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(Neatorama)   Food By State. Forget failing geography, Subby can't even identify some of the food   (neatorama.com) divider line 405
    More: Strange, fried foods, skillet, squids, cuisines  
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16351 clicks; posted to Main » on 14 Jan 2011 at 3:29 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2011-01-14 05:02:54 PM  

mikesup: binkyman: Oh, and can someone give me an easy okra recipie. I hear it is good stuff but we don't eat it up here. Never had it but can get it at the grocery store.
M

Being from North Texas there are two styles of serving that get used. First is the traditional fried okra as mentioned, the other is okra as a staple of a good Gumbo, but that is more East Texas and Louisiana. Gumbo is pretty simple. Go out to any bar ditch in Louisiana, grab everything that has a soul, some wild rice, and okra. Then throw all ingredients into a stew pot and pour in spices till your eyeballs fall out of your head. Now, it may sound like I don't like Gumbo from that, on the contrary, I love it. I'm just saying, as long as there are creatures crawling in the swamp, ain't nobody in Louisian/E. Texas going hungry.

For fried Okra your best bet is to have a deep fryer, if not, you can fry in a pan, but it takes more attention.

10 pods of Okra, slice to 1/4" thickness
1 Large egg, beaten
1 Cup of cornmeal
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of salt
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon of black pepper (fresh ground is best)
Vegetable oil (enough to fill deep fryer, or if in pan you'll need 1/2 cup)

1. Soak okra in egg for about 10 minutes, then in a separate bowl, mix okra with cornmeal, salt, and pepper until well breaded.
2. Place into deep fryer or a pan heated to Medium High heat with vegetable oil. Cook until golden brown. For pan cooking, once the okra starts to brown, turn heat down to medium, since it is easy to overcook.
3. Drain on paper towels
4. Enjoy as a good side to a "Southern" meal like Chicken Fried Steak, Barbeque, or Fried Chicken; and a nice beer, preferably a Bock style.


Thanks to all the okras, will try this tomorrow.
 
2011-01-14 05:03:29 PM  

Agatha Crispy: Dear Pennsylvania,
Steak-ums on a bun showered with Cheez-Whiz isn't really a food.
Thanks and regards,
Skinny People


You should see what we do on the other end of the state. Sandwiches with french fries and cole slaw. No, those aren't sides.
 
2011-01-14 05:04:39 PM  
phaseolus: I'm not all that well-traveled, and I think even I coulda come up with some better choices. You can get plain ol' cheese or steak anywhere, pick something characteristically local and it would be more interesting.

Wisconsin -- Cheese CURDS.
West Virginia -- wouldn't those sausage roll things they sell in every gas station be a better choice?
Texas -- barbecue brisket, or even Frito pie.
Pennsylvania -- I always think of Wawa sandwiches. (shrug)
South Carolina -- fatback


You know how I know you've never had a philly cheesesteak (or one from the Lehigh Valley for that matter)...

/Wawa hoagies are greater after a night of drinking
//Even better when you still have half left over the next morning
 
2011-01-14 05:05:28 PM  

GuyCaballero: BC: Salmon
Alberta: Beef
Sask: Wheat
Manitoba: (?)
Ontario: Some produce; take your pick
Quebec: Poutine, smoked meat
Maritimes except PEI: Seafood, take your pick
PEI: potatoes

Easy


Thats a little vague. PEI eats kickass seafood,
NFLD is salt cod, potatoes and hard tack (hard bread)

New Brunswick for fiddleheads and apple pie

Dunno Nova Scotia, but I vote for greasy downtown donairs.
 
2011-01-14 05:06:23 PM  

Cyno01: NASAM: Wet burritos are a regional thing? I can't recall ever going to a sitdown Mexican joint and not being able to get one "wet".

I cant say i've ever heard of a "wet burrito", but just guessing at what it is, how does it differ from an enchilada? Size?

/mmm, giant enchiladas


Yeah, they're quite a bit bigger than any enchilada I've ever seen. They can get into "Man Vs Food" territory. I knew a place that would give you a bumper sticker if you could finish it.
 
