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(Chicago Breaking News)   People with Type 1 Diabetes want a different name for their condition so people don't think it's the same as Type 2 Diabetes. And they get pretty pissy about it too   (chicagotribune.com) divider line 137
    More: Silly, adult-onset diabetes, diabetes, insulin  
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5015 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Nov 2010 at 8:31 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-11-23 11:01:51 AM  
BumpyMcNipples [TotalFark]wrote on pg 1 Well that's pretty insulint of them!
Excellent pun,imho.
then The_Homeless_Guy [TotalFark] wrote, also on pg 1
ABCD? (auto-imune beta cell destruction), at least its easy to remember.
I've had Type 1/Juvenile/Insulin Dependent for 51+ years now. I wasn't supposed to survive this long either. But initial docs who were Joslin Clinic-trained (which hardly anyone now has ever heard of) & their insistent on carb-counting before it was popular (metric calculation & use of gram scale also) & super- tight control have probably made my survival possible.
akya quoted on pg 2
Prank Call of Cthulhu: Type I = "Diabetes"
Type II = "The Diabeetus" or maybe just "The 'eetus"

then cited Examples: "I must go check my insulin levels, for I have diabetes."
"Just one more dougnut; I gots the 'eetus."

First example is flat wrong! rant, it's glucose/blood sugar levels that are checked, that determines how much insulin is needed (along with carbs consumed or to be consumed). Obvious to me that anya's not diabetic!
Goddessoffark grouses a trifle further down pg 2 about not being able to get insurance; she lives in Australia now, which may either be part of or cause the problem. If she still lived in US, she could get exorbitantly-priced HIPAA insurance from someplace like where I get mine (e-mail in my profile, gof). Also seadoo2006's comments re US insurance & $3500 deductible. Personally I only get $1000 allowance for meds of any kind, which I exhaust by US Tax Day traditionally. So I no longer have meds coverage on my insurance, but boy oh boy you should see the huge medical-deductions page on our annual IRS report.
Oh yeah, BTW, after 30 years of Not Wanting to Go There, I finally acquired an insulin pump early this month. 30-odd years ago pump was still experimental, no insurance covered it at all. I do have a huge deductible to cover before insurance will start paying, but the other trifle is, that because I got it now, if there's any Medicare left by the time I'm old enough for it (very few more years), Medicare should pay for at least some. The sole thing I already don't like about the pump, tho I'm now "not allowed" to return to Multiple Daily Injections/MDI in shorthand, is the tremendous amount of sharps-container medical waste generated. (Half-gallon empty milk jug presented itself as obvious suspect candidate for pump supplies sharps-container; big-enough opening)
End rant & comments, I think. Also regret there are no obvious graphics to tack on here, as there are in A Certain Other Thread. It's not worth my while & time to create one, tho I could!
 
