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(Daily Mail)   After the discovery of a wooden version of Stonehenge, scientists say it could be one of the most important archaeological finds for decades. Or it could be the remains of a farmer's fence   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 41
    More: Amusing, Stonehenge, radar imaging, Woodhenge, Neolithic, Birmingham University, Salisbury Plain  
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7705 clicks; posted to Main » on 12 Dec 2010 at 3:58 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2010-12-12 01:22:49 PM  
Wake me when the find the remains of Strawhenge.

/no one's built a henge like it since. no one knows what the f*ck a henge is...
 
2010-12-12 02:30:53 PM  
i105.photobucket.com.
 
2010-12-12 03:29:24 PM  
It was probably built by evil giraffes.
 
2010-12-12 03:42:47 PM  
Heretic pagans making fun of the druids...wait till they find the one made out of Legos.
 
2010-12-12 03:49:26 PM  
TheOther: ...wait till they find the one made out of Legos.


That one's actually about 80 km northeast.

i105.photobucket.com
 
2010-12-12 04:04:37 PM  
i.dailymail.co.uk

Even the neolithic Briton is pictured holding a pint.
 
2010-12-12 04:08:26 PM  
I am going to build a plastic Stonehenge and bury it in my backyard just to piss off and mislead future researchers in a couple thousand years.
 
2010-12-12 04:22:29 PM  
If you buried something this important you'd probably want to remember where you put it...
 
2010-12-12 04:25:12 PM  
This is the first I've heard of this wooden henge (or "fence" as it's being called). I'm getting a kick because I may have one in my own backyard!
 
2010-12-12 04:31:33 PM  
Fallout Boy: I am going to build a plastic Stonehenge and bury it in my backyard just to piss off and mislead future researchers in a couple thousand years.

I want to carve a Rosetta stone, but with English, Chinese, French and the made up Star Wars alphabet.

I want future archaeologists to speculate that we worshipped Wookiees and believed in the Force. Hopefully George Lucas will build himself some kind of epic illustrated pyramid tomb that will last 5000 years.
 
2010-12-12 04:34:43 PM  
bobbette: Even the neolithic Briton is pictured holding a pint.

Cups, plates and chalices hold a symbolic role in the kinship & lordship societies of teutonic, barbarian Europe (pre and post-Roman). Just as a judge uses a gavel to symbolize the authority and power of ancient judicial systems (he with the weapon makes the rules), so too does a Cup or Plate signify prestige, wealth, and accomplishment, as a representation of food or drink (which was important in a brutal climate where the land was harsh and unforgiving). It was a common folktale for a Champion Warrior to win The Cup by defeating The Foe. This carries over in our professional sports leagues today, the Champion always winning a Cup, Plate or Bowl of some kind.

When Christian missionaries brought the Good Word to the British Isles, like all smart religions they incorporated local lore into the Christ mythos so that the locals could relate better to a dead jewish zombie 5000 miles away talking about animals and tribes and customs not native to England.... thus was born the tale of the Holy Grail, and England sent its finest warriors to go retrieve it. But in truth, Christ never had a special Cup, there's no mention of it anywhere, and outside of England and France, it's not an especially important part of Christian dogma.

/the more you know
//I really just came here for Eddie Izzard, leaving satisfied
 
2010-12-12 04:36:27 PM  
bobbette: Hopefully George Lucas will build himself some kind of epic illustrated pyramid tomb that will last 5000 years.

Lucas won't, but Oprah will.
 
2010-12-12 04:41:09 PM  
bobbette: Fallout Boy: I am going to build a plastic Stonehenge and bury it in my backyard just to piss off and mislead future researchers in a couple thousand years.

I want to carve a Rosetta stone, but with English, Chinese, French and the made up Star Wars alphabet.

I want future archaeologists to speculate that we worshipped Wookiees and believed in the Force. Hopefully George Lucas will build himself some kind of epic illustrated pyramid tomb that will last 5000 years.


I would stick with Klingon. I know Star Wars is obviously superior to Star Trek, but there's already an accepted language and alphabet for Klingon. I'm not aware of a Star Wars language in a similar state (maybe Huttese, Rodian, or something else?).
 
2010-12-12 04:43:33 PM  
Fallout Boy: I am going to build a plastic Stonehenge and bury it in my backyard just to piss off and mislead future researchers in a couple thousand years.

www.lewiston.k12.id.us

Approves
 
2010-12-12 04:51:00 PM  
Ishkur: bobbette: Even the neolithic Briton is pictured holding a pint.

