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(Fosters.com)   A University of New Hampshire professor thinks she did something amazing by furnishing her home with all used items. Subby beat her by furnishing his first home with nothing but milk crates   (fosters.com ) divider line
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7215 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Nov 2010 at 11:19 AM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-11-28 12:16:38 PM  
hmmm...things in my apartment purchased new...kitchen storage hutch that I bought a few years ago from Ikea and assembled with usual amount of expletives, two new lamps, new sheets, towels, and shower curtain. Yup, that's it I think. Maybe some random kitchen items too, now that I think about it.

Who IS this person?
 
2010-11-28 12:18:36 PM  

SharkInfested: hmmm...things in my apartment purchased new...kitchen storage hutch that I bought a few years ago from Ikea and assembled with usual amount of expletives, two new lamps, new sheets, towels, and shower curtain. Yup, that's it I think. Maybe some random kitchen items too, now that I think about it.

Who IS this person?


You have NEW stuff? Go brag to your country club friends, rich boy!
 
2010-11-28 12:21:08 PM  

Rip Dashrock: Living space one - used furniture, crate for coffee table, nothing on the walls, mismatched and disposable eating utensils, mattress on floor of bedroom. Just the basics.
Living space two - wall to wall stuff, new stuff, stuff everywhere.
Pictures, figurines, flowers, knick knacks, doilies, pillows, more photos, more stuff. In short, looks like a Bed Bath And Beyond.
What common denominator separates the two?


As a chick, I'd just like to say: meh.

I've outfitted rental apartments with roommates that look kick-effing-ass for psychotically small amounts of money. Holding on to good furniture we happen upon for free or cheap (grandma's dining table, *old* leather chair that got passed between 3 friends and 4 apartments, pull out couch for a spare bed, $20), slowly gathering cheap/free kitchen stuff, working with landlords (free paint if we keep to historical colors and make it look better than 'generic off white rental', for example), and living with art students = awesome apartment for hella cheap.

Besides, just going to a store and outfitting an entire place seems like cheating to me at this point. Yippee, my house looks like it came out of a showroom. And there's absolutely no story to anything, other than the work it took to get the cash to buy it.
 
2010-11-28 12:21:10 PM  

RedLemming: unalivezombie: Is it possible for people to be snobbish about used furniture?

Have you ever been to an overpriced antique store? The ones where they want 300 bucks for a picnic basket from 1924? Or 250 for a cedar chest from 1937?


Thats actually not bad for a cedar chest. In a high end antique store it would be more like a grand.
 
2010-11-28 12:25:47 PM  

Panty Sniffer: StreetlightInTheGhetto: The week before moveout, grab a friend, cruise the rentals and the dorms, and keep an eye out.

You have to be careful with what you pick up though. College kids can be jerks and will urinate on perfectly good furniture just so nobody else can enjoy it.


I just avoided the student ghetto/frat and sorority areas. And anything that looked kind of sketchy, pass.

Also, when I was at home working through the summers, cruising around during likely spring cleaning / after garage sale and estate sale times. I'll never have to buy a clay pot (or any other pot, really, or gardening tool, or hose) ever again.

Actually, I might, I like growing things. And I made up for it in the amount I spent on seeds and peat/perlite/compost/bark, but whatever. I have an awesome set of gardening tools that are roughly 60 years old from a cleaning-house-after-estate-sale thing. They'll last a couple more decades with care, easily.
 
2010-11-28 12:25:53 PM  
I'm trying to figure out why this is news... Maybe in New Hampshire they burn their furniture for warmth each winter, and that's why this is a new concept?

Our whole house is done this way, too. Mrs. Werekoala is really very creative and talented so she took a bunch of mismatched furniture we had lying around and refinished it all, gave it matching hardware and voila, we had an awesome matching solid hardwood bedroom set for about $100.

We found a table at a consignment shop with a couple of burn marks in it; and she refinished that too, I installed a chandelier from the same place, our dining room looks like it's out of Pottery Barn for less than $200.