2011-01-14 05:06:41 PM  

SandmanMS: atomsmoosher: SandmanMS: atomsmoosher: "Italian sub" = New Jersey. Oh, I don't think so.

Its called a Hoagie, biatches, and it came from Philly first, which is true, dammit, even if its a lie.

Unless you're from Norristown, then you gotta get a Zep.

For that matter giving ALL of PA a cheesesteak is just crazy. You can't get a decent steak outside the metropolitan area.

It should be funnel cake or something.

Woah woah woah, back that train up. There are some damn good cheesesteaks up here in the Lehigh Valley. My favorite is still Steve's but that's a northeast thing.

You can probably find a decent steak up your way, I admit, but certainly not in Harrisburg or Pittsburgh. You have Yocco's up your way, so I'm willing to give you the benefit of the doubt.

Otherwise, it goes like this:

1) Dalassandro's + Chink's
2) Steve's Prince of Steaks
3) Places in Philly and surrounding counties that has a general appreciation of cheesesteaks.
4) What you can get in S. Jersey or the Lehigh Valley if you are lucky (no offense, mac)
5) Garbage.

Tell me where to go for a steak in the Lehigh? What do they use for rolls?

There's a number of places to get a good cheese steak up here.

1) Carl's Corner - Bethlehem
2) Michael's Steaks - South Side Bethlehem
3) Crossroads - Hellertown
4) Machs Gute - Bethlehem
5) Brass Rail - Allentown

The one main difference up here is just about everyone uses american cheese instead of wiz. Though you can get wiz at Michael's and a cheddar cheese sauce at the others. There's a few good bakeries up here were the rolls come from, Lusitania and Vallo's come to mind.

I worked in Philly for a number of years and commuted between there and the valley and I would put those cheese steaks up against a lot of what you can get in Philly.

As for hot dogs, since you mentioned Yocco's, the place you want to go up here is Pott's. It's right by Moravian College on Fairview Street. Their chili cheese dogs make Yocco's look like they're selling generic store bought franks.

Another new development up here is we now have sidewalk vendors selling food. A guy called Easy Weenies runs a hot dog cart on South Side Bethlehem. The dogs are Sabretts so they're good and he brings in a spicy sausage from NYC that is delicious. Plus he has home made sauerkraut that rivals what my grandma used to make.


Wiz is for fools. Provolone is what you put on a steak. I'll stab anyone who sez otherwise.

Thanks for the tips.
 
2011-01-14 05:06:49 PM  

lilistonic: Oztemprom: Dynascape: Cincinnati Chili does not represent Ohio.

Just Cinci, and Skyline is farking gross.

Sure, Cincinnati Chili does not represent Ohio, but Chili with beans and spaghetti in it, topped with cheddar, is common throughout the midwest.

However, I do challenge you to find any other food that is fairly unique to Ohio.

Now, as for Skyline being gross? You have no idea WTF you are talking about, but I suppose, as they say, de gustibus non disputandum est

Or something

Will I be required to eat this when I move to Cincinnati this summer? Because I really, really don't want to. But I don't want to be an outcast or whatever.

I've seen pictures and it just reminds me of the first time my daughter went to a buffet and then threw up on me afterwards. May be my basically Italian cooking heritage, with some random rural bits thrown in, but to me, those foods belong on different tables in different rooms. On different days.



I doubt anyone will require you to eat it, but at some point you will be strongly encouraged to.
 
2011-01-14 05:06:59 PM  

brantgoose:

We eat only sweet yellow corn in New Brunswick. The varigated and colourful corn that many Americans eat, even just across the border in Maine, is grown but is fed only to lifestock. We call it Indian corn or cow corn. If we do eat it, it is in the form of blue tortilla chips.

There are lots of these weird little variations in dietary custom, some local, some regional. A dish can be completely unknown in the next village, let alone county.


