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(Some Guy)   The story of MoH recipient, SSG Sal Giunta, as told by himself when he doesn't have to worry about the censors on 60 Minutes, or insulting the President. Not safe for work Language   (restrepothemovie.com) divider line 317
    More: Hero, SSG Sal Giunta  
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29880 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Nov 2010 at 3:29 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-11-17 04:58:01 PM
Sexy Republican Girl: Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: [notsureifserious.jpg]

You're not sure? Let me clarify.

You suck at life and I hope you are seriously injured in the near future.
Whether or not that injury results in your death is really of no matter, as long as someone videotapes you crying like a woman, and posts it for all to see.
welcometofark.jpg


Hey, I like you!
 
2010-11-17 04:58:47 PM
Hey you know who would be a true American hero? The President who can get us completely out of Iraq and Afghanistan instead of this continued bloodbath of wasted money and lives. The fact this continues to go on for more than 10 years and we won't be gone till probably forever means we are screwed as a nation. People like Sal Giunta should of never been put in those situations because he should of been sitting comfortably with his family at home relaxing and enjoying their company. The US needs to give up this non stop feeding of the military complex and the companies who wish for war to line their pockets with money. Yes there are bad people in the world and yes we need to defend ourselves but we do not need to go on endlessly in some ignorant fashion claiming moral high ground when we have none.

Face it people the terrorists have won. The have reduced our country, a good portion of those old Fox news viewers who are so scared of everything they can't look at their own shadow, to an authoritarians dream. There is so much money to be made in either jailing people, building the prisons, monitoring people, or the slew of other jobs in terms of full filling the role of big brother that we have started down that slippery slope and I don't think it will stop. It's sad we can't fly now with out being felt up by TSA or being scanned like you are in some Total Recall movie.

/this country is getting more and more less desirable to be in
//might of had a few drinks
 
2010-11-17 04:59:08 PM
AntiNerd: So what do all the Fark Independents (tm) here think of the new conservative position on this recognition?

Tough Talk from a TRUE American. (new window)

Personally, I just don't see how people like XXXXX XXXXXXX are tolerated in civilized society, much less elected to office. But that's the American right wing for you today.

Why yes I think that IS a troll. I didn't mean it. I think.


Dammit! Went from shedding a tear because of the film to complete rageface after reading that bile. I won't even repeat his name.
 
2010-11-17 04:59:28 PM
Let's hope he doesn't get into politics.
 
2010-11-17 05:00:00 PM
Jake Steed: AntiNerd 2010-11-17 03:43:39 PM
Tough Talk from a TRUE American. (new window)
Personally, I just don't see how people like Bryan Fischer are tolerated in civilized society, much less elected to office. But that's the American right wing for you today.
-------------------

...and this is the American left wing for you today...


Ummm. Please get it right. Those are the rare Ultra Left Wing Nut Jobs.

Us regular Left Wingers don't tend to burn the flag to stay warm at night. Thanks, good luck, and good night.
 
2010-11-17 05:00:11 PM
Befuddled: Maybe this is a stupid comment after watching this, but why don't the helicopters or drones in Afghanistan have spotlights like the police helicopters have? The Apaches couldn't fire because they didn't know who was who in the dark but if they could have put a spotlight on the enemy, then the forces on the ground could say to the gunships that yes, that's where the enemy is so start firing.

I can't imagine being in combat. I'd be too scared and thinking way too much 'Why the fark am I here doing this' to be worth anything.


Helos flying in combat support fly quite low, to the point that even an untrained insurgent with a dumb-fire RPG could hit it if they used a searchlight.

I was under the impression that our guys used IR beacons so they pinged on the FLIR display, though. I'm Navy helo crew and we've got them on our shoulders so if we're ever on the ground, they pilots can tell us from them.
 
2010-11-17 05:00:25 PM
I should have been aborted: That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.

Aaaaaannnnd that's where you lost it - 0/10, no more trolling for you.
 
2010-11-17 05:00:43 PM
realtorofthemonth Quote 2010-11-17 04:57:45 PM

It was teh awesome.

>>>>

what the hell is awesome about this? or war in general? You think it's awesome he was next to his dying buddies? and probably feels responsible for their loss of life? The never ending nightmares he will suffer with and probably never hold a steady job?
 
2010-11-17 05:01:08 PM
I'm so jaded that for a second when I read "The story of MoH recipient" I thought someone had gven this guy a free copy of the game or something.


Do people really cry when they see this stuff?


If I was ever an actor I could cry on cue just thinking about Private James Francis Ryan asking his wife to tell him he is a good man.
 
2010-11-17 05:02:20 PM
ShillinTheVillain: Befuddled: Maybe this is a stupid comment after watching this, but why don't the helicopters or drones in Afghanistan have spotlights like the police helicopters have? The Apaches couldn't fire because they didn't know who was who in the dark but if they could have put a spotlight on the enemy, then the forces on the ground could say to the gunships that yes, that's where the enemy is so start firing.

I can't imagine being in combat. I'd be too scared and thinking way too much 'Why the fark am I here doing this' to be worth anything.

Helos flying in combat support fly quite low, to the point that even an untrained insurgent with a dumb-fire RPG could hit it if they used a searchlight.

I was under the impression that our guys used IR beacons so they pinged on the FLIR display, though. I'm Navy helo crew and we've got them on our shoulders so if we're ever on the ground, they pilots can tell us from them.


Why I went Navy. They tend to be ...smarter? Used technology better? At least in 1980 they did....
 
2010-11-17 05:03:17 PM
Big Al: realtorofthemonth Quote 2010-11-17 04:57:45 PM

It was teh awesome.

