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(SFGate)   The Sixties turned 50 this year. Are they still relevant to us, or were they all just a collection of Billy Joel-ready pop culture cliches?   (sfgate.com) divider line 131
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2604 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Nov 2010 at 5:55 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-11-27 05:57:57 PM
I'm not sure what message to take from the 60's -- the good aspirations, or the disgusting culmination and end of the worst generation, the baby boomers.

I guess I'll take both.
 
2010-11-27 05:58:00 PM
No comments and this got a greenlight?

Meh. The sixties were an excuse to rebel against the very things those people turned into. Sorry, guys.
 
2010-11-27 05:58:15 PM
All I know is that we didn't start the fire.
 
2010-11-27 05:59:43 PM
bigdavediode: I'm not sure what message to take from the 60's -- the good aspirations, or the disgusting culmination and end of the worst generation, the baby boomers.

I guess I'll take both.


Pretty much this. A generation of self-absorbed assholes that took personal responsibility and threw it away to make a quick buck, protested the system except when the system worked to their advantage, and left us all a nation of bleeding hearts that saw us go from an honorable nation to a nation that couldn't find its moral ass with both hands.
 
2010-11-27 06:00:42 PM
i789.photobucket.com
 
2010-11-27 06:01:03 PM
Like with most things in this life we have a bad tendency to make things that have occurred in the past appear greater than they actually were.

Can't wait till 2040 when people start talking about how great the 90s were because of TV shows and boy band music (Won't be surprised if Time Life has a boy band music collection before 2040).
 
2010-11-27 06:02:54 PM
MorphOSX: bigdavediode: I'm not sure what message to take from the 60's -- the good aspirations, or the disgusting culmination and end of the worst generation, the baby boomers.

I guess I'll take both.

Pretty much this. A generation of self-absorbed assholes that took personal responsibility and threw it away to make a quick buck, protested the system except when the system worked to their advantage, and left us all a nation of bleeding hearts that saw us go from an honorable nation to a nation that couldn't find its moral ass with both hands.


I guess the core value of the 60's was superficiality.

On the bright side, they were activists -- something that the populace should learn from.
 
2010-11-27 06:03:02 PM
What did Joel have to do with the 60's? Wasn't he like the late-mid 70's?
 
2010-11-27 06:04:56 PM
MorphOSX: No comments and this got a greenlight?

Meh. The sixties were an excuse to rebel against the very things those people turned into. Sorry, guys.


I think the baby boomers "sold out" only because their aims where unreasonable and unrealistic. They brought us a lot of rights and freedoms that we all should be thankful to have, but I'm also glad we didn't see the goals of Timothy Larry, the Weather Underground, and Abby Hoffman [among others] brought to fruition.
 
2010-11-27 06:05:26 PM
LegacyDL: Can't wait till 2040 when people start talking about how great the 90s were because of TV shows and boy band music (Won't be surprised if Time Life has a boy band music collection before 2040).

I look forward to a gray-haired Mark Wahlberg selling his New Kids On the Block Time-Life hits.
 
2010-11-27 06:05:30 PM
brilett: What did Joel have to do with the 60's? Wasn't he like the late-mid 70's?

I prefer Mike myself.
 
2010-11-27 06:07:07 PM
I used to think the Sixties were such a cool time to live through. The music was amazing, drugs were out and in the open, cool clothes.


/dad went to Woodstock
 
2010-11-27 06:10:02 PM
Jonathan Hohensee: I think the baby boomers "sold out" only because their aims where unreasonable and unrealistic. They brought us a lot of rights and freedoms that we all should be thankful to have, but I'm also glad we didn't see the goals of Timothy Larry, the Weather Underground, and Abby Hoffman [among others] brought to fruition.

What did Abby Hoffman do, other than interrupt the Who and demonstrate against Vietnam?
 
2010-11-27 06:10:27 PM
bigdavediode: I look forward to a gray-haired Mark Wahlberg selling his New Kids On the Block Time-Life hits.

Be very interesting since Mark Wahlberg wasn't in New Kids.
 
2010-11-27 06:10:48 PM
We laid one hell of a lot of pipe.

/And we weren't fat

.
 
2010-11-27 06:11:00 PM
raerae1980: I used to think the Sixties were such a cool time to live through. The music was amazing, drugs were out and in the open, cool clothes.


/dad went to Woodstock


you know how I know you smell like patchouli and B.O.?
 
2010-11-27 06:11:50 PM
"Never again" was forgotten soon enough. The boomers becoming hypocrites is just weak example of the same thing and not the main thing to get worked up about.
 
