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(Pop Matters)   Maybe classic rock's most bothersome aspect is that it traffics in arguably one of the most fertile creative periods in rock history, but leaves the impression that most bands never wrote more than three or four songs   (popmatters.com) divider line 163
    More: Ironic, classic rock, musical group, Alison Krauss, Animal Collective, Bob Seger, dreck, Robert Plant, The Wall  
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2643 clicks; posted to Music » on 03 Aug 2010 at 3:25 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



163 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2010-08-03 12:23:54 PM  
I was coming to say that I thought that the classic rock era gave us albums we can listen to from beginning to end, but then skimming through the article the guy made better points:


1. It's impossible to listen to classic rock radio during the coveted drivetime hours without hearing the frakkin' Eagles.

THIS


3. Warren Zevon deserves better than to be known as that "'Werewolves of London' guy". He wrote some great songs, people! Let's hear 'em!

THIS

4. I'm not a huge fan of later Aerosmith, but I have to admit that Joe Perry's guitar was smokin' for most of the '80s and '90s. That chaotic, clanging solo on "Janey's Got a Gun" totally rocks.

AND THIS
 
2010-08-03 12:56:28 PM  
Exactly what classic rock is or isn't can be hard to define.

I would never have thought that Tennessee Ernie Ford's Sixteen Tons from 1955 would be on the list.

Not that it's not a good song. It's just not "rock" and certainly not "classic rock". I believe it's a pop arrangement of a folk song.

//The point that there is a lot of great classic rock besides the repetitive playlists you hear on radio is certainly true.

//Went to a Santana show a couple of weeks ago and he covered Clapton's "Sunshine of your love" in his first encore. That was certainly a surprise. I love good covers of great songs. That's something they could play on the radio too.
 
2010-08-03 01:05:28 PM  
notmtwain: Exactly what classic rock is or isn't can be hard to define.

Apparently, Nirvana, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Pearl Jam are now considered classic rock, at least, according to my local classic rock station.
 
2010-08-03 01:06:58 PM  
Clear channel ruined classic rock for me. If it's not Boston, it sounds like Boston, so I'd rather not screw with anything published after 1973. Unless it's decided not "rock" -- which I'd include Warren Zevon in.
 
2010-08-03 01:10:48 PM  
CraicBaby: notmtwain: Exactly what classic rock is or isn't can be hard to define.

Apparently, Nirvana, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Pearl Jam are now considered classic rock, at least, according to my local classic rock station.


This years high school seniors were born AFTER "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was released.

So, yeah, it is classic rock now, and, yeah, you are old.

/so am I
 
2010-08-03 01:27:52 PM  
DarnoKonrad: Clear channel ruined classic rock for me. If it's not Boston, it sounds like Boston, so I'd rather not screw with anything published after 1973. Unless it's decided not "rock" -- which I'd include Warren Zevon in.

Everyone knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact.
 
2010-08-03 01:55:54 PM  
I'm not a huge fan of later Aerosmith, but I have to admit that Joe Perry's guitar was smokin' for most of the '80s and '90s. That chaotic, clanging solo on "Janey's Got a Gun" totally rocks.

That's funny, because I've heard that it was sort of an open secret that a lot of the guitar on early Aerosmith albums was played by uncredited studio musicians because Joe Perry sucked so hard. My mom saw them in the mid-seventies at the Pontiac Silverdome and told me they nearly got booed off the stage as the headliner because they were so bad live.

I think Aerosmith paid for getting better as musicians by getting worse at writing songs.
 
2010-08-03 02:01:56 PM  
Maybe that's one good thing that came from the massive studio bills that bands used to rack up, maybe no one knows how to mic instruments like they used to, or maybe it's the price newer albums are paying for participating in the loudness wars.

I was never a Santana fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.

Maybe I should go dig up some classic rock.
 
2010-08-03 02:06:18 PM  
jaylectricity: I was never a Santana fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.

I feel the same way about Steely Dan. I realize a lot of people can't stand them, but those are some of the best recorded albums in the history of music.
 
2010-08-03 02:10:12 PM  
jaylectricity: Maybe that's one good thing that came from the massive studio bills that bands used to rack up, maybe no one knows how to mic instruments like they used to, or maybe it's the price newer albums are paying for participating in the loudness wars.

I was never a Santana fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.

Maybe I should go dig up some classic rock.




Go find something live from Santana. Or just go buy the Wood Stock DVD
 
2010-08-03 02:18:15 PM  
sigdiamond2000: jaylectricity: I was never a Santana fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.

I feel the same way about Steely Dan. I realize a lot of people can't stand them, but those are some of the best recorded albums in the history of music.


Perfect example of a 'studio' band. They had a hell of a lot of talent.
 
2010-08-03 02:21:44 PM  
Classic rock bothers me because of the way it's caused radio and television to stagnate, and how much the members of those bands lied. Past generations gave them money so they could "live fast and die young." They lived fast, then reneged on the "die young" part.

So now we have The Who waddling on stage during the Super Bowl, Daltrey not able to hit any of the high notes, and the whole band sounding like something you'd see at the state fair.

Now we have Aerosmith still pretending to be relevant, far after they've worn out their welcome.

And AC/DC released an album only available at Wal-Mart. That's really how rock and roll sticks it to the man, isn't it?

At least other genres of music had the decency to vanish from the mainstream for a while, only to be appreciated by a handful of people, before re-emerging and pretending to be "new." Take ska or swing music, for instance. Or even that lovable scamp known as punk rock. They all went away for decades. Why can't butt-rock do the same?
 
2010-08-03 02:31:55 PM  
So many great songs and good bands from that period that are ignored. It really is frustrating to hear the same shiat over and over.

One problem (IMO) is that they have condensed "Classic Rock" to only the 3-4 minute songs.

Even with that said, Pat Travers (for example) has MUCH better songs than "Boom Boom out go the lights".

UFO isn't just "Doctor Doctor"

Robin Trower isn't just "Bridge of Sighs"

I could go on and on.
 
2010-08-03 02:54:48 PM  
mediablitz: UFO isn't just "Doctor Doctor"

I'd consider "Lights Out" more played on classic rock radio than "Doctor Doctor".
 
2010-08-03 03:33:22 PM  
FOGHAT!!!!!
 
2010-08-03 03:37:14 PM  
Hender: Everyone knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact.

And yet 1974 is also the year of the first "Bad Company" release.

You see, poor live performances by the likes of Chuck Berry and even Jerry Lee Lewis are destroying the music they allege to celebrate. And tests show that a Beach Boys concert is a very sad thing. This, coupled with the growing interest in ethnic music has undermined the support base of the music you and your friends love.

/looks forward to the dominance of jazz
 
2010-08-03 03:40:08 PM  
2 words: Blind Faith. :(
 
2010-08-03 03:41:45 PM  
Uzzah: And yet 1974 is also the year of the first "Bad Company" release

I tried to re appreciate Bad Co this year because I'm a Mott fanatic, and Free made some great albums but, far far less than the sum of it's parts that is for sure.
 
2010-08-03 03:42:14 PM  
I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio. It's always 'Back in Black' or something for the one millionth time. Too many hidden gems out there.
 
2010-08-03 03:48:05 PM  
TheLopper: I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio.

www.amiright.com

This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.
 
2010-08-03 03:49:51 PM  
jaylectricity: Maybe that's one good thing that came from the massive studio bills that bands used to rack up, maybe no one knows how to mic instruments like they used to, or maybe it's the price newer albums are paying for participating in the loudness wars.

I was never a Santana fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.

Maybe I should go dig up some classic rock.


Go dig up the original Fleetwood Mac version and be blown away.
 
2010-08-03 03:53:12 PM  
First time I saw Ac/Dc was on the Powerage tour..Ended up seeing them at least twice on every tour thru "Flick of the Switch" when I gave up because it seemed like they were just going thru the motions at that stage.
 
2010-08-03 03:53:44 PM  
TheLopper: It's always 'Back in Black' or something for the one millionth time. Too many hidden gems out there.

I had trouble with this, too. I think part of the problem is that, at least in AC/DC's case, the production on those early albums is pretty "meh" and the Brian Johnson era stuff is higher-quality, production wise. It's a shame, because if you put on "If you want blood you've got it" (Bon Scott era live cuts, released in US in 1978) you realize just how monstrously good they were, and you NEVER hear that stuff on the radio.

As to all those other amazing bands that recorded really high-quality (performance-wise) stuff, the programming directors at the mainstream, free-radio stations know what their audience wants, and it's not "obscure genius". People want to hear Pinball Wizard, Hotel California, Low Rider, Riders on the Storm, Comfortably Numb and the occasional Led Zep threefer. The programming directors need to give the audience what they want.

You want "hidden gems" you gotta go to like Sirius/XM, or just turn off the radio and find alternate sources.

/turned off the radio in 1992
 
2010-08-03 03:53:47 PM  
What's a radio station?

/haven't willingly listened to terrestrial or even Satellite radio in close to 15 years.

//Some will take that (and what follows) as smugness (and I can't defend against that, so won't) but it's really not designed to be. It's more an expression of my continued incredulity that, as there exist so many other (better, IMO) options for listening to/being exposed to music these days, anyone would willingly choose to listen to what others choose to play for you.

Really, unless they ABSOLUTELY want to (or, yes, they work/spend your time in an environment in which exposure is out of their control) there doesn't seem to exist a viable reason why anybody should/would have cause to listen to music they don't want when they absolutely can only listen only to what they do at their whim.

I'm stunned actually that music-playing radio stations are still an extant phenomena in 2010. I fully understand the need for (weather) info/community talk stations in rural areas, but not music-playing ones.

I'm sincerely not trolling. I honestly don't understand the need. Can someone explain to me WHY there are still music-playing terrestrial/satellite stations in 2010?

Am I just (again) being short-sighted?
 
2010-08-03 03:54:19 PM  
I'm listening to Stevie Ray Vaughan's Riviera Paradise, so I'm getting a kick...

Oooh, now it's Joe Walsh, and it ain't "Life's Been Good"! (new window)
 
2010-08-03 03:57:21 PM  
Infamous Dr. X: It's a shame, because if you put on "If you want blood you've got it" (Bon Scott era live cuts, released in US in 1978) you realize just how monstrously good they were, and you NEVER hear that stuff on the radio.

