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(USA Today)   Egg industry says it's your own stupid fault if you got salmonella poisoning from undercooking your eggs   (usatoday.com) divider line 235
    More: Fail, salmonella, Consumer Federation of America, Kansas State University, largest animals, blaming the victim, IHOP, Charlotte Observer, immunodeficiencies  
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9804 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Aug 2010 at 1:55 AM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-08-30 03:01:13 AM
1400 cases nation wide is a pretty small farking risk. You're gonna have to pry my fresh mayo out away from my cold, dehydrated, diarrhea covered body.

Poowaddins: Given that I produce farm fresh, cage-free eggs for sale at local farm stands and health food stores, I'm really getting a kick...

Hey, so what's a fair price? There's a lady selling open range hen eggs (I've been to her farm) for $6 a dozen. There's another guy, not sure how his eggs came about, selling for $3/dozen. I don't fear store bought eggs but I get all my produce from the farmers market and don't mind getting my eggs there too if I know I'm not getting ripped off.
 
2010-08-30 03:01:41 AM
Cervidanti: Poowaddins: Given that I produce farm fresh, cage-free eggs for sale at local farm stands and health food stores, I'm really getting a kick...

No really, my business has picked up tremendously when people suddenly realize that factory farmed food is inherently unsafe to consume for a myriad list of reasons.


It's not "inherently" unsafe. It's unsafe if something goes wrong. Something like a salmonella infection. Do you know what? It's possible for your chickens to get that, too. And whether you have 3 chickens or 3,000, do you know how many will get infected if just one gets it?

100%.


how do factory farmed chickens, stuck in a shoebox, all get salmonella contamination (it's not an infection)? they don't. Free range and herp derp organic chickens are more susceptible to contamination spread.
 
2010-08-30 03:02:57 AM
Cervidanti: Poowaddins: Given that I produce farm fresh, cage-free eggs for sale at local farm stands and health food stores, I'm really getting a kick...

No really, my business has picked up tremendously when people suddenly realize that factory farmed food is inherently unsafe to consume for a myriad list of reasons.


It's not "inherently" unsafe. It's unsafe if something goes wrong. Something like a salmonella infection. Do you know what? It's possible for your chickens to get that, too. And whether you have 3 chickens or 3,000, do you know how many will get infected if just one gets it?

100%.


It's run by people.
It WILL go wrong.
Hopefully w/ less than half a billion before wrong is noticed.
 
2010-08-30 03:03:10 AM
Poowaddins: Given that I produce farm fresh, cage-free eggs for sale at local farm stands and health food stores, I'm really getting a kick...

No really, my business has picked up tremendously when people suddenly realize that factory farmed food is inherently unsafe to consume for a myriad list of reasons.

However, part of the blame DOES rest with the consumer. You can't blame the producers for getting sick after eating un/under-cooked meat products. You take a certain risk with everything you consume and there are bona fide methods to virtually eliminating the risk of food borne illness. If you're too stupid to do that, then you're just the kind of stupid who enjoys explosive vomiting and diarrhea for days on end.


And why should anyone believe your standards are any higher or methods are any safer than "factory farmed foods"?

Just because it comes from a farmer's market doesn't mean it's safer, better, tastier, etc. It just means it comes from a farmer's market.

/raised all sorts of animals
//loves farmer's markets
 
2010-08-30 03:04:06 AM
Broken9754: Dear public: irradiation of food is perfectly safe. Your punishment for your irrational fear is this wave of diarrhea.

But it has the word "radiation" in it! That means I'll die like a peasant in Hiroshima if I eat irradiated food. OMG, you're trying to kill me and you hate the Japanese.
 
2010-08-30 03:04:23 AM
USP .45: Cervidanti: Poowaddins: Given that I produce farm fresh, cage-free eggs for sale at local farm stands and health food stores, I'm really getting a kick...

No really, my business has picked up tremendously when people suddenly realize that factory farmed food is inherently unsafe to consume for a myriad list of reasons.


It's not "inherently" unsafe. It's unsafe if something goes wrong. Something like a salmonella infection. Do you know what? It's possible for your chickens to get that, too. And whether you have 3 chickens or 3,000, do you know how many will get infected if just one gets it?

100%.

how do factory farmed chickens, stuck in a shoebox, all get salmonella contamination (it's not an infection)? they don't. Free range and herp derp organic chickens are more susceptible to contamination spread.


