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(Government Technology)   Lots of IT jobs to be available soon IF you can handle inconveniences like excellent pay and a pension   (govtech.com) divider line 320
    More: PSA, Under Pressure, pensions, Bureau of Labor Statistics, furloughs  
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24061 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jan 2011 at 11:48 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-01-27 12:41:12 PM  
My first ten years in the workforce I did a number of IT jobs, some enjoyable, some not. Then one day I realized I had been doing the same repairs and upgrades for two years and even though i occasionally got the chance to program or at least script a little I had hit the wall. Wasn't on the management track, had a good reputation as a troubleshooter but the challenge just wasn't there anymore.

So I took a 'sabbatical' and drove a Boston taxi for a little over a year. Best move I ever made. Learned 15 ways to get to Fenway Paaahk at rush hour. Tried every diner from Southie to Somerville. Cleared my head out real good. Got my next IT job driving that cab. But I got downsized two years later, which was a real shame; that was a great gig.
 
2011-01-27 12:41:41 PM  

Big Al: The_Pirate Quote 2011-01-27 12:01:49 PM
bump: You wouldn't even need an IT department if you'd ween them off of the PC teet. Macs all around and you might actually get some productive work out of people...

HAHA...


>>

You can laugh but it's true. I have seen the IT dept at my company run around fixing virus outbreaks, windows corruptions, spyware, slowdown caused by everything from spyware viruses and registry errors, windows updates corrupting systems, etc.

Osx is such a superior platform in every respect, and deployment is built in with ARD, rather than buying expensive applications then learning how stupid they are like Altiris.


Your IT department doesn't know how to secure their network. PCs on our managed network very seldom get viruses, and if they do, the IT dept knows about it before the user does. In 8 years, I have seen ONE virus effect one of our servers, and that's because it was new and Symantec hadn't seen it yet. Within 4 hours of it being noticed by one of the server guys, Symantec had a patch out and added it to their automatic updates.
 
2011-01-27 12:41:45 PM  

ventmonkey: RussianPooper: I like how the only thing people think IT does is help desk.

I believe this is part of the problem. If IT does their job well, and the servers/services keep working correctly, all the end users see the IT staff doing is help desk. I've had people demand that I not wear headphones and listen to music because they might have a problem, and just want to be able to yell at me. They have no idea that we spend most of our time keeping things running smoothly...er...in theory.


I work in Network Infrastructure so what I do is sitting and typing or after work hours or on holidays, weekends, etc. So during the week if I am not running around people assume I am doing nothing even if I was there until 10 pm the night before or worked all weekend.
 
2011-01-27 12:43:01 PM  

The_Gallant_Gallstone: Jobber8742: What you always hear about are the older people around here, they did not have it taken away when it was changed. They'll still get that sweet deal.

Plot bloody rebellion. Join the PSL or grin and bear it.

JoeCamelToe: I tell them to stop looking at porn.

You sound female.


Oh, I'm not complaining about our retirement. I just hate when people complain about us Government employees get this sweet pension when really the policy was changed over 20 years ago. A raise would be nice, but you jerks put an end to that.
 
2011-01-27 12:43:19 PM  

The_Gallant_Gallstone: ventmonkey: And as a side gripe....as bad as the economy is, I would think it would be easier to find good developers. I am having such a hard time finding a good Java developer. They just don't seem to be unemployed at all. Any advice on where to look?

By "good" do you "unattainably perfect given the meager wage I'm offering"?

I'm not saying that's the case, but part of this economic death we're experiencing involves employers expecting demigods to work for practically nothing.


Oh, not at all. We can pay quite well. I just can't find anyone very good. Everyone seems to know PHP, not so many available people doing enterprise Java.
 
2011-01-27 12:44:06 PM  

StrangeQ: As someone who is starting his masters in computer engineering this summer...I'm actually getting a kick out of this.

/utter terror replaced with cautious optimism?


If you end up with an IT job with that degree, you have failed.
 
2011-01-27 12:44:25 PM  
I would also like to throw a CSB out there.

