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(Salon)   The coolest story of a woman who tracked down her thief using Craigslist, Myspace and a McDonalds you will read today   (salon.com) divider line 109
    More: Interesting, Craigslist, mcdonalds, car doors, San Mateo, MySpace, Islamic Revolution, backpacks  
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25400 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jan 2011 at 12:12 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-01-17 01:40:41 PM  
two years' worth of love letters from her toddlers



You know who else loves mail from toddlers?
images.fanpop.com
 
Ral
2011-01-17 01:41:47 PM  

ultrachronic: I got re-arranged a few weeks ago. I'd say robbed, but I didn't. Accidentally left my car open overnight, got back to it in the morning, with all the contents all over the car. I thought "crap, I've been robbed" and as I started to pick everything up and I came to realise that nothing had actually been stolen.

You know your stuff's crap when it's not even worthwhile stealing...


Same thing happened to me many years ago when I was a teenager driving a '76 Pinto. Why anyone thought there would be anything valuable in a car like that, I have no idea. I didn't lock the doors -- why bother since it would only result in me having to fix a broken window? Only stuff in there was a handful of loose change and my mix tape. I found the mix tape down the street the next day.
 
2011-01-17 01:45:04 PM  

thelordofcheese: In the first 24 hours after someone broke into my car in my own driveway, I was mostly mad at my husband. Who leaves a backpack with a BlackBerry and a wallet full of cash and credit cards in the car overnight, with a GPS visible on the dashboard and the freaking car doors unlocked?
[princessbride.jpg]


Introducing this thread's troll: Playing the part of the semantics-douche (who's still incorrect) while defending the actions of some shiatstain career criminal is...
The Lord of Cheese!

Let's give him a round of applause for his performance.

thelordofcheese: And how many people know how easy it is to card or even pick standard house locks? ... I'm a type of guy that goes to the library or coffee shops and uses the public computers to mine data.


You seem like the type to know all about it.
I admit, topping it off with some felony computer crimes is a nice touch.

/hopefully your ass gets 'intruded' randomly next time you're in lockup
//won't be 'breaking in' though, since it slides in so nice
 
2011-01-17 01:47:39 PM  

Ral: Only stuff in there was a handful of loose change and my mix tape. I found the mix tape down the street the next day.


So you got your Creedence back?
 
2011-01-17 01:52:00 PM  

Ral: I found the mix tape down the street the next day


You listen to shiatty music.
 
2011-01-17 02:00:27 PM  
Why does everything on Salon, including this story, sound fabricated?
 
2011-01-17 02:08:07 PM  

Lamune_Baba: thelordofcheese: In the first 24 hours after someone broke into my car in my own driveway, I was mostly mad at my husband. Who leaves a backpack with a BlackBerry and a wallet full of cash and credit cards in the car overnight, with a GPS visible on the dashboard and the freaking car doors unlocked?
[princessbride.jpg]

Introducing this thread's troll: Playing the part of the semantics-douche (who's still incorrect) while defending the actions of some shiatstain career criminal is...
The Lord of Cheese!

Let's give him a round of applause for his performance.

thelordofcheese: And how many people know how easy it is to card or even pick standard house locks? ... I'm a type of guy that goes to the library or coffee shops and uses the public computers to mine data.

You seem like the type to know all about it.
I admit, topping it off with some felony computer crimes is a nice touch.

/hopefully your ass gets 'intruded' randomly next time you're in lockup
//won't be 'breaking in' though, since it slides in so nice


How's it feel to be an idiot? I mean, my sister's retarded, but your actually an idiot. I usually avoid idiots because idiots actually can avoid being idiots but they are just too big of assholes and are lazy. I'm curious now.

No breaking was involved. Hence, no breaking in. Just because some lawyer called it one thing in order to get higher damages from a case to bolster his bank account doesn't mean he was right. In fact, it provides proof that his motives were not about being right and that he was actually erroneous.

Now, please tell me how you could have construed that I actually defended this guy? That's really amazing. I'm very intrigued at this point. At no point did I say it wasn't wrong for him to take other people's stuff.