Greatest live album ever recorded. Bar none.
 
2010-08-03 03:58:14 PM  
dletter: CraicBaby: notmtwain: Exactly what classic rock is or isn't can be hard to define.

Apparently, Nirvana, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Pearl Jam are now considered classic rock, at least, according to my local classic rock station.

This years high school seniors were born AFTER "Smells Like Teen Spirit" was released.

So, yeah, it is classic rock now, and, yeah, you are old.

/so am I


You just made this 25 year old feel 85
 
2010-08-03 04:01:46 PM  
beerrun: jaylectricity: Maybe that's one good thing that came from the massive studio bills that bands used to rack up, maybe no one knows how to mic instruments like they used to, or maybe it's the price newer albums are paying for participating in the loudness wars.

I was never a Santana fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.

Maybe I should go dig up some classic rock.

Go dig up the original Fleetwood Mac version and be blown away.


Or ANYTHING Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac. I have the entire discography and it is some of the greatest electric blues out there.
 
2010-08-03 04:01:53 PM  
Japancakes: What's a radio station?

Thanks -- you aren't alone. I don't know the answer. There's a farkton of apathy and I think some measure of comfort in listening to 20 minutes of ads and 20 minutes of DJ piffle every hour.

The first time I replaced my car stereo was the last time I listened to the radio. Mix tapes, then mix CDs, then mix mp3 CDs, now mix mp3 DVDs.
 
2010-08-03 04:02:34 PM  
Most of Thin Lizzy's best work was stuff that was not played on the radio. Lynott was able to get some impressive guitarists on his records and the songwriting was amazing. I've been listening to Still Dangerous a lot the last few weeks and I still cannot believe that Lizzy wasn't bigger in the States than they were.

I could go the rest of my life and never hear Santana again.

Early Fleetwood Mac with Peter Green were an amazing band. The Nicks era Fleetwood Mac that gets played to death is crap compared to the Green era stuff.

My favorite Zevon song is still Roland the Thompson Gunner and it never gets any airplay either. Same thing with most of Pat Travers' back catalog. AC/DC's Jailbreak still gets in rotation on my ipod and in the cd player. Some of Bon Scott's best work.


Still waiting on Leader O'Cola to come in here and tell everyone that they suck for listening to anything other than his precious death metal.
 
2010-08-03 04:02:52 PM  
beerrun: Go dig up the original Fleetwood Mac version and be blown away.

This.

Some really good stuff to be had with any early/pre Stevie & Lindsey Fleetwood Mac.

Also, try out some early Rush. I was brought up on UFO, Stones, Yes, Rush, Beatles and Boston. Was a great time to be a kid and have a Dad who liked to crank up "Heart of the Sunrise" while we cleaned house on Saturday mornings.

/yes, I went there
//does Rush really classify as Classic Rock vs. Progressive?
///my slashies are better then yours
 
2010-08-03 04:03:06 PM  
Nights with Alice Cooper does a good job with his deep cuts. otherwise its:

Bad Co.
AC/DC
Boston
Styx
Kansas
Foreigner
Repeat
 
2010-08-03 04:04:20 PM  
Nice to see there are some other people out there with taste. Carry on, gentlefolk.

/would give anything to time-travel back to a rock station, circa early seventies.
 
2010-08-03 04:04:21 PM  
Clear Channel - and the adherents to their business model - are what's wrong with radio.
 
2010-08-03 04:05:27 PM  
The only Classic Rock I listen to is Deep Tracks on Sirius/XM ... and even that channel pales in comparison to what was The Vault on Sirius.

/And, yes, Boston sucks. (Well, they may not have sucked, but after hearing Foreplay/More Than a Feeling every hour of every day on FM radio, they now suck.)
 
2010-08-03 04:07:20 PM  
sigdiamond2000: Infamous Dr. X: It's a shame, because if you put on "If you want blood you've got it" (Bon Scott era live cuts, released in US in 1978) you realize just how monstrously good they were, and you NEVER hear that stuff on the radio.

Greatest live album ever recorded. Bar none.


Uh, just no. Live and Dangerous is with Strangers in The Night a close second.
 
2010-08-03 04:07:49 PM  
Japancakes: I'm sincerely not trolling. I honestly don't understand the need. Can someone explain to me WHY there are still music-playing terrestrial/satellite stations in 2010?

Maybe I'm smug, too, but I agree with most of what you're saying.

There are a few reasons, though, why it's still out there. Lest I appear pedantic and lecturing, I'll summarize:

1. Access is free (or nearly so) and there's no work involved. Whether you're in your car, on foot, on the train, sitting by the pool, or at work, you can turn on your radio and have instant access to entertainment at virtually no cost (save the investment in the radio) and with no energy/work expended (in researching which albums/tracks to accumulate and put onto a mixtape or mp3 player).

2. It's still a key part of the industry marketing machine. Despite the advent of youtube, itunes, pandora, last.fm, etc., terrestrial radio is still THE premier marketplace for the industry - for free, you are able to sample a very wide variety of product, product that you'll likely go buy some of (in form of a cd or album download). The industry WANTS people to have cost- and work-free access to their product.

3. No actual statistical data for this, but I suspect that the vast majority of people WANT radio, because it makes life easier. In some small way because their choice of outlet/music source and/or fandom of genres helps them identify themselves and seek like-minded people, just like people watch certain stations on TV or follow certain shows. The same reason people choose to join random subcultures based on hobbies, fashion, or whatever. Again, because it's cost- & work-free, it's an easy and convenient way for people to get entertained and enjoy community.

Okay, that was pretty f*ing pedantic. Sorry.
 
2010-08-03 04:08:13 PM  
A local station - WKLH - used to pride itself on playing 'deep cuts'.

Yeah, about that. 'Deep cuts' were the third, fourth or 5th single from a popular album such as Rumors or Thriller.

Farking Allah I hated that station for years simply because of this bullshiate, trying to appear hip without taking a single chance.

Glad I got satellite.
 
2010-08-03 04:10:42 PM  
Maybe that's because radio stations ONLY PLAY SINGLES.

Do What Now Question Mark: Nice to see there are some other people out there with taste. Carry on, gentlefolk.

/would give anything to time-travel back to a rock station, circa early seventies.


And you'd be heart broken because they'd be playing all the chaff that sank to the bottom and became forgotten. For every "wow that song still sounds great today" there are five "what the hell is this?" and four "I never really liked this song".
 
2010-08-03 04:13:50 PM  
TheLopper
I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio. It's always 'Back in Black' or something for the one millionth time. Too many hidden gems out there.

I never understand why some tracks go heavy-rotation and others become "deep cuts". Why "You Shook Me All Night Long" over "Rock N Roll Singer" or "Live Wire"? Why "Truckin'" over "Brown-eyed Women" or "Jack Straw"?

It's frustrating to think about how good commercial radio could be, without even changing all that much. I mean, they've already got the discs in the studio, they just have to play different tracks.
 
2010-08-03 04:14:03 PM  
gopher321: sigdiamond2000: jaylectricity: I was never a Santana fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.

I feel the same way about Steely Dan. I realize a lot of people can't stand them, but those are some of the best recorded albums in the history of music.

Perfect example of a 'studio' band. They had a hell of a lot of talent.


I was always lukewarm on Steely Dan until I caught Classic Albums - Aja on VH1 Classic (you can get it from Netflix). Superb insight into how a perfectionist studio band like them pieces together a record. Highly recommended.
 
2010-08-03 04:16:07 PM  
GreenAdder: So now we have The Who waddling on stage during the Super Bowl, Daltrey not able to hit any of the high notes, and the whole band sounding like something you'd see at the state fair.

Blame Janet Jackson and her "wardrobe malfunction" for having nothing but classic rock bands since. That's really sad, that the Stones and The Who are the *safe* option in programming, though Prince using his guitar as a penis was a nice touch.

www.thetechlounge.com

Now we have Aerosmith still pretending to be relevant, far after they've worn out their welcome.

Really? I think at this point, Aerosmith just wants all five members to stay alive long enough to make another album and get through a full tour without having to cancel 20 shows due to medical problems.

I don't think most classic rock bands not named The Who are under any illusion that they're "relevant" anymore, but what are they going to do? stop writing songs and touring because they're not hot buzz-bands like they were in the late 60's and 70's? Oh, that's right, they could do us all a favor and take your advice and die. Funny how they might not want to do that.

And AC/DC released an album only available at Wal-Mart. That's really how rock and roll sticks it to the man, isn't it?

Well, if rock and roll wasn't so addicted to the lame "we're so rebellious! We're sticking it to the man (even though we're all signed to multinational corporations!)" mindset, we'd all be better off. As someone once noted, "All teenage rebellion since Rebel Without A Cause is fake, it's manufactured". AC/DC did what was best for them in the face of a disintegrating music industry and widespread album theft.

My personal "Waah! Waah! Why don't they play more than [hit song]:

ELP: There's more to their catalog than Lucky Man and First Impression, Part 2. Really!

Yes: Same deal, there's more there than Roundabout and Owner of a Lonely Heart, though I realize no FM station today would play all 18 minutes of Close to the Edge, though it wasn't unheard of back in the early 70's.
 
2010-08-03 04:17:16 PM  
dionysusaur
Clear Channel - and the adherents to their business model - are what's wrong with radio.

You know, I felt this way for a really long time. But to give CC their due, when I moved to San Antonio, KISS was the first radio station I'd ever heard that played Slayer, Iron Maiden, and the full 9-minute "Master of Puppets" during weekday drivetime.

Maybe it's the exception that proves the rule, but that CC station was one of the better terrestrial rock stations I've heard.
 
2010-08-03 04:18:18 PM  
MagFura2: TheLopper
I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio. It's always 'Back in Black' or something for the one millionth time. Too many hidden gems out there.

I never understand why some tracks go heavy-rotation and others become "deep cuts". Why "You Shook Me All Night Long" over "Rock N Roll Singer" or "Live Wire"? Why "Truckin'" over "Brown-eyed Women" or "Jack Straw"?

It's frustrating to think about how good commercial radio could be, without even changing all that much. I mean, they've already got the discs in the studio, they just have to play different tracks.