When I moved to a new state I had to go whore myself out in the IT contracting scene again. For those of you not in the industry, as a network engineer it's not always very easy to find a solid steady job (especially a direct hire). Once your skillset gets to a certain level, a company would prefer to only bring you in for the design and implementation phases of a project, then roll it over to some idiot that they pay half your salary for "operation and support". So anyway, contracting it was for a while.

One 8 week contract I took was for the State's Department of Revenue. I have never worked in public sector before so I had no idea what I was in for. Never have I seen a culture of such undeserved self-congratulatory circle jerking. First off, not one single person that was actually an employee of DOR had any farking clue how to do the job that their job titled implied was their responsibility. NONE OF THEM. Their 'network person' was a moderately attractive MILFy type that after 5 years in the job did not know how to set ANY of the passwords on a Cisco router. Not only that, she got mad when I tried to explain to her HOW to do it instead of just doing it for her. They essentially survived by getting budget approval for boondoggle projects so they could bring in contractors for a few weeks at a time just so they could have people on site that understood technology for a few weeks. It was very very sad.

The worst part is that they constantly had catered meetings to congratulate each other on what a wonderful job they did... and by job I mean hiring contractors for a few weeks. Then to add insult to injury, they did some MORE of their annual asbestos removal in the building.

fark government work. Apparently everything centers around that pension.... positions are filled not based on qualification but rather who the other people want to look at for 30 years while they are waiting to punch out. They are terrible with their budget since they don't have to raise their own revenue or compete with anybody, and if you are luckly enough to be hired, you have 30 years of coworker incompetence to look forward to.

/Not naming the state but it isn't MI
 
2011-01-27 12:44:33 PM  

dr.zaeus: I know of a lot of fellow ArcGIS Analyst/Developers that are about to retire. These old bastards have been around since the Avenue/AML days and have left a mountain of code update work for the next generation to sort out.

Municipal and State government mapping departments, however, aren't the best GIS positions out there; get a job with an Electric Membership Cooperative like I did and you'll strike paydirt.


At CA Dept of Fish and Game GIS is very important but the pay is not so great. The benefits are ok, not as good as people believe they are.
 
2011-01-27 12:44:55 PM  

LittleSmitty: (2a) (corollary). No matter how hard you try, you can't make a baby in much less than 9 months.


I've heard this phrased as "you can't get nine women to make a baby in one month".
 
2011-01-27 12:44:56 PM  

BigMevy: And yet, just like when people meet a lawyer or a doctor the first thing they start doing is asking for free legal or medical advice, the first thing they say when they find out you're IT is "Say... I've got this problem on my pc..."


As a programmer, I always respond: "I only write the software. I don't actually know how to use it."
 
2011-01-27 12:45:41 PM  

John Paul Jones: HotSalsaZoot: Uhhh, no. Really, no. Ten years ago, someone with a BS in CS, 2-3 years of real Oracle experience, maybe a year in Oracle Apps experience would get you $120-150. Today, it's an MBA, 5-8 years Oracle experience plus must have worked in every programming environment known to man for $65-80K/year AND they'll work you to death and typically offer little in return.

Glory days of IT are over.

You're talking about DBAs. That's one tiny aspect of IT. Trust me, people that actually know system and network architecture are making more than ever.


You're both talking pure technical as well. I just hired a new technical consultant who does 0 hands on. He simply follows me around and fields technical questions on our products. His salary is $175k a year.

At the sales end we're talking even higher .. easily into the $300k a year range.

Once you've been hands on for awhile look to go into consulting if you want the money then slide into sales if you want even more money and can handle the pressure.
 
2011-01-27 12:46:04 PM  

ventmonkey: Oh, not at all. We can pay quite well. I just can't find anyone very good. Everyone seems to know PHP, not so many available people doing enterprise Java.


Where are you looking for people?
 
2011-01-27 12:46:06 PM  

altinos: BigMevy: And yet, just like when people meet a lawyer or a doctor the first thing they start doing is asking for free legal or medical advice, the first thing they say when they find out you're IT is "Say... I've got this problem on my pc..."