And calling someone a troll isn't a valid argument. In fact, it's a logical fallacy.

And security measures are an interest of mine. I live with a special forces vet and worked information security for a hospital (and one of my friends is now worried about being kicked out of school for unintentionally violating HIPAA when she forgot her binder on top of an ATM, so of course she turned to me).

And I haven't been arrested for years and never for theft. Just mischief. And public drunkenness.

/really
//tell me what being an idiot is like
///I'm very curious
 
2011-01-17 02:09:12 PM  

ultrachronic: You know your stuff's crap when it's not even worthwhile stealing...


When I lived in Vancouver I'd leave my truck unlocked and absolutely nothing worth stealing inside. About once every couple of months the local crackheads would go through my truck. I'd come out in the morning to find the glove box open and papers scattered on the front seat.

The funny part was that they'd often steal the roaches out of the ashtray. Good. Hope that staves off your heroin/crack/meth jones for a couple of hours.

theMagni: "You renewed your insurance recently, right? Do you pay your car insurance by the month? Go check your registration right now and come back."

"Uh, I don't. I pay it at once. Why?"

"They use the info on it for ID theft."


When you reup your car insurance here with the provincial insurer they tell you to "rip this part off and shred it or keep it safe cuz it's got your banking info on it".

When my car would be tossed, that piece of paper with the torn-off bottom third would always be on top of the pile.
 
Ral
2011-01-17 02:11:04 PM  

MycroftHolmes: thelordofcheese: No, it is not breaking in. Intruding, yes. Definitely burglary. But not breaking in.

And how many people know how easy it is to card or even pick standard house locks? And remember when you could easily get in to garages thanks to automatic openers that were less sophisticated than TV remotes? That's the case with a lot of keyless entry systems for modern cars.


Even in the old days it was easy to get into cars. Most cars, especially GM, only used about 50 different locks. If you could get a set of the master keys (not that difficult), you could get into any GM car without even damaging it.


Well,if you are using the legal definition, it is breaking in. Sorry if that does not coincide with your interpretation of the word.

Here is another one. Again, the definition is the use of any force to enter. This applies if the force is nothing more than lifting a door handle.

http://www.legal-explanations.com/definitions/breaking-and-entering.htm

I know it is a quibble, but I do find it annoying when people take the time to correct people without finding out what the right answer is first.


Perhaps you should do the same, considering that you are wrong depending on the jurisdiction. It is a mistake to use a single source of definitions for legal terms in a country like the United States, where those definitions vary from state to state, county to county.

In California, if you leave a car unlocked, it is not considered breaking and entering under 459 PC. And yes, that is the correct interpretation of the text.
 
2011-01-17 02:15:12 PM  

Ral: MycroftHolmes: thelordofcheese: No, it is not breaking in. Intruding, yes. Definitely burglary. But not breaking in.

And how many people know how easy it is to card or even pick standard house locks? And remember when you could easily get in to garages thanks to automatic openers that were less sophisticated than TV remotes? That's the case with a lot of keyless entry systems for modern cars.

Even in the old days it was easy to get into cars. Most cars, especially GM, only used about 50 different locks. If you could get a set of the master keys (not that difficult), you could get into any GM car without even damaging it.


Well,if you are using the legal definition, it is breaking in. Sorry if that does not coincide with your interpretation of the word.

Here is another one. Again, the definition is the use of any force to enter. This applies if the force is nothing more than lifting a door handle.

http://www.legal-explanations.com/definitions/breaking-and-entering.htm

I know it is a quibble, but I do find it annoying when people take the time to correct people without finding out what the right answer is first.

Perhaps you should do the same, considering that you are wrong depending on the jurisdiction. It is a mistake to use a single source of definitions for legal terms in a country like the United States, where those definitions vary from state to state, county to county.

In California, if you leave a car unlocked, it is not considered breaking and entering under 459 PC. And yes, that is the correct interpretation of the text.


I suggest we call it a new name with an even more violent connotation in order to seem even tougher on crime.

Property rape.
 
