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(Pop Matters)   Maybe classic rock's most bothersome aspect is that it traffics in arguably one of the most fertile creative periods in rock history, but leaves the impression that most bands never wrote more than three or four songs   (popmatters.com) divider line 163
    More: Ironic, classic rock, musical group, Alison Krauss, Animal Collective, Bob Seger, dreck, Robert Plant, The Wall  
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2638 clicks; posted to Ironic on 03 Aug 2010 at 3:25 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-08-03 11:08:31 PM
Summer Glau's Love Slave: My old Dad has a huge record collection. Lots of good old stuff: Beatles, Doors, Hendricks...

i like you, and wish you the best. but it's "hendrix".
 
2010-08-03 11:19:26 PM
sigdiamond2000: TheLopper: I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio.



This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.


I have heard some of the originals but I loves me some Mark Kozelek covers from that album. What do hardcore AC/DC fans think of them? I don't know if it's the context of Kozelek's arrangements but the lyrics are beautiful.

Up to my Neck in You
Riff Raff
What's Next to the moon
 
2010-08-03 11:31:31 PM
I haven't listened to the radio in many many years. I always bring a stack of CDs in the car (including a few of my own mixes) and that's all I listen to. That's why I can still happily listen to those "classic rock" bands - I only hear them when I want to hear them and when I do I listen to the entire album as the band wanted me to listen to it.

/The Allman Brothers Band at Fillmore East is a great live album
//and yes, The Eagles do indeed suck
 
2010-08-03 11:39:06 PM
FWIW I found a bunch of classic Roxy Music MP3 downloads dirt cheap at Amazon. I find the early 70's British glam and alternative scene to still be ahead of its time. Or maybe I'm just extremely slow catching up.
 
2010-08-03 11:57:09 PM
"Pat Travers (for example) has MUCH better songs than "Boom Boom out go the lights"."

"I Tried to Believe" and "Getting Better" come to mind.
/there are more.
 
2010-08-03 11:58:46 PM
KwameKilstrawberry
I'm listening to Stevie Ray Vaughan's Riviera Paradise, so I'm getting a kick...


Huge fan of SRV. Unfortunately, according to any classic rock station, the only song he has ever been known to play is "Crossfire."

And if I hear One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer one more time....
 
2010-08-04 12:07:08 AM
Kurmudgeon: "I Tried to Believe" and "Getting Better" come to mind.

That would be Gettin' Betta.

/I also like his live album Go For What You Know
//and his version of Born Under A Bad Sign on Crash and Burn
 
2010-08-04 12:40:13 AM
Most rock songs DID suck. You only listened to them because your opinion was biased by the one or two decent songs of that band.
 
2010-08-04 12:44:46 AM
Summer Glau's Love Slave: I, on the other hand, have literally never paid for music in my entire life. I really can't come to terms with the idea of paying 20+ dollars for a CD that I know for a fact will be unplayable even after a few years of normal use. There are no lyrics to read, because there are no liner notes, the cover art will be cheap (most likely a lame photograph) and the music usually is, generally speaking, very shallow, trashy, and much like all the other music that I've already been exposed too very repeatedly.

Most CDs don't cost anywhere near $20, most do have liner notes, and I've got CDs that are 20 years old that still play fine, and if the music you listen to is shallow and trashy, that's YOUR fault, and you should make the effort to find better music, which IS out there. Why not just be honest and admit you just don't want to pay for it?

I download music illegally too, but I'm honest about why. It's not some grand struggle against the evil RIAA. I just want free shiat.
 
2010-08-04 01:09:54 AM
deathon2legs: PopFreshenmeyer: You'd think living in one of the largest radio markets in the country would yield some variety to their rock and roll. And while I appreciate the effort to bring in some of the new young turks out there (Green Day? On MY classic rock station?! I'm sure they're just as surprised), I wholeheartedly agree that I have never, ever, ever, heard a Warren Zevon song other than "Werewolves of London."


Really? Our local classic schlock station manages to alternate "Werewolves" with "Lawyers, Guns and Money" pretty regularly. But that's it; apparently Mr. Zevon only wrote two songs.


I went to find a clip of it. This is the first time I have heard this song.
 
2010-08-04 01:30:18 AM
I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that there is a large number of people, the majority of whom have never visited the Fark music tab, who just want to hear music that is familiar to them. Can't really sing along if you don't know the words. And they can't be bothered to seek out anything new on their own, too many other things they'd rather do with their lives. So they listen to what radio gives them. Radio (terrestrial, for the most part), not willing to risk losing that audience, gives them what they know people like: the proven hits.