HA. That's funny.

If they're vaccinated then it's a moot point. If they're organically fed, then there's less a chance of contacting salmonella through the feed.

and if they're all in close quarters, there's a HELL of a lot more chance that the infection - ANY infection - will spread.
 
2010-08-30 03:04:42 AM
Thanks guys, now I'm hungry.
i590.photobucket.com

/Not kidding. Yum.
 
2010-08-30 03:06:57 AM
Well, yeah. Some eggs have salmonella. Cook them.
Same with chicken. People biatch about it having campylobacter.
Yeah? Yeah. Get over it and learn to cook chicken.

/It's like eating human and complaining it has allergies. No shiat?
 
2010-08-30 03:08:47 AM
StreetlightInTheGhetto: USP .45: Cervidanti: Poowaddins: Given that I produce farm fresh, cage-free eggs for sale at local farm stands and health food stores, I'm really getting a kick...

No really, my business has picked up tremendously when people suddenly realize that factory farmed food is inherently unsafe to consume for a myriad list of reasons.


It's not "inherently" unsafe. It's unsafe if something goes wrong. Something like a salmonella infection. Do you know what? It's possible for your chickens to get that, too. And whether you have 3 chickens or 3,000, do you know how many will get infected if just one gets it?

100%.

how do factory farmed chickens, stuck in a shoebox, all get salmonella contamination (it's not an infection)? they don't. Free range and herp derp organic chickens are more susceptible to contamination spread.

HA. That's funny.

If they're vaccinated then it's a moot point. If they're organically fed, then there's less a chance of contacting salmonella through the feed.

and if they're all in close quarters, there's a HELL of a lot more chance that the infection - ANY infection - will spread.


it's a bacteria spread by contact, not your feelings.
 
2010-08-30 03:09:46 AM
USP .45: eggs come out of the reptilian stink hole of chickens, then they shiat all over them
millions of people raise their own chickens at home for the eggs without issue.


Honestly, how can we know this? Just being honest, but most salmonella causes nothing more than the occasional loose stool or slight stomach ache, and unless you're consuming massive quantities of salmonella-infected product, itself with massive quantities of infection, or you're immunocompromised, you're going to have no symptoms, or symptoms so fleeting and temporary that you won't realize you're sick before you're better.

The only way we could *tell* that home-raised eggs were safer would be if they were subjected to the same inspection process as other eggs, which is not a viable solution...

There is a slight benefit to getting an egg in a fridge faster, in that you can prevent salmonella present in the egg (and most of it's actually on them, not in them) from growing to an amount where it could likely infect a healthy adult, but that's going to be a function of how often you're checking your hens, not where they are laying.

/biologist.
//building my own hen house
///knows lots of chicken people whose eggs I would not trust.
 
2010-08-30 03:09:54 AM
So, what happens when you make it cheaper to ignore, circumvent and "beat" the safety rules w/ food production?

'Bout the same thing you get when you let oil companies run free range.

In the quest for every penny of profit, rules are optional. For sociopaths.
 
2010-08-30 03:10:54 AM
I don't know about the rest of you, but I've been cooking my eggs the "wrong" way for YEARS...and I like it that way. I scramble them up and fry them on medium with butter/margarine/whatever the hell is in the fridge and cook the hell out of them until they're browned up a little. I farking HATE runny eggs...or any trace of it. Blech.

I almost barfed going through a breakfast buffet once...their idea of scrambled was sweating them under a lid in a chafing dish. The condensation just made it look like part coagulated baby, part bukkake'ed chicken.

/Sheer terror.
 
2010-08-30 03:19:26 AM
Egg industry is right on this one. Naman: Relatively Obscure: Who knew eating raw or undercooked eggs was dangerous? No one on the planet has ever heard that there were risks involved in eating raw or undercooked eggs. Not ever.

That's great, except for the fact that what makes the danger more than negligible is the fact that large-scale egg producers usually keep their chickens in filthy, cramped conditions where salmonella spreads rampantly.

In order to get salmonella from eggs, it has to spread to the chickens that lay the eggs. Healthy chickens produce safe eggs.
\

Citation needed.
 
2010-08-30 03:21:56 AM
Mock26: In order to get salmonella from eggs, it has to spread to the chickens that lay the eggs. Healthy chickens produce safe eggs.\

Citation needed.


salmonella is just produced at random from healthy chickens that are magically contaminated?
 