2010-11-27 06:12:00 PM
SCUBA_Archer: Be very interesting since Mark Wahlberg wasn't in New Kids.

Sorry, Donnie Wahlberg! Wrong brother!

/Damn my foolish -- wait, I'm proud I don't know who was in that travesty.
 
2010-11-27 06:15:00 PM
Well, seeing as how Boomers now rule the fricking world and wont surrender it from their grubby, bloodstained claws until the last one of their wretched ilk releases their final, blackened death-rattle from within their hollowed hearts, I'd say... Yes.
 
2010-11-27 06:18:13 PM
i237.photobucket.com
The 2010's are going to make the 1960's look like the 1950's, man
 
2010-11-27 06:18:47 PM
Clete Orris: raerae1980: I used to think the Sixties were such a cool time to live through. The music was amazing, drugs were out and in the open, cool clothes.


/dad went to Woodstock

you know how I know you smell like patchouli and B.O.?


I don't like Patchouli but I do wear oils instead of perfume. And I can't stand hairy legs, so no, you're wrong.
 
2010-11-27 06:19:07 PM
I turned fifty this year too.

Causation or correlation?
 
2010-11-27 06:19:29 PM
Cliche#01: Harry Truman
Cliche#02: Doris Day
Cliche#03: Red China
Cliche#04: Johnnie Ray
Cliche#05: South Pacific
Cliche#06: Walter Winchell
Cliche#07: Joe DiMaggio
Cliche#08: Joe McCarthy
Cliche#09: Richard Nixon
Cliche#10: Studebaker
Cliche#11: television
Cliche#12: North Korea
Cliche#13: South Korea
Cliche#14: Marilyn Monroe

/it was always burning since the world was turning
 
2010-11-27 06:19:34 PM
ThreeEdgedSword 2010-11-27 06:05:30 PM  
brilett: What did Joel have to do with the 60's? Wasn't he like the late-mid 70's?

I prefer Mike myself.
========+=====
Mike?

God I hate those flappers. And don't get me started on those zoot suiters!

Must be tough to be such old men when they're young. Not very attractive to we disstaff posters, either.
 
2010-11-27 06:20:47 PM
The 60s was a major turning point in American history. In some respects, it was the third major evolution point in our country's history. The first being the American Revolution, the second the Civil War. The 60s represented the death of trust in American government as a benevolent protector, the true beginning of disenchantment with the growing power of government, and a growing social consciousness with significant grievances against the status quo. The 60s was a time of throwing off the history of the United States until then and the attempt to create a new society based on enlightened concepts like peace and equality. It was, of course, a huge failure.

September 11, 2001 is the fourth major evolution. It represents the loss of our idealism and belief in the ultimate goodness of ourselves that even the tumultuous 60s was unable to break. The slow drag since that day has seen this country turned into a veritable police state with the government and media doing what it can to foment hate, fear, and worry. Factionalism represents us now. We cling to our party and revile other parties. Politically, we are split almost perfectly in half.

The current state of the nation is pretty ugly. To the people of the 60s, the changes seen then were just as ugly. But growing pains are seldom easy.
 
2010-11-27 06:21:05 PM
Hippies smell, but elderly hippies smell worse.
 
2010-11-27 06:22:51 PM
mjoven1975: es smell, but elderly hippies smell wo

i just threw up a little in my mouth.
 
2010-11-27 06:23:15 PM
SCUBA_Archer: bigdavediode: I look forward to a gray-haired Mark Wahlberg selling his New Kids On the Block Time-Life hits.

Be very interesting since Mark Wahlberg wasn't in New Kids.


Mark was an original member of New Kids on the Block.
 
2010-11-27 06:24:06 PM
Clete Orris: raerae1980: I used to think the Sixties were such a cool time to live through. The music was amazing, drugs were out and in the open, cool clothes.


/dad went to Woodstock

you know how I know you smell like patchouli and B.O.?


Pot is better today.
Woodstock was a joke. Hippies left that place looking like a junkyard and it never made money.
Even the Beatles said Haight-Ashbury was a bunch of bums looking for handouts.
 
2010-11-27 06:24:56 PM
THE 60S!!!! 3.bp.blogspot.com


www.thomasbopedersen.org

images.nationalgeographic.com
www.peacebuttons.info
img141.imageshack.us
www.mp3crib.com
www.welovemetal.com
technoccult.net
malcolmxproperties.com
fantasm.still-inspired.com
www.amoeba.com
gamesareevil.com
 
2010-11-27 06:25:01 PM
The only thing hippies did was make facial hair acceptable and kill the formal hat.