2011-01-17 02:17:51 PM  

Wodan11: Ms. Enayati's story is cool and all, but I'd think she might have at least a second thought for what happens when this guy gets out of jail in a year and a half (sooner with prison crowding for non-violent offenders).


They guy put himself in prison. She didn't frame him or whatever and he's a cowardly thief, stealing things when people are not around. Maybe her husband is a Navy Seal. From what she said about her past life, I wouldn't put it past her to buy a gun and shoot the guy if he threatens her family.
 
2011-01-17 02:20:16 PM  
a lock is merely a deterrent.
 
Ral
2011-01-17 02:20:28 PM  

thelordofcheese: I suggest we call it a new name with an even more violent connotation in order to seem even tougher on crime.

Property rape.


I believe that's called "mechaphilia".
 
2011-01-17 02:21:14 PM  

redmid17: They left an mp3 player (admittedly non-functioning) and brand new polo cologne bottle in the glove box. I


Polo? Did they miss your Wham! UK cassete tape?
 
Ral
2011-01-17 02:21:47 PM  

you_idiot: Wodan11: Ms. Enayati's story is cool and all, but I'd think she might have at least a second thought for what happens when this guy gets out of jail in a year and a half (sooner with prison crowding for non-violent offenders).

They guy put himself in prison. She didn't frame him or whatever and he's a cowardly thief, stealing things when people are not around.


You think moral logic stops people like that from tracking down the person who "put them in jail" and taking revenge on them? Criminals are experts at blaming everyone but themselves for their failures.
 
2011-01-17 02:23:13 PM  

Ral: MycroftHolmes: thelordofcheese: No, it is not breaking in. Intruding, yes. Definitely burglary. But not breaking in.

And how many people know how easy it is to card or even pick standard house locks? And remember when you could easily get in to garages thanks to automatic openers that were less sophisticated than TV remotes? That's the case with a lot of keyless entry systems for modern cars.

Even in the old days it was easy to get into cars. Most cars, especially GM, only used about 50 different locks. If you could get a set of the master keys (not that difficult), you could get into any GM car without even damaging it.


Well,if you are using the legal definition, it is breaking in. Sorry if that does not coincide with your interpretation of the word.

Here is another one. Again, the definition is the use of any force to enter. This applies if the force is nothing more than lifting a door handle.

http://www.legal-explanations.com/definitions/breaking-and-entering.htm

I know it is a quibble, but I do find it annoying when people take the time to correct people without finding out what the right answer is first.

Perhaps you should do the same, considering that you are wrong depending on the jurisdiction. It is a mistake to use a single source of definitions for legal terms in a country like the United States, where those definitions vary from state to state, county to county.

In California, if you leave a car unlocked, it is not considered breaking and entering under 459 PC. And yes, that is the correct interpretation of the text.


Under general common law, the door being locked or unlocked is generally irrelevant. Apparently it can vary from state to state.
 
2011-01-17 02:25:23 PM  

mcreadyblue: redmid17: They left an mp3 player (admittedly non-functioning) and brand new polo cologne bottle in the glove box. I

Polo? Did they miss your Wham! UK cassete tape?


It was a gift from my brother. There's a reason why it was in the glove box. Sadly the cassette deck was non-functioning due to a Don Henley cassette my Dad pretty much jammed in there. Given that the radio was pretty much non-functional, it's a miracle I lasted the entire trip home.
 
2011-01-17 02:25:24 PM  

Ral: you_idiot: Wodan11: Ms. Enayati's story is cool and all, but I'd think she might have at least a second thought for what happens when this guy gets out of jail in a year and a half (sooner with prison crowding for non-violent offenders).

They guy put himself in prison. She didn't frame him or whatever and he's a cowardly thief, stealing things when people are not around.

You think moral logic stops people like that from tracking down the person who "put them in jail" and taking revenge on them? Criminals are experts at blaming everyone but themselves for their failures.


Thanks or reminding me of Betty Johnston, the walker woman of Pittsburgh.

/she threatened to taser my houesmate
//he had his 44 on him
 
2011-01-17 02:27:52 PM  
Am I the only one who wished this lady never got her stuff back just because of how obnoxious she is?
 
