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(Gizmodo)   Why living in cities sucks... besides all the crazy people   (gizmodo.com) divider line 84
    More: Obvious, Jesus Diaz, constellation, sucks  
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6993 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Oct 2010 at 8:18 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-10-08 05:37:16 PM
I'll trade being able to see stars every single night for public transportation, bars and restaurant within walking distance, actual culture, not needing a car for much, and all that.
 
2010-10-08 05:41:37 PM
Best night sky I've ever seen was in Poudre Park in the Rocky Mountains. It was amazing. I also lived in the desert of NM and it was pretty easy to get far enough away from lights.
 
2010-10-08 06:42:34 PM
Man, the article is right. Having excellent public works, conscientious police, fire and rescue, access to excellent restaurants, museums, theatres and music venues, plenty of great schools, fair-to-middlin' radio stations, easy broadband access, safe roads, decent availability of good jobs and lots of people to interact with is AWFUL. Instead, I wish I lived in the middle of Bumfark, Nowhere so I could go outside and see stars, and shiat.

I'm not belittling the obvious majesty of the universe, or anything. I'm just saying that trading a little light pollution for the sort of conveniences we urban-dwellers value is a pretty easy decision for those of us prone to making it.
 
2010-10-08 07:30:59 PM
There are always tradeoffs. Yes, the only thing astronomical about where I live is the rent, but it's worth it for the limitless opportunities that await in a truly global city.
 
2010-10-08 07:57:33 PM
img99.imageshack.us

V.S.

img819.imageshack.us

Yeah. It sucks living in a city.
 
2010-10-08 08:00:30 PM
The ones who are touting the urban life, I have an observation

When I was a child, we lived in the country. The town was about 7 miles away. Ever summer I could go out to the front yard with my Cosmos star wheel and see the constellations.

As I grew older, the town grew towards where I lived. The milky white glow began fade into our sky. Almost 30 years later, after my father died, I went to our old place to see the stars. All 7 miles + were filled in with subdivisions.

You could no longer see the universe.

I live in So Cal now. Granted there are a lot of benefits, but I find myself missing the stars.
 
2010-10-08 08:26:15 PM
I lived in the middle of nowhere for five years before moving to a small city (job reasons and all). At first I loved having 'civilization' around me...but after a couple of years, I find myself wanting to get out of here and back to somewhere remote.

/hoping he can see a comet tonight if the light pollution isn't so bad.
//lived 20 minutes from a national dark sky park before
///misses it a lot
 
2010-10-08 08:31:01 PM
Light pollution is one of the biggest disadvantages to living in a city.

I still prefer living in a city.
 
2010-10-08 08:32:02 PM
T.M.S.: V.S.



Yeah. It sucks living in a city.


fark nature. We got lazers and shiat woooooooooo
 
2010-10-08 08:33:52 PM
MaxxLarge: Man, the article is right. Having excellent public works, conscientious police, fire and rescue, access to excellent restaurants, museums, theatres and music venues, plenty of great schools, fair-to-middlin' radio stations, easy broadband access, safe roads, decent availability of good jobs and lots of people to interact with is AWFUL. Instead, I wish I lived in the middle of Bumfark, Nowhere so I could go outside and see stars, and shiat.

Translation: I like living in the city because other people do shiat for me.
 
2010-10-08 08:33:53 PM
I go camping.
 
2010-10-08 08:36:14 PM
Darth_Lukecash: The ones who are touting the urban life, I have an observation

When I was a child, we lived in the country. The town was about 7 miles away. Ever summer I could go out to the front yard with my Cosmos star wheel and see the constellations.

As I grew older, the town grew towards where I lived. The milky white glow began fade into our sky. Almost 30 years later, after my father died, I went to our old place to see the stars. All 7 miles + were filled in with subdivisions.

You could no longer see the universe.

I live in So Cal now. Granted there are a lot of benefits, but I find myself missing the stars.




The desert is less then a 2 hour drive for us....and you really appreciate when you drive 2 hours to see it.
 
2010-10-08 08:39:07 PM
Darth_Lukecash: The ones who are touting the urban life, I have an observation

When I was a child, we lived in the country. The town was about 7 miles away. Ever summer I could go out to the front yard with my Cosmos star wheel and see the constellations.

As I grew older, the town grew towards where I lived. The milky white glow began fade into our sky. Almost 30 years later, after my father died, I went to our old place to see the stars. All 7 miles + were filled in with subdivisions.

You could no longer see the universe.

I live in So Cal now. Granted there are a lot of benefits, but I find myself missing the stars.


This, man. I miss living in the middle of nowhere. Now I live 20 miles from the best city in the US and I can barely see the moon for all the light pollution. The city is great, but the country is awesome (in the original sense of the word).
 