Ah, youngsters. Back in the day, promo vinyl came with "notes" telling DJ's which songs the company wanted played, sometimes to the point of these little arrow stickers affixed right to the vinyl pointing at the desired tracks lead in...
 
2010-08-03 04:18:52 PM  
enad58

You just made this 25 year old feel 85

I felt the same way when I realized that if "Master of Puppets" was a car, it would be an antique. And that was almost ten years ago.
 
2010-08-03 04:19:08 PM  
apeiron242: Maybe that's because radio stations ONLY PLAY SINGLES.

Do What Now Question Mark: Nice to see there are some other people out there with taste. Carry on, gentlefolk.

/would give anything to time-travel back to a rock station, circa early seventies.

And you'd be heart broken because they'd be playing all the chaff that sank to the bottom and became forgotten. For every "wow that song still sounds great today" there are five "what the hell is this?" and four "I never really liked this song".


YOU'RE RUINING MY FANTASIES DAMNIT. STOP THAT.
 
2010-08-03 04:19:32 PM  
sigdiamond2000: Greatest live album ever recorded. Bar none.

drewogatory: Uh, just no. Live and Dangerous is with Strangers in The Night a close second.

Well, I beg to differ (as much as I love Blood). Of course, this is all wicked subjective and we can argue 'til we're all dead from exhaustion, but I have some alternative choices for "best":

The Who, Live at The Isle of Wight (1970)
The Who, Live at Leeds (Expanded De-Luxe mega edition, or whatever they called it)
Neil Young, Live at The Fillmore East (1970)
Otis Redding, In Person at The Whiskey-A-Go-Go (1966)
Cream, Wheels of Fire Disc 2 (Winterland/Fillmore, 1968)

There's a bunch of other live albums out there that I think are absolutely killer, but these five I think are the absolute tops among "classic rock"...Blood and Cheap Trick At Budokan are at the very top of the honorable mention list.
 
2010-08-03 04:23:03 PM  
Woopsy, I'm an idiot with the math. "Master of Puppets" will be 25 next year. Doy.
 
2010-08-03 04:23:23 PM  
"Warren Zevon deserves better than to be known as that "'Werewolves of London' guy". He wrote some great songs, people! Let's hear 'em!"

Yes, please.
 
2010-08-03 04:30:07 PM  
Henry Holland: Oh, that's right, they could do us all a favor and take your advice and die. Funny how they might not want to do that.

It's too late anyway. The deal was "live fast and die young." Being that they're not spring chickens anymore, they could do us a favor and stop making new music. They have money. They can retire.
 
2010-08-03 04:30:30 PM  
sigdiamond2000: This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.

I purchased that cassette at least 4 times (along with Let There be Rock and If You Want Blood).

I can throw on Powerage anytime I'm in a shiatty mood and BAM! Rockin!
 
2010-08-03 04:36:00 PM  
For the folks touting Peter Green's FleetwoodMac, You should check out the Best of Peter Green. Awesome.

I used to like those stations that let their DJ's play what they want simply for the oppotunity to be "turned on" to some new music. That died LONG LONG ago.

The first Boston album was an instant classic with some very solid material that obviously still holds up today. Radio overplay kills everything it touches. Hate the stations and their overlords, not the artists.
 
2010-08-03 04:38:15 PM  
Major labels don't have to push new young rock acts anymore. It's too expensive to promote a band who may or may not hit it big after recording four albums and touring for five or six years.

The major labels and Clearchannel have stacked the deck against good new music -- classic rock stations only play bands who have been established for decades, and hot-top-40 stations only push manufactured pop acts who are a license to print money. Throw in some niche marketing to the R&B and country crowd and you have the state of music today.

The best acts performing today don't get pushed by the labels or the radio stations, so they don't get hugely popular.

I think radio will improve when downloading finally kills off the major labels.

/what am I listening to today? Glad you asked. (new window)
//Why would a radio station play an old Paul Simon song that everyone has heard five hundred times when they could play this? (new window)
 
2010-08-03 04:40:39 PM  
It's not even about the same bands, it's about the same SONGS. The guy behind me has the classic rock station on and EVERY SINGLE FARKING DAY if I don't have my headphones on I can be guaranteed to hear:

Journey, "Don't Stop Believin'"
Aerosmith, "Dream On"
Steely Dan, "Reelin' In The Years"
Thin Lizzy, "The Boys Are Back In Town"
Queen, "Bohemian Rhapsody"
Eagles, "Hotel California"
Heart, "Barracuda"

Plus the guy burps like fifty times a day, seriously.

/I'll be over here listening to gothy European chick metal, thanks
 
2010-08-03 04:44:29 PM  
I remember my first transistor radio that had the FM option, and listening to my local FM station play tracks from Zep's "Physical Graffiti" in the middle of the night - and feeling spooked by it (I was young, it was when Physical Graffiti was just released, and I was unaware of most music other than the AM pablum I grew up on). It was, quite honestly, life-changing. That may be the last time I felt that way listening to a radio station.

I'd rather listen to a news channel now if I'm in the car without Sirius/XM. If in the car with the satellite radio, I like listening to Underground Garage, Classic Vinyl and Deep Cuts. They can all surprise me sometimes.
 
2010-08-03 04:46:58 PM  
Infamous Dr. X: Japancakes: I'm sincerely not trolling. I honestly don't understand the need. Can someone explain to me WHY there are still music-playing terrestrial/satellite stations in 2010?

Maybe I'm smug, too, but I agree with most of what you're saying.

There are a few reasons, though, why it's still out there. Lest I appear pedantic and lecturing, I'll summarize:

1. Access is free (or nearly so) and there's no work involved. Whether you're in your car, on foot, on the train, sitting by the pool, or at work, you can turn on your radio and have instant access to entertainment at virtually no cost (save the investment in the radio) and with no energy/work expended (in researching which albums/tracks to accumulate and put onto a mixtape or mp3 player).

2. It's still a key part of the industry marketing machine. Despite the advent of youtube, itunes, pandora, last.fm, etc., terrestrial radio is still THE premier marketplace for the industry - for free, you are able to sample a very wide variety of product, product that you'll likely go buy some of (in form of a cd or album download). The industry WANTS people to have cost- and work-free access to their product.

3. No actual statistical data for this, but I suspect that the vast majority of people WANT radio, because it makes life easier. In some small way because their choice of outlet/music source and/or fandom of genres helps them identify themselves and seek like-minded people, just like people watch certain stations on TV or follow certain shows. The same reason people choose to join random subcultures based on hobbies, fashion, or whatever. Again, because it's cost- & work-free, it's an easy and convenient way for people to get entertained and enjoy community.

Okay, that was pretty f*ing pedantic. Sorry.


Thanks very much. That's exactly what I was looking for when I posted (out of a place of "genuinely curious-ignorance").

Oh and best live rock album honors go to "Kick Out The James" by the MC5.
Best non-rock live album goes to "Live At the Apollo" by James Brown.
 
2010-08-03 04:48:34 PM  
sigdiamond2000: This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.

A great, big THIS.

AC/DC, down payment blues (new window)
 
2010-08-03 04:51:40 PM  
I could easily go my entire life without ever hearing any of the hits off of Back in Black, as well as countless other songs, thanks to classic rock radio. This is all thanks to being stuck in a sign shop listening to FM radio for 15 years. Didn't take long!

It got so bad that I will gladly listen to sports talk radio for 8 hours straight.
 
2010-08-03 04:55:28 PM  
You'd think living in one of the largest radio markets in the country would yield some variety to their rock and roll. And while I appreciate the effort to bring in some of the new young turks out there (Green Day? On MY classic rock station?! I'm sure they're just as surprised), I wholeheartedly agree that I have never, ever, ever, heard a Warren Zevon song other than "Werewolves of London."

How sick am I of 70's and 80's cheese rock, mixed with "new classics" like Nickleback? I will only listen to Oldies stations nowadays, just for the off chance that they'll play "Louie Louie" and maybe, just maybe, any of the early Who songs that isn't that kind-of-lame extended cut of "Magic Bus."

/also, I hate that U2 is played everywhere from top 40 to Alternative rock to classic rock, to lite rock. That should seal how miserably bland they are.
//I still sing along to "Magic Bus" anyway, by the way. Can't ignore those blocks!
 
2010-08-03 04:55:46 PM  
Marisyana
It's not even about the same bands, it's about the same SONGS.

Holy god this irritates me. I hear one of two Stone Temple Pilots songs every single day on the radio. I never liked them to begin with, but seriously? They released, what, two or three albums in their entire career (not a huge fan, so there may well be more)?
 
2010-08-03 04:59:40 PM  
devilskware: I could easily go my entire life without ever hearing any of the hits off of Back in Black, as well as countless other songs, thanks to classic rock radio. This is all thanks to being stuck in a sign shop listening to FM radio for 15 years. Didn't take long!

It got so bad that I will gladly listen to sports talk radio for 8 hours straight.


Dude, I'm CONVINCED this exact thing is what led to the sports talk boom. Pure backlash against rock radio overplay. I would pray for baseball season to start just for something different. At least we had awesome college radio in my area.
 
2010-08-03 05:04:13 PM  
I'm sure I'll get made fun of for this, but how can you write an entire article on classic rock without one mention of Clapton, Hendrix, or Deep Purple?
 
2010-08-03 05:10:45 PM  
PopFreshenmeyer: You'd think living in one of the largest radio markets in the country would yield some variety to their rock and roll. And while I appreciate the effort to bring in some of the new young turks out there (Green Day? On MY classic rock station?! I'm sure they're just as surprised), I wholeheartedly agree that I have never, ever, ever, heard a Warren Zevon song other than "Werewolves of London."


Really? Our local classic schlock station manages to alternate "Werewolves" with "Lawyers, Guns and Money" pretty regularly. But that's it; apparently Mr. Zevon only wrote two songs.
 
2010-08-03 05:17:47 PM  
It doesn't have to be olde to be classical!


drewogatory: devilskware: I could easily go my entire life without ever hearing any of the hits off of Back in Black, as well as countless other songs, thanks to classic rock radio. This is all thanks to being stuck in a sign shop listening to FM radio for 15 years. Didn't take long!

It got so bad that I will gladly listen to sports talk radio for 8 hours straight.