2011-01-17 02:27:57 PM  
I was half expecting hoping the entire story to read:

"How I tracked down my thief using Craigslist, Myspace and a McDonalds and then got robbed at gun point by the same thief."
 
2011-01-17 02:30:37 PM  
CSB:

Last Spring, I woke up really early so I could get to the gym in 26 minutes. Had the bedroom lights off and for whatever reason looked outside only to see a group of teens checking car doors and grabbing stuff out of them on my block. Threw on a long sleeve shirt, not enough time for anything but my boxers, and went outside. Followed them down the street and got a good look at them, then started running at them. They took off like roaches, but I had what I needed and went back home to call the po-po. Now I've got to give Loveland PD credit, these guys respond to calls. Within 15 minutes, a deputy was at my door to drive me down the road to ID three kids they had found. They ended up recovering a laptop and a bunch of other stuff.

Not sure what they got as far as time, but they're lucky they didn't get a curb stomping.
 
2011-01-17 02:34:14 PM  
And it only took FARK four fark'n months to link to the story.

/-1
/Old news is still old
 
2011-01-17 02:38:32 PM  

Ral: MycroftHolmes: thelordofcheese: No, it is not breaking in. Intruding, yes. Definitely burglary. But not breaking in.

And how many people know how easy it is to card or even pick standard house locks? And remember when you could easily get in to garages thanks to automatic openers that were less sophisticated than TV remotes? That's the case with a lot of keyless entry systems for modern cars.

Even in the old days it was easy to get into cars. Most cars, especially GM, only used about 50 different locks. If you could get a set of the master keys (not that difficult), you could get into any GM car without even damaging it.


Well,if you are using the legal definition, it is breaking in. Sorry if that does not coincide with your interpretation of the word.

Here is another one. Again, the definition is the use of any force to enter. This applies if the force is nothing more than lifting a door handle.

http://www.legal-explanations.com/definitions/breaking-and-entering.htm

I know it is a quibble, but I do find it annoying when people take the time to correct people without finding out what the right answer is first.

Perhaps you should do the same, considering that you are wrong depending on the jurisdiction. It is a mistake to use a single source of definitions for legal terms in a country like the United States, where those definitions vary from state to state, county to county.

In California, if you leave a car unlocked, it is not considered breaking and entering under 459 PC. And yes, that is the correct interpretation of the text.


Maybe I am missing something, but I found no reference in what you linked to breaking and entering or to the circumstance of a vehicle being unlocked. I could have easily missed it, though. Could you be so kind as to cut and past the relevant wording (or at least give me a clue which portion of the code you are referencing)?
 
2011-01-17 02:41:49 PM  
IIT: Farkers aren't aware of what misnomers are.
 
2011-01-17 02:42:14 PM  
Anyone post any "this one time that I got my car broken into" CSB's yet?
 
2011-01-17 02:42:25 PM  
"I called the police. They were over in 15 minutes."

BUUUUUUULLLLLLLLL
SHHHIIIIIIIIIATTT

It's not worth the police's time to do all this CSI gumshoe crap in response to a weeks-old report of a $100 GPS unit being stolen out of an unlocked car.
 
Ral
2011-01-17 03:13:12 PM  

MycroftHolmes: Maybe I am missing something, but I found no reference in what you linked to breaking and entering or to the circumstance of a vehicle being unlocked. I could have easily missed it, though. Could you be so kind as to cut and past the relevant wording (or at least give me a clue which portion of the code you are referencing)?


Goddamn linky broky. Ok here is the text of that section:

459. Every person who enters any house, room, apartment, tenement, shop, warehouse, store, mill, barn, stable, outhouse or other building, tent, vessel, as defined in Section 21 of the Harbors and Navigation Code, floating home, as defined in subdivision (d) of Section 18075.55 of the Health and Safety Code, railroad car, locked or sealed cargo container, whether or not mounted on a vehicle, trailer coach, as defined in Section 635 of the Vehicle Code, any house car, as defined in Section 362 of the Vehicle Code, inhabited camper, as defined in Section 243 of the Vehicle Code, vehicle as defined by the Vehicle Code, when the doors are locked, aircraft as defined by Section 21012 of the Public Utilities Code, or mine or any underground portion thereof, with intent to commit grand or petit larceny or any felony is guilty of burglary. As used in this chapter, "inhabited" means currently being used for dwelling purposes, whether occupied or not. A house, trailer, vessel designed for habitation, or portion of a building is currently being used for dwelling purposes if, at the time of the burglary, it was not occupied solely because a natural or other disaster caused the occupants to leave the premises.