I have no taste for commercial radio, but I do like to hear new things. Luckily, there are many other options these days.
 
2010-08-04 01:38:25 AM
You know, Heart really rocked it back then. I love all of their classic stuff. Their pre MTV stuff. I also really love Stevie Nicks.

I really need to pick up both group's greatest hits.

As for AC/DC, omg they suck and need to disappear. I can't stand them at all. All of their stuff sounds like the same song over and over. Ug.
 
2010-08-04 01:41:03 AM
I'm almost not sure where to start here... too much ignoranceschpanky: I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that there is a large number of people, the majority of whom have never visited the Fark music tab, who just want to hear music that is familiar to them. Can't really sing along if you don't know the words. And they can't be bothered to seek out anything new on their own, too many other things they'd rather do with their lives. So they listen to what radio gives them. Radio (terrestrial, for the most part), not willing to risk losing that audience, gives them what they know people like: the proven hits.

I have no taste for commercial radio, but I do like to hear new things. Luckily, there are many other options these days.


^That. Visit the Music tab often these days. Still, I gotta complain about the serious lack of articles or mention there on the single greatest live touring act, Tool. What the hell
 
2010-08-04 01:46:42 AM
What's needed is classic "b-side" programming.
 
2010-08-04 01:58:07 AM
samperkinsdog: Summer Glau's Love Slave: My old Dad has a huge record collection. Lots of good old stuff: Beatles, Doors, Hendricks...

i like you, and wish you the best. but it's "hendrix".


D'oh!

I'm 17 (derp) I don't know better. Thanks for the update.

/I don't download illegally, btw..
//too afraid of being sued
 
2010-08-04 03:59:12 AM
schpanky: I'm gonna go out on a limb here and say that there is a large number of people, the majority of whom have never visited the Fark music tab, who just want to hear music that is familiar to them. Can't really sing along if you don't know the words. And they can't be bothered to seek out anything new on their own, too many other things they'd rather do with their lives. So they listen to what radio gives them. Radio (terrestrial, for the most part), not willing to risk losing that audience, gives them what they know people like: the proven hits.

I have no taste for commercial radio, but I do like to hear new things. Luckily, there are many other options these days.


I spend a good amount of time specifically hunting down new music and I still like knowing that LA's famous classic rock station KLOS 95.5 is on the dial and when I want it, I'll get exactly what I expect. AOR radio is the comfort food of music for me.
 
2010-08-04 04:14:13 AM
Summer Glau's Love Slave: My old Dad has a huge record collection. Lots of good old stuff: Beatles, Doors, Hendricks, Rush, Zappa, Jethro Tull, Black Sabbath...

Good for you for checking out some great old music. My kids have done the same with my albums.

If he has Hendrix's Rainbow Bridge album, Pali Gap is a great tune and the version of Hear My Train A Comin' on there completely rocks. And check out Midnight on War Heroes.
 
2010-08-04 04:31:16 AM
Allman Brothers live at Fillmore East. A "close" 2nd would be quite a distance away...
That is all
 
2010-08-04 06:13:06 AM
Just want the conversation to get back to how POWERAGE is one of the best albums ever. Great alone or for a party. 2 sense.
 
2010-08-04 06:57:26 AM
ftroop:

And if I hear One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer one more time....


How about the original recorded (and actually, y'know, GOOD) version? (^)
 
2010-08-04 07:20:33 AM
Tyler823: From TFA: 7. Seemingly the only nod that the entire New Wave movement will get from classic rock radio is that U2 gets played every once in a while.

THIS.


Back in the day, Toronto had Q-107 (Rock) and CFNY (Alternative), they still exist, but have no idea what the vibe is anymore. Anywhos, a DJ (methinks it was Andy Frost) has the idea to play How Soon Is Now on a scheduled Psychedelic segment. My jaw dropped. Apart from play on CFNY and every frickin alternative/alternative wanabe club, nobody played it. Way cool.