2010-08-30 03:22:26 AM
Maybe things have changed. But when I took food handler's training in the late 80's I was taught that close to 1/3rd of the eggs in upstate NY (where I worked) had salmonella, and that all eggs had to be cooked completely. What happened? Did we cure salmonella somehow?
 
2010-08-30 03:22:49 AM
Why is this fail? Sure, it's been kind of a given that people will eat "less than properly cooked" eggs for a long time now, but people should be aware that it will come with risks.

Like eating a raw steak or oysters (I love raw oysters). I know what I am doing has a chance of going bad, and people should be aware of that.

That said.....many people do eat undercooked eggs, and this problem should be resolved. The people are just trying to educate people. At least that's the way I see it.

Eat things raw....undercooked or unwashed? You bet that is has possibilities for sickness.
 
2010-08-30 03:33:05 AM
Cats_Lie: Maybe things have changed. But when I took food handler's training in the late 80's I was taught that close to 1/3rd of the eggs in upstate NY (where I worked) had salmonella, and that all eggs had to be cooked completely. What happened? Did we cure salmonella somehow?

Just guessing, but based on my own experience, that 1/3 number probably referred to presence of bacteria on the shell, which is why food handlers are now always taught, for example, to use an egg separator, not separate egg from white in the shell, whereas the 1 in a million (or whatever) number refers to the presence of bacteria IN the shell, from an infection inside the bird or from cracks or pores in the shell, and that, yes, we have a lot of better handling now, resulting in fewer cracked shells, so less transmission from outside of an egg to inside, and, IIRC, eggs are sprayed with various things like ethyl alcohol (oh teh nose! not the vodak!) these days during packaging as well.
 
2010-08-30 03:34:54 AM
If it was really the consumers/victims fault then why was it a voluntary recall?
 
2010-08-30 03:36:50 AM
USP .45: Mock26: In order to get salmonella from eggs, it has to spread to the chickens that lay the eggs. Healthy chickens produce safe eggs.\

Citation needed.

salmonella is just produced at random from healthy chickens that are magically contaminated?


Miracles all up in this biatch hen?
 
2010-08-30 03:48:59 AM
Isn't it dangerous to eat things raw/undercooked? I have always seen things about food being undercooked or raw being dangerous because you could get food poisoning.

So if you completely cook the eggs that were recalled it kills the salmonella and it is safe to eat?

Dear Mr. Darwin
If you could just give all these people that ignore the warnings about undercooked foods a case of the super king koopa shiats that would be great. Not anything deadly, just 8 or 10 hours of not being able to leave the toilet for fear of making a mess all over the house.

Thanks,
Everyone who pays attention to food safety guidelines.

My wife will grab a handfull of raw hamburger meat and eat it. However, she thinks that a steak cooked rare is disgusting and wont touch it. I told her I'm not going to visit her in the hospital if she gets food poisoning from it.
 
2010-08-30 03:49:01 AM
APE992: Edipis: just like with beef, i'm not sure what the point of eating egg that has been cooked to rubber quite is.

I've always cooked eggs completely and never have had them turn out like rubber. Runny eggs taste like snot.

As for beef I'd prefer to not have my ass and mouth explode because it should be "juicy". That is blood and grease my friend, not juice. Though overcooking it clearly is disgusting and rubbery. If cooked right it can be "completely" cooked and not rubbery.

/good luck getting someone who knows what "not rubbery" means though


Just so we're clear: you're never cooking for me, especially not grilling a steak.
 
2010-08-30 03:57:02 AM
I submit this for your approval.
Tamago kake gohan (new window).

You can take my raw eggs out of my cold, dead hands. (and for the lazy (new window)...)
 
2010-08-30 03:57:44 AM
Some people don't know how to hard boil eggs.
 
2010-08-30 04:03:24 AM
butIprovedthem: You can take my raw eggs out of my cold, dead hands.

Sure it's a great snack. But not every meal.

capt-victoria10blue.cocolog-nifty.com
 
2010-08-30 04:06:08 AM
*sigh* I would gladly pay a bit more for somewhat safer eggs if it meant the industry wouldn't treat me like a criminal for liking the occasional soft-boiled egg and toast soldiers for breakfast, or for having a taste of the dough when I bake cookies.