The specific presence of the phrase "when the doors are locked" in this definition is of note, and has been interpreted by courts here as being essential to whether a burglary took place.
 
2011-01-17 03:17:20 PM  
Been caught steal'n...
 
2011-01-17 03:46:56 PM  
Hey, ive finally got a CSB to share!

In my youth, I had a trusty 1988 honda accord. Well i heard a noise out front, grabbed a crowbar (almost exactly like the one in Half Life) and ran outside. I saw someone half way hanging out of my car yelled something (I dont remember what) and gave chase (probably stupid, i know but i was 18) and nearly ran them down. Regrettably they made it to a waiting car which sped off. I flung the half life crowbar at the car, destroying the back windows. I still have the crowbar to this day.

/CSB
 
2011-01-17 03:54:49 PM  
Someone once got into my old LTD wagon at a highway rest-stop. Came out to find all four doors open.

The guy took 15 cent in pennies I had in the change tray.
 
2011-01-17 03:54:56 PM  
thesilence:

They're lucky your Gravity Gun was in for repairs.
 
2011-01-17 04:14:35 PM  

No Such Agency: thesilence:

They're lucky your Gravity Gun was in for repairs.




Doubly so, as I was it into this:
 
2011-01-17 04:15:57 PM  
Lets try again:

No Such Agency: thesilence:

They're lucky your Gravity Gun was in for repairs.


Doubly so, as I was modding it into this:

25.media.tumblr.com
 
2011-01-17 04:41:46 PM  

Ral: MycroftHolmes: Maybe I am missing something, but I found no reference in what you linked to breaking and entering or to the circumstance of a vehicle being unlocked. I could have easily missed it, though. Could you be so kind as to cut and past the relevant wording (or at least give me a clue which portion of the code you are referencing)?

Goddamn linky broky. Ok here is the text of that section:

459. Every person who enters any house, room, apartment, tenement, shop, warehouse, store, mill, barn, stable, outhouse or other building, tent, vessel, as defined in Section 21 of the Harbors and Navigation Code, floating home, as defined in subdivision (d) of Section 18075.55 of the Health and Safety Code, railroad car, locked or sealed cargo container, whether or not mounted on a vehicle, trailer coach, as defined in Section 635 of the Vehicle Code, any house car, as defined in Section 362 of the Vehicle Code, inhabited camper, as defined in Section 243 of the Vehicle Code, vehicle as defined by the Vehicle Code, when the doors are locked, aircraft as defined by Section 21012 of the Public Utilities Code, or mine or any underground portion thereof, with intent to commit grand or petit larceny or any felony is guilty of burglary. As used in this chapter, "inhabited" means currently being used for dwelling purposes, whether occupied or not. A house, trailer, vessel designed for habitation, or portion of a building is currently being used for dwelling purposes if, at the time of the burglary, it was not occupied solely because a natural or other disaster caused the occupants to leave the premises.

The specific presence of the phrase "when the doors are locked" in this definition is of note, and has been interpreted by courts here as being essential to whether a burglary took place.


Which would not negate any theft that may have occured during said entry.
 
2011-01-17 05:05:05 PM  
Funniest thing I read this year, FTA: "Given Johnny's dozen tattoos, given his weakness for skank, I made a leap -- and assumed he was on MySpace." And, she was 100% correct!

Take this advise from a criminal defense attorney... who has represented a fair number of thieves... the best way to prevent theft of items from your car (except your car stereo) is to keep everything stashed out of sight and lock your car doors. Thieves opportunistic. They don't risk breaking into cars unless they know there is a good chance it contains something they want or can sell.
 