I'm back to DJing again (small bar, keep's me sane) and this cross-segmenation has always appealed to me. You can't ignore the contribution of other genres and/or past generations as influences in other genres/generations. I suppose you could, but then you'd be a right turd. This relates to classic rock as a genre; it's a misnomer at best, a cop-out at worst. Rock has been around since the early 50s. It's still going on, although a little watered down in terms of sheer talent and production values. What defines classic rock to me are the following:

a) Instant recocgnition
b) Rock pedigree (either by artist or influence, see the Smiths reference above)
c) Sustainability

Rock and Classic Rock stations have all too sadly gone the road of every other terrestrial station: too tight a rotation, not enough variation in the library. Can you imagine if you were a classical music buff having to listen to Four Seasons by Vivaldi every two hours followed by Mozart's Requiem Mass in D Minor? Think you'd put up with that? Hell's no. Why do we put with it for other genres?

What's the fix? Stop listening to commercial radio. Urge others to stop listening to commercial radio. Make commercial radio stations understand your intentions. Get out to clubs/bars more often and chat with the DJs (those that still have them). They are for the most part affable and responsive, given they have a free ear. Teach the youngun's about music, not just your must haves, but stuff that influenced other stuff.

Mini-mega rant off. Coming up...Stairway to Heaven by caller request.
 
2010-08-04 07:23:34 AM
sigdiamond2000: TheLopper: I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio.



This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.


i662.photobucket.com

Word.
 
2010-08-04 08:13:41 AM
Thudfark: Why do we put with it for other genres?

Because people use the stations differently. They have the rock station on for maybe a half hour in the morning and a half hour on the way home, and maybe on in the background at work. For ever four times your local top-40 station plays a Katy Perry song, the people at work don't hear three of them - so they still think it's fresh.

Not a lot of classical radio listeners listen that way, and not a lot of pop-music fans listen to the radio the way a classical listener would. Next time something like "No Reply At All" comes on the radio at work, see if any of your co-workers demands utter silence to appreciate Mike Rutherford's bass line.

People who are casual music fans often never get sick of the same familiar songs. They carry a few hundred around in their brains, whereas people like me or you carry tens of thousands - and nobody has yet found a way to broaden their tastes, especially when they'd just as soon be watching Oprah or porn.
 
2010-08-04 08:37:49 AM
Gulper Eel: Thudfark: Why do we put with it for other genres?

Because people use the stations differently. They have the rock station on for maybe a half hour in the morning and a half hour on the way home, and maybe on in the background at work. For ever four times your local top-40 station plays a Katy Perry song, the people at work don't hear three of them - so they still think it's fresh.

Not a lot of classical radio listeners listen that way, and not a lot of pop-music fans listen to the radio the way a classical listener would. Next time something like "No Reply At All" comes on the radio at work, see if any of your co-workers demands utter silence to appreciate Mike Rutherford's bass line.

People who are casual music fans often never get sick of the same familiar songs. They carry a few hundred around in their brains, whereas people like me or you carry tens of thousands - and nobody has yet found a way to broaden their tastes, especially when they'd just as soon be watching Oprah or porn.


I can get down with what you're saying. Fortunately, for me anyway, when I did work in an office I had the headphones on. One cubicle farm I was in had PC destruction next to us. They seemed to like thrash metal, fark that was annoying.

Back to the low-brainers and their unfortunate listening habits. I can see the format for pop top 40 being the way it is because the listener is likely to have the attention span of a brain dead mole and the musical taste of a freshly swatted gnat. What does irk me is that rock stations seem to have tightened their rotations to whatever greatest rock hits cd the programming department's uncle just bought.

When I used to listen to radio, they played a lot of stuff, even drive time was not overly repetitive. If we stick to rock as a format, you do not have to be overly creative to field a rotation that is at once recognizable yet not played to death. You could play one known song from each month that rock has been around for and not get a repeated song for about 200 years. Maybe I exagerate a tad, but you get the point. This is what I used to love about radio. You heard stuff that you didn't know existed on a fairly consistent basis, and that is my main philosophy when I DJ. I introduce people to new stuff or stuff they'd forgotten about, while also managing to play "hits". Why is this concept so difficult to grasp?
 
2010-08-04 09:10:06 AM
Summer Glau's Love Slave: There are no lyrics to read, because there are no liner notes,

How are those liner notes on the pirated downloads workin' out for you?

I've purchased many LPs back in the day that had squat for liner notes, and I have purchased many CDs with tons of notes (booklet so thick, it didn't easily fit back in the case) so you can't blame the format. Elvis Costello's rereleases of his earlier albums had copious notes from EC himself.

But you just keep clinging to your feeble justifications for pirating...
 