>>>>

what the hell is awesome about this? or war in general? You think it's awesome he was next to his dying buddies? and probably feels responsible for their loss of life? The never ending nightmares he will suffer with and probably never hold a steady job?


The Q&A was "teh awesome"

I bit...1/10
 
2010-11-17 05:03:20 PM
I should have been aborted: Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: [notsureifserious.jpg]

You're not sure? Let me clarify.

You suck at life and I hope you are seriously injured in the near future.
Whether or not that injury results in your death is really of no matter, as long as someone videotapes you crying like a woman, and posts it for all to see.

You seem like a rational person. Nope, not someone who is controlled by emotions at all. Nothing wrong here, just another perfectly balanced human being.

/take a chill pill, man


Why? I thought the point of trolling was to get a reaction. You've succeeded.
/calmer than you are
 
2010-11-17 05:03:20 PM
Jorge Sum: AntiNerd: So what do all the Fark Independents (tm) here think of the new conservative position on this recognition?

Tough Talk from a TRUE American. (new window)

Personally, I just don't see how people like Bryan Fischer are tolerated in civilized society, much less elected to office. But that's the American right wing for you today.

Why yes I think that IS a troll. I didn't mean it. I think.

I can't help but notice that TPM failed to actually link to the post it was quoting. WTF TPM?

However here is the actual post: http://www.afa.net/Blogs/BlogPost.aspx?id=2147500421

His point is slightly more valid (and he's certainly not complaining about Giunta, merely the trend) if you read it in context. The money quote: "every Medal of Honor awarded during these two conflicts has been awarded for saving life. Not one has been awarded for inflicting casualties on the enemy. Not one."


Sgt. Paul Smith may beg to differ if he was still alive:

"As the fight developed, Sergeant First Class Smith braved hostile enemy fire to personally engage the enemy with hand grenades and anti-tank weapons, and organized the evacuation of three wounded soldiers from an armored personnel carrier struck by a rocket propelled grenade and a 60mm mortar round. Fearing the enemy would overrun their defenses, Sergeant First Class Smith moved under withering enemy fire to man a .50 caliber machine gun mounted on a damaged armored personnel carrier. In total disregard for his own life, he maintained his exposed position in order to engage the attacking enemy force. During this action, he was mortally wounded. His courageous actions helped defeat the enemy attack, and resulted in as many as 50 enemy soldiers killed, while allowing the safe withdrawal of numerous wounded soldiers. Sergeant First Class Smith's extraordinary heroism and uncommon valor are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Third Infantry Division "Rock of the Marne," and the United States Army."

Times change, go to the MoH website and read the commendations for the Civil War/1812/etc. They used to give out MoH for keeping the regimental colors/national ensign from hitting the ground, for example.
 
2010-11-17 05:03:33 PM
FilmBELOH20: I should have been aborted: That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.

Aaaaaannnnd that's where you lost it - 0/10, no more trolling for you.


Wrong. I just realize that once someone dies, they no longer occupy their body.
 
2010-11-17 05:04:28 PM
Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: [notsureifserious.jpg]

You're not sure? Let me clarify.

You suck at life and I hope you are seriously injured in the near future.
Whether or not that injury results in your death is really of no matter, as long as someone videotapes you crying like a woman, and posts it for all to see.

You seem like a rational person. Nope, not someone who is controlled by emotions at all. Nothing wrong here, just another perfectly balanced human being.

/take a chill pill, man

Why? I thought the point of trolling was to get a reaction. You've succeeded.
/calmer than you are


The thing is, I am not trolling. I am not trying to get a reaction out of people, I am stating facts.
 
2010-11-17 05:06:14 PM
I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20: JohnFernelius: Do people really cry when they see this stuff? I was certainly impressed, and the man is a hero in every way.

Still, I didn't break down in tears. I'm a grown man and some of these comments are baffling. Not even Giunta is crying.

But even the soldier is not crying about it. I am sure he was more hurt and lost more than you losing your one friend (to suicide, not even from the war).

Wow. You are an amazing troll or your fark handle is amazingly apt. Either way 10/10

And STFU.

Hmm...

[notsureifserious.jpg]

Clearly you didn't watch the video. From the beginning of where he's describing the ambush to where he rescues the body from the enemy fighters, he chokes up repeatedly and has tears shining in his eyes. He also says "wrenches the gut". Don't pine because this man's mere existence short-dicks you by 4 inches. Also, most of us who choked up have this thing called empathy.

Also, for those who post lacking knowledge.
Night combat is a very interesting demon where light is your absolute enemy.
A) When you are accustomed to a low light area, then you've gained your night eyes, and you can usually move around with some reliability. Any flash, flare or bright light eliminates your night eyes and prevents you from being able to engage a night target with any accuracy.
B) Tracers work both ways... with most groups heading for a night fight stripping them out, or decreasing the frequency to 15-30, just to prevent the enemy's hard hitting weapons from ranging in on your position.
C) An l shaped ambush (which is what these poor bastards were caught in) is a an L designed for the incoming enemy to be nearly right on top of the bend in the L before you open up. At this time you are quite intermingled with the enemy, and it makes friend or foe identification nearly impossible.
This should explain why there were no lights and why air support couldn't engage.

That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.


To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.
 
2010-11-17 05:07:40 PM
FilmBELOH20: Wombatzu: CAADbury: Wombatzu: I must have missed the insult to the President.

Q: So what did you feel when you heard you were winning the MoH?
Giunta: fark you.

And you took that as a personal attack on the President? The man is obviously suffering from massive survivor guilt and is angry at being singled out. You have to be a real dickhead to make this left vs. right.