And yeah, we brag about this, but only because we're proud of our thriftiness and resourcefullness not because it's some deep statement about saving the planet from the whales or whatever the hell. It's very much dictated by the fact that we AREN'T rolling in dough.
 
2010-11-28 12:26:34 PM  
Woman in question:

marine.unh.edu

She even has a blog about it. (new window)


Courses Taught

Economics of Travel and Tourism EREC/TOUR 633; Community Development Perspectives CD 415; Environmental Economics Perspectives EREC 411; Natural Resources Economics EREC 572; Economics of Forestry NR 643; New Hampshire Real Estate CD 672


I'm beginning to think the "College is worthless" posters are on to something here.
 
2010-11-28 12:26:53 PM  

ace in your face: RedLemming: unalivezombie: Is it possible for people to be snobbish about used furniture?

Have you ever been to an overpriced antique store? The ones where they want 300 bucks for a picnic basket from 1924? Or 250 for a cedar chest from 1937?

Thats actually not bad for a cedar chest. In a high end antique store it would be more like a grand.


RedLemming: unalivezombie: Is it possible for people to be snobbish about used furniture?

Have you ever been to an overpriced antique store? The ones where they want 300 bucks for a picnic basket from 1924? Or 250 for a cedar chest from 1937?


seatown75: unalivezombie: I know there are beer, wine, and hotdog snobs.

Is it possible for people to be snobbish about used furniture?

Absolutely. There's a huge difference between buying used furniture that cost a few hundred $$$ new vs a few thousand $$$$.



I should have been more clear. I meant CHEAP used furniture.
 
2010-11-28 12:28:33 PM  

werekoala: And yeah, we brag about this, but only because we're proud of our thriftiness and resourcefullness not because it's some deep statement about saving the planet from the whales or whatever the hell. It's very much dictated by the fact that we AREN'T rolling in dough.


Bingo.

That said, my mom goes overboard with this (the garage is full of stuff that is still patiently waiting to be refurbished), so if you make it all the way to the end (read: properly outfitting a whole room but doing it the cheap, slow, and hard-working way), congrats are in order.

I do have to force myself to not pick up something if it's really not worth it, though. That's the environmentalist and my mom's influence in my kicking in, but I'm getting better about it.
 
2010-11-28 12:29:02 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: The week before moveout, grab a friend, cruise the rentals and the dorms, and keep an eye out.


Also known as Dumpster Diving.
 
2010-11-28 12:30:22 PM  

Seacop: My first coffee table


At least your spool had wire on it.
 
2010-11-28 12:34:09 PM  
I could probably count the number of things I bought new on both hand. That's in my whole house, including clothes. I do buy new underwear. I guess I have to buy new car parts sometimes, and of course the food is unused. Sometimes day-old, but unused.
 
2010-11-28 12:34:40 PM  

Barakku: Seacop: My first coffee table

At least your spool had wire on it.


Actually, that's a stock photo, no cable either.
 
2010-11-28 12:35:43 PM  

chu2dogg: Woman in question:


She even has a blog about it. (new window)


Courses Taught

Economics of Travel and Tourism EREC/TOUR 633; Community Development Perspectives CD 415; Environmental Economics Perspectives EREC 411; Natural Resources Economics EREC 572; Economics of Forestry NR 643; New Hampshire Real Estate CD 672


I'm beginning to think the "College is worthless" posters are on to something here.


I'm all for education. But when you have people who seem to have lived some kind of protected upper middle class existence who go from home to university and then end up working at a university and then start publishing books (and blogging) about things other people have been doing forever while acting like they've discovered them...that is really farking annoying.

They have this self satisfied "I have a massive education, only someone such as myself is fit to properly investigate and relay the socio-political implications of picking up a cockroach ridden sofa from the side of the road" kind of thing going on.
 