2010-08-04 09:15:09 AM
Time to shill for a couple of websites:

http://www.escforum.net -- there's music contests galore, plus discussion of pop music's greatest moment -- Eurovision.
http://www.radioyeye.com -- I got sick of tired of having heard all the oldies songs already. So I hear about 60% original stuff and 40% stuff covered by French or Quebecois artists.

:)
 
2010-08-04 09:22:45 AM
Thudfark: Gulper Eel: Thudfark: Why do we put with it for other genres?

Because people use the stations differently. They have the rock station on for maybe a half hour in the morning and a half hour on the way home, and maybe on in the background at work. For ever four times your local top-40 station plays a Katy Perry song, the people at work don't hear three of them - so they still think it's fresh.

Not a lot of classical radio listeners listen that way, and not a lot of pop-music fans listen to the radio the way a classical listener would. Next time something like "No Reply At All" comes on the radio at work, see if any of your co-workers demands utter silence to appreciate Mike Rutherford's bass line.

People who are casual music fans often never get sick of the same familiar songs. They carry a few hundred around in their brains, whereas people like me or you carry tens of thousands - and nobody has yet found a way to broaden their tastes, especially when they'd just as soon be watching Oprah or porn.

I can get down with what you're saying. Fortunately, for me anyway, when I did work in an office I had the headphones on. One cubicle farm I was in had PC destruction next to us. They seemed to like thrash metal, fark that was annoying.

Back to the low-brainers and their unfortunate listening habits. I can see the format for pop top 40 being the way it is because the listener is likely to have the attention span of a brain dead mole and the musical taste of a freshly swatted gnat. What does irk me is that rock stations seem to have tightened their rotations to whatever greatest rock hits cd the programming department's uncle just bought.

When I used to listen to radio, they played a lot of stuff, even drive time was not overly repetitive. If we stick to rock as a format, you do not have to be overly creative to field a rotation that is at once recognizable yet not played to death. You could play one known song from each month that rock has been around for and not get a repeated song for about 200 years. Maybe I exagerate a tad, but you get the point. This is what I used to love about radio. You heard stuff that you didn't know existed on a fairly consistent basis, and that is my main philosophy when I DJ. I introduce people to new stuff or stuff they'd forgotten about, while also managing to play "hits". Why is this concept so difficult to grasp?


What saddens me most about commercial terrestrial radio is that that used to be the way. I've been among the living long enough to experience (and lament the passing of) this bizarre concept called "free-form FM". This was actualized by the DJs actually playing pretty damn much whatever music popped into their brains without limit or (apparently) much oversight from anybody in a position of authority over them. When I was a teen I recalled being exposed to prog-rock, hard rock, Classic Rock (and not the same 3 songs per artist that became the norm later on), some afro-beat, roots-rock, 50s-60s garage rock, nascent punk-rock (or: proto-punk as it is known known [new york dolls, stooges, mc5,etc.], some country (Cash, Waylon, Bob Wills, Patsy, Loretta, Merle etc.), a dollop of jazz, some early punk-rock (Damned, Ramones, Clash [first album Clash], Siouxsie, Sex Pistols, Talking Heads, Costello, etc), a triple handful of soul/r&b/blues records along with the hits all on the same dial.

Somewhere along the way (if memory serves somewhere around 81-82) it all went to Straight to Hell and never returned. Everything became obscenely fragmented and regimented and playlist-dominated and hits-only dominated. The fun and variety and spontaneity of free-form was gone and so was the majority of my interest.

I pretty much tuned radio out but to check the progress (status?) of the decline during the eighties and early nineties and gave up the ghost for good when I got my first car with a CD player (95ish).
 
2010-08-04 09:31:48 AM
I'm listening a lot to Tanya Donnelly's beauty Sleep CD these days. She was basically the mind behind Belly. Hey I like it, I don't care what anybody else thinks.

I like all music. I never stopped listening. My tastes are more King Crimson (Bruffod, Wetton era) when we are talking the 70's.

There's plenty good out there....just have to work at finding it.
 
2010-08-04 09:33:52 AM
www.drugmusic.com
best Internet show.
 
2010-08-04 09:38:29 AM
Uzzah: Hender: Everyone knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact.

And yet 1974 is also the year of the first "Bad Company" release.

You see, poor live performances by the likes of Chuck Berry and even Jerry Lee Lewis are destroying the music they allege to celebrate. And tests show that a Beach Boys concert is a very sad thing. This, coupled with the growing interest in ethnic music has undermined the support base of the music you and your friends love.

/looks forward to the dominance of jazz


I'll never get drunk on just one beer.
 