Americans call it "Indian corn" too, and we don't eat it on the cob--we use it as a Thanksgiving decoration. Thanks to farm subsidies, it also manages to sneak its way into everything else we eat in the form of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Whenever I travel to another country (including Canada), I'm always struck by how comparatively few items (especially snack foods) contain HFCS.
 
2011-01-14 05:07:06 PM  
WTF is up with TN having tomatoes as the ultra special food?
 
2011-01-14 05:07:58 PM  

redmid17: Andromeda: I'm trying to figure out what Connecticut did to deserve hamburgers. Or Indiana for popcorn.

Also I've lived in Ohio for six years and have never had Cincinnati chili but that probably has something to do with never going further south than Akron before (kinda strange of me now that I think about it).

Orville Reddenbacher was from Indiana and has lots of corn, but that's about it. fark, the grilled corn on the cob is where it's at. Popcorn can suck it.

Rapmaster2000: I'm glad I saw tomatoes for Tennessee right off the bat so I knew to disregard the whole thing.

Protip subby: you could consider asking people from various states what reminds them of home. If you're going with Chicago-style pizza for IL then there's no reason you couldn't go with Memphis BBQ for Tennessee. And even when you're close like popcorn for Indiana, asking a Hoosier would get you the deep fried pork tenderloin because they can get popcorn anywhere. They can't get the sandwich everywhere.

Peaches works for GA though. When they're in season they really are outstanding - and cheap.

Bolded for truth. Proper deep fried pork tenderloin is tough to find outside of Indiana, and I've never really had luck finding it in northern Indiana. You might be able to find it in northern Kentucky along the Ohio River and in some parts of southwestern Ohio. My dad gets cravings for it a lot more than I do, but I still miss it.


The thing I miss most from Missouri (besides Andres at the Plaza and sometimes Wimpy's) is the breaded pork tenderloin sandwich. And yes, some of them are done wrong. But the good ones are great; deep-fried, giganticker than anything, and served in a red plastic basket with onion rings somehow shoved in there as well.

Also a good Missouri sandwich; hot beef. It's an open-faced roast beef sandwich with mashed potatoes and a scary amount of gravy poured on top.
 
2011-01-14 05:08:20 PM  
atomsmoosher: SandmanMS: atomsmoosher: SandmanMS: atomsmoosher: "Italian sub" = New Jersey. Oh, I don't think so.

Its called a Hoagie, biatches, and it came from Philly first, which is true, dammit, even if its a lie.

Unless you're from Norristown, then you gotta get a Zep.

For that matter giving ALL of PA a cheesesteak is just crazy. You can't get a decent steak outside the metropolitan area.

It should be funnel cake or something.

Woah woah woah, back that train up. There are some damn good cheesesteaks up here in the Lehigh Valley. My favorite is still Steve's but that's a northeast thing.

You can probably find a decent steak up your way, I admit, but certainly not in Harrisburg or Pittsburgh. You have Yocco's up your way, so I'm willing to give you the benefit of the doubt.

Otherwise, it goes like this:

1) Dalassandro's + Chink's
2) Steve's Prince of Steaks
3) Places in Philly and surrounding counties that has a general appreciation of cheesesteaks.
4) What you can get in S. Jersey or the Lehigh Valley if you are lucky (no offense, mac)
5) Garbage.

Tell me where to go for a steak in the Lehigh? What do they use for rolls?

There's a number of places to get a good cheese steak up here.

1) Carl's Corner - Bethlehem
2) Michael's Steaks - South Side Bethlehem
3) Crossroads - Hellertown
4) Machs Gute - Bethlehem
5) Brass Rail - Allentown

The one main difference up here is just about everyone uses american cheese instead of wiz. Though you can get wiz at Michael's and a cheddar cheese sauce at the others. There's a few good bakeries up here were the rolls come from, Lusitania and Vallo's come to mind.

I worked in Philly for a number of years and commuted between there and the valley and I would put those cheese steaks up against a lot of what you can get in Philly.

As for hot dogs, since you mentioned Yocco's, the place you want to go up here is Pott's. It's right by Moravian College on Fairview Street. Their chili cheese dogs make Yocco's look like they're selling generic store bought franks.