Oh for farks sake. It was meant as the fact that he could tell his story using language that he would normally use, which would be; A) censored by 60 minutes, and B) insulting to use in civil conversation with his Commander in Chief. It wasn't meant to be political in nature or about right vs. left. For one farking thread just respect what they guy did and don't turn it into a pissing match about politics.


THIS.
 
2010-11-17 05:08:34 PM
ShillinTheVillain: I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20: JohnFernelius: Do people really cry when they see this stuff? I was certainly impressed, and the man is a hero in every way.

Still, I didn't break down in tears. I'm a grown man and some of these comments are baffling. Not even Giunta is crying.

But even the soldier is not crying about it. I am sure he was more hurt and lost more than you losing your one friend (to suicide, not even from the war).

Wow. You are an amazing troll or your fark handle is amazingly apt. Either way 10/10

And STFU.

Hmm...

[notsureifserious.jpg]

Clearly you didn't watch the video. From the beginning of where he's describing the ambush to where he rescues the body from the enemy fighters, he chokes up repeatedly and has tears shining in his eyes. He also says "wrenches the gut". Don't pine because this man's mere existence short-dicks you by 4 inches. Also, most of us who choked up have this thing called empathy.

Also, for those who post lacking knowledge.
Night combat is a very interesting demon where light is your absolute enemy.
A) When you are accustomed to a low light area, then you've gained your night eyes, and you can usually move around with some reliability. Any flash, flare or bright light eliminates your night eyes and prevents you from being able to engage a night target with any accuracy.
B) Tracers work both ways... with most groups heading for a night fight stripping them out, or decreasing the frequency to 15-30, just to prevent the enemy's hard hitting weapons from ranging in on your position.
C) An l shaped ambush (which is what these poor bastards were caught in) is a an L designed for the incoming enemy to be nearly right on top of the bend in the L before you open up. At this time you are quite intermingled with the enemy, and it makes friend or foe identification nearly impossible.
This should explain why there were no lights and why air support couldn't engage.

That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.

To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.


Thank you for responding like a human and explaining the importance of this act to me. Now, yes, I understand and it makes sense.

Thank you, again.
 
2010-11-17 05:11:27 PM
I should have been aborted: Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: [notsureifserious.jpg]

You're not sure? Let me clarify.

You suck at life and I hope you are seriously injured in the near future.
Whether or not that injury results in your death is really of no matter, as long as someone videotapes you crying like a woman, and posts it for all to see.

You seem like a rational person. Nope, not someone who is controlled by emotions at all. Nothing wrong here, just another perfectly balanced human being.

/take a chill pill, man

Why? I thought the point of trolling was to get a reaction. You've succeeded.
/calmer than you are

The thing is, I am not trolling. I am not trying to get a reaction out of people, I am stating facts.


Is your name Lee Ving?
You're better at this than I thought.
 
2010-11-17 05:14:12 PM
Freakman: I for one am very glad that this went to an enlisted servicemember. There are way too many officer ribbon chasers and way too many people who look the other way. The enlisted do the real work.

/officers shouldn't even get ribbons and medals


Apparently the selection committees mostly agree, because if you look at the list then only one out of the ten Medals of Honor given since the end of the Vietnam War was given to an officer.

But y'know, if you want to look up the citation of Lieutenant Michael P. Murphy and claim that officers shouldn't be eligble to get medals then go right ahead.
 
2010-11-17 05:14:31 PM
Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: [notsureifserious.jpg]

You're not sure? Let me clarify.

You suck at life and I hope you are seriously injured in the near future.
Whether or not that injury results in your death is really of no matter, as long as someone videotapes you crying like a woman, and posts it for all to see.

You seem like a rational person. Nope, not someone who is controlled by emotions at all. Nothing wrong here, just another perfectly balanced human being.

/take a chill pill, man

Why? I thought the point of trolling was to get a reaction. You've succeeded.
/calmer than you are

The thing is, I am not trolling. I am not trying to get a reaction out of people, I am stating facts.

Is your name Lee Ving?
You're better at this than I thought.


Remember this, folks. We live in a world of diversity, which is what makes life interesting. Sometimes diversity creates conflict, that is just a fact of life.

Just because someone disagrees with you does not mean they are "trolling", some people might actually believe the opposite of what you believe, about anything, and be just as incredulous at your opinions or statements about a subject as you are of theirs.

Everyone is different, everyone has different opinions on everything. Get used to it, learn to be a part of a diverse society... ok?
 
2010-11-17 05:14:33 PM
I should have been aborted: ShillinTheVillain: I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20:

To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.

Thank you for responding like a human and explaining the importance of this act to me. Now, yes, I understand and it makes sense.

Thank you, again.


Allow me to contribute as well (and thanks for the even response).
A) PR opportunities are critical for them to show, because most people aligned against us are terrified of us because American's are usually damn hard to kill. When they do get a body, they work it for all its worth to show that we are killable, because they remain convinced that we're nearly unstoppable.

B) As a commander, your responsibility is to return your unit home. Might not all be alive, or in 1 piece, but you have a promise to the families of these soldiers to bring them home. To have someone under your command to be the next al-jazeera trophy kill is the ultimate failure of command. The very last thing you want is for the family of the soldier to find out the bad news because they're desecrating his body.
 
2010-11-17 05:15:37 PM
Bottom line -- this kid is awesome, as is everyone else that puts their lives on the line for the rest of us.

thank you
 
2010-11-17 05:15:54 PM
Jorge Sum: Freakman: I for one am very glad that this went to an enlisted servicemember. There are way too many officer ribbon chasers and way too many people who look the other way. The enlisted do the real work.

/officers shouldn't even get ribbons and medals

Apparently the selection committees mostly agree, because if you look at the list then only one out of the ten Medals of Honor given since the end of the Vietnam War was given to an officer.

