrast" thing when put up against the other books. And you can argue how bad it is all you want. It IS influential.
 
2011-02-02 05:17:52 AM
'to critique' is not a verb.
 
2011-02-02 08:47:55 AM

Occam's Chainsaw: Old story. Twilight is required reading for that lit course as a case study in how schlock sells. IIRC, the point of the course is critical literary analysis. They compare and contrast Twilight with literature that is now considered "classic", and in its day was considered pedantic trash.


If that means Twilight will one day be considered "classic", I might just kill myself now. The future is bleak.
 
2011-02-02 09:19:50 AM
I don't feel I can criticize the book without reading it first.
 
2011-02-02 10:26:13 AM

thefatbasturd: Nobody SAYS it's being taught as an equal, you twit. That's what everyone is TELLING you. It's a "compare and contrast" thing when put up against the other books. And you can argue how bad it is all you want. It IS influential.


So everyone was TELLING him it is being taught as equal. Now you are TELLING him it is compare and contrast. Care to set your TELLING apart by actually showing evidence or proof it's compare and contrast? Or are you a twit yourself?
 
2011-02-02 10:41:54 AM

thefatbasturd: Nobody SAYS it's being taught as an equal, you twit. That's what everyone is TELLING you. It's a "compare and contrast" thing when put up against the other books. And you can argue how bad it is all you want. It IS influential.


Did you open the copy of the course syllabus upthread, which was posted before I commented?

I did. It's grouped in the syllabus with Dracula and Frankenstein as an influential work on the supernatural. It's being taught as an equal.

I'm sure the actual assignments will be to analyze and compare and contrast, but the course syllabus makes no distinction between Stephanie Meyer and Mary Shelly.

Which is pretty freaking awful.
 
2011-02-02 10:57:43 AM

Genevieve Marie: I'm sure the actual assignments will be to analyze and compare and contrast, but the course syllabus makes no distinction between Stephanie Meyer and Mary Shelly.


I'm sure the actual assignments won't compare and contrast and conclude Twilight is shiat. From the syllabus:

While we read and discuss some important, influential narratives about the supernatural - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Bram Stoker's Dracula, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, and Stephenie Meyer's Twilight as well a few minor works - we will also explore how these texts, like much other fiction, try to create particular reading experiences, as they push us to consider the nature and importance of literary imagination and the way fiction's seductiveness is tied to other potentially dangerous attractions.

The professor just told you great things about Twilight (bolded) and placed it on the same pedastal. The easy "A" is to agree, the difficult "A" is to disagree and have to write that much better of a paper and even then cross your fingers and hope the teacher grades fairly. Guess which way students actually go? And I don't fault them for it.
 
2011-02-02 03:28:01 PM

lennavan: thefatbasturd: Nobody SAYS it's being taught as an equal, you twit. That's what everyone is TELLING you. It's a "compare and contrast" thing when put up against the other books. And you can argue how bad it is all you want. It IS influential.

So everyone was TELLING him it is being taught as equal. Now you are TELLING him it is compare and contrast. Care to set your TELLING apart by actually showing evidence or proof it's compare and contrast? Or are you a twit yourself?


Don't read well do you? What my post says is that everyone is telling HER is that it is not being necessarily being taught as an equal but as a comparison of how the genre has changed. You've gone beyond twit to full on idiot.
 
2011-02-02 03:40:35 PM

lennavan: Genevieve Marie: I'm sure the actual assignments will be to analyze and compare and contrast, but the course syllabus makes no distinction between Stephanie Meyer and Mary Shelly.

I'm sure the actual assignments won't compare and contrast and conclude Twilight is shiat. From the syllabus:

While we read and discuss some important, influential narratives about the supernatural - Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, Bram Stoker's Dracula, Henry James' The Turn of the Screw, and Stephenie Meyer's Twilight as well a few minor works - we will also explore how these texts, like much other fiction, try to create particular reading experiences, as they push us to consider the nature and importance of literary imagination and the way fiction's seductiveness is tied to other potentially dangerous attractions.

The professor just told you great things about Twilight (bolded) and placed it on the same pedastal. The easy "A" is to agree, the difficult "A" is to disagree and have to write that much better of a paper and even then cross your fingers and hope the teacher grades fairly. Guess which way students actually go? And I don't fault them for it.