As a programmer, I always respond: "I only write the software. I don't actually know how to use it."


I've always gone with "I only know how to use Unix...not windows"
 
2011-01-27 12:46:18 PM  
Government IT worker here.

6 years into my career with 3 here. On the 'Special Implementations' (installing all the new big expensive systems) team after putting my dues in helpdesk and deskside.

Currently 80K/year + fair amount of OT, 5 weeks vacation per year to start, 4 weeks sick leave, full pension, casual work-environment. Lots of training.

It's a decent gig.

Could I be making more in the private sector? Who knows. My first three jobs out of college were in the private sector (QA, Helpdesk, Helpdesk/Junior Sys Admin) paid 26K, 30K, and 35K respectively. I do know that I was treated like just a cog in the first two jobs, and like dirt in the third.

But I like it here, and I don't see myself anywhere else in the forseeable future.
 
2011-01-27 12:47:43 PM  

altinos: ventmonkey: Oh, not at all. We can pay quite well. I just can't find anyone very good. Everyone seems to know PHP, not so many available people doing enterprise Java.

Where are you looking for people?


Phoenix, AZ.

I'm now starting to do a lot of IT/Entrepreneur meet-ups. I figure networking will hopefully help me find the right people.
 
2011-01-27 12:47:47 PM  

Jobber8742: raise would be nice, but you jerks put an end to that.


Yeah... people who can't get anything are going to vote for the Republicans to shut off your gravy train until they get a better deal. The philosophy is "if I'm going to wither into financial nothingness, so should you."

Practically speaking, they should vote Democratic, but they know that's a dead-end. Democrats will either fluff out (Carter, maybe Obama) or turn Republican-lite (Clinton, maybe Obama).

That's why we need a militant socialist party in this country... not necessarily to seize power, but to scare the elite into providing the people decently.
 
2011-01-27 12:48:51 PM  
I used to work on the help desk for large law firms, and then one of the big 4 accounting firms. I moved to the IT audit side and am now the game keeper instead of the game.

It is a much better existence, never on call, and CIOs have to listen to my recommendations and implement them.

If you can get into the Compliance side you are much better off. I worked for Deloitte for the first 2 years and wanted to quit my job every day, but the knowledge I gained there has been priceless.

I get calls from recruiters often trying to steal me away, and my resume isn't even on any job boards.

I do miss the troubleshooting from the help desk though, that was fun.
 
2011-01-27 12:48:55 PM  

ventmonkey: Phoenix, AZ.

I'm now starting to do a lot of IT/Entrepreneur meet-ups. I figure networking will hopefully help me find the right people.


For the longest time in the Detroit area, the only people who applied for PHP jobs were teens and early 20s programmers who hacked it on their own. Has it really come that far in the enterprise?
 
2011-01-27 12:49:06 PM  
I can tap on a keyboard...pay me 200k a year...and a pension...

/waaaaaaa!
 
2011-01-27 12:49:17 PM  
BUT DID YOU REBOOT 3 TIMES?? (new window)

/seems relevant
 
2011-01-27 12:49:22 PM  

ventmonkey: RussianPooper: I like how the only thing people think IT does is help desk.

I believe this is part of the problem. If IT does their job well, and the servers/services keep working correctly, all the end users see the IT staff doing is help desk. I've had people demand that I not wear headphones and listen to music because they might have a problem, and just want to be able to yell at me. They have no idea that we spend most of our time keeping things running smoothly...er...in theory.


In IT, the amount of praise you receive is inversely proportional to the difficulty and amount of work a task or project requires.
 
2011-01-27 12:50:31 PM  

TheRedMonkey: The benefits are ok, not as good as people believe they are.


RC Cola sounds delicious when all you have to drink is mud water.
 
2011-01-27 12:51:03 PM  
Headline ≠ what the article says.
 
2011-01-27 12:51:08 PM  

EditorialSpace: I can tap on a keyboard...pay me 200k a year...and a pension...


What do you do, shiatbird? I can bet it's nothing too damn important.
 