But y'know, if you want to look up the citation of Lieutenant Michael P. Murphy and claim that officers shouldn't be eligble to get medals then go right ahead.


I think he is implying that officers never do brave things, which is an incomprehensibly idiotic thing to say.
 
2010-11-17 05:15:58 PM
Small unit cohesiveness. Fight for your mates and do the mission. fark the rest.

SSG Sal Giunta, Thanks for your service and for the burdens you will bear in the future. Very respectfully, Snake
 
2010-11-17 05:16:30 PM
I should have been aborted: ShillinTheVillain: I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20: JohnFernelius: Do people really cry when they see this stuff? I was certainly impressed, and the man is a hero in every way.

Still, I didn't break down in tears. I'm a grown man and some of these comments are baffling. Not even Giunta is crying.

But even the soldier is not crying about it. I am sure he was more hurt and lost more than you losing your one friend (to suicide, not even from the war).

Wow. You are an amazing troll or your fark handle is amazingly apt. Either way 10/10

And STFU.

Hmm...

[notsureifserious.jpg]

Clearly you didn't watch the video. From the beginning of where he's describing the ambush to where he rescues the body from the enemy fighters, he chokes up repeatedly and has tears shining in his eyes. He also says "wrenches the gut". Don't pine because this man's mere existence short-dicks you by 4 inches. Also, most of us who choked up have this thing called empathy.

Also, for those who post lacking knowledge.
Night combat is a very interesting demon where light is your absolute enemy.
A) When you are accustomed to a low light area, then you've gained your night eyes, and you can usually move around with some reliability. Any flash, flare or bright light eliminates your night eyes and prevents you from being able to engage a night target with any accuracy.
B) Tracers work both ways... with most groups heading for a night fight stripping them out, or decreasing the frequency to 15-30, just to prevent the enemy's hard hitting weapons from ranging in on your position.
C) An l shaped ambush (which is what these poor bastards were caught in) is a an L designed for the incoming enemy to be nearly right on top of the bend in the L before you open up. At this time you are quite intermingled with the enemy, and it makes friend or foe identification nearly impossible.
This should explain why there were no lights and why air support couldn't engage.

That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.

To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.

Thank you for responding like a human and explaining the importance of this act to me. Now, yes, I understand and it makes sense.

Thank you, again.


That, and the guy was actually still alive when the dude went to rescue him. That's a slightly important fact people seem to forget! He died later at base.

Even if he weren't - never mind for propaganda reasons, how about for your own? Sure, he might be dead and gone, but that's still the body of your friend and the body of a person that served his country to his death. His memory deserves more than 'well, his body was taken by the enemy.'
 
2010-11-17 05:18:01 PM
But, but, but...who made the sandwiches at Subway when he quit to join the Army? Doesn't that guy deserve a medal, too?
 
2010-11-17 05:18:39 PM
I should have been aborted: Get used to it, learn to be a part of a diverse society... ok?

No. You've been farkied as a gloriously foul unicorn eating troll.
Deal with it.
 
2010-11-17 05:19:11 PM
TelJanin: I should have been aborted: ShillinTheVillain: I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20:

To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.

Thank you for responding like a human and explaining the importance of this act to me. Now, yes, I understand and it makes sense.

Thank you, again.

Allow me to contribute as well (and thanks for the even response).
A) PR opportunities are critical for them to show, because most people aligned against us are terrified of us because American's are usually damn hard to kill. When they do get a body, they work it for all its worth to show that we are killable, because they remain convinced that we're nearly unstoppable.

B) As a commander, your responsibility is to return your unit home. Might not all be alive, or in 1 piece, but you have a promise to the families of these soldiers to bring them home. To have someone under your command to be the next al-jazeera trophy kill is the ultimate failure of command. The very last thing you want is for the family of the soldier to find out the bad news because they're desecrating his body.


Though I might tend to think preserving ones life, or the lives of others to be of utmost importance in a battle situation, I can see how retrieving the bodies of fallen comrades ranks a close second place, due to the insights offered by both of you. Thanks again.
 
2010-11-17 05:19:13 PM
OK, I'll admit that I didn't get any dust in my eyes until I read the transcript....I can't imagine being 19 or 20 years old - still a kid to my aged eyes - and trying to reassure a dying friend "Dude, you're going home and you're gonna be drinking beers and telling your stories to the ladies." I couldn't muster up that kind of support in a hospital room after my Dad had his heart attack because I was so scared and upset (Dad recoveredk BTW). This guy is dragging a bleeding comrade to safety while bullets are whizzing past his own head and is able run an encouraging, distracting line of conversation at the same time.

Excuse me, something's in my eye again....
 
2010-11-17 05:20:14 PM
Oh, and for those who say he isn't crying - no, he isn't outright bawling, but look at his eyes and listen to the way his voice is cracking. It's possible to cry manly tears, folks, and that's exactly what he's doing.
 
2010-11-17 05:21:36 PM
Schmoppo: I should have been aborted: Get used to it, learn to be a part of a diverse society... ok?

No. You've been farkied as a gloriously foul unicorn eating troll.
Deal with it.


HAHAHA!! Now that, my friend, truly filled my eyes with tears as I tried to contain my laughter.
 
2010-11-17 05:21:39 PM
SSG Giunta was asked "What went through your mind when you were told you were going to be awarded the MoH".

His initial reaction to that was "fark you." He didn't specifically say that to anyone.

Farking brilliant, if you ask me. Totally devoid of any selfishness and entitlement. Wish there were more people like him.

I would gladly salute this man and his fellow soldiers any day!

/Thank you for the freedoms I have, men and women of the armed services!
 