Cups, plates and chalices hold a symbolic role in the kinship & lordship societies of teutonic, barbarian Europe (pre and post-Roman). Just as a judge uses a gavel to symbolize the authority and power of ancient judicial systems (he with the weapon makes the rules), so too does a Cup or Plate signify prestige, wealth, and accomplishment, as a representation of food or drink (which was important in a brutal climate where the land was harsh and unforgiving). It was a common folktale for a Champion Warrior to win The Cup by defeating The Foe. This carries over in our professional sports leagues today, the Champion always winning a Cup, Plate or Bowl of some kind.

When Christian missionaries brought the Good Word to the British Isles, like all smart religions they incorporated local lore into the Christ mythos so that the locals could relate better to a dead jewish zombie 5000 miles away talking about animals and tribes and customs not native to England.... thus was born the tale of the Holy Grail, and England sent its finest warriors to go retrieve it. But in truth, Christ never had a special Cup, there's no mention of it anywhere, and outside of England and France, it's not an especially important part of Christian dogma.

/the more you know
//I really just came here for Eddie Izzard, leaving satisfied


That's interesting, but it totally undermines my insult about the English being drunks since the beginning of time. Alas.

I'm skeptical about the gavel theory. A hammer is not a really great war-symbol. Concepts of justice holding a sword and scales are more common. Some quick googling reveals that nobody knows the real origin of the gavel, and that perhaps it has medieval rent-collecting or Masonic origins.
 
2010-12-12 04:52:30 PM  
bobbette: That's interesting, but it totally undermines my insult about the English being drunks since the beginning of time. Alas.

I'm skeptical about the gavel theory. A hammer is not a really great war-symbol. Concepts of justice holding a sword and scales are more common. Some quick googling reveals that nobody knows the real origin of the gavel, and that perhaps it has medieval rent-collecting or Masonic origins.


Symbolizes prima nocta, the authority's right to tap that ass.
 
2010-12-12 04:56:19 PM  
redmid17: bobbette: Fallout Boy: I am going to build a plastic Stonehenge and bury it in my backyard just to piss off and mislead future researchers in a couple thousand years.

I want to carve a Rosetta stone, but with English, Chinese, French and the made up Star Wars alphabet.

I want future archaeologists to speculate that we worshipped Wookiees and believed in the Force. Hopefully George Lucas will build himself some kind of epic illustrated pyramid tomb that will last 5000 years.

I would stick with Klingon. I know Star Wars is obviously superior to Star Trek, but there's already an accepted language and alphabet for Klingon. I'm not aware of a Star Wars language in a similar state (maybe Huttese, Rodian, or something else?).


IDGAF about Star Trek, so no. Star Wars language is just English with a different alphabet, Aurebesh.
 
2010-12-12 04:59:28 PM  
Fano: bobbette: That's interesting, but it totally undermines my insult about the English being drunks since the beginning of time. Alas.

I'm skeptical about the gavel theory. A hammer is not a really great war-symbol. Concepts of justice holding a sword and scales are more common. Some quick googling reveals that nobody knows the real origin of the gavel, and that perhaps it has medieval rent-collecting or Masonic origins.

Symbolizes prima nocta, the authority's right to tap that ass.


This strikes me (oh bad pun) as being as plausible as the "it symbolizes Thor's hammer!" theory that I've also read.
 
2010-12-12 05:04:44 PM  
bobbette: Hopefully George Lucas will build himself some kind of epic illustrated pyramid tomb that will last 5000 years.


Can we get him to do that before he makes any more movies?
Please, please, please?


/P.S. The Neolithic/EBA "Beaker" the guy in your illustration is holding almost certainly was full of beer.
 
2010-12-12 05:04:57 PM  
bobbette: A hammer is not a really great war-symbol.

Clearly you haven't read any Norse mythology (or played any RPGs). Shame on you.

c.complex.com

/over seas
/with thrashing oar
/our only goal will be the western shore
/AUUUUUUUUUUUUGGGGGHHHHH!!
 
2010-12-12 05:32:48 PM  
This has been known for quite some time. I recall seeing a documentary about Stonehenge and Woodhenge, as they were calling it, several years ago, and it wasn't exactly new then.

There was also another article linked here on Fark several months ago about it.

This is not new. Stop acting like it is, please.
 
2010-12-12 06:48:01 PM  
Came here for Hayhenge. Not finding, hereby link (hot):

static2.stuff.co.nz


/no smoking, please
 
2010-12-12 06:55:59 PM  
You guys know that there is evidence of a few few wooden henges? There isn't just stonehenge. There are lots of them and they can be made out of more than stone too. Stonehenge is just the best example and the one that attracts nutters.
 
2010-12-12 06:56:00 PM  
Maybe the woodhenge thing was a precursor to the stonehenge monolith. Wood rots after so long and repairing it was probably time consuming. Maybe after a few generations some neo-fellow said "Ya know, if we built it outta stone it would last longer and be less of a hassle to upkeep."