2010-11-23 11:05:49 AM  
laulaja: BumpyMcNipples [TotalFark]wrote on pg 1 Well that's pretty insulint of them!
Excellent pun,imho.
then The_Homeless_Guy [TotalFark] wrote, also on pg 1
ABCD? (auto-imune beta cell destruction), at least its easy to remember.
I've had Type 1/Juvenile/Insulin Dependent for 51+ years now. I wasn't supposed to survive this long either. But initial docs who were Joslin Clinic-trained (which hardly anyone now has ever heard of) & their insistent on carb-counting before it was popular (metric calculation & use of gram scale also) & super- tight control have probably made my survival possible.
akya quoted on pg 2
Prank Call of Cthulhu: Type I = "Diabetes"
Type II = "The Diabeetus" or maybe just "The 'eetus"
then cited Examples: "I must go check my insulin levels, for I have diabetes."
"Just one more dougnut; I gots the 'eetus."
First example is flat wrong! rant, it's glucose/blood sugar levels that are checked, that determines how much insulin is needed (along with carbs consumed or to be consumed). Obvious to me that anya's not diabetic!
Goddessoffark grouses a trifle further down pg 2 about not being able to get insurance; she lives in Australia now, which may either be part of or cause the problem. If she still lived in US, she could get exorbitantly-priced HIPAA insurance from someplace like where I get mine (e-mail in my profile, gof). Also seadoo2006's comments re US insurance & $3500 deductible. Personally I only get $1000 allowance for meds of any kind, which I exhaust by US Tax Day traditionally. So I no longer have meds coverage on my insurance, but boy oh boy you should see the huge medical-deductions page on our annual IRS report.
Oh yeah, BTW, after 30 years of Not Wanting to Go There, I finally acquired an insulin pump early this month. 30-odd years ago pump was still experimental, no insurance covered it at all. I do have a huge deductible to cover before insurance will start paying, but the other trifle is, that because I got it now, if there's any Medicare left by the time I'm old enough for it (very few more years), Medicare should pay for at least some. The sole thing I already don't like about the pump, tho I'm now "not allowed" to return to Multiple Daily Injections/MDI in shorthand, is the tremendous amount of sharps-container medical waste generated. (Half-gallon empty milk jug presented itself as obvious suspect candidate for pump supplies sharps-container; big-enough opening)
End rant & comments, I think. Also regret there are no obvious graphics to tack on here, as there are in A Certain Other Thread. It's not worth my while & time to create one, tho I could!


There, on your keyboard, see the little key that says "Enter"?

tl;dr
 
2010-11-23 11:06:16 AM  
robbrie: ScottRiqui: Do you have a link to those stats? My first thought is that the definition of "obesity" has been a moving target in recent years, so it might not have meant the same thing in the 1991 study as in the 2009 study.

Not that I doubt the nation's getting fatter, but today's healthiest state having the same obesity rate as the least-healthy state from less than 20 years ago seems a little suspicious.

Didn't quite get the numbers right, but the premise is correct.

http://healthyamericans.org/reports/obesity2010/

"In 1991, no state had an obesity rate above 20 percent...In 2009, the only state with obesity rate lower than 20 percent is Colorado."



Thanks for the follow-up. I looked around as well and I was mistaken earlier - BMI calculation and the threshold for obesity haven't changed over the years.

Anyone know why Colorado consistently does so well on the obesity front?
 
2010-11-23 11:07:58 AM  
laulaja: BumpyMcNipples [TotalFark]wrote on pg 1 Well that's pretty insulint of them!
Excellent pun,imho.
then The_Homeless_Guy [TotalFark] wrote, also on pg 1
ABCD? (auto-imune beta cell destruction), at least its easy to remember.
I've had Type 1/Juvenile/Insulin Dependent for 51+ years now. I wasn't supposed to survive this long either. But initial docs who were Joslin Clinic-trained (which hardly anyone now has ever heard of) & their insistent on carb-counting before it was popular (metric calculation & use of gram scale also) & super- tight control have probably made my survival possible.
akya quoted on pg 2
Prank Call of Cthulhu: Type I = "Diabetes"
Type II = "The Diabeetus" or maybe just "The 'eetus"
then cited Examples: "I must go check my insulin levels, for I have diabetes."
"Just one more dougnut; I gots the 'eetus."
First example is flat wrong! rant, it's glucose/blood sugar levels that are checked, that determines how much insulin is needed (along with carbs consumed or to be consumed). Obvious to me that anya's not diabetic!
Goddessoffark grouses a trifle further down pg 2 about not being able to get insurance; she lives in Australia now, which may either be part of or cause the problem. If she still lived in US, she could get exorbitantly-priced HIPAA insurance from someplace like where I get mine (e-mail in my profile, gof). Also seadoo2006's comments re US insurance & $3500 deductible. Personally I only get $1000 allowance for meds of any kind, which I exhaust by US Tax Day traditionally. So I no longer have meds coverage on my insurance, but boy oh boy you should see the huge medical-deductions page on our annual IRS report.
Oh yeah, BTW, after 30 years of Not Wanting to Go There, I finally acquired an insulin pump early this month. 30-odd years ago pump was still experimental, no insurance covered it at all. I do have a huge deductible to cover before insurance will start paying, but the other trifle is, that because I got it now, if there's any Medicare left by the time I'm old enough for it (very few more years), Medicare should pay for at least some. The sole thing I already don't like about the pump, tho I'm now "not allowed" to return to Multiple Daily Injections/MDI in shorthand, is the tremendous amount of sharps-container medical waste generated. (Half-gallon empty milk jug presented itself as obvious suspect candidate for pump supplies sharps-container; big-enough opening)
End rant & comments, I think. Also regret there are no obvious graphics to tack on here, as there are in A Certain Other Thread. It's not worth my while & time to create one, tho I could!