2010-08-04 10:09:27 AM
Radio playing hits-only is what annoys me the most about it. Hell, even in the 90s, the radio was playing Nirvana and Pearl Jam b-sides and album-only tracks. That doesn't happen at all anymore. That coupled with the browbeating over anyone into underground music gets brow-beaten into trying to be music snobs when it's really just trying to escape from the same damn 3 songs.

I also think a lot of the flack classic rock gets is that a lot of its most adamant supporters either full embrace listening to the same damn 3 songs by one band (seriously, Led Zeppelin is probably the only classic rock bands that gets anything other than two or three big hits played) and/or talk shiat about any band post-1974. I like classic rock, but I find anyone who listens solely to classic rock to be extremely closed-minded and rather dull. Yes, radio from the 1970s, even when playing the Fallout Boys and Nickelbacks of their day, still did play Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, etc. and that's more than we can say about radio now, but Mainstream Radio != the entirety of modern music. Any modern act that survives the test of time is not playing on the radio right now.

That said, I honestly don't give a shiat about radio. It's a format for those who can't form their own taste. It had it's place when the only alternative was buying a random LP without the ability to preview it beforehand.
 
2010-08-04 10:45:19 AM
I would complain about radio stations in my area but thanks to the wonders of technology I have a ton of options. I have a CD player in my car, an iPod hook-up, and about 8 radio stations that play music I enjoy. The classic stations in the area play some great tunes (even the Clear Channel owned ones) plus Alice Cooper's night program comes on with some deeply buried tracks. However, if I start to tire of the songs being played over and over again I can always turn on the 30 days worth of music on my iPod... Isn't technology wonderful?


Also, Powerage was classic but, High Voltage will always be AC/DCs best album (IMHO).
 
2010-08-04 11:31:15 AM
FeedTheCollapse: I like classic rock, but I find anyone who listens solely to classic rock to be extremely closed-minded and rather dull. Yes, radio from the 1970s, even when playing the Fallout Boys and Nickelbacks of their day, still did play Black Sabbath, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, etc. and that's more than we can say about radio now, but Mainstream Radio != the entirety of modern music. Any modern act that survives the test of time is not playing on the radio right now.

That said, I honestly don't give a shiat about radio. It's a format for those who can't form their own taste. It had it's place when the only alternative was buying a random LP without the ability to preview it beforehand.


Funny, I find people who make character judgments based on musical tastes to be pretentious douchebags.
 
2010-08-04 11:47:50 AM
quizybuck: Funny, I find people who make character judgments based on musical tastes to be pretentious douchebags.

and you sound like you probably have boring taste in music. Welcome to the Music tab...
 
2010-08-04 12:19:57 PM
JDJD: www.drugmusic.com
best Internet show.


I dunno about "best" but it is steady dose of very good.
 
2010-08-04 12:20:25 PM
FeedTheCollapse: quizybuck: Funny, I find people who make character judgments based on musical tastes to be pretentious douchebags.

and you sound like you probably have boring taste in music. Welcome to the Music tab...


Good God man, calling my taste in music boring? I must fetch the dueling pistols. I demand satisfaction!

I listen to music that is interesting to me. I really don't care if its objectively meaningful or impresses people like you. How this makes me closed minded, dull, or unable to form my taste I'll never know, but I should probably defer to those with more experience in musical preening.
 
2010-08-04 12:23:14 PM
Like all radio stations, classic or otherwise, they program for the masses, the widest net.
And unfortunately for the minority who appreciate musical variety, the masses still like hearing the same songs over and over.
 
2010-08-04 12:25:22 PM
quizybuck: I listen to music that is interesting to me. I really don't care if its objectively meaningful or impresses people like you. How this makes me closed minded, dull, or unable to form my taste I'll never know, but I should probably defer to those with more experience in musical preening.

I've been playing music for 30 years now. FeedTheCollapse's comment makes zero sense.

None. Zip sqaut diddly.
 
2010-08-04 12:55:12 PM
I was never a Fleetwood Mac fan growing up, but every once in a while a song like "Black Magic Woman" comes on and I just can't believe the depth I am listening to.
 
2010-08-04 12:58:22 PM
sigdiamond2000: TheLopper: I've recently started getting into older AC/DC (Bon Scott era), Thin Lizzy, and other bands from the 70s, and am amazed at how I never hear these songs on the radio.



This is one of the greatest rock albums ever made, and I'd be willing to bet 99.9% of the population - and about half of all AC/DC fans - have never heard even one song off of it.