2011-01-27 12:51:29 PM  

ventmonkey: The_Gallant_Gallstone: ventmonkey: And as a side gripe....as bad as the economy is, I would think it would be easier to find good developers. I am having such a hard time finding a good Java developer. They just don't seem to be unemployed at all. Any advice on where to look?

By "good" do you "unattainably perfect given the meager wage I'm offering"?

I'm not saying that's the case, but part of this economic death we're experiencing involves employers expecting demigods to work for practically nothing.

Oh, not at all. We can pay quite well. I just can't find anyone very good. Everyone seems to know PHP, not so many available people doing enterprise Java.


Describe "pay quite well". Realize a good Java dev is making at least a $100k in MN... I'd expect it to be higher on better talent or the coasts, were people think they are naturally worth more.
 
2011-01-27 12:52:07 PM  
Debunking the Myth of a Desperate Software Labor Shortage

http://www.cs.ucdavis.edu/~matloff/glut.html
 
2011-01-27 12:52:15 PM  

altinos: ventmonkey: Phoenix, AZ.

I'm now starting to do a lot of IT/Entrepreneur meet-ups. I figure networking will hopefully help me find the right people.

For the longest time in the Detroit area, the only people who applied for PHP jobs were teens and early 20s programmers who hacked it on their own. Has it really come that far in the enterprise?



No, it hasn't. The problem I am having is that too many people know PHP, and not enough know Enterprise Java.
 
2011-01-27 12:53:34 PM  

The_Gallant_Gallstone: TheRedMonkey: The benefits are ok, not as good as people believe they are.

RC Cola sounds delicious when all you have to drink is mud water.


True, but its the non IT jobs that are really gravy. The IT jobs are underpaid or staffed by unskilled workers mostly. But then again, expectations are very low.
 
2011-01-27 12:53:39 PM  
Thank God the Hyderabad School of Bicycle Repair is cranking out IT workers. Otherwise, we'd have to pay these glorified janitors what we used to pay them, and that sucked.
 
2011-01-27 12:54:24 PM  

DrewFL: EditorialSpace: I can tap on a keyboard...pay me 200k a year...and a pension...

What do you do, shiatbird? I can bet it's nothing too damn important.


- - -

you can curse, too? I bet that's a 10k a year bonus.

/be careful on who you step on with yur ascent, you will surely see tham on the way down. I don't give to bums. sorry!
 
2011-01-27 12:54:53 PM  

meat0918: cbackous: I guess I could tell people to turn it off and on again all day..

Or have to call IT to plug in a mouse.

//Does the grunt IT work at my office, while the main IT guys sit at HQ a few hours away, in addition to regular stuff like software dev.


::Sigh:: I had this call yesterday from a building that is 5 miles away. I told them there had to be somebody in the building that had the ability to plug a mouse in.
 
2011-01-27 12:56:19 PM  

rumpelstiltskin: Thank God the Hyderabad School of Bicycle Repair is cranking out IT workers. Otherwise, we'd have to pay these glorified janitors what we used to pay them, and that sucked.


Bicycle Repairmen! But how?
 
2011-01-27 12:58:30 PM  

Falcon Hunter:

As long as there are non-IT people, you will need IT people and support departments. If you think the "Help Desk" is helpless, it's because the Help Desk doesn't like you and knows you're a complete moron.

Shut up and reboot.

ID-10 T error.



THIS. Worked IT in the medical field for 2 years. If you think the average person is tech illiterate try dealing with a doctor. Combine technical illiteracy with a douchey sense of entitlement. "No Doctor, your clinical records app is not going to work, you're on a beach in the Bahamas, you have no connection to our network....Sorry, no we can't magically give you network access over the phone. Yes sir, I realize the hotel gave you free wireless but that doesn't give you access to our HIPAA-protected network. Sure, call my CIO, he'll laugh in your face. Goodbyehaveaniceday."
 
2011-01-27 01:00:54 PM  

LegacyDL: IT is only in demand because people are too lazy to fix their own computers/printers/servers/coding.