Good Jesus Christ man ... wow ...
 
2010-11-23 11:09:43 AM  
I have less of a problem with people in general - who are either stupid or pretty understanding - that I do with Type 2 diabetics.

Ok, make that 2 particular Type 2 diabetics.

There's my uncle, who got Type 2 at age 50 (without being particularly overweight or anything - it does happen) and changed his lifestyle to become very fit and trim, watched his diet, and eventually, 10 years later, had to start taking insulin. He was devastated. When I was diagnosed, he thought it was Type 2, and started talking to me to share his experiences. When it turned out I had Type 1 and had to start on the insulin right away, he just said, "Whoa. I'm so sorry. Anything we can do for you, let us know." He inquires about my health, but doesn't give advice.

My aunt also has Type 2. And just about every other condition you could think of. Lives on pizza and Diet Coke. Has a colostomy bag. She's probably genetically predisposed to T2 too, but her lifestyle can't have helped - I don't remember her ever having been not grotesquely obese. Never really tried the diet and exercise route, just went straight to insulin. She always wants to talk about diabetes with me, but says things like (at a family function) "Oh, on a day like today, I usually just let it go, and then check my sugars and take a big correction at the end of the day." Well, that's awesome. Did you know as a Type 1 diabetic, if I were to do that, I'd run a decent risk of going into severe ketoacidosis, possibly leading to organ failure and death? You didn't? Why the fark not, you've had diabetes for 15 farking YEARS! I'm sure she'll lose a leg or two soon, and then go blind, all because she won't give up the goddam Hot Pockets.

It horrifies me that someone would not do anything they could to NOT get diabetes, even if it's "just" Type 2.

I'm all for calling T1 "Diabetes" and T2 "The Diabeetus" - that way I don't have to get mad at that farking walrus telling me how to get my supplies cheap on the gym TV while I work out - "oh, right, he's talking about THE DIABEETUS, not my thing."
 
2010-11-23 11:14:06 AM  
laulaja: BumpyMcNipples [TotalFark]wrote on pg 1 Well that's pretty insulint of them!
Excellent pun,imho.
then The_Homeless_Guy [TotalFark] wrote, also on pg 1
ABCD? (auto-imune beta cell destruction), at least its easy to remember.
I've had Type 1/Juvenile/Insulin Dependent for 51+ years now.


51 years! Good on you!
 
2010-11-23 11:18:30 AM  
goddessoffunk: I have had Type 1 for close to 22 years. I have had some very bleak diagnoses even though I have taken pretty good care of it since I broke out of the rebellious teenage years.

I hate the confusion of type 1 and type 2 because often people DO get on my case without realizing I could not have prevented the diabetes or they tell me about this lovely new treatment and I look it up and go waaah! Well, I used to, but now I pretty much go "That sounds like it's for type 2."

I think a different name would be practical. If I donate to diabetes research I expect to give my money to help a disease I do not have unless its specifically for the JDF.