Not that I don't mind hardboiled eggs (or rather, hard-steamed eggs - learned that trick from Alton Brown's I'm Just Here for the Food) so long as they're not cooked so hard they get that blackish-green layer around the yolk. -_-'
 
2010-08-30 04:08:42 AM
I had heard it was possible to get Salmonella from the shell, to get it on your thumb and then later rub it on your plate. In this instance fully cooking the egg wouldn't help. Though, arguably, better food preparation habits would. =/
 
2010-08-30 04:15:51 AM
Relatively Obscure: optikeye: However, in the past, an 'egg over easy' was common..and safe.

Nope.


LOL, what?
Are you by any chance an egg farmer from Iowa?
 
2010-08-30 04:28:02 AM
charro: Relatively Obscure: optikeye: However, in the past, an 'egg over easy' was common..and safe.

Nope.

LOL, what?
Are you by any chance an egg farmer from Iowa?


Not even close. Eggs were not "safe" from salmonella in the past. That's just simple fact.
 
2010-08-30 04:41:10 AM
Relatively Obscure: charro: Relatively Obscure: optikeye: However, in the past, an 'egg over easy' was common..and safe.

Nope.

LOL, what?
Are you by any chance an egg farmer from Iowa?

Not even close. Eggs were not "safe" from salmonella in the past. That's just simple fact.


Yes, like other people said on this thread... The body can deal with a "normal" amount of salmonella causing some stomach ache or loose stool. But this "voluntary" recall means that the amount of salmonella was exceedingly high and these farms must be incredibly nasty dumps.
People have eaten eggs over easy before and their immune systems have dealt with it reasonably well... now the question is if scramble eggs from these farms are safe as well.
 
2010-08-30 04:47:18 AM
charro: and these farms must be incredibly nasty dumps.

again...The feed was contaminated.
 
2010-08-30 04:49:48 AM
charro: Relatively Obscure: charro: Relatively Obscure: optikeye: However, in the past, an 'egg over easy' was common..and safe.

Nope.

LOL, what?
Are you by any chance an egg farmer from Iowa?

Not even close. Eggs were not "safe" from salmonella in the past. That's just simple fact.

Yes, like other people said on this thread... The body can deal with a "normal" amount of salmonella causing some stomach ache or loose stool. But this "voluntary" recall means that the amount of salmonella was exceedingly high and these farms must be incredibly nasty dumps.
People have eaten eggs over easy before and their immune systems have dealt with it reasonably well... now the question is if scramble eggs from these farms are safe as well.


Yes, people have eaten eggs over easy before. They still do. Most people deal with it reasonably well, because most people are healthy and most eggs (still) aren't contaminated.

There was never a golden age of magical, risk-free eggs of which I am aware in all of human history.
 
2010-08-30 04:50:28 AM
There just isn't anything punny about over-medium eggs; or is there.

/I don't eat a lot of animal products since I saw 'Food, Inc.'
 
2010-08-30 04:52:05 AM
"Some people may not think of an egg as you would ground beef, but they need to start," says Krista Eberle of the United Egg Producers' Egg Safety Center. "It may sound harsh, and I don't mean it to sound that way. But all the responsibility cannot be placed on the farmer. Somewhere along the line, consumers have to be responsible for what they put in their bodies." Consumers who don't cook their eggs all the way through "are taking a risk on themselves," she says.

Isn't it cute how millionaire industrialists who run highly-mechanized chicken factories call themselves "farmers"?
 
2010-08-30 04:54:04 AM
pb-crunch: Isn't it cute how millionaire industrialists who run highly-mechanized chicken factories call themselves "farmers"?

2: a person who cultivates land or crops or raises animals (as livestock or fish)

No?
 
2010-08-30 05:07:49 AM
LabGrrl: I love how people have no problem with running their processed egg product through an xray machine to look for stray band-aids from food workers (and this is why food workers aren't supposed to use any band-aids without special metal strips in them) or when the product is shipped through an airport, or when the box is sampled to go through a security checkpoint, but gamma irradiation is somehow OMGZ! TOXIC!

/Same exact machine.
//Every time a kid dies of salmonella or ecoli because of fear mongering, remember that.


-4/10

gamma radiation is higher energy than an x-ray machine, and I don't like that either. Of all the things in my house, the only one that's likely been subjected to x-ray is my coffee.


Irradiation also lowers the levels of vitamins in foods, and while it does not lower the levels of proteins, it must change them somehow otherwise it would be completely ineffective. Some destruction of nutritional value is required in order to kill the bacteria.