Really? Where? Where does it say "great things about Twilight"? "Influential" and an "important" part of the genre? Yeah, it is due to it's overwhelming popularity and the way it has swept the world AND so polarised the fans and detractors. Also? Actually READ the last part you "bolded", "the way fiction's seductiveness is tied to other potentially dangerous attractions". If you can't see how Twilight would fit well into that discussion, you really are stupid. And it has NOTHING to do with the book's literary merit.
 
2011-02-02 04:00:33 PM
What kind of education would you really expect at the Ohio State University, anyway? Sometimes you have to dumb things down for your audience.
 
2011-02-02 05:01:28 PM

Redscum: Occam's Chainsaw: Old story. Twilight is required reading for that lit course as a case study in how schlock sells. IIRC, the point of the course is critical literary analysis. They compare and contrast Twilight with literature that is now considered "classic", and in its day was considered pedantic trash.

If that means Twilight will one day be considered "classic", I might just kill myself now. The future is bleak.


Well I've got some bad news for you, Sparky. It very well might be. A great deal of what is considered "literature" today was derided by authors and critics of the day as the death of the art form and it's popularity proof positive of the decline of human intelligence.

Great examples are the "pulp" writers. People like Walter Gibson, Alex Raymond, Philip Francis Nowlan, Sax Rohmer, Mickey Spillane, Zane Grey, H.P. Lovecraft, E.R. Burroughs, H. Rider Haggard, R.E. Howard, W. E. Johns. I could go on and on. many of these were considered "trash" writers in their day, but are now thought to be classics of their genre and being thought of as "literature".

Even Shakespeare was not revered as "The Great Bard" in his day. He was not a writer of "great literature", but someone who wrote plays that appealed to the masses as well as "society". He received some critical praise at the time, but was not thought of as the greatest of his contemporaries. Ben Jonson said his writings "wanted art" and other critics dismissed him for combining the comic and the tragic.

It all comes down to this: WE aren't going to be the ones deciding what future generations will call "the great classics" of our age. THEY are. And there is a better than average chance Twilight could be on the list. Because hate it or not, there is NO denying that there is SOMETHING there that appeals to the public in a huge way. I'm not arguing that popularity equals quality, I'm just saying there is SMOMETHING more than "crap writing" there that strikes a chord with the public. And trying to discover what THAT is is why it is a viable option to discuss it in this class. The fact that you don't get it (the appeal NOT the books themselves) doesn't make you smarter, dumber, better or worse than those who do. Just makes you different.
 
2011-02-02 06:14:48 PM

thefatbasturd: lennavan: thefatbasturd: Nobody SAYS it's being taught as an equal, you twit. That's what everyone is TELLING you. It's a "compare and contrast" thing when put up against the other books. And you can argue how bad it is all you want. It IS influential.

So everyone was TELLING him it is being taught as equal. Now you are TELLING him it is compare and contrast. Care to set your TELLING apart by actually showing evidence or proof it's compare and contrast? Or are you a twit yourself?

Don't read well do you? What my post says is that everyone is telling HER is that it is not being necessarily being taught as an equal but as a comparison of how the genre has changed. You've gone beyond twit to full on idiot.


Right but you're an amazingly retarded twit because it is not being taught as a comparison. You've gone beyond full derp and entered the domain of defending going full derp. You've gone full derp and defend it.
 
2011-02-02 06:16:47 PM

thefatbasturd: Really? Where? Where does it say "great things about Twilight"? "Influential" and an "important" part of the genre? Yeah, it is due to it's overwhelming popularity and the way it has swept the world AND so polarised the fans and detractors. Also? Actually READ the last part you "bolded", "the way fiction's seductiveness is tied to other potentially dangerous attractions". If you can't see how Twilight would fit well into that discussion, you really are stupid. And it has NOTHING to do with the book's literary merit.


My apologies, all along I assumed you have had a college class. I can clearly tell from this post you didn't go to college. It's cool mocking people and making fun of how stupid they are but now I feel like someone who made fun of a kid and just learned he has Down's Syndrome. Boy do I feel sheepish.
 
2011-02-02 07:37:51 PM

lennavan: thefatbasturd: Really? Where? Where does it say "great things about Twilight"? "Influential" and an "important" part of the genre? Yeah, it is due to it's overwhelming popularity and the way it has swept the world AND so polarised the fans and detractors. Also? Actually READ the last part you "bolded", "the way fiction's seductiveness is tied to other potentially dangerous attractions". If you can't see how Twilight would fit well into that discussion, you really are stupid. And it has NOTHING to do with the book's literary merit.