For good type 1 diabetes control you have to dedicate a large part of your life to controlling it. I am trying to arrange some sort of insurance so that I can get on something besides Humulin 70/30 which is haphazard at best. Right now I am on a low carbohydrate, fat-moderated diet. It's one of the easiest ways to keep the sugar in check as carbs turn into sugar. I have greatly reduced the amount of insulin I need to take. Too bad Lantus/Humalog or a pump are not affordable to the uninsured.
I am looking forward to finding some way to step up my care plan. I had some scares, but my doctors say I have a long, reasonably healthy life ahead of me if I keep doing what I am doing.

AND ITS NOT THE EETUS YOU C***SUCKER!

/SORRY HYPOGLYCEMIA
/Just Kidding!


Eek. Good luck.

Friend of mine was Type 1 without insurance. She had the foresight to stock as much as she could before she got thrown off her parents plan, but yeah, that ain't fun. I have some ridiculously minor in comparison pre-existing conditions (two meds a day, every other month doctor visit, and going to a specialist when I need antibiotics 'bout twice a year 'cause after two decades my body's resistance to most) and I already pay a stupidly large amount monthly (which I can't drop, otherwise getting anyone else to cover me later would be even worse). I can't imagine what they'd charge for someone with Type I trying to buy individual coverage. Ugh.

laulaja: But initial docs who were Joslin Clinic-trained (which hardly anyone now has ever heard of)

I have. Which is weird. I think my friend went there at one point.
 
2010-11-23 11:25:36 AM  
SweetSilverBlues: There, on your keyboard, see the little key that says "Enter"?

*snicker*

/wait
//is it inappropriate to say "snicker" in a diabetes thread?
 
2010-11-23 11:33:24 AM  
seadoo2006: Not going to lie ... it does annoy me ever so slightly that people think my Type-1 Diabetes was caused by eating the wrong food. The daily injections get old and I never liked the pumps ... :-/ ... At least we don't really have diet restrictions.

/IT'S AN AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE!!


Yep here is a list of my father's auto-immune diseases:

ulcerative colitis
type I diabetes
Addison's
Primary sclerosing cholangitis
and he is asplenic (they had to take it out at one point)

Not that much fun, but he has done much better than anyone would expect. He used to think he would be lucky to live to see me and my sister graduate; now he is thrilled he has a new grandson.
 
2010-11-23 11:48:28 AM  
Wife is Type I on the pump. Both my and her parents are Type II.

She tells them all to piss off when they complain about their complications.

/Getting a kick out this thread!
 
2010-11-23 12:25:02 PM  
robbrie: Sunny von Bülow approves.

/probably have to be 40ish to understand
//unless you're a complete movie and-or a news geek


I got it.

/39(ish)
 
2010-11-23 12:27:34 PM  
SundaesChild: robbrie: Sunny von Bülow approves.

/probably have to be 40ish to understand
//unless you're a complete movie and-or a news geek

I got it.

/39(ish)

I get a kick out of that when I fly - I'm allowed to board with deadly weapons - fill a syringe with Humalog and I could take out anyone on the plane. Cool!
 
2010-11-23 12:59:26 PM  
Maybe use an "involuntary/voluntary" designation for Type 1 and 2, respectively.
 
2010-11-23 01:01:26 PM  
Calipataa: SundaesChild: robbrie: Sunny von Bülow approves.

/probably have to be 40ish to understand
//unless you're a complete movie and-or a news geek

I got it.

/39(ish)
I get a kick out of that when I fly - I'm allowed to board with deadly weapons - fill a syringe with Humalog and I could take out anyone on the plane. Cool!


That ... MIGHT ... take a while ... and I do believe the normal human body could cope with 100 odd units of humalog stuffed in them.
 
2010-11-23 01:01:32 PM  
HappyDaddy: In my opinion, the ADA does more to benefit Type 1's than does JDRF. JDRF does nothing other than raise money for research. That's good. But, the share of research that is privately funded (whether through JDRF grants or ADA grants) is a drop in the bucket compared to that funded by NIDDK (NIH). The ADA spends a great deal of time, money and energy doing advocacy work on behalf of all people with diabetes. That includes school, insurance, drivers license, concert venue, and workplace discrimination (to name but a few recent issues). To put it simply, JDRF wants a cure (who doesn't) but it does very little to improve the lives of people living with the disease.