Once people figure out the secret to IT *cough*searching google*cough* it will lose its appeal and will soon join the other professions that used to be hot and then got cooled off(nursing, law, education, etc).

Hell half the people that do IT just do it so they can transition themselves to get towards the business end of things, the other half are simply consultants.


I didn't realize google was a secret. I do that right in front of them and nobody's taken the initiative to try that themselves before calling. The average user can't even comprehend an error message, let alone type it into google and figure out which response applies to their situation then use the information to fix their problem.
 
2011-01-27 01:02:24 PM  

ventmonkey: I'm now starting to do a lot of IT/Entrepreneur meet-ups. I figure networking will hopefully help me find the right people.


I need to get in meet-ups too... But I haven't really found any in my county, which is odd, considering I'm only 30 miles from New York City.
 
2011-01-27 01:03:32 PM  

Bag of Hammers: Falcon Hunter:

As long as there are non-IT people, you will need IT people and support departments. If you think the "Help Desk" is helpless, it's because the Help Desk doesn't like you and knows you're a complete moron.

Shut up and reboot.

ID-10 T error.


THIS. Worked IT in the medical field for 2 years. If you think the average person is tech illiterate try dealing with a doctor. Combine technical illiteracy with a douchey sense of entitlement. "No Doctor, your clinical records app is not going to work, you're on a beach in the Bahamas, you have no connection to our network....Sorry, no we can't magically give you network access over the phone. Yes sir, I realize the hotel gave you free wireless but that doesn't give you access to our HIPAA-protected network. Sure, call my CIO, he'll laugh in your face. Goodbyehaveaniceday."



I can confirm that doctors are the worst. Followed closely by car dealerships, then small financial firms, Lawyers, and that small segment of computer based training places that teach non-technical people how to use a specific piece of software.
 
2011-01-27 01:03:58 PM  
As an Oldskool IT type, I can say that the article speaks truth. In fact, a few years ago I was able to make some extra money via side contracts with the Govt, and there were a LOT of fulltime openings even then they could not fill (with the caveat that I am in a very specialized category, Oracle/Unix and SQL Server DBA work/architecture).

A few things that you need to know if you are looking for a place to land in IT.

1) Security is great, as the article says, but I would say database work is better (and a lot more common of a need). That and a CISSP is REQUIRED for security, and it is a REALLY hard test to pass I understand.

2) ERP experience (Peoplesoft, Oracle Financials, GP, etc) is golden. I know ERP folks who can still get 200$ an Hour today.

3) Coding/Programming isn't as great as people make it out to be, it depends on the situation. It's a lot better to have the idea than create it (in other words, being an architect is a 6-figure gig, but base coding that design is 50k). Being a coder is the IT analogue of an assembly line (unless of course you work for you, in which case all bets are off an you can make ... or lose... your own destiny.

4) Coding deprecates all the time, in fact from year to year people wash out because they can't keep up with the complex changes. Databases are a steeper learning curve at the start, but really don't change that often (Codd's relational theory goes back to the early 70s, and Oracle essentially hasn't changed anything but interfaces in about 10 years so that if you learn it once you can probably coast for awhile ... if that's your thing).

5) Certifications only mean something if they represent knowledge of practical use. Nobody want to pay an MCSE 100k/yr with no experience, so don't expect your community college to vault you into some great career. It's like any other business, no matter who you are you pay your dues.

6)Govt Work is VERY boring. If you have any skills at all it will probably bore you into burnout. Quickly. They are seriously change averse, expect to argue every change you intend to make to any system to death. Seriously.

Good luck to guys hoping to switch over. It's a myth (at least in IT) that it's hard to get a job as an old guy. I'm a development officer for a startup, and we actually have 4 generations of coders on our team right now. My oldest guy is almost 60, and he's sharp as a tack. IT is one job you can do until you're dead (in other words, at any age as long as you got skills).
 
2011-01-27 01:04:11 PM  
Bag of Hammers:"No Doctor, your clinical records app is not going to work, you're on a beach in the Bahamas"

Here's my CSB:

I had a user call me once, screaming, that he couldn't get his email. After a few minutes into the conversation, come to find that he's in Namibia. Farkin' Namibia. His "hotel" had no internet, and even our last-resort dial-up provider didn't work in Namibia.