Another new development up here is we now have sidewalk vendors selling food. A guy called Easy Weenies runs a hot dog cart on South Side Bethlehem. The dogs are Sabretts so they're good and he brings in a spicy sausage from NYC that is delicious. Plus he has home made sauerkraut that rivals what my grandma used to make.

Wiz is for fools. Provolone is what you put on a steak. I'll stab anyone who sez otherwise.

Thanks for the tips.


I'm a no wiz kinda guy myself. Personally I like american. That's why I liked Steve's. They have that american cheese sauce that they just slather on the slabs of ribeye.
 
2011-01-14 05:08:28 PM  
I thought NC was the bacon state. Then i zoomed in and got sad.
 
2011-01-14 05:09:34 PM  
LMAO re the green jello for Utah.

Grapes sounds about right for California. We grow a lot of them, eat a lot of them, bottle into wine, drink a lot of wine, etc.
 
2011-01-14 05:11:54 PM  

Cyberluddite: OK, I just noticed the key and now see it's supposed to be hazel nuts, but that's still certainly not a food I think of when I think of Oregon.


Oregon is known for pears and blackberries, which grow like weeds all over the state.
 
2011-01-14 05:12:03 PM  

Oztemprom: lilistonic: Oztemprom: Dynascape: Cincinnati Chili does not represent Ohio.

Just Cinci, and Skyline is farking gross.

Sure, Cincinnati Chili does not represent Ohio, but Chili with beans and spaghetti in it, topped with cheddar, is common throughout the midwest.

However, I do challenge you to find any other food that is fairly unique to Ohio.

Now, as for Skyline being gross? You have no idea WTF you are talking about, but I suppose, as they say, de gustibus non disputandum est

Or something

Will I be required to eat this when I move to Cincinnati this summer? Because I really, really don't want to. But I don't want to be an outcast or whatever.

I've seen pictures and it just reminds me of the first time my daughter went to a buffet and then threw up on me afterwards. May be my basically Italian cooking heritage, with some random rural bits thrown in, but to me, those foods belong on different tables in different rooms. On different days.


I doubt anyone will require you to eat it, but at some point you will be strongly encouraged to.


I feel it must have been at least partially the inspiration for that KFC "Bowl." But I'll try to pretend to have tried it or something.
 
2011-01-14 05:14:31 PM  
Illinois: Some sort of disgusting looking pie?

Chicago-style pizza

Huh, I was right.

But what the heck is that in Minnesota, a wang necrotic with frostbite? I'm pretty sure that is not good eats.
 
2011-01-14 05:15:51 PM  
Chicago thin crust pizza is (as usual) overlooked by out-of-towners.

A proper thin-crust pizza should be crisp, not soggy.

/Aurelio's FTW
 
2011-01-14 05:17:06 PM  
I think the whole damn thing should be called:

"A Linkbait Map I Made Because I Can Kind Of Think Of A Food For Each State Without Looking It Up"
 
2011-01-14 05:19:51 PM  

astronot: How can Colorado not be green chili? This list is ALL WRONG.


This!

Colorado native, and have never had a Denver omelet. I miss the green chili, now that I live in the land of pizza.
 
2011-01-14 05:20:03 PM  

SandmanMS: You know how I know you've never had a philly cheesesteak (or one from the Lehigh Valley for that matter)...


I was referring to the choice of "cheese" for WI and "steak" for TX... and I've had only one cheesesteak, from a little neighborhood place down the block from the science museum. I'd forgotten about that. I guess the sandwich wasn't particularly memorable.
 
2011-01-14 05:20:10 PM  

Rapmaster2000: I'm glad I saw tomatoes for Tennessee right off the bat so I knew to disregard the whole thing.

Protip subby: you could consider asking people from various states what reminds them of home. If you're going with Chicago-style pizza for IL then there's no reason you couldn't go with Memphis BBQ for Tennessee. And even when you're close like popcorn for Indiana, asking a Hoosier would get you the deep fried pork tenderloin because they can get popcorn anywhere. They can't get the sandwich everywhere.