2010-11-28 12:36:18 PM  

chu2dogg: Woman in question:

She even has a blog about it. (new window)


Courses Taught

Economics of Travel and Tourism EREC/TOUR 633; Community Development Perspectives CD 415; Environmental Economics Perspectives EREC 411; Natural Resources Economics EREC 572; Economics of Forestry NR 643; New Hampshire Real Estate CD 672


I'm beginning to think the "College is worthless" posters are on to something here.


What bothers me is that she essentially the lowest of the low when in comes to college professors, but she thinks she's something special.

'Far better it is to dare mighty things to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure...than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy much nor suffer much because they live in a grey twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."
 
2010-11-28 12:41:07 PM  
When my sister and I were over 18 my parents went out and bought their first brand new furniture set. All leather and cherry, expensive stuff. I asked them why we never had that stuff as a kid, they said because we were kids and would have ruined it, so they bought used crappy stuff. Now that I have kids, I completely understand. Get a $40 couch off of Craigslist or Salvation Army, don't panic when the kids tear it up.
 
2010-11-28 12:46:31 PM  
I like used stuff, especially for electronics. I just installed a home theater system that retailed for $300, and I bought it for $60 on ebay.

When it comes to furniture, I prefer used stuff - furniture isn't made very well anymore. The only new stuff that is really good quality is hideously expensive. If you learn the basics of sanding and refinishing wood, you can make a matching set from different sources.

I also furnished my workout area from Craigslist. I got a Bowflex for $45, and a CHUCK NORRIS endorsed Total Gym for $30 (buy exercise equipment from fat people - it will be barely used). When I upgrade to real weights, it will be used as well.

I'd hate to think of what everything in my house would have cost had I bought it new.
 
2010-11-28 12:47:05 PM  
I never owned new furniture in my life, but my wife did and when we bought a new house she went full nuts and bought a bunch of granny-grade stuff. Damn, furniture is expensive. I was happy with a used futon and a particle-board dresser.
 
2010-11-28 12:48:26 PM  

Panty Sniffer: atomic-age: 3/4 dogs are also previously owned

All of my dogs I found roaming the streets. After a sincere effort to locate the owners I had them shot (vaccines, not bullets) and licensed.


farm5.static.flickr.com?

/ Aisle seat, please
 
2010-11-28 12:49:33 PM  

chu2dogg: Woman in question:

She even has a blog about it. (new window)


Courses Taught

Economics of Travel and Tourism EREC/TOUR 633; Community Development Perspectives CD 415; Environmental Economics Perspectives EREC 411; Natural Resources Economics EREC 572; Economics of Forestry NR 643; New Hampshire Real Estate CD 672


I'm beginning to think the "College is worthless" posters are on to something here.


She bought a new refrigerator at Sears. She could have found one on craigslist (I have found energy star stuff on craigslist, often even new stuff from people who have given up on their remodels) , or frankly bought a new one at Lowes or Home Depot for much less. Sears sucks.
 
2010-11-28 12:52:31 PM  

chu2dogg: StreetlightInTheGhetto: The week before moveout, grab a friend, cruise the rentals and the dorms, and keep an eye out.

Also known as Dumpster Diving.


Having actually dumpster dived (Trader Joe's only), I don't call it that.

I call it 'pulling stuff off the curb'.

Funny about that, though. Years ago in Newsweek someone wrote to some crappy mini answer column on the back few pages asking what this 'dumpster diving' her grandkids were talking about was. The writer said it was looking for information to steal someone's identity.

/sigh
 
2010-11-28 12:54:40 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: chu2dogg: StreetlightInTheGhetto: The week before moveout, grab a friend, cruise the rentals and the dorms, and keep an eye out.

Also known as Dumpster Diving.

Having actually dumpster dived (Trader Joe's only), I don't call it that.

I call it 'pulling stuff off the curb'.

Funny about that, though. Years ago in Newsweek someone wrote to some crappy mini answer column on the back few pages asking what this 'dumpster diving' her grandkids were talking about was. The writer said it was looking for information to steal someone's identity.