Both organizations have their place, but to say that ADA does nothing for Type 1's is simply wrong.


Not saying that ADA doesn't do anything but NIH spends the money that they do because of the lobbying efforts of JDRF. Take a look at the Children's Congress program. Take a look at the efficiency ratings of of both organizations as well grades from Forbe's, Charity Navigator and other ratings sytems.
 
2010-11-23 01:01:49 PM  
Type I diabetic since 15.

I larfed at the headline, not going to lie.

Take pretty good care so far, my BS averaged 130-140 this month.

New tech really really helps.

-D
 
2010-11-23 01:06:45 PM  
laulaja: But initial docs who were Joslin Clinic-trained (which hardly anyone now has ever heard of)

I have. Which is weird. I think my friend went there at one point


Me, too. Dad's there right now (@ Joslin). Always has a snide comment about the "half ton" people there... May have 50+ years of type I under his belt, but you can't keep a mean spirited grumpy old man down!
 
2010-11-23 01:12:09 PM  
jumpin: There is a clear difference between the two.

Type 1: auto-immune disease (body attacks pancreas)
Type 2: genetic or lifestyle-induced resistance to insulin.

They will have different cures.

Not giving insulin to a Type 1 will kill them in 30 days or less. Not giving insulin to a Type 2 can go unnoticed for years.


I doubt that stat. Consider the amount of people who develop type 1 and remain undiagnosed for several months (I'd wager a large percentage of people). If they only had a 30 day window, there would be a much smaller number of type 1s around.

And remember, too much insulin is WAY worse than not enough.
 
2010-11-23 01:12:51 PM  
ScottRiqui: Anyone know why Colorado consistently does so well on the obesity front?

In Colorado, everyone bikes/hikes in the summer & skis/snowboards in the winter. Its culture is the antithesis of a sedentary lifestyle.

/vacationed there once in the summer of 1995
//would go back if given the oppurtunity
 
2010-11-23 01:22:15 PM  
Asplenium: I doubt that stat. Consider the amount of people who develop type 1 and remain undiagnosed for several months (I'd wager a large percentage of people). If they only had a 30 day window, there would be a much smaller number of type 1s around.

And remember, too much insulin is WAY worse than not enough.
'

Uh, no. T1 typically develops over a 3-6 month period (sometimes much longer in adults, then it's called LADA) - that's the several months you can go undiagnosed. Once it's full-blown, you can die in a lot less than 30 days, unless you go on a starvation diet. Literal starvation diet - my endocrinologist knew one patient who had survived 12 months with T1 diabetes and no insulin because she was in a Japanese civilian internment camp during WW2 - she was starving to death, but it saved her life.

Too much insulin is not worse than not enough. Type 1 diabetics can go in a coma in either direction. Going into a hypoglycemic coma, while dangerous (if you go really, really too low, you can of course die, but it's pretty rare), can result in no damage at all when you come out of it - but a hyperglycemic coma can easily lead to organ failure and death.

At least that's what I've been taught.
 
2010-11-23 01:32:35 PM  
Type 2 should be called "step away from that triple cheeseburger you fat fark" at least for anyone diagnosed as a teen or young adult. Eating crap is the root cause for many and a contributing factor for most. As mentioned previously, heredity plays some part.

While we were together, my ex had insulin resistant pre-diabetes diagnosed by her internest at 40 yrs old. She was on some prescription pills for it. Didn't stop her from continuing to gorge on hohos and similar junk. Her irresesponsibility about that and whole lot of other of poor lifestyle choices is a major reason why I ended it.

/okay to gorge on junk
//special occasions only
 
2010-11-23 01:41:11 PM  
I doubt that stat. Consider the amount of people who develop type 1 and remain undiagnosed for several months (I'd wager a large percentage of people). If they only had a 30 day window, there would be a much smaller number of type 1s around.