Peaches works for GA though. When they're in season they really are outstanding - and cheap.


Exactly
, when I think of Tennessee food,the first thing I think of is FRIED CATFISH!... with sliced tomatoes on the side.
 
2011-01-14 05:20:17 PM  

rickycal78: CmndrFish: rickycal78: Really? Cheese for Wisconsin? C'mon, they at least could have tried something other than that tired old cliche. What about cranberries? We're the top cranberry producing state in the US last I checked, and haven't been the top dairy producer in a long time now.

Lazy article is lazy.

I would have settled for beer.

What? has the same number of calories as "food"

/Wisconsinite
//Mmmm... Beer...

Yeah, I woulda settled for beer too, and in Wisconsin beer does qualify as food.


Beer battered deep fried cheese curds?

/I may just have to be cheap and lazy and head to Culvers on the way home.
 
2011-01-14 05:20:38 PM  

33centpanties: inkling79: mynamebackwards: Another life long Arkansan that's never heard of a jelly pie.

Arkansas should be fried catfish.

Add me to the list.

/Mmmm...fried catfish.

agreed.

/Catfish Hole in Alma, Arkansas FTW!


I didn't know there was one in Alma. I live about a mile from the Catfish Hole in Fayetteville.

I never go, but this thread may change all that. Catfish for me tonight!
 
2011-01-14 05:21:24 PM  

binkyman:
Dunno Nova Scotia, but I vote for greasy downtown donairs.


As a Nova Scotian, I have to say THIS. Seafood is pretty standard throughout the Maritimes, but the best donairs are in NS.
 
2011-01-14 05:22:35 PM  

anniesmom: FRIED CATFISH!... with sliced tomatoes on the side.


Fried Catfish fritters for Il or froglegs.
Brother would probably say fried buffalo fish.
 
2011-01-14 05:25:43 PM  

arkansas: WTF is "Jelly Pie"? Lived in Arkansas all of my life and have never heard of it.

Stupid.


Ditto. Except for the living there my whole life part.
 
2011-01-14 05:27:44 PM  

Mensan: Pineapples for Hawaii? Seriously? Yes, Hawaii grows pineapples. Then they get shipped to either resorts or the mainland.

Either the people behind that map have never been to Hawaii, or they never left their resort. The true food of Hawaii is Spam. Spam steak and eggs or Spam omelet for breakfast, Spam burger or a Spam sushi roll for lunch, and Spam l'orange or Spam Wellington for dinner. Then enjoy Spambrosia or Spam upside down cake for dessert.


I love it! I'm having the Spam Spam Spam Spam Spam Baked Beans Spam Spam and Spam!
 
2011-01-14 05:31:04 PM  
Texas should be corndogs.
 
2011-01-14 05:37:36 PM  
After looking over the map, I'll give them credit for grapes for California, since we are pretty well known for the Sonoma and Napa Valley wines (though Oregon and Washington also make some tasty wine as well), and there are a bajillion microbrews up and down the coast, but to be honest, what DON'T we grow out there? Except for chocolate, coffee, and some of the tropic-only foods, there's not much that can't be found local-ish. As for cooking, we're a little short on the European foods for the most part, but we have proper Mexican (not Tex-Mex!), and alllll of the Asian munchies. Mmmm, curry sounds tasty now, as does pancit, bulgogi, and pad thai. *Drool!!!*

But I must ask, since I've seen it referenced several times but never explained: what is toasted ravioli? That sounds good...
 
2011-01-14 05:43:33 PM  

Igor Jakovsky: Kansas and North Carolina got ribs/barbecue. Tennessee got tomatoes

/as is proper


BLASPHEMER!!! Everyone that knows barbecue knows that Memphis pulled pork is the Alpha and Omega of the slow roasted pig/cow flesh realm.
 