/sigh


here in my city you have to have a $10.00 salvage permit to pull stuff from the curb. because it's a college town, a lot of people are doing it.
 
2010-11-28 01:03:23 PM  

silent tom: here in my city you have to have a $10.00 salvage permit to pull stuff from the curb. because it's a college town, a lot of people are doing it.


In Oshkosh, WI? When did that start?
 
2010-11-28 01:03:37 PM  
I just made the amazing discovery that if I put on a sweater rather than turn up the heat when I get chilly, it saves money AND reduces electricity consumption. Quick, somebody call the media and share my stunning wisdom with the world!
 
2010-11-28 01:04:35 PM  
Granted, it's an idiotic article, but then since she's teaching a course in environmental living, she would be equally criticized if she had any new possessions.

/ridiculing college professors=shooting fish in a barrel
//low-hanging fruit
///not as bad as tedious Farkers who stampede into the thread to brag about their own used furniture
 
2010-11-28 01:04:54 PM  
"Courses Taught

Economics of Travel and Tourism EREC/TOUR 633; Community Development Perspectives CD 415; Environmental Economics Perspectives EREC 411; Natural Resources Economics EREC 572; Economics of Forestry NR 643; New Hampshire Real Estate CD 672

I'm beginning to think the "College is worthless" posters are on to something here."

I love the part on her blg where she talks about reusing boxes that she picked up for free as opposed to buying them. What a discovery! Reusing boxes for moving?! Who would've imagined!
 
2010-11-28 01:10:11 PM  
UNH profs are all a bit strange. It sort of bleeds out into the local school system beyond the college too. Poor Clam Creek graduates, especially those that don't escape the D/L/M area.

/managed to escape
//not fishing for "you too??" posts, not at all
 
2010-11-28 01:10:25 PM  

silent tom: here in my city you have to have a $10.00 salvage permit to pull stuff from the curb. because it's a college town, a lot of people are doing it.


Really? Sigh.

That's one of the things that really annoyed me about my college town, though... people often didn't have any manners about leaving things nicer than when they got there. That's what started making Trader Joe's difficult (the one and only place I dumpster dived because the employees actually set aside the expiring in one or two day products (or slightly dented, or wine bottles where one broke and stained the other labels of perfectly okay bottles...) in clean bags and the trash knotted in other bags. And all the plants that they tossed were always set on the ground (I had a hell of a lot of basil and mint thanks to them last year, not to mention scores of free decent pots)

Then people started not obeying the decent rules of order (if you get there first, you get first dibs, but only take what you need and pass it on, and leave the whole place just as clean as when you got there) and the cops started keeping an eye out. Sigh.

People suck.

And I was working but not making much at the time (damn non-profit work, how I love and hate you), and loaves of bread we immediately froze and everything else we got for free there (plus that garden that TJ's ended up helping out too) made it possible for me to eat without resorting to food stamps or charity. Likewise for a few friends. I probably only went half a dozen times.

Of course, the kids who didn't really need to pull that but thought it was 'cool' probably were the ones who started leaving messes behind, too.
 
2010-11-28 01:12:12 PM  

Canyoudigit: "Courses Taught

Economics of Travel and Tourism EREC/TOUR 633; Community Development Perspectives CD 415; Environmental Economics Perspectives EREC 411; Natural Resources Economics EREC 572; Economics of Forestry NR 643; New Hampshire Real Estate CD 672

I'm beginning to think the "College is worthless" posters are on to something here."

I love the part on her blg where she talks about reusing boxes that she picked up for free as opposed to buying them. What a discovery! Reusing boxes for moving?! Who would've imagined!


Ha, next you'll tell me that if you don't have anywhere to store old boxes you can go to the grocery store and get egg carton boxes, or Trader Joe's and get wine boxes, and plenty of other places, all for free if you ask nicely.

That's just crazy!
 
2010-11-28 01:13:49 PM  

Huggermugger: Granted, it's an idiotic article, but then since she's teaching a course in environmental living, she would be equally criticized if she had any new possessions.