Dude, I'm CONVINCED this exact thing is what led to the sports talk boom. Pure backlash against rock radio overplay. I would pray for baseball season to start just for something different. At least we had awesome college radio in my area.


i generally listen to my CD collection while driving. i hear radio mostly in my wife's car. Even then it gets annoyingly repetitive. Corporate radio does this. It's all singles, commerials and jibber jabber.
 
2010-08-03 05:23:57 PM  
The mostly Internet-based radio station from KCDX is a commercial-free jukebox of deep-cut classic rock. Mostly familiar artists, mostly unfamiliar songs, as TFA requested.
 
2010-08-03 05:35:10 PM  
Just wanted to drop in and agree with all the intelligent AC/DC fans. Powerage is their greatest album. What's Next to the Moon is pretty much the most underrated song on their underrated album.
 
2010-08-03 05:39:38 PM  
"IRONIC"? What's the matter? The classic rock Fark wouldn't play the "Obvious" tag on this music tab?
 
2010-08-03 05:42:41 PM  
Ok, gonna have to give Powerage a try. If its as good as "let there be rock", i will win.

/Whole Lotta Rosie is the best song about farking fat chicks ever
 
2010-08-03 05:56:11 PM  
GoatCheeseNog: sigdiamond2000: This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.

A great, big THIS.

AC/DC, down payment blues (new window)


That song and "Overdose" on Let There Be Rock are my two favorite AC/DC songs.
 
2010-08-03 06:13:13 PM  
AuxRSS: The mostly Internet-based radio station from KCDX is a commercial-free jukebox of deep-cut classic rock. Mostly familiar artists, mostly unfamiliar songs, as TFA requested.


*Off for a test drive*

First up: Melanie - Brand New Key

/bookmarked
 
2010-08-03 06:14:07 PM  
From TFA: 7. Seemingly the only nod that the entire New Wave movement will get from classic rock radio is that U2 gets played every once in a while.

THIS.
 
2010-08-03 06:20:27 PM  
Sometimes one of the local rock radio stations play something long like "Innagaddadavida" all 17 mins, or PF's "echoes", all 23 minutes. hell, i'm pretty sure they played PF's "Dogs" once. that's pretty cool.

they started playing "thick as a brick" by Jethro Tull, and it surprised the crap outta me... but they only played the edit... first 3 mins....

I wish they'd play more stuff like Van Der Graaf Generator and/or Peter Hammill on the radio.

Peter Hamill : "Nadir's Big Chance"
Link (new window)
 
2010-08-03 06:40:24 PM  
What amazes me is that nobody seems to care about Joe Satriani & other instramental guitar shredders of the 80's.

The stuff is straight up ROCK!!!!
 
2010-08-03 06:54:13 PM  
PopFreshenmeyer: You'd think living in one of the largest radio markets in the country would yield some variety to their rock and roll. And while I appreciate the effort to bring in some of the new young turks out there (Green Day? On MY classic rock station?! I'm sure they're just as surprised), I wholeheartedly agree that I have never, ever, ever, heard a Warren Zevon song other than "Werewolves of London."


Really? Our local classic schlock station manages to alternate "Werewolves" with "Lawyers, Guns and Money" pretty regularly. But that's it; apparently Mr. Zevon only wrote two songs.

My local station sometimes plays, "Hula Hula Boys," but maybe that's because I live in Hawaii.
 
2010-08-03 06:57:11 PM  
The article was much better than the headline led me to believe it would be.
 
2010-08-03 07:07:07 PM  
I think they play excellent songs on classic rock radio, but they play them to death. Familiarity breeds contempt. The sad truth is though, that's what people want. If no one listened, they wouldnt play it. the NYC classic rock station has the typical Stones-Aerosmith-Clapton-Beatles-Pinkfloyd-Who etc rotation, the same songs on all the time. It's one of the top 10 stations on the air. The other, barely-adventurous rock station (some newer tunes mixed with the overplayed 90s stuff) is at the bottom of the list. So blame your fellow radio listeners.

And by the way, the Eagles were a pretty damn talented band who wrote good songs. The problem is Classic Rock stations have overplayed every farking song in their catalog for the last 35 years. I used to immediately switch the station anytime an Eagles song came on (still do when I hear Hotel Calif.) But I happened to read Don Felder's book and began listening to them again, it was almost new to me since I've been turning them off for 20 years. Damn good band, and I wonder if a band like that would even get airplay today. (Band of Horses is in somewhat of a similar vein I guess).
 
2010-08-03 07:12:28 PM  
bglove25: Ok, gonna have to give Powerage a try. If its as good as "let there be rock", i will win.

/Whole Lotta Rosie is the best song about farking fat chicks ever


Agree 100% but that's a pretty low bar, isn't it? There's Fat-Bottomed Girls by Queen and Baby Got Back by some rap mofo...what else?
 
2010-08-03 07:19:50 PM  
also:
in the same vein as my previous post,

"Birthday Special"
by Peter Hammill

Link (new window)

keep in mind, both were 1975. the beginnings of 70's british punk?
 
2010-08-03 07:30:08 PM  
Just gotta add to the Powerage love. AC/DC's best album. There is some actual lyrical content instead of the usual "I'm gonna fight, fark, and go to hell" shtick.

John Buck 41:
Agree 100% but that's a pretty low bar, isn't it? There's Fat-Bottomed Girls by Queen and Baby Got Back by some rap mofo...what else?


Don't forget the Tap.
Link (new window)
 
2010-08-03 07:30:37 PM  
Listening to the radio to find good music is like going to McDonald's to discover some interesting new cuisine.

How to find great old music:
1. Buy a used record player somewhere, like a thrift store. Make sure it works and the needle isn't too gnarled.
2. Start buying up records from the same sources (flea markets, etc). Buy anything that looks interesting. They're only like $1 each or less usually.
3. Listen to the records. Both sides entirely, a few times.
4. Repeat from #2.

If you're really hip you'll get into 8-tracks and find a whole new dimension... but that's for the truly dedicated.

/Hi Rockers!
 
2010-08-03 07:32:33 PM  
the problem? focus groups. no bullpuckey.

so much of this programming is the result of traveling to malls in middle america, swinging a check for $50 and a domino's pizza in front of a willing participant, and then providing a series of stupid one-or-the-other choices over the course of an hour.

you like pink floyd? oh yeah? would you rather hear "fearless" or "comfortably numb"?

excellent. how about steely dan? would you rather hear "botthisivah" or "peg"?

thank you. led zeppelin. which song do you like more, "stairway to heaven" or "hats off to roy harper"?

wonderful. here's a tough one. nazareth. here's "love hurts" and here's "waiting for the man". which one do you have stronger memories with?

excellent, please... enjoy some more pizza. now, here's "satisfaction", by the stones. would you rather hear that, or "torn & frayed"?


and so on. focus groups... especially when accounting for groupthink and the fact that they aren't directed at music fans... well, they ruin everything.

and take it from someone who worked in commercial radio, they were EVERYWHERE for a while. it cemented the lowest common denominator among programmers.
 
2010-08-03 07:34:03 PM  
Shame Based Man: Just gotta add to the Powerage love. AC/DC's best album. There is some actual lyrical content instead of the usual "I'm gonna fight, fark, and go to hell" shtick.

John Buck 41:
Agree 100% but that's a pretty low bar, isn't it? There's Fat-Bottomed Girls by Queen and Baby Got Back by some rap mofo...what else?

Don't forget the Tap.
Link (new window)


And let's not forget Spinal Tap doing Big Bottom live (new window)
 
2010-08-03 07:41:03 PM  
was watching that famous Woodstock documentary, and up came a band who were pretty damn awesome.

Ten Years After. I had never even heard of them... and they still perform to this day, and i grew up with classic rock, in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame city.
 
2010-08-03 07:58:02 PM  
samperkinsdog: the problem? focus groups. no bullpuckey.

so much of this programming is the result of traveling to malls in middle america, swinging a check for $50 and a domino's pizza in front of a willing participant, and then providing a series of stupid one-or-the-other choices over the course of an hour.

you like pink floyd? oh yeah? would you rather hear "fearless" or "comfortably numb"?

excellent. how about steely dan? would you rather hear "botthisivah" or "peg"?

thank you. led zeppelin. which song do you like more, "stairway to heaven" or "hats off to roy harper"?

wonderful. here's a tough one. nazareth. here's "love hurts" and here's "waiting for the man". which one do you have stronger memories with?

excellent, please... enjoy some more pizza. now, here's "satisfaction", by the stones. would you rather hear that, or "torn & frayed"?

and so on. focus groups... especially when accounting for groupthink and the fact that they aren't directed at music fans... well, they ruin everything.

and take it from someone who worked in commercial radio, they were EVERYWHERE for a while. it cemented the lowest common denominator among programmers.


I worked at a station that played hooks at bottle clubs on Saturday nights. Yes, a good part of our playlist relied on input from women hammered on Allen's Coffee Brandy and guys on cheap beer.
 
2010-08-03 07:58:47 PM  
Infamous Dr. X: Okay, that was pretty f*ing pedantic. Sorry.

Nah, nothing to apologize for, good stuff there. I know everything on FARK is supposed to be two sentences at most and full of snark, but screw that, this is the music tab and we do what we want.

I never really listened to radio when I was younger, I had a circle of friends who were music fanatics and we were very competitive about finding new stuff and introducing it to the gang. My big scores were Echo & The Bunnymen and The Smiths. Now the Internet functions like that group of friends.

Now I listen to classical music in my car and at work and sad to say, it's run on pretty much the same model as classic rock stations: the same pieces from Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart, Brahms and Tchaikovsky, over and over. There's only one classical station of any power left in Los Angeles (KUSC) so I'm kind of stuck. If they dare play something weird or atonal, it's at 3:00 am so it doesn't frighten the children.
 
2010-08-03 08:34:28 PM  
Henry Holland

Now I listen to classical music in my car and at work and sad to say, it's run on pretty much the same model as classic rock stations: the same pieces from Beethoven, Haydn, Mozart, Brahms and Tchaikovsky, over and over. There's only one classical station of any power left in Los Angeles (KUSC) so I'm kind of stuck. If they dare play something weird or atonal, it's at 3:00 am so it doesn't frighten the children.