Actually, he's right.
 
2010-11-23 01:43:40 PM  
Calipataa: Asplenium: I doubt that stat. Consider the amount of people who develop type 1 and remain undiagnosed for several months (I'd wager a large percentage of people). If they only had a 30 day window, there would be a much smaller number of type 1s around.

And remember, too much insulin is WAY worse than not enough.'

Uh, no. T1 typically develops over a 3-6 month period (sometimes much longer in adults, then it's called LADA) - that's the several months you can go undiagnosed. Once it's full-blown, you can die in a lot less than 30 days, unless you go on a starvation diet. Literal starvation diet - my endocrinologist knew one patient who had survived 12 months with T1 diabetes and no insulin because she was in a Japanese civilian internment camp during WW2 - she was starving to death, but it saved her life.

Too much insulin is not worse than not enough. Type 1 diabetics can go in a coma in either direction. Going into a hypoglycemic coma, while dangerous (if you go really, really too low, you can of course die, but it's pretty rare), can result in no damage at all when you come out of it - but a hyperglycemic coma can easily lead to organ failure and death.

At least that's what I've been taught.


THIS was said much better than I could have said it.
 
2010-11-23 02:10:30 PM  
Calipataa: Asplenium: I doubt that stat. Consider the amount of people who develop type 1 and remain undiagnosed for several months (I'd wager a large percentage of people). If they only had a 30 day window, there would be a much smaller number of type 1s around.

And remember, too much insulin is WAY worse than not enough.'

Uh, no. T1 typically develops over a 3-6 month period (sometimes much longer in adults, then it's called LADA) - that's the several months you can go undiagnosed. Once it's full-blown, you can die in a lot less than 30 days, unless you go on a starvation diet. Literal starvation diet - my endocrinologist knew one patient who had survived 12 months with T1 diabetes and no insulin because she was in a Japanese civilian internment camp during WW2 - she was starving to death, but it saved her life.

Too much insulin is not worse than not enough. Type 1 diabetics can go in a coma in either direction. Going into a hypoglycemic coma, while dangerous (if you go really, really too low, you can of course die, but it's pretty rare), can result in no damage at all when you come out of it - but a hyperglycemic coma can easily lead to organ failure and death.

At least that's what I've been taught.


Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is what you're referring to, and it is a serious issue/ticket to the Medical ICU if it is accompanied by cerebral edema.

As for the Diabetes Nomenclature debate, while type I and type II diabetes mellitus are indeed very distinct disease processes, they both lead to similar signs, symptoms and complications from persistently elevated serum glucose.

I think it's also wildly misguided to label all with DM type II as slovenly pariahs because it's clear that diet and body habitus are only part of the story. In fact, Type II DM has a FAR GREATER genetic component than Type I DM as shown by monozygotic twin studies.

(there are also other types of diabetes such as Diabetes Insipidus... with diabetes coming from the greek to describe conditions leading to large volumes of urine)

Also, Subby I think I see what you did there ("pissy").
 
2010-11-23 02:15:19 PM  
Highway61Revisited:
Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is what you're referring to, and it is a serious issue/ticket to the Medical ICU if it is accompanied by cerebral edema.


Yup. When I was diagnosed (I had gone to the doctor because of a persistent stomachache, and they did blood work, and it came back ugly) they sent me to the ER "because you might get very very sick very very quickly." They didn't tell me why. Scared the crap out of me.
 
2010-11-23 02:17:55 PM  
Calipataa: Highway61Revisited:
Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is what you're referring to, and it is a serious issue/ticket to the Medical ICU if it is accompanied by cerebral edema.

Yup. When I was diagnosed (I had gone to the doctor because of a persistent stomachache, and they did blood work, and it came back ugly) they sent me to the ER "because you might get very very sick very very quickly." They didn't tell me why. Scared the crap out of me.


That's shiatty.