/ridiculing college professors=shooting fish in a barrel
//low-hanging fruit
///not as bad as tedious Farkers who stampede into the thread to brag about their own used furniture


Actually, if she just made it a point to buy/find mostly used furniture and didn't think that was actually something special to brag about, probably not.
 
2010-11-28 01:16:39 PM  

altinos: silent tom: here in my city you have to have a $10.00 salvage permit to pull stuff from the curb. because it's a college town, a lot of people are doing it.

In Oshkosh, WI? When did that start?


i'm not sure, i heard that someone responding to a craigslist curb alert received a warning from one of our many many cops. it's likely other cities have this as well.
 
2010-11-28 01:16:52 PM  

atomic-age: Panty Sniffer: We are not poor by any means, but 90% of our stuff is used and we don't go around patting ourselves on our backs for being environment friendly or thrifty. Good job professor for living like most everybody else does.

I owned a shop that specialized in midcentury modern furnishings. Shockingly, almost everything I use is from the 40s-60s. Old bikes, furniture, kitchen appliances, tools, dishes, glasses . . . virtually everything. Sure, the posh folks would look down on it, but I don't like any posh folks well enough to let them in the house.

3/4 dogs are also previously owned.


Appliances usually aren't worth the bother for me except maybe an oven. Everything else, newer is probably gonna be more efficient.

But tools (especially hand), dishes, silverware, definitely bikes... if it's lasted this long you know it's good. Might just need a little love and care.
 
2010-11-28 01:18:09 PM  

silent tom: altinos: silent tom: here in my city you have to have a $10.00 salvage permit to pull stuff from the curb. because it's a college town, a lot of people are doing it.

In Oshkosh, WI? When did that start?

i'm not sure, i heard that someone responding to a craigslist curb alert received a warning from one of our many many cops. it's likely other cities have this as well.


I understand just picking stuff out of trash, but if someone puts up a Craigslist ad how is that just not a private transaction? Even if it's first come first serve?

Maybe people could just start putting up 1 penny as cost on the Craigslist ads? Or just putting stuff on the driveway for pickup instead of the curb?
 
2010-11-28 01:20:46 PM  
some people just leave items in the yard rather than on the terrace. may also be a good idea to print a copy of the ad to show that you're there legitimately.
 
2010-11-28 01:25:41 PM  
oops....that was in response to StreetlightInTheGhetto
 
2010-11-28 01:40:41 PM  
Meh. People have been furnishing their homes with used stuff since I was young, and years before that too. The dressers in our bedrooms were mine and my sisters from when we were kids.

We've had our coffee table and matching end tables since my son was in elementary school (he's 30-years old now). Found them next to a dumpster at the apartment complex we lived at the time. The previous owners had bought new furniture and put their old stuff out for others to take. My queen size mattress & box springs, plus 3 sets of Ralph Lauren Egyptian cotton sheets, were acquired at a yard sale for $40 (this was years ago, long before the bedbug influx).

I'd say that 90% of the furnishings in my home was acquired through salvaging (coffee table & end tables), garage/yard/estate sales or being inherited from my grandma (dishes, silverware, pots & pans).
 
2010-11-28 01:46:56 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Huggermugger: Granted, it's an idiotic article, but then since she's teaching a course in environmental living, she would be equally criticized if she had any new possessions.

/ridiculing college professors=shooting fish in a barrel
//low-hanging fruit
///not as bad as tedious Farkers who stampede into the thread to brag about their own used furniture

Actually, if she just made it a point to buy/find mostly used furniture and didn't think that was actually something special to brag about, probably not.


And yet here you are, bragging about YOUR even BETTER finds...
 
2010-11-28 02:02:27 PM  
Subby could afford milk crates?
Posh bastard. I had to use cinder blocks I stole from construction sites. I'd often run home with guard dogs chasing me. I found that German Shepherd is surprisingly tasty in mac n'cheese, and the fur can keep you warm quite effectively once you preserve it with salt packets stolen from McDonalds.
 