JERKS! FORMAL HATS ARE AWESOME!
 
2010-11-27 06:27:00 PM
AverageAmericanGuy: The 60s was a major turning point in American history. In some respects, it was the third major evolution point in our country's history. The first being the American Revolution, the second the Civil War. The 60s represented the death of trust in American government as a benevolent protector, the true beginning of disenchantment with the growing power of government, and a growing social consciousness with significant grievances against the status quo. The 60s was a time of throwing off the history of the United States until then and the attempt to create a new society based on enlightened concepts like peace and equality. It was, of course, a huge failure.

September 11, 2001 is the fourth major evolution. It represents the loss of our idealism and belief in the ultimate goodness of ourselves that even the tumultuous 60s was unable to break. The slow drag since that day has seen this country turned into a veritable police state with the government and media doing what it can to foment hate, fear, and worry. Factionalism represents us now. We cling to our party and revile other parties. Politically, we are split almost perfectly in half.

The current state of the nation is pretty ugly. To the people of the 60s, the changes seen then were just as ugly. But growing pains are seldom easy.


Wow - a rational thought in a baby boomer hating thread. How refreshing.
 
2010-11-27 06:31:59 PM
Depends...
images.eonline.com
When did this guy cease to be relevant?

Youth rebellion was hardly new, the only thing the 60s had was numbers, and they only had that because of the baby boom. Not to mention HALF the BS they were rebelling against had been done in the "jazz age" already. The 1960s boomers were just re-rebelling against rules installed in the 40s and 50s by a population turned repressive.

And the population became repressive due to the abject horrors of warfare tearing at their sanity. Hrm, come to think of it this casts the Lovecraft, "horror make you crazy" in a new light...

/oh yeah, image be hotlinked
 
2010-11-27 06:34:11 PM
bigdavediode: Jonathan Hohensee: I think the baby boomers "sold out" only because their aims where unreasonable and unrealistic. They brought us a lot of rights and freedoms that we all should be thankful to have, but I'm also glad we didn't see the goals of Timothy Larry, the Weather Underground, and Abby Hoffman [among others] brought to fruition.

What did Abby Hoffman do, other than interrupt the Who and demonstrate against Vietnam?



Well, he did commit suicide in April 1989. The ultimate cop out.
 
2010-11-27 06:34:43 PM
halB Quote 2010-11-27 06:25:01 PM
The only thing hippies did was make facial hair acceptable and kill the formal hat.


About a million bewhiskered dudes that fought in the Civil War dare to dispute your point. In the 1860s
 
2010-11-27 06:35:54 PM
MorphOSX:
Pretty much this. A generation of self-absorbed assholes that took personal responsibility and threw it away to make a quick buck, protested the system except when the system worked to their advantage, and left us all a nation of bleeding hearts that saw us go from an honorable nation to a nation that couldn't find its moral ass with both hands.



Welcome to America.
 
2010-11-27 06:36:57 PM
fortheloveofgod: Wow - a rational thought in a baby boomer hating thread. How refreshing.

Where? It certainly wasn't what you quoted...

The 60s were as big as the civil war and the American Revolution? Come on now, I know boomers have the same generation egotism as the rest but good grief...
 
2010-11-27 06:39:17 PM
And let us not forget one salient point...the democrats got us involved in Vietnam and almost blew up the country in the Cuban Missile Crisis. But warmongering is only a republican trait, according to the usual cadre of fark liberals
 
2010-11-27 06:40:26 PM
public option: And let us not forget one salient point...the democrats got us involved in Vietnam and almost blew up the country in the Cuban Missile Crisis. But warmongering is only a republican trait, according to the usual cadre of fark liberals

2/10.
 
2010-11-27 06:44:15 PM
Can't wait until we just stop giving a fark about them. Not looking forward to paying for their fat, dying asses either.
 
2010-11-27 06:44:32 PM
TheBigJerk: fortheloveofgod: Wow - a rational thought in a baby boomer hating thread. How refreshing.

Where? It certainly wasn't what you quoted...

The 60s were as big as the civil war and the American Revolution? Come on now, I know boomers have the same generation egotism as the rest but good grief...


Oh look! It's a disenfranchised GenXer.
 
2010-11-27 06:45:29 PM
We live in this Orwellian nightmare now, so what the 60's actually were or meant is completely irrelevant now. All information, including our collective memory, is for sale to the highest bidder.