And somehow, this was my fault.
 
2011-01-27 01:04:40 PM  

GookNukem: Big Al: The_Pirate Quote 2011-01-27 12:01:49 PM
bump: You wouldn't even need an IT department if you'd ween them off of the PC teet. Macs all around and you might actually get some productive work out of people...

HAHA...


>>

You can laugh but it's true. I have seen the IT dept at my company run around fixing virus outbreaks, windows corruptions, spyware, slowdown caused by everything from spyware viruses and registry errors, windows updates corrupting systems, etc.

Osx is such a superior platform in every respect, and deployment is built in with ARD, rather than buying expensive applications then learning how stupid they are like Altiris.

Your IT department sucks.


Yeah - I was just going to add: you know how I know he sucks at his job?
 
2011-01-27 01:04:52 PM  
I worked for the Department of Energy a few years ago as a low-level Desktop Support/Jr. Sys Admin. At that time, I was one of THREE people under the age of 30. And all three of us were contractors - not Department employees.

And that was the Department. Not just IT.

The main problem isn't that they will be able to find technical or experienced people. But the issue is that the people coming in won't have the years of training their predecessors had. They won't know processes or procedures, contacts, federal laws, etc that you pick up as someones protege.

I've seen entire laboratories and agencies "Red Flagged" and shutdown because of one or two policy issues. And this is with people that have been doing things for years. The coming issues over the next two decades are going to be AMAZING to witness.

If we want to correct this we need to spend money. We've got to hire young people into the Department NOW if we don't want to fall behind. But that would swell the ranks of Federal employees, something the American people are against (and in fact are attacking them by reducing wages).

So my options as a well-skilled, and educated Millennials are this:

1. Work for the Government:
-Stagnant or decreasing wages & benefits.
-Some people are contractors for years(which in Gov. Service means a lot).
-Crushed with red-tape/processes/procedures.
-Generally hated by politicians and the populous.

2. Work for the private sector:
-Stagnant or decreasing wages. But a possibility of advancement.
-Some people are contractors for years.
 
2011-01-27 01:05:14 PM  
The problem is now that companies insist on hiring "nerd managers" who can solve all sorts of Unix, J2EE, Python, Exchange and other technical issues, but fall down horribly on completion of day-to-day activities such as employee reviews, processing time sheets, budgeting, customer/vendor relationship etc while they get caught up in solving technical issues. Morale suffers but nobody can quit because there are no jobs out there now. We just keep getting more stressed and miserable.

Yet the corporations continue to hunt for this mythical beast of "perfect guru-manager" because paying for one body instead of two keeps those "short-term-thinking" shareholders happy.

Really, short-term thinking is killing the goose that lays the golden eggs.
 
2011-01-27 01:06:45 PM  
I work in desktop support (trying to get into a sysadmin position). Our helpdesk manager is a state secretary, and the desktop support manager is a logistician. The prior manager was a personnel clerk. Helpless desk? Much.
 
2011-01-27 01:08:21 PM  

bump: You wouldn't even need an IT department if you'd ween them off of the PC teet. Macs all around and you might actually get some productive work out of people...


Or just have a handful of competent people format every computer the company receives and install a standard Linux distro.
 
2011-01-27 01:08:36 PM  

BigMevy: SFSailor: Threads like these, and the attitudes, ignorance and arrogance expressed in them are just another reminder of the horrible way IT people are typically treated... the last group that is socially acceptable to mock and deride to their face... even lawyers get more respect culturally. "I set up my home PC just fine - you must be an idiot!" Ugh.

And yet, just like when people meet a lawyer or a doctor the first thing they start doing is asking for free legal or medical advice, the first thing they say when they find out you're IT is "Say... I've got this problem on my pc..."


How true!

When I was on the help desk I made up a bunch of business cards and started handing them out for side jobs. I would give them my card and tell them issues are hard to diagnose without seeing them on site.