2010-11-17 05:23:37 PM
I should have been aborted: ShillinTheVillain: I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20: JohnFernelius: Do people really cry when they see this stuff? I was certainly impressed, and the man is a hero in every way.

Still, I didn't break down in tears. I'm a grown man and some of these comments are baffling. Not even Giunta is crying.

But even the soldier is not crying about it. I am sure he was more hurt and lost more than you losing your one friend (to suicide, not even from the war).

Wow. You are an amazing troll or your fark handle is amazingly apt. Either way 10/10

And STFU.

Hmm...

[notsureifserious.jpg]

Clearly you didn't watch the video. From the beginning of where he's describing the ambush to where he rescues the body from the enemy fighters, he chokes up repeatedly and has tears shining in his eyes. He also says "wrenches the gut". Don't pine because this man's mere existence short-dicks you by 4 inches. Also, most of us who choked up have this thing called empathy.

Also, for those who post lacking knowledge.
Night combat is a very interesting demon where light is your absolute enemy.
A) When you are accustomed to a low light area, then you've gained your night eyes, and you can usually move around with some reliability. Any flash, flare or bright light eliminates your night eyes and prevents you from being able to engage a night target with any accuracy.
B) Tracers work both ways... with most groups heading for a night fight stripping them out, or decreasing the frequency to 15-30, just to prevent the enemy's hard hitting weapons from ranging in on your position.
C) An l shaped ambush (which is what these poor bastards were caught in) is a an L designed for the incoming enemy to be nearly right on top of the bend in the L before you open up. At this time you are quite intermingled with the enemy, and it makes friend or foe identification nearly impossible.
This should explain why there were no lights and why air support couldn't engage.

That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.

To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.

Thank you for responding like a human and explaining the importance of this act to me. Now, yes, I understand and it makes sense.

Thank you, again.


you thank him for responding like a human.
why not ask like a human? why do you have to ask like a troll?
 
2010-11-17 05:23:42 PM
Befuddled: Maybe this is a stupid comment after watching this, but why don't the helicopters or drones in Afghanistan have spotlights like the police helicopters have? The Apaches couldn't fire because they didn't know who was who in the dark but if they could have put a spotlight on the enemy, then the forces on the ground could say to the gunships that yes, that's where the enemy is so start firing.


in a black out situation like that, if you're certain your team doesn't have air support, if something turns on a light above you, shoot at it... i'm sure they didn't want to turn themselves into a giant bullseye.
 
2010-11-17 05:24:25 PM
Can't wait to see this when it's unfarked. Farking farkers farking shiat.
 
2010-11-17 05:25:56 PM
papabusche: I should have been aborted: ShillinTheVillain: I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20: JohnFernelius: Do people really cry when they see this stuff? I was certainly impressed, and the man is a hero in every way.

Still, I didn't break down in tears. I'm a grown man and some of these comments are baffling. Not even Giunta is crying.

But even the soldier is not crying about it. I am sure he was more hurt and lost more than you losing your one friend (to suicide, not even from the war).

Wow. You are an amazing troll or your fark handle is amazingly apt. Either way 10/10

And STFU.

Hmm...

[notsureifserious.jpg]

Clearly you didn't watch the video. From the beginning of where he's describing the ambush to where he rescues the body from the enemy fighters, he chokes up repeatedly and has tears shining in his eyes. He also says "wrenches the gut". Don't pine because this man's mere existence short-dicks you by 4 inches. Also, most of us who choked up have this thing called empathy.

Also, for those who post lacking knowledge.
Night combat is a very interesting demon where light is your absolute enemy.
A) When you are accustomed to a low light area, then you've gained your night eyes, and you can usually move around with some reliability. Any flash, flare or bright light eliminates your night eyes and prevents you from being able to engage a night target with any accuracy.
B) Tracers work both ways... with most groups heading for a night fight stripping them out, or decreasing the frequency to 15-30, just to prevent the enemy's hard hitting weapons from ranging in on your position.
C) An l shaped ambush (which is what these poor bastards were caught in) is a an L designed for the incoming enemy to be nearly right on top of the bend in the L before you open up. At this time you are quite intermingled with the enemy, and it makes friend or foe identification nearly impossible.
This should explain why there were no lights and why air support couldn't engage.

That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.

To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.

Thank you for responding like a human and explaining the importance of this act to me. Now, yes, I understand and it makes sense.

Thank you, again.

you thank him for responding like a human.
why not ask like a human? why do you have to ask like a troll?


Now that I read my original post, I guess I could have said something like "Why did he feel it necessary to risk his life for someone that was already dead?" But... where is the fun in that? I like to stir the pot sometimes, keep the discussion lively.
 
2010-11-17 05:28:26 PM
I should have been aborted: Now that I read my original post, I guess I could have said something like "Why did he feel it necessary to risk his life for someone that was already dead?" But... where is the fun in that? I like to stir the pot sometimes, keep the discussion lively.

i'm pretty sure there is a term for that...
can't remember now.
 
2010-11-17 05:32:13 PM
Copyright be damned. Here's the transcript:

Vanity Fair contributing photographer Tim Hetherington spotlights Giunta in the December issue. While on assignment with contributing editor Sebastian Junger-who wrote a book about Giunta and his platoon, War- Hetherington was with a platoon near Giunta's in the Korengal during Operation Rock Avalanche. Hetherington also wrote a book about his time in the Korengal, Infidel, and he and Junger's documentary Restrepo won the Grand Jury Prize for best documentary at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival. Giunta sat down with Hetherington and spoke at length about the medal and his service in Afghanistan.

Tim Hetherington: Let's start at the beginning. How did you end up joining the army?