Our local classical station KMFA is plagued by DJs who confuse movie soundtracks with classical music, and by a New Agey evening show called 'Reverie' that sets my teeth on edge. We don't get much modern fare outside of Gershwin. Very rarely something by Philip Glass. The one nice thing is that the heavy rotation is fairly deep - Corelli, Sebelius (sp?), Shostakovitch, and then the usual suspects.

/ KSTX 89.1 San Antonio FTW
 
2010-08-03 08:36:11 PM  
/ KSTX 89.1 San Antonio FTW

Woopsy.

/ KPAC 88.3 FTW
 
2010-08-03 08:36:38 PM  
kevinfra: You'd think living in one of the largest radio markets in the country would yield some variety to their rock and roll.

Just the opposite is true.

A large-market station has the most ad dollars at stake, so they won't do bupkes in NY or LA unless it tests well in Chicago and every market on down to Casper, Wyoming.

Oldies radio does the same thing classic-rock does. You will hear "Good Vibrations" a thousand times before "Kiss Me Baby" ever comes up.

/b-side of 'help me rhonda', you kids on my lawn
 
2010-08-03 08:40:50 PM  
GreenAdder: Classic rock bothers me because of the way it's caused radio and television to stagnate, and how much the members of those bands lied. Past generations gave them money so they could "live fast and die young." They lived fast, then reneged on the "die young" part.

www.keithmoon.co.uk
 
2010-08-03 08:49:07 PM  
CraicBaby: notmtwain: Exactly what classic rock is or isn't can be hard to define.

Apparently, Nirvana, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Pearl Jam are now considered classic rock, at least, according to my local classic rock station.


The Bear and K97 suck ass.
 
2010-08-03 08:59:28 PM  
I live in Los Angeles, and I say we start small. By forbidding stations to play more than one song by Tom Petty per hour.
 
2010-08-03 09:21:42 PM  
97X. Bam! The future of rock and roll.
 
2010-08-03 09:32:30 PM  
GreenAdder: 97X. Bam! The future of rock and roll.

There's no future anymore... (new window)
 
2010-08-03 09:39:18 PM  
the article was toooooooo daaaamn looooooonnnnggg!
 
2010-08-03 09:44:05 PM  
Infamous Dr. X: sigdiamond2000: Greatest live album ever recorded. Bar none.

drewogatory: Uh, just no. Live and Dangerous is with Strangers in The Night a close second.

Well, I beg to differ (as much as I love Blood). Of course, this is all wicked subjective and we can argue 'til we're all dead from exhaustion, but I have some alternative choices for "best":

The Who, Live at The Isle of Wight (1970)
The Who, Live at Leeds (Expanded De-Luxe mega edition, or whatever they called it)
Neil Young, Live at The Fillmore East (1970)
Otis Redding, In Person at The Whiskey-A-Go-Go (1966)
Cream, Wheels of Fire Disc 2 (Winterland/Fillmore, 1968)

There's a bunch of other live albums out there that I think are absolutely killer, but these five I think are the absolute tops among "classic rock"...Blood and Cheap Trick At Budokan are at the very top of the honorable mention list.


Great list, I would add "Get yer Ya-Ya's Out" and Allman's "Live at the Fillmore East".

Anyone else here have Santana "Lotus"?
 
2010-08-03 09:51:42 PM  
every classic rock band has great tunes you've never heard, with the exception of Journey, REO, Styx, Nugent , Foreigner, and Boston. freeform radio died a horrible death, but first gave birth to the most predictable, repetitive, boring format possible.
/get the Led out
//get the floyd and eagles out while you're at it
 
2010-08-03 10:06:26 PM  
dictyboy 2010-08-03 09:44:05 PM


Anyone else here have Santana "Lotus"?


*raises hand*
oooh oooh i do!

i got it for $33 for a used 3LP set [import] a few years ago.
 
2010-08-03 10:06:50 PM  
T.rex: was watching that famous Woodstock documentary, and up came a band who were pretty damn awesome.

Ten Years After. I had never even heard of them... and they still perform to this day, and i grew up with classic rock, in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame city.


I find this very amusing, considering your Fark handle.
 
2010-08-03 10:15:57 PM  
My favorite AC/DC (new window)

Sorry if it's been posted.
 
2010-08-03 10:55:32 PM  
My old Dad has a huge record collection. Lots of good old stuff: Beatles, Doors, Hendricks, Rush, Zappa, Jethro Tull, Black Sabbath... He often talks about buying new records (for less than $7.00 I might add) taking his treasure home, putting on the headphones on and listening to the entire album while reading the liner notes. Sounds like fun to me.

I, on the other hand, have literally never paid for music in my entire life. I really can't come to terms with the idea of paying 20+ dollars for a CD that I know for a fact will be unplayable even after a few years of normal use. There are no lyrics to read, because there are no liner notes, the cover art will be cheap (most likely a lame photograph) and the music usually is, generally speaking, very shallow, trashy, and much like all the other music that I've already been exposed too very repeatedly.

If music is dying it's because the RIAA is killing it.

/2c
//getting off lawn
 
2010-08-03 11:08:31 PM  
Summer Glau's Love Slave: My old Dad has a huge record collection. Lots of good old stuff: Beatles, Doors, Hendricks...

i like you, and wish you the best. but it's "hendrix".
 
2010-08-03 11:19:26 PM  
sigdiamond2000: TheLopper: I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio.



This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.


I have heard some of the originals but I loves me some Mark Kozelek covers from that album. What do hardcore AC/DC fans think of them? I don't know if it's the context of Kozelek's arrangements but the lyrics are beautiful.

Up to my Neck in You
Riff Raff
What's Next to the moon
 
2010-08-03 11:31:31 PM  
I haven't listened to the radio in many many years. I always bring a stack of CDs in the car (including a few of my own mixes) and that's all I listen to. That's why I can still happily listen to those "classic rock" bands - I only hear them when I want to hear them and when I do I listen to the entire album as the band wanted me to listen to it.

/The Allman Brothers Band at Fillmore East is a great live album
//and yes, The Eagles do indeed suck
 
2010-08-03 11:39:06 PM  
FWIW I found a bunch of classic Roxy Music MP3 downloads dirt cheap at Amazon. I find the early 70's British glam and alternative scene to still be ahead of its time. Or maybe I'm just extremely slow catching up.
 
2010-08-03 11:57:09 PM  
"Pat Travers (for example) has MUCH better songs than "Boom Boom out go the lights"."

"I Tried to Believe" and "Getting Better" come to mind.
/there are more.
 
2010-08-03 11:58:46 PM  
KwameKilstrawberry
I'm listening to Stevie Ray Vaughan's Riviera Paradise, so I'm getting a kick...


Huge fan of SRV. Unfortunately, according to any classic rock station, the only song he has ever been known to play is "Crossfire."

And if I hear One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer one more time....
 
2010-08-04 12:07:08 AM  
Kurmudgeon: "I Tried to Believe" and "Getting Better" come to mind.

That would be Gettin' Betta.

/I also like his live album Go For What You Know
//and his version of Born Under A Bad Sign on Crash and Burn
 
2010-08-04 12:40:13 AM  
Most rock songs DID suck. You only listened to them because your opinion was biased by the one or two decent songs of that band.
 
2010-08-04 12:44:46 AM  
Summer Glau's Love Slave: I, on the other hand, have literally never paid for music in my entire life. I really can't come to terms with the idea of paying 20+ dollars for a CD that I know for a fact will be unplayable even after a few years of normal use. There are no lyrics to read, because there are no liner notes, the cover art will be cheap (most likely a lame photograph) and the music usually is, generally speaking, very shallow, trashy, and much like all the other music that I've already been exposed too very repeatedly.

Most CDs don't cost anywhere near $20, most do have liner notes, and I've got CDs that are 20 years old that still play fine, and if the music you listen to is shallow and trashy, that's YOUR fault, and you should make the effort to find better music, which IS out there. Why not just be honest and admit you just don't want to pay for it?

I download music illegally too, but I'm honest about why. It's not some grand struggle against the evil RIAA. I just want free shiat.
 
2010-08-04 01:09:54 AM  
deathon2legs: PopFreshenmeyer: You'd think living in one of the largest radio markets in the country would yield some variety to their rock and roll. And while I appreciate the effort to bring in some of the new young turks out there (Green Day? On MY classic rock station?! I'm sure they're just as surprised), I wholeheartedly agree that I have never, ever, ever, heard a Warren Zevon song other than "Werewolves of London."


Really? Our local classic schlock station manages to alternate "Werewolves" with "Lawyers, Guns and Money" pretty regularly. But that's it; apparently Mr. Zevon only wrote two songs.


I went to find a clip of it. This is the first time I have heard this song.
 
2010-08-04 01:30:18 AM  
I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that there is a large number of people, the majority of whom have never visited the Fark music tab, who just want to hear music that is familiar to them. Can't really sing along if you don't know the words. And they can't be bothered to seek out anything new on their own, too many other things they'd rather do with their lives. So they listen to what radio gives them. Radio (terrestrial, for the most part), not willing to risk losing that audience, gives them what they know people like: the proven hits.

I have no taste for commercial radio, but I do like to hear new things. Luckily, there are many other options these days.
 
2010-08-04 01:38:25 AM  
You know, Heart really rocked it back then. I love all of their classic stuff. Their pre MTV stuff. I also really love Stevie Nicks.

I really need to pick up both group's greatest hits.

As for AC/DC, omg they suck and need to disappear. I can't stand them at all. All of their stuff sounds like the same song over and over. Ug.
 
2010-08-04 01:41:03 AM  
I'm almost not sure where to start here... too much ignoranceschpanky: I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that there is a large number of people, the majority of whom have never visited the Fark music tab, who just want to hear music that is familiar to them. Can't really sing along if you don't know the words. And they can't be bothered to seek out anything new on their own, too many other things they'd rather do with their lives. So they listen to what radio gives them. Radio (terrestrial, for the most part), not willing to risk losing that audience, gives them what they know people like: the proven hits.

I have no taste for commercial radio, but I do like to hear new things. Luckily, there are many other options these days.


^That. Visit the Music tab often these days. Still, I gotta complain about the serious lack of articles or mention there on the single greatest live touring act, Tool. What the hell
 
2010-08-04 01:46:42 AM  
What's needed is classic "b-side" programming.
 