Oh hells yes.
 
2010-08-04 01:03:50 PM
For (necessary?) clarity's sake that sentence in my last post should have concluded "...all on the same point on the radio dial."


But yeah, back then as an adventurous listener of music it was terrifically exciting to not know either what the next song was going to be or what the next genre was going to be. I was exposed to a lot of really great stuff by radio during the 1970s that I've never known to be aired again post-1982.

Damn you radio consultants and focus groups for permanently f*cking up a wonderful deal. Damn you.

"Coming up we have the 2,500,000,000th airing of "Hotel California" this week. Followed by the 3,000,000,000th airing of "Money".

/like "Money"
//don't like it enough to want to hear it over and over at the expense of some other song that has never had airtime and is just as good.
 
2010-08-04 01:15:55 PM
I totally lost interest in reading that article.
 
2010-08-04 01:36:08 PM
It might be hard for younger music fans to imagine, but there was once a time before MP3s, before iPods, before online streaming, when you were at the mercy of whatever radio signals reached your area.

thomas edison invented the phonograph in 1877. maybe this guy should have gone to a record store.

/he probably would have had to walk both ways uphill in the snow to get there
 
2010-08-04 01:38:36 PM
and if he was talking about during the MTV era, he could have gotten a walkman and listened to whatever cassette tapes he wanted.

whiney ass.
 
2010-08-04 01:44:45 PM
Truth of the matter is radio companies have given up on those that have drifted to satellite and MP3 players. The number of people that listen to satellite radio is still a very tiny percentage of the American population. Classic rock's target demo is men 25-54... most of whom work blue-collar jobs for decent pay and have families, homes, and money to spend. Countless research on these types have shown that these people know what they like, everything else, they don't wanna know about it. More often than not, it's the same old meathead tracks that music aficionados can't stand.

Anytime any of these stations have a "battle of the bands" promo, Lynyrd Skynyrd always beats The Who, AC/DC always beats The Allman Brothers Band, and good luck even hearing The Moody Blues, Jethro Tull or Emerson Lake and Palmer anymore.

Blame your high-school educated, Budweiser drinking, Ford-truck driving, NASCAR-watching neigbhor that somehow has a nicer house than you for all this. Classic rock radio panders to That Guy.
 
2010-08-04 01:56:39 PM
dereksmalls: every classic rock band has great tunes you've never heard, with the exception of Journey, REO, Styx, Nugent , Foreigner, and Boston. freeform radio died a horrible death, but first gave birth to the most predictable, repetitive, boring format possible.
/get the Led out
//get the floyd and eagles out while you're at it


userserve-ak.last.fm
www.metalkingdom.net

Two Journey albums that actually kick ass. Pre-Steve Perry.
 
2010-08-04 02:17:44 PM
LL Bean J: dereksmalls: every classic rock band has great tunes you've never heard, with the exception of Journey, REO, Styx, Nugent , Foreigner, and Boston. freeform radio died a horrible death, but first gave birth to the most predictable, repetitive, boring format possible.
/get the Led out
//get the floyd and eagles out while you're at it

Two Journey albums that actually kick ass. Pre-Steve Perry.



Reo's live album is far from terrible,Nugent's first solo album (with Derek St Holmes singing) was pretty damn good, and the first Boston album,despite death by overplay, was a game changer in DIY home recording,that album was recorded in a farking basement with homemade gear.
 
2010-08-04 02:34:28 PM
drewogatory: and the first Boston album,despite death by overplay, was a game changer in DIY home recording,that album was recorded in a farking basement with homemade gear.

Ah, the good old days where they had to come out and say they DIDN'T "use computers". I
 
2010-08-04 03:19:53 PM
You know, the other day a spooky, sparse, atmospheric track came on at the gym that made me go, "Whoa, how come they're playing weird shiat on regional pop/rock radio? Did Pitchfork guerrillas invade the studio?"

I stopped to listen a little more closely, and hey, it was Led Zeppelin's "Dazed and Confused". Didn't recognize it out of context. Never heard it on the radio before. And by the standards of today's mainstream radio/chart rock, it really is way, way out there.
 
2010-08-04 04:01:19 PM
I'm just here to publicly declare my love for BREAD.

www.bbc.co.uk


I'm a hardcore Skinny Puppy fanatic, but I have an abiding love of all my soft rock favorites, and I'm not ashamed to admit it.

/Your diary
//I found it underneath a tree
 
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