Staff Sergeant Salvatore Giunta: At the time I joined the Army I was working at Subway. I didn't really have a whole lot going on.

Was it a result of 9/11, or were you curious about the world?

I was curious about the world. I wasn't trying to be patriotic. It just felt right.

Did you want to do this growing up?

When I was working at Subway, I was working nights-and the commercial came on about the recruiters in the mall handing out T-shirts. Oh, I'm a sucker for a free T-shirt. I'm still a sucker for a free T-shirt. I'd keep that quiet around some people-offer me a free T-shirt, I might do something crazy.

Your first appointment was in Zabul?

Yes, with 173rd and Battle Company.

You went from Iowa to Afghanistan. What went through your head?

I don't know exactly the one thought that was running through my head. I know I became a man in Afghanistan-whatever entails being a man-there was definitely a change that happened that first time in Afghanistan where I grew up. I felt grown up. I felt like the world could beat me. I didn't feel so impervious either. I knew shiat could stop me.

Was there a particular event that happened there that made you realize you'd grown up?

August 21, 2005, there was an I.E.D. that hit one of the trucks in the company from Third Platoon-four guys died and one guy was seriously wounded. It's one thing to see someone dead. But it's another thing to see an American soldier, or someone you know. They're at the strongest moments of their life and it is just ... gone from them.

In Sebastian Junger's book War, he talks about when Brendan O'Byrne says, "There's people in this platoon who hate each other, but we'd all die for each other." It's not just friendship, but it's also a brotherhood?

It is a brotherhood. I don't think it's something you can expect, because it's such a strong feeling, you'll never know it unless it's already happened, and then you have it. Can't get rid of it. Can't shake it.

What else sticks in your mind about the Zabul Province deployment?

On September 1, 2005, Lieutenant [Derek Haines] died in the Baylough area, and that made me really feel my own mortality at 19 or 20. My team leader, Nicholas Post. talked to me. He said, "It is what it is and you just got to try to do everything you can when it's your time to do it. It might be you tomorrow. It might be me tomorrow. It might be, you know, all of us tomorrow. But that's tomorrow." I've pretty much taken that with me the rest of my life from the time we had that talk.

Did you re-up after Zabul, or had you signed up for a certain length of time?

I signed up for four years when I came into the army. I didn't think that I was going to go again, but Stop-Loss. I didn't really understand Stop-Loss, until Stop-Loss.

So as a result of Stop-Loss you went to the Korengal?

We were in the Korengal, but I couldn't leave the Korengal as a result of the Stop-Loss, yes.

Describe flying into the Korengal.

There's a lot of mountains, and they're steep and rocky. I was thinking, it was maybe going to be a little Afghan paradise. It was not an Afghan paradise. The dudes already there were looking rough and tired. And they were happy that we were there, which makes you a little bit uneasy.

What had you heard about the Korengal before you went?

I didn't really hear much. I tried not to pay attention. It was going to come regardless of what I heard.

Tell me about Operation Rock Avalanche.

You get a warm-fuzzy feeling inside when you see the Apache [helicopter] circling. That's pretty sweet, you know? I know they got rockets. I know they got guns, and they got eyes from above. We were walking back out the way we came in, in the morning. We came in under darkness, and we're going to leave right there as the sun's going down and Apaches are around-should be fairly quick and painless.

See, I try to forget a lot of this-it benefits me in the long run-and coming back and talking about it wrenches the gut. Rock Avalanche was a long, drawn-out deal. So we started walking back, and they set up a good ambush. They did what we would have done.

What was the first-

There were more bullets in the air than stars in the sky. A wall of bullets at every one at the same time with one crack and then a million other cracks afterwards. They're above you, in front of you, behind you, below you. They're hitting in the dirt early. They're going over your head. Just all over the place. They were close-as close as I've ever seen.

What do you do in that situation?

You do everything you can. You don't think. You just react. Everyone knows. This isn't our first rodeo, and this isn't everyone's first time getting shot at. This is a newer experience, and this is a different way that it's ever come in, but everyone knows exactly what they need to do. If they're shooting? Shoot back. If there's cover, you find it. It's just all self-preservation at that point. Everyone's just giving it back as hard as we can, because the more we shoot, hopefully the less they shoot.

When did you know it was an L-shaped ambush?

Not until the end. All your attention is where all the flashes are. It looks like a bunch of little dragons spitting fire, and then there's just a whole bunch of rounds coming in.

You can see bullets around you going off and-

I got hit in the plate, but in the lower part of the plate, and I got hit at an angle that it came more from the north and not from the east, which is where all these bullets were coming from, and bullets don't turn corners. They bounce off of shiat, but they don't turn corners, and that one would have had to turn a corner to come and hit me like that, and there's nothing you can do about it.

If a bullet hit my plate, I would freak out. Weren't you scared?

There's no time to be scared. In hindsight, it's scarier than it was then. That's what makes talking about it so difficult. Talking about it I can rehash and I can think about every second of it and everything in my mind and I can really dwell on it when, at the time, there's no time to dwell on it. They brought the fight. We'll bring the pain.

It didn't even feel like I got hit down here. Almost simultaneously as that happened, I looked at Sergeant Gallardo, and I watched his head kind of do one of those-I don't know-an abnormal twitch. I thought he got shot in the head. He got shot in the helmet. I just ran and grabbed onto him and brought him back to where we were. We consolidated grenades.

You swapped grenades?

There's no time-you can't sit there. You got to act. We only got so many grenades. So we threw our grenades and we ran forward. We got down. Returned fire. Shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. Throw grenades. Boom. Run forward. On the third grenade we threw, we made it to Specialist Franklin Eckrode, and he was trying to fix his jam [in his gun]. He's on the ground. He was already shot at that point. I think he got shot in the calf and in the thigh.