Charged $50 an hour cash and people would give me beer when I would go to their houses and set up home networks, remove viruses, etc. I was charging less until people kept telling me I wasn't charging enough. Well, I fixed that.
 
2011-01-27 01:08:57 PM  

LegacyDL: IT is only in demand because people are too lazy to fix their own computers/printers/servers/coding.

Once people figure out the secret to IT *cough*searching google*cough* it will lose its appeal and will soon join the other professions that used to be hot and then got cooled off(nursing, law, education, etc).

Hell half the people that do IT just do it so they can transition themselves to get towards the business end of things, the other half are simply consultants.


LOL You've just confused IT and Helpdesk very thoroughly. Helpdesk says "reboot" "try again" "oh good it works". IT says "did you reflash the firmware after upgrading to XOCS2.3 standard?" "pull the chip and get a new one in there ASAP, the failover server is starting to run hot" etc.

It's unfortunate that these two very different classes of work are listed as "IT", because they require completely different skills.
 
2011-01-27 01:10:09 PM  

xynix: It's happening in the private sector too. We've always had problems finding good IT folks and the .COM crash didn't help. A lot of students who were going into IT switched during 2003 so instead of having more come into the industry in 2007 we had much less than we needed.

In addition to that we have IT burn out where people leave the industry all together. I've had two friends move from IT, one went to go drive trucks, the other started a small produce company and drives trucks.

The money is good though and I try to encourage everyone I can to get into the field. An average salary of $70k a year and after 10 years you can easily be making $150k a year.


I am one of the burned-out IT people you speak of. Mainframe work pays really well and still does.

/Did not work help desk or Tech Support
 
2011-01-27 01:11:26 PM  

JMel: "Reboot"

"Wait 15 minutes and try again"

Am I hired? Cause thats about all my IT department does. Biggest department in the company. I could save us millions to have a recording that plays those two comments on a loop when you call the helpless desk.


Trust me, no one listens to the recording when they call the help desk.
 
2011-01-27 01:15:49 PM  

HallsOfMandos: Trust me, no one listens to the recording when they call the help desk.


They're more worried about a specific site. When the entire network goes down, these people say "I can't access thissite.com." then call back and say "Now I can't access thatsite.com" and then "I'm not getting any email!" No matter how much you say "You can't get anywhere right now!" they think they must log separate tickets for each.
 
2011-01-27 01:16:59 PM  

Big Al: The_Pirate Quote 2011-01-27 12:01:49 PM
bump: You wouldn't even need an IT department if you'd ween them off of the PC teet. Macs all around and you might actually get some productive work out of people...

HAHA...


>>

You can laugh but it's true. I have seen the IT dept at my company run around fixing virus outbreaks, windows corruptions, spyware, slowdown caused by everything from spyware viruses and registry errors, windows updates corrupting systems, etc.

Osx is such a superior platform in every respect, and deployment is built in with ARD, rather than buying expensive applications then learning how stupid they are like Altiris.


Unless a company wants to build Hackintoshes, I doubt they would want to plunk down the insane prices to replace their entire network with Macs without a good reason. Most of the planet still uses Windows, and companies usually don't like spending time and money to retrain their staff just because they want to get away from a system that is so commonly used. On top of that, fixing bugs and taking care of computer issues is what supplies job security for IT people. If computers never needed fixing, IT people would go the way of elevator operators.

Besides, if MacOS becomes more mainstream, it's just a matter of time before some 13 year old kid writes up viruses to target them. It can be done, there's just no incentive for it right now since Windows still dominates a huge portion of the PC market.
 
2011-01-27 01:19:16 PM  
JMel: "Reboot"

"Wait 15 minutes and try again"

Am I hired? Cause thats about all my IT department does. Biggest department in the company. I could save us millions to have a recording that plays those two comments on a loop when you call the helpless desk.

Trust me, no one listens to the recording when they call the help desk.


t1.gstatic.com

"Hello IT, have you turned it off and on again?"

The IT Crowd, BBC via Netflix == Priceless.
 
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