2010-08-04 01:58:07 AM  
samperkinsdog: Summer Glau's Love Slave: My old Dad has a huge record collection. Lots of good old stuff: Beatles, Doors, Hendricks...

i like you, and wish you the best. but it's "hendrix".


D'oh!

I'm 17 (derp) I don't know better. Thanks for the update.

/I don't download illegally, btw..
//too afraid of being sued
 
2010-08-04 03:59:12 AM  
schpanky: I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that there is a large number of people, the majority of whom have never visited the Fark music tab, who just want to hear music that is familiar to them. Can't really sing along if you don't know the words. And they can't be bothered to seek out anything new on their own, too many other things they'd rather do with their lives. So they listen to what radio gives them. Radio (terrestrial, for the most part), not willing to risk losing that audience, gives them what they know people like: the proven hits.

I have no taste for commercial radio, but I do like to hear new things. Luckily, there are many other options these days.


I spend a good amount of time specifically hunting down new music and I still like knowing that LA's famous classic rock station KLOS 95.5 is on the dial and when I want it, I'll get exactly what I expect. AOR radio is the comfort food of music for me.
 
2010-08-04 04:14:13 AM  
Summer Glau's Love Slave: My old Dad has a huge record collection. Lots of good old stuff: Beatles, Doors, Hendricks, Rush, Zappa, Jethro Tull, Black Sabbath...

Good for you for checking out some great old music. My kids have done the same with my albums.

If he has Hendrix's Rainbow Bridge album, Pali Gap is a great tune and the version of Hear My Train A Comin' on there completely rocks. And check out Midnight on War Heroes.
 
2010-08-04 04:31:16 AM  
Allman Brothers live at Fillmore East. A "close" 2nd would be quite a distance away...
That is all
 
2010-08-04 06:13:06 AM  
Just want the conversation to get back to how POWERAGE is one of the best albums ever. Great alone or for a party. 2 sense.
 
2010-08-04 06:57:26 AM  
ftroop:

And if I hear One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer one more time....


How about the original recorded (and actually, y'know, GOOD) version? (^)
 
2010-08-04 07:20:33 AM  
Tyler823: From TFA: 7. Seemingly the only nod that the entire New Wave movement will get from classic rock radio is that U2 gets played every once in a while.

THIS.


Back in the day, Toronto had Q-107 (Rock) and CFNY (Alternative), they still exist, but have no idea what the vibe is anymore. Anywhos, a DJ (methinks it was Andy Frost) has the idea to play How Soon Is Now on a scheduled Psychedelic segment. My jaw dropped. Apart from play on CFNY and every frickin alternative/alternative wanabe club, nobody played it. Way cool.

I'm back to DJing again (small bar, keep's me sane) and this cross-segmenation has always appealed to me. You can't ignore the contribution of other genres and/or past generations as influences in other genres/generations. I suppose you could, but then you'd be a right turd. This relates to classic rock as a genre; it's a misnomer at best, a cop-out at worst. Rock has been around since the early 50s. It's still going on, although a little watered down in terms of sheer talent and production values. What defines classic rock to me are the following:

a) Instant recocgnition
b) Rock pedigree (either by artist or influence, see the Smiths reference above)
c) Sustainability

Rock and Classic Rock stations have all too sadly gone the road of every other terrestrial station: too tight a rotation, not enough variation in the library. Can you imagine if you were a classical music buff having to listen to Four Seasons by Vivaldi every two hours followed by Mozart's Requiem Mass in D Minor? Think you'd put up with that? Hell's no. Why do we put with it for other genres?

What's the fix? Stop listening to commercial radio. Urge others to stop listening to commercial radio. Make commercial radio stations understand your intentions. Get out to clubs/bars more often and chat with the DJs (those that still have them). They are for the most part affable and responsive, given they have a free ear. Teach the youngun's about music, not just your must haves, but stuff that influenced other stuff.

Mini-mega rant off. Coming up...Stairway to Heaven by caller request.
 
2010-08-04 07:23:34 AM  
sigdiamond2000: TheLopper: I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio.



This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.


i662.photobucket.com

Word.
 
2010-08-04 08:13:41 AM  
Thudfark: Why do we put with it for other genres?

Because people use the stations differently. They have the rock station on for maybe a half hour in the morning and a half hour on the way home, and maybe on in the background at work. For ever four times your local top-40 station plays a Katy Perry song, the people at work don't hear three of them - so they still think it's fresh.

Not a lot of classical radio listeners listen that way, and not a lot of pop-music fans listen to the radio the way a classical listener would. Next time something like "No Reply At All" comes on the radio at work, see if any of your co-workers demands utter silence to appreciate Mike Rutherford's bass line.

People who are casual music fans often never get sick of the same familiar songs. They carry a few hundred around in their brains, whereas people like me or you carry tens of thousands - and nobody has yet found a way to broaden their tastes, especially when they'd just as soon be watching Oprah or porn.
 
2010-08-04 08:37:49 AM  
Gulper Eel: Thudfark: Why do we put with it for other genres?

Because people use the stations differently. They have the rock station on for maybe a half hour in the morning and a half hour on the way home, and maybe on in the background at work. For ever four times your local top-40 station plays a Katy Perry song, the people at work don't hear three of them - so they still think it's fresh.

Not a lot of classical radio listeners listen that way, and not a lot of pop-music fans listen to the radio the way a classical listener would. Next time something like "No Reply At All" comes on the radio at work, see if any of your co-workers demands utter silence to appreciate Mike Rutherford's bass line.

People who are casual music fans often never get sick of the same familiar songs. They carry a few hundred around in their brains, whereas people like me or you carry tens of thousands - and nobody has yet found a way to broaden their tastes, especially when they'd just as soon be watching Oprah or porn.


I can get down with what you're saying. Fortunately, for me anyway, when I did work in an office I had the headphones on. One cubicle farm I was in had PC destruction next to us. They seemed to like thrash metal, fark that was annoying.

Back to the low-brainers and their unfortunate listening habits. I can see the format for pop top 40 being the way it is because the listener is likely to have the attention span of a brain dead mole and the musical taste of a freshly swatted gnat. What does irk me is that rock stations seem to have tightened their rotations to whatever greatest rock hits cd the programming department's uncle just bought.

When I used to listen to radio, they played a lot of stuff, even drive time was not overly repetitive. If we stick to rock as a format, you do not have to be overly creative to field a rotation that is at once recognizable yet not played to death. You could play one known song from each month that rock has been around for and not get a repeated song for about 200 years. Maybe I exagerate a tad, but you get the point. This is what I used to love about radio. You heard stuff that you didn't know existed on a fairly consistent basis, and that is my main philosophy when I DJ. I introduce people to new stuff or stuff they'd forgotten about, while also managing to play "hits". Why is this concept so difficult to grasp?
 
2010-08-04 09:10:06 AM  
Summer Glau's Love Slave: There are no lyrics to read, because there are no liner notes,

How are those liner notes on the pirated downloads workin' out for you?

I've purchased many LPs back in the day that had squat for liner notes, and I have purchased many CDs with tons of notes (booklet so thick, it didn't easily fit back in the case) so you can't blame the format. Elvis Costello's rereleases of his earlier albums had copious notes from EC himself.

But you just keep clinging to your feeble justifications for pirating...
 
2010-08-04 09:15:09 AM  
Time to shill for a couple of websites:

http://www.escforum.net -- there's music contests galore, plus discussion of pop music's greatest moment -- Eurovision.
http://www.radioyeye.com -- I got sick of tired of having heard all the oldies songs already. So I hear about 60% original stuff and 40% stuff covered by French or Quebecois artists.

:)
 
2010-08-04 09:22:45 AM  
Thudfark: Gulper Eel: Thudfark: Why do we put with it for other genres?

Because people use the stations differently. They have the rock station on for maybe a half hour in the morning and a half hour on the way home, and maybe on in the background at work. For ever four times your local top-40 station plays a Katy Perry song, the people at work don't hear three of them - so they still think it's fresh.

Not a lot of classical radio listeners listen that way, and not a lot of pop-music fans listen to the radio the way a classical listener would. Next time something like "No Reply At All" comes on the radio at work, see if any of your co-workers demands utter silence to appreciate Mike Rutherford's bass line.

People who are casual music fans often never get sick of the same familiar songs. They carry a few hundred around in their brains, whereas people like me or you carry tens of thousands - and nobody has yet found a way to broaden their tastes, especially when they'd just as soon be watching Oprah or porn.

I can get down with what you're saying. Fortunately, for me anyway, when I did work in an office I had the headphones on. One cubicle farm I was in had PC destruction next to us. They seemed to like thrash metal, fark that was annoying.

Back to the low-brainers and their unfortunate listening habits. I can see the format for pop top 40 being the way it is because the listener is likely to have the attention span of a brain dead mole and the musical taste of a freshly swatted gnat. What does irk me is that rock stations seem to have tightened their rotations to whatever greatest rock hits cd the programming department's uncle just bought.

When I used to listen to radio, they played a lot of stuff, even drive time was not overly repetitive. If we stick to rock as a format, you do not have to be overly creative to field a rotation that is at once recognizable yet not played to death. You could play one known song from each month that rock has been around for and not get a repeated song for about 200 years. Maybe I exagerate a tad, but you get the point. This is what I used to love about radio. You heard stuff that you didn't know existed on a fairly consistent basis, and that is my main philosophy when I DJ. I introduce people to new stuff or stuff they'd forgotten about, while also managing to play "hits". Why is this concept so difficult to grasp?


What saddens me most about commercial terrestrial radio is that that used to be the way. I've been among the living long enough to experience (and lament the passing of) this bizarre concept called "free-form FM". This was actualized by the DJs actually playing pretty damn much whatever music popped into their brains without limit or (apparently) much oversight from anybody in a position of authority over them. When I was a teen I recalled being exposed to prog-rock, hard rock, Classic Rock (and not the same 3 songs per artist that became the norm later on), some afro-beat, roots-rock, 50s-60s garage rock, nascent punk-rock (or: proto-punk as it is known known [new york dolls, stooges, mc5,etc.], some country (Cash, Waylon, Bob Wills, Patsy, Loretta, Merle etc.), a dollop of jazz, some early punk-rock (Damned, Ramones, Clash [first album Clash], Siouxsie, Sex Pistols, Talking Heads, Costello, etc), a triple handful of soul/r&b/blues records along with the hits all on the same dial.