What sort of time frame are we talking?

One, two, I don't know-a million lifetimes. Time is out the window.

When you're in that situation, those heightened moments, did you feel like you had a chance to think at all?

I didn't have to think at all, and I didn't even think about having to think because we were just going...

So you push forward. You get to Eckrode and then?

I just kept on running up the trail trying to find Brennan and see what the fark is up, why the fark he was all the way up there. This shiat sucks-I kept on running and I saw three guys. There was two guys carrying one guy and the one had his arms, and the other had his legs. I got my gun in my hand, just running at him. At that time, the thought was: Who the hell is up here and how did they get up here? How did they pass us?

All of a sudden, I only knew one of them, and it wasn't the one that I wanted to know. It was Brennan-and he was the one being carried away. Just farking running and shooting, running and shooting, trying to close the gap with them. I shot at both of them. I killed one, I guess. The other one I shot the shiat out of... but didn't see him, and by the time my magazine was already empty, I was at Brennan... I yelled for Sergeant Gallardo that, God, they're farking taking him.

Take your time. It's O.K.

Yeah, it's a lot harder looking back on it than it was when it was happening.

Like you said, going over it at a distance is tough.

I don't really plan on answering this question too many times. I don't have to. I got a great book written by Sebastian Junger called War. You want to read about it, read about it. You don't want to hear me talk about it. I don't want to talk about it.

It must be an awful experience to see your friend really hurt, and to see some assholes trying to drag him off the side.

It did. Plus, Brennan's was a bad ass, too. He's not that big a guy, but he's tough. And he was hurt. And he was hurt bad.

What was he saying?

He was just hurt. He said he couldn't breathe. He said he couldn't breathe. And his face was-was pretty bad. And I just grabbed him by the strap on the back of his [body armor], turned around, and started running the other way. When I dragged him back, he didn't have his gun, he didn't have his rucksack, he didn't have his helmet, he didn't have his NODS [night vision], he didn't have anything with him. He's alive. He's not dead. And he's talking.

I didn't know, but I guess Specialist Hugo Mendoza, the Platoon medic, got shot in the leg in his femoral artery and he ended up bleeding out, so I didn't know that there was not going to be a medic coming...

I was with Brennan, like, "Dude, this time you're really going to go home. You're going to be drinking beers and telling your stories to the ladies." He said, "Yeah. Yeah, I will."

Was there a point where you thought, "What the fark just happened?" Or were you still focused on Brennan?

I was focused on Brennan. I knew that they took Mendoza and I didn't know that he was dead. I knew they took Eckrode, and I knew they took Brennan, and I don't know how bad anyone else was other than Brennan.

Your platoon eventually joined the 2nd. What was going through your head when you were walking back?

Same thing that goes through my head every time, I guess, we're walking. Scan, look, check team, confront, check team, scan, look. Sooner or later we'll be back. We had to divvy up the equipment, so there were people carrying multiple weapons, people carrying extra body armor. I could just feel the weight of Brennan's body armor in my ruck.

When did you first hear that you were going to be up for a Medal of Honor? It was some time after you returned from the Korengal, wasn't it?

It was a couple of days later that I heard. Sergeant Gallardo went down for a meeting and came back up and told me. That's when I found out.

What went through your head when you heard about it?

"fark you," I said. It sounds really awesome in theory, but what's it worth? Brennan? Mendoza? No. I did what I did because in the scheme of painting the picture of that ambush, that was just my brush stroke. That's not above and beyond. I didn't take the biggest brush stroke, and it wasn't the most important brush stroke. Hearing the Medal of Honor is like a slap in the face. I don't think you know what I did. I didn't do shiat.

You'll get asked a lot about bravery. What is bravery to you? How would you define it?

Bravery to me is doing something that doesn't necessarily have to be done, doing it full heartedly, accepting it no matter what consequence comes from it, because it really does need to be done. Everyone out there is brave. Don't have to be in Afghanistan.

By your own definition, it's brave, what you did out there.

I was one person being brave in a group of a whole bunch of people that were being just as brave. Everything had the same thing to lose: their friends and themselves. I guarantee, no one thought about that out there. Bravery gets thrown around a lot. I served in Battle Company Second of the 503rd with the bravest men I've ever met in my entire life, and I'm proud to say that.

What does the Medal symbolize for you?

I want to stress the fact that this is the nation's highest honor. Awesome. And it's given to me, but just as much as me, every single person that I've been with deserves to wear it-they are just as much of me as I am. This isn't a one-man show. I'm here because someone picked me. I hope that everyone around me can share in whatever pride that comes from it. They deserve that pride.

Tell me about the moment you got the call from the president?

President Obama called me on September 9, 2010, and notified me that he had approved the Medal of Honor for my actions on October 25, 2007, in the Korengal Valley. My heart was just pounding. I don't even remember what I said, but there was a Mr. President in there.

It's quite a story. The guy who listened to a recruiting jingle while mopping floors in a Subway sandwich shop is talking to the President.

I'm just another American dude. I'm nothing special, trust me.

What did you think when you heard the news that we were pulling out of the Korengal?

I was in Washington, D.C., when I saw it on the news. At first it upset me. And then, there's no sense being upset with it. That's not our land. We're not occupying their country. We don't even want the Korengal Valley. We're there to help them. If we pull out, that is ultimately going to be their loss, but for whatever reasons, we're not pulling out of Afghanistan.

If there was peace in Afghanistan would you go back?

The world's a big place. I'd rather go somewhere else.
 
2010-11-17 05:36:09 PM
What makes this guy a hero in my eyes is that he doesn't consider himself to be one and frankly doesn't think he deserves the medal. That and he bravely performed his duty.
 