2011-01-14 05:47:12 PM  
Pasties in Michigan, huh? I lived there for seven years and it took a trip to Wisconsin to try my first (rutabega and beef...ohgodyes). I can't even find pasties in the frozen food section anywhere in Michigan. Fried smelt is where it's at.

I guess Cincinnati style chili counts as a recognizable Ohio food, especially the three or four way, but I think in Cincinnati itself goetta is the defining local dish.

www.roadfood.com

Mmmm...goetta sandwich....
 
2011-01-14 05:52:28 PM  

IExpectAKill: but I think in Cincinnati itself goetta is the defining local dish.


I found out about this some time ago, it looks absolutely delicious. I am planning a trip to Cincinnati just to try this one of these days. Long drive but wow that sounds awesome.
 
2011-01-14 05:53:29 PM  
I'm sorry... "Oranges" for the state of Florida is incorrect.
The correct answer would be "Crack".

Thank you.
Next!
 
2011-01-14 05:55:48 PM  

Chupacabra Sandwich: WhyteRaven74: Illinois is deep dish pizza, this makes me happy, and hungry.

I second this defense of deep-dish pizza from the attacks in this thread.

Chicago pizza > New York pizza

by a WIDE margin


You sound WIDE.
 
2011-01-14 05:55:57 PM  
Good God.

I am now starving.

Also, how did Alabama get cornbread? Every state in the south has cornbread. I would've picked fried green tomatoes, personally. Or any fried vegetables...we fry 'em all.

Very fond of fried squash.
 
2011-01-14 05:57:12 PM  

IExpectAKill: I guess Cincinnati style chili counts as a recognizable Ohio food, especially the three or four way, but I think in Cincinnati itself goetta is the defining local dish.


Now that? I'd be willing to try. I'll have to put it on my list.
 
2011-01-14 06:02:51 PM  
special20: I'm sorry... "Oranges" for the state of Florida is incorrect.
The correct answer would be "Crack".

Thank you.
Next!


Cooking is actually involved with the second one, from my understanding.
 
2011-01-14 06:03:44 PM  
astronot
How can Colorado not be green chili? This list is ALL WRONG.


Because 80% of the green chile crop comes from here in New Mexico,the varieties you eat (Sandia,Big Jim,etc) were developed here & our cuisine is based on it.I've seen what Coloradoans do with green chile,they don't have a clue.
 
2011-01-14 06:05:57 PM  

Petey4335: rickycal78: CmndrFish: rickycal78: Really? Cheese for Wisconsin? C'mon, they at least could have tried something other than that tired old cliche. What about cranberries? We're the top cranberry producing state in the US last I checked, and haven't been the top dairy producer in a long time now.

Lazy article is lazy.

I would have settled for beer.

What? has the same number of calories as "food"

/Wisconsinite
//Mmmm... Beer...

Yeah, I woulda settled for beer too, and in Wisconsin beer does qualify as food.

Beer battered deep fried cheese curds?

/I may just have to be cheap and lazy and head to Culvers on the way home.


You know, I see the fried cheese curds everywhere, but I've never seen beer battered cheese curds, I would think they'd be more prevalent.

Either way, whoever came up with this list could have done a little more research.

/mmmm cheese curds. The real fresh ones that you can get from local cheese factories.
//squeak
/// If you're a Wisconsinite you'll know what I mean.
 
2011-01-14 06:11:56 PM  

Frantic Freddie: Because 80% of the green chile crop comes from here in New Mexico,the varieties you eat (Sandia,Big Jim,etc) were developed here & our cuisine is based on it.I've seen what Coloradoans do with green chile,they don't have a clue.


Red or Green! Not orange. Sheesh.
 
2011-01-14 06:12:37 PM  
Aww, I lost my shadowy TF badge. I guess it's really official.
 
2011-01-14 06:14:04 PM  
JustUseTheWrench: Good God.

I am now starving.

Also, how did Alabama get cornbread? Every state in the south has cornbread. I would've picked fried green tomatoes, personally. Or any fried vegetables...we fry 'em all.

Very fond of fried squash.