2010-11-28 02:03:50 PM  

luckybastard: StreetlightInTheGhetto: Huggermugger: Granted, it's an idiotic article, but then since she's teaching a course in environmental living, she would be equally criticized if she had any new possessions.

/ridiculing college professors=shooting fish in a barrel
//low-hanging fruit
///not as bad as tedious Farkers who stampede into the thread to brag about their own used furniture

Actually, if she just made it a point to buy/find mostly used furniture and didn't think that was actually something special to brag about, probably not.

And yet here you are, bragging about YOUR even BETTER finds...


Yeah, sure, why not. On a relatively anonymous message board. Not saying that I'm better than anyone else for doing so, or thinking it's some big accomplishment. It's not, although it's nice when you put time and energy into restoring something, be it furniture or a 1950s Chevy.
 
2010-11-28 02:06:31 PM  
yeah, yeah, raging farking elitist douche; but otoh it sounds like she learned her lesson
 
2010-11-28 02:24:50 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Yeah, sure, why not. On a relatively anonymous message board. Not saying that I'm better than anyone else for doing so, or thinking it's some big accomplishment. It's not, although it's nice when you put time and energy into restoring something, be it furniture or a 1950s Chevy.


I don't think anyone including yourself were bragging about their finds, but merely pointing out that everyone does that. As far as dumpster diving at Trader Joe's goes, that does not happen where I live. They set aside the food for the food pantry that I volunteer at to pick up and give out. Some of it is a tough sell to the pantry's clients. Try pushing mangos on someone straight out of the projects.
 
2010-11-28 02:29:03 PM  

chu2dogg: Woman in question:

She even has a blog about it. (new window)


Courses Taught

Economics of Travel and Tourism EREC/TOUR 633; Community Development Perspectives CD 415; Environmental Economics Perspectives EREC 411; Natural Resources Economics EREC 572; Economics of Forestry NR 643; New Hampshire Real Estate CD 672


I'm beginning to think the "College is worthless" posters are on to something here.


The way that dog is looking at her is just a little too creepy
 
2010-11-28 02:29:11 PM  

Panty Sniffer: StreetlightInTheGhetto: Yeah, sure, why not. On a relatively anonymous message board. Not saying that I'm better than anyone else for doing so, or thinking it's some big accomplishment. It's not, although it's nice when you put time and energy into restoring something, be it furniture or a 1950s Chevy.

I don't think anyone including yourself were bragging about their finds, but merely pointing out that everyone does that. As far as dumpster diving at Trader Joe's goes, that does not happen where I live. They set aside the food for the food pantry that I volunteer at to pick up and give out. Some of it is a tough sell to the pantry's clients. Try pushing mangos on someone straight out of the projects.


I bothered the pastry shop I work at enough where they found someone to do the same, so fair enough. Glad someone's doing that.

The very decent bakery in my college town did the same thing, but if you went in at closing and asked nicely they'd usually set aside a loaf or so for you.
 
2010-11-28 02:29:14 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: atomic-age: Panty Sniffer: We are not poor by any means, but 90% of our stuff is used and we don't go around patting ourselves on our backs for being environment friendly or thrifty. Good job professor for living like most everybody else does.

I owned a shop that specialized in midcentury modern furnishings. Shockingly, almost everything I use is from the 40s-60s. Old bikes, furniture, kitchen appliances, tools, dishes, glasses . . . virtually everything. Sure, the posh folks would look down on it, but I don't like any posh folks well enough to let them in the house.

3/4 dogs are also previously owned.

Appliances usually aren't worth the bother for me except maybe an oven. Everything else, newer is probably gonna be more efficient.

But tools (especially hand), dishes, silverware, definitely bikes... if it's lasted this long you know it's good. Might just need a little love and care.