2010-11-17 05:40:44 PM
Every word uttered after the question "what went through your head when you heard about it?" was exactly why he's worthy of that medal.

Don't kid yourself Giunta...you ARE special.

//something in my eye...
 
2010-11-17 05:40:52 PM
bartink: What makes this guy a hero in my eyes is that he doesn't consider himself to be one and frankly doesn't think he deserves the medal. That and he bravely performed his duty.

I don't think I deserve a Congressional Medal of Honor either. Can I have one too?
 
2010-11-17 05:45:44 PM
ShillinTheVillain: I should have been aborted: TelJanin: I should have been aborted: Grass Hopper: I should have been aborted: FilmBELOH20: JohnFernelius: Do people really cry when they see this stuff? I was certainly impressed, and the man is a hero in every way.

Still, I didn't break down in tears. I'm a grown man and some of these comments are baffling. Not even Giunta is crying.

But even the soldier is not crying about it. I am sure he was more hurt and lost more than you losing your one friend (to suicide, not even from the war).

Wow. You are an amazing troll or your fark handle is amazingly apt. Either way 10/10

And STFU.

Hmm...

[notsureifserious.jpg]

Clearly you didn't watch the video. From the beginning of where he's describing the ambush to where he rescues the body from the enemy fighters, he chokes up repeatedly and has tears shining in his eyes. He also says "wrenches the gut". Don't pine because this man's mere existence short-dicks you by 4 inches. Also, most of us who choked up have this thing called empathy.

Also, for those who post lacking knowledge.
Night combat is a very interesting demon where light is your absolute enemy.
A) When you are accustomed to a low light area, then you've gained your night eyes, and you can usually move around with some reliability. Any flash, flare or bright light eliminates your night eyes and prevents you from being able to engage a night target with any accuracy.
B) Tracers work both ways... with most groups heading for a night fight stripping them out, or decreasing the frequency to 15-30, just to prevent the enemy's hard hitting weapons from ranging in on your position.
C) An l shaped ambush (which is what these poor bastards were caught in) is a an L designed for the incoming enemy to be nearly right on top of the bend in the L before you open up. At this time you are quite intermingled with the enemy, and it makes friend or foe identification nearly impossible.
This should explain why there were no lights and why air support couldn't engage.

That's the stupid part. Rescue a BODY? What!? What is there to rescue? A pile of worthless shiat? If someone is dead, they are DEAD. They are not there anymore, there body is nothing, the human is gone.

To you or me, it's a corpse. To the enemy, it's a war trophy, an object to be filmed and displayed and used in recruiting videos to boost morale and show that the big bad Americans are mortal. You just don't give them that opportunity.


I would also like to point out that Brennan was NOT DEAD at that point. He was still alive, although badly wounded. It is obvious that people didn't watch the clip, or didn't pay attention to what was said.

I ran through fire to see what was going on with [Brennan] and maybe we could hide behind the same rock and shoot together ... He was still conscious. He was breathing. He was asking for morphine. I said, "You'll get out and tell your hero stories," and he was like, "I will, I will."


Also this is the hell that they walked in to:

img.photobucket.com
 
2010-11-17 05:46:34 PM
Jorge Sum: bartink: What makes this guy a hero in my eyes is that he doesn't consider himself to be one and frankly doesn't think he deserves the medal. That and he bravely performed his duty.

I don't think I deserve a Congressional Medal of Honor either. Can I have one too?


as soon as they give one for being a douche, you'll be first in line.
 
2010-11-17 05:49:24 PM
superdude72: To the service people who signed up to kill and be killed in a war with no clear purpose, because the military's pay and benefits looked better than anything else their country was offering: I salute you.

Wow a troll AND a farktard all at once!
I bet your mommy is real proud of you ain't she?

/hope you're on the next plain that blows up
 
2010-11-17 05:51:46 PM
DAnthrope: superdude72: To the service people who signed up to kill and be killed in a war with no clear purpose, because the military's pay and benefits looked better than anything else their country was offering: I salute you.

Wow a troll AND a farktard all at once!
I bet your mommy is real proud of you ain't she?

/hope you're on the next plain that blows up


the rain in spain falls mainly in the plain
 
2010-11-17 05:52:18 PM
Scorpinock: Why isn't this (and stuff like this) on TV?

Because the true story are never believable by the masses. I've read tons of the MoH citations thinking, god damn, that would make an excellent movie but no one would believe it. Truth is far more awesome than any Hollywood writer's ideas.
 
2010-11-17 05:52:50 PM
Wall Street bankers laugh at your altruistic behaviour.
 
2010-11-17 05:53:39 PM
I should have been aborted: JohnFernelius: Do people really cry when they see this stuff? I was certainly impressed, and the man is a hero in every way.

Still, I didn't break down in tears. I'm a grown man and some of these comments are baffling. Not even Giunta is crying.

People who are controlled by emotions (women, gays) cry about stuff like this.


Why YES, yes you should... (never saw a screen name more appropriate)
 
2010-11-17 05:54:38 PM
Sexy Republican Girl: MaxxLarge: Seeing that there are authentic human beings in the world with the level of character that this man has without even trying? It gives me a glimmer of hope for the future.

And hubie is bang-on. When you strip away the bullshiat, the politics, the gray areas and the questions, certain things are simply beyond reproach. And the level of raw heroism, selflessness and bravery this man has burned into his DNA is nothing short of astonishing.

WW2 era Germany also had many heroic men. I wish we stopped vilifying them just because of the Nazis that were running the show at the time.


I'm sure the Germans have their own farking medals. Let them give them those.
 
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