It's the Heart of Dixie, it can lay claim to any or all of them and pass out the rest to whomever it deems worthy.

I'd pass chitterlings over to Mississippi for example.
 
2011-01-14 06:17:33 PM  

UDel_Kitty: I was expecting that "crab puff" in Delaware to be a slice of Scrapple.


THIS!!! My father in law brought some out here and people here in Wisconsin were like...you eat that? Fry it up and give me some ketchup.
 
2011-01-14 06:26:56 PM  
L33t Squirrel: But I must ask, since I've seen it referenced several times but never explained: what is toasted ravioli? That sounds good...

Ravioli stuffed with seasoned ground beef, then lightly breaded (think like a bread-crumb breading) and deep-fried. Occasionally cheese (mozzarella? provolone?) inside instead. Usually served with a side of marinara sauce, but I like eating em straight up. They're everywhere in St. Louis, but moderately difficult to find elsewhere in the state.
 
2011-01-14 06:28:42 PM  
meanmutton: Don't EVER have Cincinnati chili. That stuff is disgusting.

Fark you and the horse you rode in on. I was born in this fine city and will fight to the death any who deride the finest culinary accomplishment of the 20th century.

Oztemprom: No, Skyline is the largest Cincinnati chili chain. There is also Gold Star, and just about every neighborhood has a local chili parlor where the best Cincinnati chili may be found.

Mt. Washington has frequently won best Cinci chili, and I tend to agree. They're only on the West Side, though. On average, Skyline > Gold Star, but Gold Star still has chili cheese fries, which Skyline has discontinued. And Gold Star was founded by a great family of Jordanian immigrants who I've worked for in one of their many businesses. Real American success story, but they don't have Skyline's habanero cheese.
 
2011-01-14 06:36:54 PM  
Oregon fail, the correct answer is beer.

Although they do love their damn hazelnuts here, jesus. I swear to god if there were such a thing as an official state salad, Oregon's would have bleu cheese, apples and hazelnuts. Every. farking. Restaurant.

I sound fat.
 
2011-01-14 06:42:05 PM  

schief2: Ravioli stuffed with seasoned ground beef, then lightly breaded (think like a bread-crumb breading) and deep-fried. Occasionally cheese (mozzarella? provolone?) inside instead. Usually served with a side of marinara sauce, but I like eating em straight up. They're everywhere in St. Louis, but moderately difficult to find elsewhere in the state.


Ohhhhhh. Nifty! I dunno if I could do it deep fried (too greasy!), but pan-fried could be interesting. Hmm, to the internets for recipes!!

And damn it, every time I read "wet burrito," the first image that comes to mind is a burrito at the bottom of a fish tank in a hole-in-the-wall Mexican place, much like a lobster in a tank at a fancy restaurant. :-\
 
2011-01-14 06:51:05 PM  

special20: Chupacabra Sandwich: WhyteRaven74: Illinois is deep dish pizza, this makes me happy, and hungry.

I second this defense of deep-dish pizza from the attacks in this thread.

Chicago pizza > New York pizza

by a WIDE margin

You sound WIDE.


Oh yeah
 
2011-01-14 06:53:20 PM  
rickycal78: /mmmm cheese curds. The real fresh ones that you can get from local cheese factories.
//squeak
/// If you're a Wisconsinite you'll know what I mean.


You don't have to be a Wisconsite to enjoy squeaky curds. Have been to a few cheese factories in Ontario, and partaken in that particular delight.

/Wife is from Wisconsin, though and her uncle owned a cheese factory, so we both "get" it :)
//What about Friday night fish fries, she asks?
 
2011-01-14 06:56:33 PM  
Also, a michigan staple: Almond Boneless Chicken. Outside of the Detroit area, you just can't get it served right. It's served on a bed of shredded lettuce, side of rice, deep fried and almond-battered chicken breast, and smothered with a chicken-soysauce-mushroom-garlic gravy. And of course, prodigiously sprinkled with sliced almonds.

/makes me miss living in detroit
//also the friggen coneys were excellent.
///KOEGELS
 
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