I like color, so 1950s kitchen appliances fit the bill. Turquoise and pink, FTW! I suppose someday my 50s pink fridge will quit. I don't like to think about that day, because I'd be miserable with a new refrigerator. We did upgrade from a 1949 stove to a 1958, but that was because my husband threw a fit to have this turquoise stove rather than the white one we had. It matches the kitchen cabinets, and I have to admit, I'm really fond of it.

My husband was remarking about his hand tools most of which are US, Japan, or Hong Kong made. You can pretty much name the decade simply by looking at the place of manufacture.
 
2010-11-28 02:31:47 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: Yeah, sure, why not. On a relatively anonymous message board. Not saying that I'm better than anyone else for doing so, or thinking it's some big accomplishment. It's not, although it's nice when you put time and energy into restoring something, be it furniture or a 1950s Chevy.


Actually, it's less notable when bragging anonymously.

I have an Edwardian inlaid/carved-wood bedroom suite that I inherited from an aunt whose hobby was shopping antique furniture shows in the 1970s. It could potentially be worth $20,000. I did absolutely nothing to justify having it, I simply accepted it as a bequest and then maintained it in a decent state. Does that make me oh-so-special?
 
2010-11-28 02:33:51 PM  
My god. Most of my kitchen EQUIPMENT is used. Cast iron pans, stainless steel water pot, utensils from an old halfway house. I bought my current bed on CL for $50 from a very neat and organized college girl who was moving to Europe. My dresser is the one I had as a kid - like, 4 years old - and it was antique THEN! And o lot of the other stuff - even my DVD player - was shiat spoiled kids threw out because either "it didn't work" (read: they broke a trivial piece that was easily fixed or replaced) or they just didn't want to move it - such a hassle!

And I get free food and booze at art gallery receptions.
And I get into clubs for free and sometimes get drink tickets by signing up for their mailing lists (and sometimes other clubs affiliated with those get me on theirs as well - I really don't remember the last time I paid a cover charge... but two times I sweet talked my way in [once because I had a hot chick with me and once because it was my friend's birthday and I was early and dressed quite well and made small-talk with the doorman]).
 
2010-11-28 02:52:08 PM  

thelordofcheese: And I get free food and booze at art gallery receptions.


I am embarrassed to admit that I frequent Costco when I have nothing on my agenda and walk around with no intention of buying anything solely for the free samples. I will have to check out this art gallery angle for booze and food. Are they invitation only? No, I will have no intention of buying anything, just eating hors d'oeuvres and drinking wine. Liquor stores also have tastings.
 
2010-11-28 03:10:39 PM  

atomic-age:

I like color, so 1950s kitchen appliances fit the bill. Turquoise and pink, FTW! I suppose someday my 50s pink fridge will quit. I don't like to think about that day, because I'd be miserable with a new refrigerator.


My mom has a 1950's fridge, white with salmon pink and gold detail and interior. It just keeps going and going and going. She uses it as the milk fridge for the farm. along the way, kitchen fridge from the 70s died and the one from the early 90s is not working well at all. That old fridge is solid.
 
2010-11-28 03:13:31 PM  

FunkOut: atomic-age:

I like color, so 1950s kitchen appliances fit the bill. Turquoise and pink, FTW! I suppose someday my 50s pink fridge will quit. I don't like to think about that day, because I'd be miserable with a new refrigerator.

My mom has a 1950's fridge, white with salmon pink and gold detail and interior. It just keeps going and going and going. She uses it as the milk fridge for the farm. along the way, kitchen fridge from the 70s died and the one from the early 90s is not working well at all. That old fridge is solid.


It's because of all the uranium and asbestos they used back then. Solid workmanship and solid materials.
 
2010-11-28 03:13:34 PM  
Oh yeah, and estate sales FTW!

At garage sales you get all the crap that other people dn't want. At estate sales you get the stuff that had to be pryed from their cold dead hands. Plus their relatives really just want the free labor of emptying the house. Which do you think is going to have better stuff, and the better deals?

I don't see why anyone who isn't rich likes auctions, either...
 
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