Somewhere along the way (if memory serves somewhere around 81-82) it all went to Straight to Hell and never returned. Everything became obscenely fragmented and regimented and playlist-dominated and hits-only dominated. The fun and variety and spontaneity of free-form was gone and so was the majority of my interest.

I pretty much tuned radio out but to check the progress (status?) of the decline during the eighties and early nineties and gave up the ghost for good when I got my first car with a CD player (95ish).
 
2010-08-04 09:31:48 AM  
I'm listening a lot to Tanya Donnelly's beauty Sleep CD these days. She was basically the mind behind Belly. Hey I like it, I don't care what anybody else thinks.

I like all music. I never stopped listening. My tastes are more King Crimson (Bruffod, Wetton era) when we are talking the 70's.

There's plenty good out there....just have to work at finding it.
 
2010-08-04 09:33:52 AM  
www.drugmusic.com
best Internet show.
 
2010-08-04 09:38:29 AM  
Uzzah: Hender: Everyone knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact.

And yet 1974 is also the year of the first "Bad Company" release.

You see, poor live performances by the likes of Chuck Berry and even Jerry Lee Lewis are destroying the music they allege to celebrate. And tests show that a Beach Boys concert is a very sad thing. This, coupled with the growing interest in ethnic music has undermined the support base of the music you and your friends love.

/looks forward to the dominance of jazz


I'll never get drunk on just one beer.
 
2010-08-04 10:09:27 AM  
Radio playing hits-only is what annoys me the most about it. Hell, even in the 90s, the radio was playing Nirvana and Pearl Jam b-sides and album-only tracks. That doesn't happen at all anymore. That coupled with the browbeating over anyone into underground music gets brow-beaten into trying to be music snobs when it's really just trying to escape from the same damn 3 songs.

I also think a lot of the flack classic rock gets is that a lot of its most adamant supporters either full embrace listening to the same damn 3 songs by one band (seriously, Led Zeppelin is probably the only classic rock bands that gets anything other than two or three big hits played) and/or talk shiat about any band post-1974. I like classic rock, but I find anyone who listens solely to classic rock to be extremely closed-minded and rather dull. Yes, radio from the 1970s, even when playing the Fallout Boys and Nickelbacks of their day, still did play Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, etc. and that's more than we can say about radio now, but Mainstream Radio != the entirety of modern music. Any modern act that survives the test of time is not playing on the radio right now.

That said, I honestly don't give a shiat about radio. It's a format for those who can't form their own taste. It had it's place when the only alternative was buying a random LP without the ability to preview it beforehand.
 
2010-08-04 10:45:19 AM  
I would complain about radio stations in my area but thanks to the wonders of technology I have a ton of options. I have a CD player in my car, an iPod hook-up, and about 8 radio stations that play music I enjoy. The classic stations in the area play some great tunes (even the Clear Channel owned ones) plus Alice Cooper's night program comes on with some deeply buried tracks. However, if I start to tire of the songs being played over and over again I can always turn on the 30 days worth of music on my iPod... Isn't technology wonderful?


Also, Powerage was classic but, High Voltage will always be AC/DCs best album (IMHO).
 
2010-08-04 11:31:15 AM  
FeedTheCollapse: I like classic rock, but I find anyone who listens solely to classic rock to be extremely closed-minded and rather dull. Yes, radio from the 1970s, even when playing the Fallout Boys and Nickelbacks of their day, still did play Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, etc. and that's more than we can say about radio now, but Mainstream Radio != the entirety of modern music. Any modern act that survives the test of time is not playing on the radio right now.

That said, I honestly don't give a shiat about radio. It's a format for those who can't form their own taste. It had it's place when the only alternative was buying a random LP without the ability to preview it beforehand.


Funny, I find people who make character judgments based on musical tastes to be pretentious douchebags.
 
2010-08-04 11:47:50 AM  
quizybuck: Funny, I find people who make character judgments based on musical tastes to be pretentious douchebags.

and you sound like you probably have boring taste in music. Welcome to the Music tab...
 
2010-08-04 12:19:57 PM  
JDJD: www.drugmusic.com
best Internet show.


I dunno about "best" but it is steady dose of very good.
 
2010-08-04 12:20:25 PM  
FeedTheCollapse: quizybuck: Funny, I find people who make character judgments based on musical tastes to be pretentious douchebags.

and you sound like you probably have boring taste in music. Welcome to the Music tab...


Good God man, calling my taste in music boring? I must fetch the dueling pistols. I demand satisfaction!

I listen to music that is interesting to me. I really don't care if its objectively meaningful or impresses people like you. How this makes me closed minded, dull, or unable to form my taste I'll never know, but I should probably defer to those with more experience in musical preening.
 
2010-08-04 12:23:14 PM  
Like all radio stations, classic or otherwise, they program for the masses, the widest net.
And unfortunately for the minority who appreciate musical variety, the masses still like hearing the same songs over and over.
 
2010-08-04 12:25:22 PM  
quizybuck: I listen to music that is interesting to me. I really don't care if its objectively meaningful or impresses people like you. How this makes me closed minded, dull, or unable to form my taste I'll never know, but I should probably defer to those with more experience in musical preening.

I've been playing music for 30 years now. FeedTheCollapse's comment makes zero sense.

None. Zip sqaut diddly.
 
2010-08-04 12:55:12 PM  
I was never a Fleetwood Mac fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.
 
2010-08-04 12:58:22 PM  
sigdiamond2000: TheLopper: I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio.



This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.


Oh hells yes.
 
2010-08-04 01:03:50 PM  
For (necessary?) clarity's sake that sentence in my last post should have concluded "...all on the same point on the radio dial."


But yeah, back then as an adventurous listener of music it was terrifically exciting to not know either what the next song was going to be or what the next genre was going to be. I was exposed to a lot of really great stuff by radio during the 1970s that I've never known to be aired again post-1982.

Damn you radio consultants and focus groups for permanently f*cking up a wonderful deal. Damn you.

"Coming up we have the 2,500,000,000th airing of "Hotel California" this week. Followed by the 3,000,000,000th airing of "Money".

/like "Money"
//don't like it enough to want to hear it over and over at the expense of some other song that has never had airtime and is just as good.
 
2010-08-04 01:15:55 PM  
I totally lost interest in reading that article.
 
2010-08-04 01:36:08 PM  
It might be hard for younger music fans to imagine, but there was once a time before MP3s, before iPods, before online streaming, when you were at the mercy of whatever radio signals reached your area.

thomas edison invented the phonograph in 1877. maybe this guy should have gone to a record store.

/he probably would have had to walk both ways uphill in the snow to get there
 
2010-08-04 01:38:36 PM  
and if he was talking about during the MTV era, he could have gotten a walkman and listened to whatever cassette tapes he wanted.

whiney ass.
 
2010-08-04 01:44:45 PM  
Truth of the matter is radio companies have given up on those that have drifted to satellite and MP3 players. The number of people that listen to satellite radio is still a very tiny percentage of the American population. Classic rock's target demo is men 25-54... most of whom work blue-collar jobs for decent pay and have families, homes, and money to spend. Countless research on these types have shown that these people know what they like, everything else, they don't wanna know about it. More often than not, it's the same old meathead tracks that music aficionados can't stand.

Anytime any of these stations have a "battle of the bands" promo, Lynyrd Skynyrd always beats The Who, AC/DC always beats The Allman Brothers Band, and good luck even hearing The Moody Blues, Jethro Tull or Emerson Lake and Palmer anymore.

Blame your high-school educated, Budweiser drinking, Ford-truck driving, NASCAR-watching neigbhor that somehow has a nicer house than you for all this. Classic rock radio panders to That Guy.
 
2010-08-04 01:56:39 PM  
dereksmalls: every classic rock band has great tunes you've never heard, with the exception of Journey, REO, Styx, Nugent , Foreigner, and Boston. freeform radio died a horrible death, but first gave birth to the most predictable, repetitive, boring format possible.
/get the Led out
//get the floyd and eagles out while you're at it


userserve-ak.last.fm
www.metalkingdom.net

Two Journey albums that actually kick ass. Pre-Steve Perry.
 
2010-08-04 02:17:44 PM  
LL Bean J: dereksmalls: every classic rock band has great tunes you've never heard, with the exception of Journey, REO, Styx, Nugent , Foreigner, and Boston. freeform radio died a horrible death, but first gave birth to the most predictable, repetitive, boring format possible.
/get the Led out
//get the floyd and eagles out while you're at it

Two Journey albums that actually kick ass. Pre-Steve Perry.



Reo's live album is far from terrible,Nugent's first solo album (with Derek St Holmes singing) was pretty damn good, and the first Boston album,despite death by overplay, was a game changer in DIY home recording,that album was recorded in a farking basement with homemade gear.
 
2010-08-04 02:34:28 PM  
drewogatory: and the first Boston album,despite death by overplay, was a game changer in DIY home recording,that album was recorded in a farking basement with homemade gear.

Ah, the good old days where they had to come out and say they DIDN'T "use computers". I
 
2010-08-04 03:19:53 PM  
You know, the other day a spooky, sparse, atmospheric track came on at the gym that made me go, "Whoa, how come they're playing weird shiat on regional pop/rock radio? Did Pitchfork guerrillas invade the studio?"

I stopped to listen a little more closely, and hey, it was Led Zeppelin's "Dazed and Confused". Didn't recognize it out of context. Never heard it on the radio before. And by the standards of today's mainstream radio/chart rock, it really is way, way out there.
 
2010-08-04 04:01:19 PM  
I'm just here to publicly declare my love for BREAD.

www.bbc.co.uk


I'm a hardcore Skinny Puppy fanatic, but I have an abiding love of all my soft rock favorites, and I'm not ashamed to admit it.

/Your diary
//I found it underneath a tree
 
2010-08-04 05:27:41 PM  
CraicBaby: notmtwain: Exactly what classic rock is or isn't can be hard to define.