Just a theory.

And that dude in the picture looks like that Dog the bounty hunter dude
 
2010-12-12 08:37:14 PM  
bobbette: Even the neolithic Briton is pictured holding a pint.

I'd need a drink too if I'd broken my femur so severely that it had completely separated from the hip such as his appears to have been......
 
2010-12-12 08:50:48 PM  
farm6.static.flickr.com

/familiar with the concept of scale models.
 
2010-12-12 08:58:10 PM  
Fano: Fallout Boy: I am going to build a plastic Stonehenge and bury it in my backyard just to piss off and mislead future researchers in a couple thousand years.



Approves


I rememebr the story as a kid. Do you know of a place online I can re-read it?
 
2010-12-12 09:09:34 PM  
Nightmaretony: I rememebr the story as a kid. Do you know of a place online I can re-read it?

What is it from?
 
2010-12-12 09:15:53 PM  
In ancient times...
Hundreds of years before the dawn of history
Lived a strange race of people... the Druids

No one knows who they were or what they were doing
But their legacy remains
Hewn into the living rock... Of Stonehenge
 
2010-12-12 09:17:01 PM  
farm6.static.flickr.com
 
2010-12-12 09:17:16 PM  
James F. Campbell: Nightmaretony: I rememebr the story as a kid. Do you know of a place online I can re-read it?

What is it from?


Motel of the Mysteries by David Macaulay, not sure where to find free online.

IMO, there are few archaeology threads on fark that couldn't use a reference to it.
 
2010-12-12 09:47:50 PM  
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.boathenge.net/boathenge.gif&imgre furl=http://www.boathenge.net/contact.html&usg=__VD5e-LzUeAu5G7AogJT2brEu46Q=&h= 325&w=576&sz=107&hl=en&start=0&sig2=O4MciOOUtk5Aai9YkgbYLg&zoom=1&tbnid=aq07L76M 4DQOOM:&tbnh=113&tbnw=201&ei=F4kFTeqODYe-nAfC7YzoDQ&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dboathenge %26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DX%26biw%3D1276%26bih%3D627%26tbs%3Disch:1&um=1&itbs=1 &iact=rc&dur=276&oei=F4kFTeqODYe-nAfC7YzoDQ&esq=1&page=1&ndsp=15&ved=1t:429,r:0, s:0&tx=153&ty=38
and there
 
2010-12-12 09:48:45 PM  
crap
 
2010-12-12 10:05:43 PM  
For all your Henge needs: Clonehenge.

Twinkiehenge:

i53.tinypic.com

Weeniehenge:

i55.tinypic.com

And "Henge" aka "Craphenge"... with druid! (Banksy)

i54.tinypic.com
 
2010-12-13 02:13:58 AM  
bobbette: Fallout Boy: I am going to build a plastic Stonehenge and bury it in my backyard just to piss off and mislead future researchers in a couple thousand years.

I want to carve a Rosetta stone, but with English, Chinese, French and the made up Star Wars alphabet.

I want future archaeologists to speculate that we worshipped Wookiees and believed in the Force. Hopefully George Lucas will build himself some kind of epic illustrated pyramid tomb that will last 5000 years.


I guarantee that in 3000 years humans will dig up Las Vegas and believe it was the capital of the world.
 
2010-12-13 04:13:21 AM  
Stonehenge is overrated. This is the greatest album ever:

farm3.static.flickr.com
 
2010-12-13 06:41:55 AM  
Is it picketed?
 
2010-12-13 10:15:05 AM  
flamingboard: Is it picketed?

No, Westboro doesn't have the funds to fly out there yet.
 
2010-12-13 11:27:40 AM  
Ishkur: When Christian missionaries brought the Good Word to the British Isles, like all smart religions they incorporated local lore into the Christ mythos so that the locals could relate better to a dead jewish zombie 5000 miles away talking about animals and tribes and customs not native to England.... thus was born the tale of the Holy Grail, and England sent its finest warriors to go retrieve it. But in truth, Christ never had a special Cup, there's no mention of it anywhere, and outside of England and France, it's not an especially important part of Christian dogma.

/the more you know
//I really just came here for Eddie Izzard, leaving satisfied



It is unlikely that any actual person was ever sent to retrieve it (certainly no historically known person), the first known reference to it comes from the late 12th Century in France (not England) in a tale by Chrétien de Troyes, a poet/romance writer (no evidence exists that he served in any capacity in the Church), and it was not consistently described as being a chalice.
 
2010-12-13 01:11:54 PM  
Yes, I do believe it was a "caldron" at first.

It was not part of the Arthurian Legend until Thomas Mallory's Morte D'Arthur about two centuries later.
 
2010-12-13 03:33:04 PM  
i.dailymail.co.uk
 
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