2011-01-17 05:31:44 PM  
My cell was stolen from my unlocked car early Saturday AM. Still unaware, I received a call that afternoon on my home phone "I found your phone in the middle of the road. You want it back?" Some guy with three little kids saw it from a parking lot. There had been several long distance calls made before whoever took it tossed it.

I called the cops. "Probably kids. Since you have it back in your possession, the only crime is the cost of the long distance calls. Call your phone company and they'll refund your money. Have a nice day."

Instead, I called the long distance numbers myself.

"Hi, I found this phone and would like to return it. Do you know who called you this morning from VA?"

"Oh, yeah. My boyfriend Johnny D. He's visiting his uncle Sam D. there. The phone probably belongs to him. That's so sweet of you to return his uncle's phone."

Yes. Sweet.

I called the cops again and a detective took the info and said there was little he could do absent a confession, but he'd visit the uncle and have "a talk". Called me back the next day, said the kid was nervous but quiet and the uncle acted like he was going to "deliver an ass-whuppin'" when the cop left.

Justice served.
 
2011-01-17 05:35:22 PM  

wambu: My cell was stolen from my unlocked car early Saturday AM. Still unaware, I received a call that afternoon on my home phone "I found your phone in the middle of the road. You want it back?" Some guy with three little kids saw it from a parking lot. There had been several long distance calls made before whoever took it tossed it.

I called the cops. "Probably kids. Since you have it back in your possession, the only crime is the cost of the long distance calls. Call your phone company and they'll refund your money. Have a nice day."

Instead, I called the long distance numbers myself.

"Hi, I found this phone and would like to return it. Do you know who called you this morning from VA?"

"Oh, yeah. My boyfriend Johnny D. He's visiting his uncle Sam D. there. The phone probably belongs to him. That's so sweet of you to return his uncle's phone."

Yes. Sweet.

I called the cops again and a detective took the info and said there was little he could do absent a confession, but he'd visit the uncle and have "a talk". Called me back the next day, said the kid was nervous but quiet and the uncle acted like he was going to "deliver an ass-whuppin'" when the cop left.

Justice served.


You're smoother than I am.
 
2011-01-17 05:52:08 PM  
So, do people who leave their doors unlocked ever not get robbed? Do they actually think, "Locking this lock is so inconvenient, I can't believe how much smarter I am by saving time by not doing something everyone else is doing?"

Don't get me started on people who don't use seatbelts.
 
2011-01-17 06:09:09 PM  
bleah.. I had an old 88 pickup truck broken into ...twice. both times unlocked, but they still smashed the wing window.

and stole my cheap ass Realistic stereo.

Why? Why would they steal crap? twice?
 
2011-01-17 06:12:36 PM  
My sheriff's office wouldn't give two shiats if I had all the evidence, video, fingerprints, confessions and the guy tied up on my porch waiting for them to pick up. They wouldn't do a damn thing.
 
2011-01-17 06:16:42 PM  

SecretAgentWoman: My sheriff's office wouldn't give two shiats if I had all the evidence, video, fingerprints, confessions and the guy tied up on my porch waiting for them to pick up. They wouldn't do a damn thing.


This.

Maybe they bothered to do it since the guy was on probation?
 
N7
2011-01-17 06:17:48 PM  
I got robbed at gunpoint in September. They got $2 in cash (and they were driving a pretty nice car, too. I hope the effort was worth it). They also took my purse, which had nothing of value in it. The worst part of the entire thing wasn't even having the barrel of a gun against my throat and being made to lay face down on the asphalt. It was my partner finding my destroyed purse and possessions, and all the pages they had ripped out of my journal, one by one. When I got to the part in the article where the author said that the victim of a robbery would probably prefer to find their shiat dumped in the trash, I was nodding my head.

If you're really so pathetic that you feel the need to take crap from people by force, you're already so deep in dickhead territory that no amount of thoughtfulness will make your actions more palatable. But it might make you a little less straight-up, mustache-twirlingly evil if you'd just take whatever items of value you've convinced yourself you're entitled to and at least give your victim the chance of finding the shiat that doesn't mean anything to you intact.
 