There honestly aren't a lot of kids in the US who die from salmonella and e. coli to begin with, and certainly not enough to feel bad about. Most of kids dying from such diseases occurs in the third world where people are still crapping in their drinking water.
 
2010-08-30 05:13:49 AM
You're eating it wrong?

I didn't know that Steve Jobs was a spokesman for the egg industry.
 
2010-08-30 05:15:14 AM
generally I cook my eggs hard
but once and awhile you need a runny yolk to dunk toast in
 
2010-08-30 05:25:30 AM
TommyymmoT: In New Jersey, it's illegal (since 1992) for restaurants to serve soft boiled eggs, or eggs over easy (new window)

Not. That regulation generated such a wave of rage that it was ditched within six months, and it was widely ignored before that.
 
2010-08-30 05:31:40 AM
Bullroarer_Took: Thanks guys, now I'm hungry.

/Not kidding. Yum.


For me, the pickles and the beets (I think those are beets) are the nastiest things on that plate.
 
2010-08-30 05:33:17 AM
500 million eggs recalled?!

How are they not using those to make the world's largest omelet?

The current record sits at 6,510 lbs.
500 million eggs would make a 55,115,600 pound one.

I have no idea how they'd cook it, but still, best PR move ever.
 
2010-08-30 05:48:25 AM
Consumers that were sickened reportedly all ate eggs that were not properly or thoroughly cooked gross. Eggs need to be cooked so that the whites and yolks are firm (not runny) disgusting, which should kill any bacteria,
 
2010-08-30 06:15:00 AM
LabGrrl: Cats_Lie: Maybe things have changed. But when I took food handler's training in the late 80's I was taught that close to 1/3rd of the eggs in upstate NY (where I worked) had salmonella, and that all eggs had to be cooked completely. What happened? Did we cure salmonella somehow?

Just guessing, but based on my own experience, that 1/3 number probably referred to presence of bacteria on the shell, which is why food handlers are now always taught, for example, to use an egg separator, not separate egg from white in the shell, whereas the 1 in a million (or whatever) number refers to the presence of bacteria IN the shell, from an infection inside the bird or from cracks or pores in the shell, and that, yes, we have a lot of better handling now, resulting in fewer cracked shells, so less transmission from outside of an egg to inside, and, IIRC, eggs are sprayed with various things like ethyl alcohol (oh teh nose! not the vodak!) these days during packaging as well.



No, that's not it.

We were taught that ALL eggs have salmonella on the outside. 1/3rd of eggs have micro-fractures in the shell which allow the salmonella to contaminate the edible part. But again, that is merely what I was told, and that was back in the late 80's.

Still, you're insane if you eat raw eggs.
 
2010-08-30 06:35:03 AM
Who the hell is eating raw eggs? Seriously, do we need to take measures to keep these people in the genepool? If you take health advice from the ROCKY movies, GTFO of my species.
 
2010-08-30 06:54:12 AM
Well... sorry that I like soft boiled egg with my toast.
 
2010-08-30 06:54:55 AM
It's your own fault for eating the eggs at all! End chicken slavery! Go vegan!
 
2010-08-30 07:09:05 AM
Broken9754: That's fine. I just wanted to say "wave of diarrhea."

vintageknives.com
 
2010-08-30 07:10:10 AM
PersistantRash: Who the hell is eating raw eggs? Seriously, do we need to take measures to keep these people in the genepool? If you take health advice from the ROCKY movies, GTFO of my species.

I do... I mixed raw egg with congee. I soaked my bread in the yolk as part of my breakfast ritual. I know the risk, but screw that. Life would be boring if you just play it safe with everything.
 
2010-08-30 07:12:19 AM
I'm not a huge egg eater. I buy maybe half a dozen a month, but I did switch to free range about a year ago and I've noticed a huge difference in the quality of the eggs. The shells are thicker - the shells break cleanly into two halves when you crack them open rather than disintegrating into multiple fragments. The yolk is a brighter shade of yellow and the egg itself tastes more ... eggy.

Whether those factors are something you consider when you buy your eggs is something I leave to you, but I invite you to at least try some free range eggs sometime and consider the difference in your egg-consuming experience.
 
2010-08-30 07:22:01 AM
Bbbut, gummint regalation is teh bad!

Sarah Palin told me so!
 
2010-08-30 08:13:14 AM
Can't we just let the free range market fix this by itself?
 
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