2010-10-08 08:40:08 PM
The saddest thing is, you could have both, except for all that marketing.

If you care, http://www.darksky.org
 
2010-10-08 08:42:25 PM
I'd love to live in the middle of nowhere, if I were still partial to hallucinogens, they don't mix too well with large amounts of strangers.
Apart from that, fark being in the middle of nowhere, really. Who gives a shiat?

/what does it mean?
 
2010-10-08 08:49:42 PM
Frank N Stein: I like living in the city because other people do shiat for me.

That's pretty much the entire point of being a member of society. People can specialize. It's kinda cool, actually, when you don't have to rear and slaughter your own meat and can do things like, program computers.
 
2010-10-08 08:53:34 PM
MaxxLarge: Man, the article is right. Having excellent public works, conscientious police, fire and rescue, access to excellent restaurants, museums, theatres and music venues, plenty of great schools, fair-to-middlin' radio stations, easy broadband access, safe roads, decent availability of good jobs and lots of people to interact with is AWFUL. Instead, I wish I lived in the middle of Bumfark, Nowhere so I could go outside and see stars, and shiat.

This. As someone who grew up living in the damn woods, fark the rural areas. If I want stars I'll go camping. There's nothing to do, the people are all dumb hicks, the drugs blow dick, the police will fark with you if you're walking around at night, there are more churches in my town than stoplights, yet somehow everyone manages to drive like a prick...

Somebody help me, I'm drowning on Mayberry...
 
2010-10-08 09:06:44 PM
When the sky is over-cast at night in Ottawa, the lights reflecting off the clouds make the sky orange, like a cloudy day on Mars. You'll never see that with your dark skies.

I do love to see the stars and planets and things. With binoculars, when the sky is not hazy or cloudy, you can see a lot of the detail you miss with the naked eye. In the country, of course, you can see that detail without the binoculars very often. It is lovely to have dark skies. There was a bus stop in the middle of nowhere to the West of town where you could see things much better. I saw one of the famous comets there.

Parliament Hill is fairly dark at night. As long as you don't spook the police, you can see the sky fairly well. Parking lots help also. The astronomers have access to roof tops.

Another advantage to living in Ottawa is that Canadian sky maps and other measurements are often centred here because that's where a lot of the government science is headquartered. I don't have to adjust for longitude all of the time.

But it would be nice if they would put some lamp shades on those street lights and also turn off more of the buildings at night. Dialing it down a little would make a lot more stars visible and would be environmentally friendly. Birds and animals suffer because of the light pollution even more than people.

Raccoons don't seem to mind though. They've learned how to deal with downtown traffic. They're smarter than most of the dogs and cats. Street smarts they have in buckets. I'd vote them most likely to follow in the footsteps of Man when we go extinct. Cunning little hands they have. Speak like Yoda, they do.
 
2010-10-08 09:11:19 PM
t3knomanser: Frank N Stein: I like living in the city because other people do shiat for me.

That's pretty much the entire point of being a member of society. People can specialize. It's kinda cool, actually, when you don't have to rear and slaughter your own meat and can do things like, program computers.


Of course. Being from the Chicago suburbs, I enjoy a lot of services provided by various entities. However, it seems that the first few people in the thread took an elitist point of view (as one person suggested, there is no "real" culture without cities. Guess you can tell native Americans to STFU about their culture), regarding access to those services as a superior way of living.

In many ways, man is better to live in small communities out in the middle of nowhere. Out there, one is more in tuned with the environment, with himself, and with those around him. Man doesn't need bus drivers to survive. In fact, it's healthier to walk instead of jamming yourself on a bus. Same goes with being connected 24/7. It's a convenience, it as a strange side effect it isolates us more.
 
2010-10-08 09:27:17 PM
Frank N Stein: In fact, it's healthier to walk instead of jamming yourself on a bus

Walk where? As someone who's spent plenty of time in rural areas, aside from recreation, there's no purpose to walking.

Frank N Stein: Out there, one is more in tuned with the environment

That's just a pile of crap. You may be more "in tune". I certainly wasn't. I enjoyed spending my formative years in the wilderness, but it never got me in tune with anything. That's all just mealy-mouthed, touchy-feely garbage. And I certainly don't miss spending my time in the hinterlands. It was a lovely period in my life, but I'm glad I'm not doing it anymore so that I may enjoy the comforts of my current lifestyle.
 
2010-10-08 09:29:34 PM
brantgoose:

But it would be nice if they would put some lamp shades on those street lights and also turn off more of the buildings at night. Dialing it down a little would make a lot more stars visible and would be environmentally friendly. Birds and animals suffer because of the light pollution even more than people.