Sadly, this type of patient communication in the norm. People would be much better informed about their own health if doctors only had the skills to educated their patients better... even in an emergency situation like this.
 
2010-11-23 02:40:11 PM  
It's sweet when diabetics get pissy,
 
2010-11-23 02:47:09 PM  
aagrajag: It's sweet when diabetics get pissy,

images.starpulse.com

Sees what you did there.
 
2010-11-23 02:57:26 PM  
how about Halle Berry Diabetes and Wilford Brimley Diabetes?

/would not wish either one on anybody
 
2010-11-23 08:07:31 PM  
I'm married to a Type I. She complains about the confusion between the names all the time. Part of it is because she's a nurse and has to explain to people all the time about the two.

She's had it since she's been six years old. But she leads a very normal lifestyle. She's a pretty good athlete and gets tons of exercise. She eats pretty normal. I do all the cooking so we know exactly what's in her diet.

I'm just dreading the long-term health issues.
 
2010-11-23 08:16:17 PM  
Goddessoffark grouses a trifle further down pg 2 about not being able to get insurance; she lives in Australia now, which may either be part of or cause the problem. If she still lived in US, she could get exorbitantly-priced HIPAA insurance from someplace like where I get mine (e-mail in my profile, gof

Nice word replacement there. I thought I'd updated my profile to say I was back to the US. Everything was free in Australia except for new stuff like Lantus.
 
2010-11-23 10:33:38 PM  
pete1729: SBinRR: FTFA: But nothing irritates her more than having people mistakenly assume she has Type 2 diabetes - and then suggest she "cure herself" by eating less sugar and exercising more.

If she thinks changing the name will stop this, then she's lived a sheltered life. No matter the subject, an "expert" will always offer an opinion on how to improve yourself.
Tell them you've lost 50 pounds? "That's great! Here's what you should do if you REALLY want to take off the weight...."
Tell them you are getting treated for cancer? "You should see my cousin's oncologist. He was cured in 30 days".
Tell them you're putting down new carpet in the bedroom? "You should put down hardwood floors....."

That person will always be there, and when you change the name from Type I Diabeetus to Rainbow Fart Syndrome, they'll still be there, ready to tell you how to handle it in an even better way.

This post would be funnier if you didn't use all those words and had a picture of a cat. My nephew could show you a lot about being funny on the internet.


I have no idea what you're talking about, so...
*bunnypancakehead.jpg*
 
2010-11-23 11:19:54 PM  
So Type 1 diabetics are "real" diabetics and Type II are just posers? Is that the gist of it? Personally, I hate fat people who blame everyone but themselves, but if you're one of the few percent who have a health problem you didn't cause, you're deserving of some amount of sympathy.

Yes, food is an addiction.
 
2010-11-23 11:50:53 PM  
Can't say I blame them, since it's now a synonym for "fatty."
 
2010-11-24 09:11:03 AM  
goddessoffunk,(not offark) sorry I miscalled your Fark ID on pg 2. Thought I'd copied it, but obviously not! Typos & tyops, they happen too easily!!
 
2010-11-24 02:41:23 PM  
Rose of Sharon: how about Halle Berry Diabetes and Wilford Brimley Diabetes?

/would not wish either one on anybody


Didn't you hear? Halle Berry claims she's Type 2 now Link (new window)
 
2010-11-24 09:06:44 PM  
I have true sympathy for type 1's but hate to read hate comments like this:

while type 2ers have become 'ill' due to complete diet irresponsibility - which means complete ecological responsibility as well - i.e. eating tons of food that is not really food (but super processed and industrialized product)and damaging to the entire world.(like my dad -0 who has recently had a stroke because he refused to change his lifestyle choices)

Sorry, it's just not that simple. Maybe for lower age groups but a person in their 60s who has no deviant eating like you describe, isn't any kind of morbid obese, ate just what the rest of the family did for a whole life, etc. can still get it (from family experience). So go be a bigot somewhere else.
 
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