Apparently, Nirvana, Red Hot Chili Peppers and Pearl Jam are now considered classic rock, at least, according to my local classic rock station.


"classic" is often defined as 20 years, like with cars. So yes, those bands are now into their 'classic' period.
 
2010-08-04 05:43:34 PM  
LL Bean J: Two Journey albums that actually kick ass. Pre-Steve Perry.


They were sort of like Santana's proggy little brother. Gregg Rolie had such a great voice. I saw them live in that era (as a 4-piece w/no rhythm guitarist), which only made me hate Steve Perry and that version of the band that much more in later years. It was a horrible disappointment to hear what they turned into.
 
2010-08-04 05:48:18 PM  
A friend of mine and I always talk about wanting to start a free-form radio station in our area. Since his and my musical taste completely kick ass, I feel it could only turn out to be a smashing success. Here is my question to all of those experienced in radio broadcasting here. What would be the thing that would be a business model killer? What does it take from a knowledge base to get started? What is the minimum capital needed to start? Etc...

This may sound niave but our main motivation behind the idea is that we farking love music. Love. It. Modern day radio, when forced to listen to it, kills my will to live. Especially Classic Rock radio. I love Classic Rock but it just seems to me that what radio stations are doing goes completely against what the original point of that music. So much of the music put out by artists considered to be in the Classic Rock genre put out albums with a concept that is only complete with listening to the entire album. Why only play two or three songs from the massive and genius bodies of work by the likes of Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones (especially the run of LPs w/ Mick Taylor)...I could go on. But the glaring omission in my opinion is this; where the fark are the tunes from the major influences like say...the Velvet Underground?? How about The Stooges or the MC5? There is so much good music in our past that even folks that grew up in that time never heard before. Am I just dreaming? Is there really not a market for this format? I personally can't believe that, so if anyone has any advice on how to get started, let me know. FYI, my background is primarily IT related. I'm a data network engineer (Cisco routers/switches is my strength)
 
2010-08-04 06:04:52 PM  
Check with the FCC. I'm pretty sure they approved "micro power" stations a few years ago.
 
2010-08-04 06:10:05 PM  
Cortez the Killer: A friend of mine and I always talk about wanting to start a free-form radio station in our area. Since his and my musical taste completely kick ass, I feel it could only turn out to be a smashing success. Here is my question to all of those experienced in radio broadcasting here. What would be the thing that would be a business model killer? What does it take from a knowledge base to get started? What is the minimum capital needed to start? Etc...

This may sound niave but our main motivation behind the idea is that we farking love music. Love. It. Modern day radio, when forced to listen to it, kills my will to live. Especially Classic Rock radio. I love Classic Rock but it just seems to me that what radio stations are doing goes completely against what the original point of that music. So much of the music put out by artists considered to be in the Classic Rock genre put out albums with a concept that is only complete with listening to the entire album. Why only play two or three songs from the massive and genius bodies of work by the likes of Led Zeppelin, The Rolling Stones (especially the run of LPs w/ Mick Taylor)...I could go on. But the glaring omission in my opinion is this; where the fark are the tunes from the major influences like say...the Velvet Underground?? How about The Stooges or the MC5? There is so much good music in our past that even folks that grew up in that time never heard before. Am I just dreaming? Is there really not a market for this format? I personally can't believe that, so if anyone has any advice on how to get started, let me know. FYI, my background is primarily IT related. I'm a data network engineer (Cisco routers/switches is my strength)


DO you speak Spanish? Know a lot of Spanish music???

The only radio that does well anymore is Spanish stations.

Seriously, radio is in the dump right now. Hell, a lot of major cities dot even have standard rock stations anymore, let alone anything experimental.
 
2010-08-04 06:28:07 PM  
drewogatory: and the first Boston album,despite death by overplay, was a game changer in DIY home recording,that album was recorded in a farking basement with homemade gear.

ARE YOU SERIOUS?!!?!?! THAT'S f***ING AWESOME!


/didn't know that
 
2010-08-04 08:06:36 PM  
Cortez the Killer: But the glaring omission in my opinion is this; where the fark are the tunes from the major influences like say...the Velvet Underground?? How about The Stooges or the MC5? There is so much good music in our past that even folks that grew up in that time never heard before. Am I just dreaming? Is there really not a market for this format? I personally can't believe that, so if anyone has any advice on how to get started, let me know. FYI, my background is primarily IT related. I'm a data network engineer (Cisco routers/switches is my strength)

The reason why you don't hear the VU, Stooges, MC5, and their ilk on classic rock stations is that in they weren't that popular in terms of sales and radio airplay when their records originally came out. For years, you generally only heard those groups played on college radio stations. AOR stations (the forerunner of classic rock stations) would either ignore them or only play them at 3 a.m. on Monday morning.

As for trying to start a free-form radio station now, your best option would be an internet-only one.
 
2010-08-04 08:16:52 PM  
just a quick thought: community radio.

there seems to be one in nearly every major city (here in seattle, we have KSER in everett, KBCS in bellevue and of course, the mighty KEXP), and volunteering and contributing not only make you feel better about a valuable medium, but you yourself can change the direction of how you want programming to be. also, you'll meet a bunch of other music lovers like yourself, and you can trade ideas and suggestions, and teach and learn and grow. it's beautiful, man.

non locally-owned radio is awful, just like non-locally owned restaurants are generally awful. why support a texas based mega-media conglomerate selling you radio, billboards and concert events when you could be supporting your local pals?
 
2010-08-04 08:27:19 PM  
Cortez the Killer: A friend of mine and I always talk about wanting to start a free-form radio station in our area. Since his and my musical taste completely kick ass, I feel it could only turn out to be a smashing success. Here is my question to all of those experienced in radio broadcasting here. What would be the thing that would be a business model killer? What does it take from a knowledge base to get started? What is the minimum capital needed to start? Etc...

Make it LOCAL. Local music, local news, local businesses. Shake the hands, kiss the babies, show up at Little League games, school board meetings, plays, restaurants, you name it.

The music alone isn't going to carry it - but when you do play the music, give people the title and artist. Not everybody is as cool as you, but they would like to be and it doesn't help them to be indier-than-thou as if all the cool kids already know the song so you don't need to mention it to the unwashed sheeple.

There's always somebody out there who's hearing Led Zeppelin for the first time, y'know?

I leave the other multimedia stuff to people who are better at it, but this much I know - you'll want to have lots of unique material on the station website that's not on the air.
 
2010-08-04 10:18:02 PM  
Gulper Eel: Cortez the Killer: A friend of mine and I always talk about wanting to start a free-form radio station in our area. Since his and my musical taste completely kick ass, I feel it could only turn out to be a smashing success. Here is my question to all of those experienced in radio broadcasting here. What would be the thing that would be a business model killer? What does it take from a knowledge base to get started? What is the minimum capital needed to start? Etc...

Make it LOCAL. Local music, local news, local businesses. Shake the hands, kiss the babies, show up at Little League games, school board meetings, plays, restaurants, you name it.

The music alone isn't going to carry it - but when you do play the music, give people the title and artist. Not everybody is as cool as you, but they would like to be and it doesn't help them to be indier-than-thou as if all the cool kids already know the song so you don't need to mention it to the unwashed sheeple.

There's always somebody out there who's hearing Led Zeppelin for the first time, y'know?

I leave the other multimedia stuff to people who are better at it, but this much I know - you'll want to have lots of unique material on the station website that's not on the air.


Thanks all so far for your responses and opinions. This post struck the closest to home as to what I would envision, so I'll respond to it.

Yes, I absolutely want it to be local..and keep it local. I want to bring a value to the community so I see that local information pertainent to the listeners as a co-priority. That not only provides a community service, but is smart business (for this vision anyway). I don't want to strike it rich off of it, although a comfortable living isn't out of the question, i'm hoping.

As for the music, your point also resonates with what I'm thinking. The want to be a eye-opener, so to speak. I want to bring not only the music, but a little bit of the story behind it; put it into some context. I think that a big reason that people don't understand certain music is that they don't understand the state of mind the artist was in when they wrote it. Not that I want to ramble on, just throw some tidbits out there that are interesting and relevent to the music being played. At a minimum, let them know the artist, song name, and album for every song played.

I do remember the first time I've heard Zeppelin (kind of young; we had a 45 of Misty Mnt Hop bought at a garage sale). I also remember the first time LZ blew me away. I want people to feel the same way I did. I'm also smart enough to know that playing some track off of "Pet Sounds" will never do anything for me personally, but to some listener out there, it might be like "Holy shiat!! I've never heard music like that!!" I guess I want to get away from the science of "least common denominator" polls and use more of a critical concensus as my guide.

I've got other ideas I would like to express on this to get opinions, but I just worked 15 hours at my crappy job and my beer buzz is getting good. I'll check back later, but thanks again so far.
 
2010-08-05 04:53:31 AM  
I have news for you: If you live in an area like mine and have only 1 rock and 1 classic rock station, you will immediately notice that both have the same problem. While the rock station isn't playing some of the best music made, it is playing the same songs over and over. Hence the reason I listen to my cds 99% of the time.

It's certainly not a musical wasteland out there, but the fact is programming managers have no idea what it is they are doing.

Classic rock: "Let's play the same two Lynard Skynard songs at least 6 times in the next 12 hours! BRILLIANT!"

Rock: "Let's play Jane's Addiction's "Been Caught Stealing" every hour! BRILLIANT!"

And all that 'Two For Tuesday,' 'Mandatory Metallica' crap needs to DIIIIIEEEEEE
 
2010-08-05 02:50:52 PM  
Third_Uncle_Eno: drewogatory: and the first Boston album,despite death by overplay, was a game changer in DIY home recording,that album was recorded in a farking basement with homemade gear.

ARE YOU SERIOUS?!!?!?! THAT'S f***ING AWESOME!


Home made as in commercial gear extensively customized and optimized by an MIT PhDEE (one T.Scholz - the lead guitarist and most anal retentive man in rock and roll).

/ 3M announced they were going to stop making his favorite recording tape, so he bought every foot of it he could lay his hands on.
 
2010-08-06 11:41:01 AM  
listening to only classic rock for a month is ridiculously easy. Hell, I did that with the Beatles and Led Zeppelin, each, without even using their entire respective catalogs.
 
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