Besides being environmentally friendly, I have to wonder how much money you could save with stuff like this. Imagine if instead of allowing all that light to go up, they put reflective shades on the street lights. How much more light would the streets get? Would they be able to remove , say, every other streetlight?

I know at the university I work at they did some tests in the parking lots with all the lights they have there. With 1/2 of the lightposts turned off, they still had a brightness equivalent to daylight out there. That probably saved them a good chunk of money.
 
2010-10-08 09:33:33 PM
brantgoose: I'd vote them most likely to follow in the footsteps of Man when we go extinct.

Our neural Chernobyl.
 
2010-10-08 09:34:18 PM
Mr_H: With 1/2 of the lightposts turned off, they still had a brightness equivalent to daylight out there.

I remember when my school installed new lighting. They were these halogen beasts- you could easily read by them. They were well spread out, but most of the students were unhappy with them because they were too damn bright and the old lights had generally been adequate. The administration claimed it was for safety and security.
 
2010-10-08 09:46:45 PM
you know what would really be awesome?
if we could ban people who talk about how bad cities are from ever travelling to one.

TADA, problem solved.

I love the stars.
do I need to see them every night? no
do I love living downtown so I can walk everywhere and have everything at my finger tips? FARK YES

seriously, we need to do what NYC has done and put CRAZY high tolls for people who drive into the city.

/lol
 
2010-10-08 09:59:24 PM
downstairs: I'll trade being able to see stars every single night for public transportation, bars and restaurant within walking distance, actual culture, not needing a car for much, and all that.

You do that. I will live on this 400 acre farm, drive my v8 heavy duty truck to do my work, cut my firewood shoot some of my meat and pick on my mandolin. And smoke some sweet ass home grown. I doubt we will ever meet, so we can both be secure living the lives we know.
Hope you enjoy it cause we don't get no next go round. Mebee.
 
2010-10-08 10:19:16 PM
I am pretty sure the people living out in the boon docks will see that link when it loads on their 56k modem in about 3 hours from now.
/or they can always get sat intertubes for $79.99+
 
2010-10-08 10:19:51 PM
I kinda like spending time in cities on occasion. Public transportation is awesome and it's cool being able to go get a curry. However I have to say that getting silly drunk around a huge fire is one of my favorite activities. Also I can sit on my porch with a semiautomatic rifle and shoot at stuff. Those are a couple of the little simple things that make me appreciate rural life. Different strokes for different folks, ya know?
 
2010-10-08 10:26:31 PM
I might just be remembering wrong but I swear it's possible to see more stars now in Chicago than when I was growing up. The moon was never a problem. But seems like I can see more stars these days. Course when I lived way out, about 50 miles, in Crystal Lake, I could see lots and lots of stars. And watch meteor showers.
 
2010-10-08 10:33:21 PM
Just checking in to make sure city folk have cemented their well earned reputation. Carry on.
 
2010-10-08 10:45:49 PM
I'm going to gloat that I live near enough a downtown (Portland) that I can walk there in 30 minutes, or I can be 2 miles from anyone. Thank you to everyone who helped make Forest Park possible. It's not middle of nowhere, but it's good enough that in the middle of the night you can see the space station or shuttle pass over.
 
2010-10-08 10:47:52 PM
I do hate all the light pollution. Whenever I go on vacation somewhere away from urban areas I always make a point to hike out somewhere at night to see the milky way. I've even got a half decent telescope that between the light pollution and the fog sadly gets very little use here in San Francisco. However, tonight (and most nights this fall) is a great opportunity for everyone including us city dwellers to see one of the most historically significant sites in the sky, the "Galilean Moons" of Jupiter. Right as I'm typing this in most of the country Jupiter is high in the sky and so bright you'd think it was Venus (here on the west coast it's high and in the east and just now it is getting dark enough to see it well). With even the crappiest telescope, or a pair of 8x or more binoculars if you can hold them steady enough, you should be able to see the large bright disk of Jupiter and the four bright points of its largest moons surrounding it. These are the moons that Galileo Galilei discovered with his primitive telescope and one of the main observations that caused him to realize the heliocentric model of the solar system.

When I dragged my wife outside to check it out through the telescope a couple of weeks ago she was rather unimpressed at the sight of a large white dot with four tiny white dots around it, but it gives me goosebumps.
 
2010-10-08 10:57:42 PM
WhyteRaven74: ourse when I lived way out, about 50 miles, in Crystal Lake, I could see lots and lots of stars. And watch meteor showers.

And this guy.

img828.imageshack.us
 
2010-10-08 11:02:24 PM
Thrag: When I dragged my wife outside to check it out through the telescope a couple of weeks ago she was rather unimpressed at the sight of a large white dot with four tiny white dots around it, but it gives me goosebumps.

I feel your pain. My wife gives me the ol' "What is it I'm supposed to be seeing?"