My apologies, all along I assumed you have had a college class. I can clearly tell from this post you didn't go to college. It's cool mocking people and making fun of how stupid they are but now I feel like someone who made fun of a kid and just learned he has Down's Syndrome. Boy do I feel sheepish.


I have two degrees actually, not that it matters. Clearly you are one of those idiots that is SOOOOOOOOOOOOO in love with their own opinions they can't get over themselves. I've said it before and I'll say it again, the literary merit of the book has NO bearing on the books influence on society OR the books influence on the genre for writers coming after it. Studying the book to suss out what struck a chord with so many people to try and use it to attract readers to later, better books is without a doubt a viable pursuit.

As for derp, which is more derp like. "The book is crap, but it sold like crazy, let's try and figure out WHY." Or your "DRRRRRR HRRRRRRRRRRRRRR!!!!!! ME no like book. Me no like = nothing of value for ANYONE!!!!!! Sussept if thur morans!!!!!" I notice your arguments are COMPLETELY devoid of any kind of actual reasoning or arguments to refute a damn thing that has been said other than "I don't like the book cuz I think it's crap." Which is pretty ignorant since nobody has said it ISN'T crap.

You have NO business mocking someone else for being stupid. You've got that market cornered yourself. Because clearly you have NO clue that "important" and "influential" (which by the way can mean it influences for good OR ill, since you apparently don't know this either) do not mean "great" or even "well written". You are just one of those stupid, arrogant pricks who have been convinced that they are SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO special that they get to be the arbiter of what does and does not have any merit of any kind for anyone.
 
2011-02-02 07:51:39 PM

Coming on a Bicycle: 'to critique' is not a verb.


cri·tique
n.
1. A critical review or commentary, especially one dealing with works of art or literature.
2. A critical discussion of a specified topic.
3. The art of criticism.
tr.v. cri·tiqued, cri·tiqu·ing, cri·tiques Usage Problem
To review or discuss critically.

[French, from Greek kritik (tekhn), (art) of criticism, feminine of kritikos, critical; see critic.]
Usage Note: Critique has been used as a verb meaning "to review or discuss critically" since the 18th century, but lately this usage has gained much wider currency, in part because the verb criticize, once neutral between praise and censure, is now mainly used in a negative sense.

You were saying?
 
2011-02-02 09:00:37 PM

thefatbasturd: I have two degrees actually, not that it matters.


It doesn't. I have more, if it did.

thefatbasturd: the literary merit of the book has NO bearing on the books influence on society OR the books influence on the genre for writers coming after it.


Mark Twain disagrees. That's Samuel Clemens, for those who don't really have two degrees. I can't help you if you're not familiar with him and his writings (that is, not his books) as this is fark and not some literary class.

thefatbasturd: Which is pretty ignorant since nobody has said it ISN'T crap.


Have you any idea how many courses I could fill with crap? Can you imagine a mathematics course where they teach you how to incorrectly solve a calculus problem? The value to such an exercise is negligible at best. Much better to spend your time on how to do something well.

thefatbasturd: You have NO business mocking someone else for being stupid


You have no business commenting on course design. I win.

thefatbasturd: who have been convinced that they are SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO special that they get to be the arbiter of what does and does not have any merit of any kind for anyone.


To be fair, I'm not the only one at my University that feels that way about me.
 
2011-02-02 11:12:40 PM

lennavan: thefatbasturd: I have two degrees actually, not that it matters.

It doesn't. I have more, if it did


Not a pissing contest, remember YOU brought my attendence in college up asshole.

lennavan: thefatbasturd: the literary merit of the book has NO bearing on the books influence on society OR the books influence on the genre for writers coming after it.

Mark Twain disagrees. That's Samuel Clemens, for those who don't really have two degrees. I can't help you if you're not familiar with him and his writings (that is, not his books) as this is fark and not some literary class


I Know Mark Twain. I own his complete works (including his essays and criticisms and not just the novels. He has any bearing on this because? I know he REALLY hated Cooper and his writing, but just because Twain had some ideas on "popular vs. quality" does not make him right. Just means he had an opinion on the subject. And you'll have to do a little more than just dropping his name if you want to claim he had an opinion on how studying how a poorly written book that became so popular as to be an international phenomenon is a "bad" thing.

lennavan: thefatbasturd: Which is pretty ignorant since nobody has said it ISN'T crap.

Have you any idea how many courses I could fill with crap? Can you imagine a mathematics course where they teach you how to incorrectly solve a calculus problem? The value to such an exercise is negligible at best. Much better to spend your time on how to do something well.