2011-01-17 06:44:07 PM  
Poot Root Beer:

I called the police. They were over in 15 minutes.

BS is right. Anyplace I've ever lived, if you called the cops and said that there was a severed human head on your porch, they'd roll around in a day or two.
 
2011-01-17 06:51:35 PM  

wambu: My cell was stolen from my unlocked car early Saturday AM. Still unaware, I received a call that afternoon on my home phone "I found your phone in the middle of the road. You want it back?" Some guy with three little kids saw it from a parking lot. There had been several long distance calls made before whoever took it tossed it.

I called the cops. "Probably kids. Since you have it back in your possession, the only crime is the cost of the long distance calls. Call your phone company and they'll refund your money. Have a nice day."

Instead, I called the long distance numbers myself.

"Hi, I found this phone and would like to return it. Do you know who called you this morning from VA?"

"Oh, yeah. My boyfriend Johnny D. He's visiting his uncle Sam D. there. The phone probably belongs to him. That's so sweet of you to return his uncle's phone."

Yes. Sweet.

I called the cops again and a detective took the info and said there was little he could do absent a confession, but he'd visit the uncle and have "a talk". Called me back the next day, said the kid was nervous but quiet and the uncle acted like he was going to "deliver an ass-whuppin'" when the cop left.

Justice served.


Mom?
 
2011-01-17 07:26:23 PM  

DrainBead: My ex did something very similar. We lived in a shiatty neighborhood at the time, and he went out to get me some Diet Coke when I was up late studying for my first law school exams. We think his wallet fell out of his pants in our apartment's parking lot. He figured out it was missing the next morning, and started cancelling cards, asking each one if it had been used. We ended up with surveillance footage of the doofus trying to use an ATM, and buying a pair of shoes with the last card to be cancelled, a department store credit card. Recognized him as a local crackhead who hung out a lot at the building next door. Saw him go in there, called the cop who was working on our case, and he sent a cruiser out within five minutes. The guy came out, started talking to them, and was really shifty. Then the cop noticed something fall out of the guy's pants...my ex's BP card. I think he got six months plus probation.


See, the problem I have with your outcome and that in TFA is that these admittedly douchebag perps got 2 years and 6 months respectively in slam for 1) stealing some loose shiat from an unlocked car, and 2) picking up a wallet off the sidewalk.

Yeah, I know the first dude was a parolee, and the second guy a crackhead. But still, two farking years? At Cali's $95/day for State prison, society is paying $75,000 so this lady can write an entertaining article for Salon, or $17,000 because your ex was dorky enough to drop his wallet? Give me a farking break! No wonder we can't pay our bills.
 
2011-01-17 07:36:51 PM  
I got in my car one evening after work and smelled a very strong cigarette smell. Nothing disturbed, nothing missing, but penty of lvisible smoke in the cabin.
 
2011-01-17 09:00:13 PM  
Touching story. I laughed; I cried; I fapped.
 
2011-01-17 09:08:32 PM  
ultrachronic: You know your stuff's crap when it's not even worthwhile stealing...

I was somewhat lucky in that the good equipment in my truck box looks like it's not worth stealing. Some punk walked off with some worthless cordless tools and some beat to fark small hand tools a week or so ago, but left the stuff that I really would have been pissed off about replacing because it doesn't look like much (tow ropes, tie downs, my toolbelt etc.)

/farking cowardly biatches.
 
2011-01-17 09:18:17 PM  
Damn, I had almost forgotten. Back in 95, I used to drivea S-10 pickup. Stupid me, I left it parked with a couple of Atlanta falcons football tickets in an envelope on the end of the dash. Some sorry bastard broke into it.

/and left two more.../
 
2011-01-17 09:43:51 PM  
A friend of mine owns a comic store and back in the 90's when Magic: The Gathering was really huge someone broke into the store and stole about $600 worth of unopened boxes of the cards. But to do so they moved an estimated $70,000 worth of comics dating back to the 40's including an Amazing Fantasy #15 (the first appearance of Spider-Man).

Dumbass theives....
 
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