Some people just don't appreciate the simple things.
 
2010-10-08 11:08:22 PM
The point is correct but the comparison chart is bollocks. I can see Jupiter even from downtown Chicago - given the right angle so that there isn't a building in the way.

Don't exaggerate, buttholes. Oh wait, it's gawker media. A haven for journalism D students.
 
2010-10-08 11:29:21 PM
Is this the thread where city dwellers get overly defensive?
 
2010-10-08 11:30:44 PM
There is a greater ratio of crazy farks in the country. You just don't see them because they generally keep to their lairs, unless their victims die off and they need replacements.
 
2010-10-08 11:39:55 PM
guilt by association: Is this the thread where city dwellers get overly defensive?

Yes. Yes, it is. Pull up a seat a you get schooled on how your city sucks, your food sucks, your schools suck, and you can't do anything because there's nothing anywhere near you.
 
2010-10-09 12:01:18 AM
Gordon Bennett: img828.imageshack.us

I was wondering if someone would mention him ;)
 
2010-10-09 12:05:53 AM
cache.gawkerassets.com

Holy crap! I think that is a picture of my apartment.
 
2010-10-09 12:13:05 AM
Meh ... Did the city thing way too long.

Naysay all y'like, but a man eventually needs some elbow room and some peace & quiet.

/lawn
//off
 
2010-10-09 12:17:13 AM
I agree completely. The lack of stars is one of the things I find most annoying about living in a city.

As for the crazies, well, you find them everywhere. Having grown up in cities I expect them and don't mind them. There's a guy who goes by my apartment at 6 am almost every morning shouting and hitting himself on the head. I don't even set an alarm any more, I just wake up when Yelling Guy goes by.

I am tempted to bring him a muffin or something one morning, and be like, "Hey man! Chill out, have some breakfast?" but I'm kind of worried he might react violently, since it's obvious he's more than a little disturbed. I want to know what his story is, though. What is he yelling at? I'm thinking the head-hitting might be due to hearing voices.
 
2010-10-09 12:44:56 AM
Knarf: I kinda like spending time in cities on occasion. Public transportation is awesome and it's cool being able to go get a curry. However I have to say that getting silly drunk around a huge fire is one of my favorite activities. Also I can sit on my porch with a semiautomatic rifle and shoot at stuff. Those are a couple of the little simple things that make me appreciate rural life. Different strokes for different folks, ya know?

This is my take. There is nothing better than to walk into you backyard buck naked with your morning coffee and watch 10 whitetails playing in the backyard as a way to start your day. I will take that any day over the chance of maybe going to a concert once or twice a year or to pay for an exorbitant priced meal 15 minutes away. I do enjoy going to big cities but after about a day I start scratching and getting claustrophobic not being able to see a clear horizon.

To each their own.
 
2010-10-09 01:01:04 AM
Man, it seems like a whole bunch of people are butthurt that other people have different preferences than they do. Get over yourselves, nancies.
 
2010-10-09 01:36:16 AM
It's important to note that Gizmodo really, really likes Apple. So their opinion on what does and doesn't suck should really be taken with a grain of salt.
 
2010-10-09 01:48:12 AM
t3knomanser: Light pollution is one of the biggest disadvantages to living in a city.

I still prefer living in a city.


Sound pollution is far more a disincentive to city life than light pollution.

/subwoofers and harleys should be banned
 
2010-10-09 01:59:05 AM
Great...now I'm probably going to go drive out into the country to look at the stars tonight. Off to find my binoculars.

/10 minute drive from the middle of nowhere
//love it
 
2010-10-09 02:36:13 AM
downstairs: I'll trade being able to see stars every single night for public transportation, bars and restaurant within walking distance, actual culture, not needing a car for much, and all that.

Me too but you don't get that in most cities anyway so screw it - I'm gonna have to occasionally drive home from bars.
 
2010-10-09 02:50:02 AM
tetzy: t3knomanser: Light pollution is one of the biggest disadvantages to living in a city.

I still prefer living in a city.

Sound pollution is far more a disincentive to city life than light pollution.

/subwoofers and harleys should be banned


The argument that "Loud pipes save lives," pisses me off to no end. On top of all of it, if you are one of those assholes, I could care less if you die in a horrific wreck.
 
2010-10-09 02:50:09 AM
I was just telling a friend last night about navigating Manhattan. He's new to the city and was getting disoriented at night. I said, "You know how mariners and such have the North Star or Southern Cross, depending on where you are? It's pretty much the same here. Just follow The Star."
 
2010-10-09 02:53:37 AM
Heh... I went to Orlando for the first time this week.

Wound up talking with someone who moved there a few years ago. When I asked him what was the worst thing about living in a city like Orlando, he replied "Hurricane season."
 
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