Like say HOW TO APPEAL TO A HUGE AUDIENCE OF READERS WHICH GOOD OR BAD TWILIGHT DID? I know. I know. It's not REALLY worth study because nobody REALLY enjoyed it they just bought it and started the phenomenon JUST to piss you off.


lennavan: thefatbasturd: You have NO business mocking someone else for being stupid

You have no business commenting on course design. I win.


Again. Not a contest. You DON'T win a damn thing.

lennavan: thefatbasturd: who have been convinced that they are SOOOOOOOOOOOOOO special that they get to be the arbiter of what does and does not have any merit of any kind for anyone.

To be fair, I'm not the only one at my University that feels that way about me


And THERE is your biggest problem. You've arrogantly bought into your own press. And IF the people at "your University" feel that way (I really doubt they do feel you have the final say on ANYTHING as far as if it does or doesn't have any worth to anyone) I weep for the students. Because you've sure shown NOTHING to merit that in this discussion other than the AMAZINGLY high opinion you have of your self and your opinions. Which is really highly overrated seeing as how you don't know the difference between a mathematics class with quantifiable rights and wrongs and something more arbitrary and subjective like a literature class where studying and discussing how a book of less than stellar literary merit was able to clearly do SOMETHING right to appeal to such a wide audience MIGHT be beneficial or of interest to literature students.
 
2011-02-03 10:18:35 AM

thefatbasturd: other than the AMAZINGLY high opinion you have of your self and your opinions.


I only get uppity when putting people like you in your place. I'm not really this way in real life to normal people. I've studied the practice of undergraduate education. There is actual research on it and published journals that are specifically for it, I bet you didn't know that.

In a forum such as Fark, I cannot quickly impart what I know from the experience of others who were generous enough with their time to write it up to you. Suffice to say, 3 classics juxtaposed with a 4th shiat book, whether the teacher intended it or not is irrelevant, the students will assume the 4th shiat book is on the same level as the first 3.

thefatbasturd: where studying and discussing how a book of less than stellar literary merit


Is a waste of time.

thefatbasturd: was able to clearly do SOMETHING right to appeal to such a wide audience


In college, you learn the name of this fallacy and why it is incorrect logic. This is where you hinge your argument and this is a named logical fallacy. Where do I go with this other than to mock you and your dual degrees?

thefatbasturd: You have no business commenting on course design. I win.

Again. Not a contest. You DON'T win a damn thing.


It's the internet. You're a random person posting ridiculous nonsensical uninformed opinions. I may as well have some fun.
 
2011-02-03 10:27:57 AM

bhcompy: exempli gratis: I had to read Discworld, Enders Game and A Clockwork Orange for HS lit class - a curriculum comprised of the three dullest, most poorly written novels ever.

Ender's Game isn't dull, but it is a boy's book and it should be read and examined by middle schoolers rather than high schoolers, if at all. Girls hate it regardless.


We do? Huh. Must have missed that memo. I loved it.
 
2011-02-03 03:53:08 PM

lennavan: I only get uppity when putting people like you in your place. I'm not really this way in real life to normal people. I've studied the practice of undergraduate education. There is actual research on it and published journals that are specifically for it, I bet you didn't know that.


Congrats! You've become an ISG (Internet Smart Guy). I don't care WHAT you've studied, your opinion based on your interpretation of the data and facts is NOT the only RIGHT one. The fact you can't see this is what makes you a real world dumbass.

lennavan: thefatbasturd: was able to clearly do SOMETHING right to appeal to such a wide audience

In college, you learn the name of this fallacy and why it is incorrect logic. This is where you hinge your argument and this is a named logical fallacy. Where do I go with this other than to mock you and your dual degrees?


Really? how is this a fallacy? One of the goals of being a successful audience is finding an audience. Twilight did that. How is this NOT doing something right? Oh, right. Because YOU don't like it there is NOTHING positive about it. Sorry. Forgot. Say, what kind of wineglass do you use for your flatulence?

lennavan: thefatbasturd: Again. Not a contest. You DON'T in a damn thing.

It's the internet. You're a random person posting ridiculous nonsensical uninformed opinions. I may as well have some fun.



Well you go RIGHT ahead, buddy. Because with every post you make yourself look more and more the dumbass with your own nonsensical arrogant opinions. Go ahead and read back up the thread and you'll see that most people posting were smart enough to realise as crappy as the book is there might be SOMETHING to be learned from it. But I'm sure everyone else isn't as smart as you unless they are agreeing with whatever drivel is coming out of your stupid mouth.
 
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