Personal liberty would not be what it is today if the 60's had never happened. What the TSA does to your gonads publicly now would have been commonplace 30 years ago. You can thank a hippie for that slight delay in the inevitable.
 
2010-11-27 06:48:25 PM
stuhayes2010: Even the Beatles said Haight-Ashbury was a bunch of bums looking for handouts.

still is
 
2010-11-27 06:49:39 PM
I think the Depression, followed by World War II, were the true shaping events of the twentieth century. They forced us to become an urban society, and they paved the way for integration (especially Truman integrating the military, which predated Brown v. Board of education by ten years) The Sixties produced the most self-important generation of the century, however.
 
2010-11-27 06:53:50 PM
Jesus would have been a hippie. Does that mean Jesus was wrong?
 
2010-11-27 06:54:04 PM
fortheloveofgod: AverageAmericanGuy: The 60s was a major turning point in American history. In some respects, it was the third major evolution point in our country's history. The first being the American Revolution, the second the Civil War. The 60s represented the death of trust in American government as a benevolent protector, the true beginning of disenchantment with the growing power of government, and a growing social consciousness with significant grievances against the status quo. The 60s was a time of throwing off the history of the United States until then and the attempt to create a new society based on enlightened concepts like peace and equality. It was, of course, a huge failure.

September 11, 2001 is the fourth major evolution. It represents the loss of our idealism and belief in the ultimate goodness of ourselves that even the tumultuous 60s was unable to break. The slow drag since that day has seen this country turned into a veritable police state with the government and media doing what it can to foment hate, fear, and worry. Factionalism represents us now. We cling to our party and revile other parties. Politically, we are split almost perfectly in half.

The current state of the nation is pretty ugly. To the people of the 60s, the changes seen then were just as ugly. But growing pains are seldom easy.

Wow - a rational thought in a baby boomer hating thread. How refreshing.


I find it interesting that he considers the 60s as a more significant turning point than World War II. That war took us from a provincially-minded, minor league nation to a global superpower, with production capabilities to match. The sixties only measure up as a means of encouraging personal impression.
 
2010-11-27 06:57:30 PM
PiperArrow: All I know is that we didn't start the fire.

But we are keeping the faith.
 
2010-11-27 07:01:59 PM
The people that survived The Great Depression and World War II said, I don't want my kids to go through what I went through, so they made the Baby Boomers.
 
2010-11-27 07:07:07 PM
bigdavediode: I'm not sure what message to take from the 60's -- the good aspirations, or the disgusting culmination and end of the worst generation, the baby boomers.

I guess I'll take both.


If it wasn't for us boomers you'd be wearing a three-piece suit to your job at McDonald's every day, so STFU.
 
2010-11-27 07:08:14 PM
hogans: fortheloveofgod: AverageAmericanGuy: The 60s was a major turning point in American history. In some respects, it was the third major evolution point in our country's history. The first being the American Revolution, the second the Civil War. The 60s represented the death of trust in American government as a benevolent protector, the true beginning of disenchantment with the growing power of government, and a growing social consciousness with significant grievances against the status quo. The 60s was a time of throwing off the history of the United States until then and the attempt to create a new society based on enlightened concepts like peace and equality. It was, of course, a huge failure.

September 11, 2001 is the fourth major evolution. It represents the loss of our idealism and belief in the ultimate goodness of ourselves that even the tumultuous 60s was unable to break. The slow drag since that day has seen this country turned into a veritable police state with the government and media doing what it can to foment hate, fear, and worry. Factionalism represents us now. We cling to our party and revile other parties. Politically, we are split almost perfectly in half.

The current state of the nation is pretty ugly. To the people of the 60s, the changes seen then were just as ugly. But growing pains are seldom easy.

Wow - a rational thought in a baby boomer hating thread. How refreshing.

I find it interesting that he considers the 60s as a more significant turning point than World War II. That war took us from a provincially-minded, minor league nation to a global superpower, with production capabilities to match. The sixties only measure up as a means of encouraging personal impression.


In many ways, WWII was one of the key factors leading to the 60s "revolution". However, for the most part, the government was still seen as benevolent, and the war itself (even today) was seen as a righteous cause. People stood together as Americans.

The Vietnam War and the Korean War to a lesser extent washed the eyes of the American public and revealed the growing distance between the government and its citizens.

Many of the seeds of the 60s were planted earlier, but it was the confluence of all these movements (peace, civil rights, feminism, etc) that make the 60s remarkable. It culminated in the resignation of Nixon in 1974 and ushered in the true modern age of America.
 
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