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(Time)   Because kids can't handle the truth, moms now tell toddlers about The Binky Fairy   (time.com) divider line 215
    More: Stupid, Binky Fairy, University of Toronto, mommies, The Modern Parents, preschools  
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15884 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Jul 2010 at 1:16 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-07-27 01:39:07 PM  
aimtastic: Any time I got a toy that my mom deemed too messy (Play Doh was on the top of that list), she would disappear it. I'd play with it one day then a few days later decide I wanted to play with it again but it was nowhere to be found. When I'd ask my mom where it was, she'd say, "Wherever you left it."

Between that and my grandma giving me a really nice necklace then sneaking it out of my jewelry box to give to someone else, I grew up thinking that I had a horrible inexplicable inclination for losing things. I still avoid expensive jewelry because I assume I'll lose it.


that way of parenting is the exact cause of this current way of parenting.

yesterday's parents were mean, selfish and injured their children. today's type of parents dont want their kids to go through what they did because they know firsthand that IT DIDNT WORK.

how long can a child really hang on to a pacifier? eventually they'll let it go in exchange for other things. taking a pacifier by a certain date is more for the benefit of the parent's appearance than for the child's.
 
2010-07-27 01:40:01 PM  
memilkisyummy's tactic for breaking the binky habit with her kids:

Never giving them a farking binky in the first place.
 
2010-07-27 01:40:26 PM  
beavens: and when did people stop calling it a pacifier??

I don't know, but the term 'binky' has been in popular use for at least 30 years in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US.
 
2010-07-27 01:40:29 PM  
MaxxLarge: silo123j: \\Maxxlarge has sharp knees

I think it's been pretty well-established that I am a fat.


I think you're a hoot and a half. Don't listen to the others, you're the bees knees.
 
2010-07-27 01:41:02 PM  
My mom kept me on the bottle until I was 2 and a half (I knew how to fill it with cold milk if I wanted). I was a profound stutterer and the bottle helped calm me down. One day I went to get a bottle and couldn't find any. I asked my mom and she said the garbage man's wife had a baby and they didn't have any bottles, so she gave them mine. Evidently I was okay with that. That was the end of my bottle period.
 
2010-07-27 01:42:03 PM  
Cagey B: I predict a wave of neckbeards who aren't allowed near a woman's vagina without a fistful of money orders biatching endlessly about that one time they had to hear a kid crying for five minutes three booths away at Denny's, and it totally ruined their Extra Lard-Ass Slam for them.

Indeed. Fark threads about children always seem to bring out the eminently unfarkable, who of course are best equipped to offer parenting advice.
 
2010-07-27 01:42:10 PM  
I must have lucked out with the whole binky thing. Joseph HATED pacifiers! Unfortunately, he's a total blanket baby....anything to keep him quiet though, amiright?????
 
2010-07-27 01:43:22 PM  
My cousin had a blanket for years, until it was literally just a little triangle of cloth, frayed completely around.

Although, now that I think about it, my friendss kid is about 1 1/2 years old, and I don't think he's ever used a pacifier. Guess they're nipping that problem in the bud.
 
2010-07-27 01:43:48 PM  
The story goes my mother cut the tip off mine and said 'oops, it's broken now' and threw it away. I shrugged and went on with my toddler life.

/CSB
 
2010-07-27 01:43:51 PM  
I thought it was the binky goblin?
 
2010-07-27 01:46:22 PM  
Maynard G. Muskievote: Cagey B: I predict a wave of neckbeards who aren't allowed near a woman's vagina without a fistful of money orders biatching endlessly about that one time they had to hear a kid crying for five minutes three booths away at Denny's, and it totally ruined their Extra Lard-Ass Slam for them.

Indeed. Fark threads about children always seem to bring out the eminently unfarkable, who of course are best equipped to offer parenting advice.


Of course it does, because they don't suffer from the brainrot that having a child gives you.
 
2010-07-27 01:48:20 PM  
sxacho
Unfortunately, the doctor was unable to save the pacifier, and he never asked for it again. Although a few times in the following weeks/months he would kind of sigh in a sad way and tell us, "I miss my pacifier", in the way that you might tell someone that you miss your old puppy.

I think the lesson to parents from your story is that to get their kid off the pacifier, they just need to take junior out to the driveway and drop him on his face.
 
2010-07-27 01:48:43 PM  
Or you could just not use the pacifier in the first place. I used it on my kid for sleep and traumatic events only. The first couple of times are rough but if he cries and you give it back, guess what you just taught him? If your kid is awake and happy he should be yapping away not sucking on a pacifier.
 
2010-07-27 01:51:59 PM  
Some posters have obviously never had to try to get a nights sleep after making the pacifier disappear from their 3 year old daughter.

I'm sparing my children the life long Jesus myth, but the binky fairy is fine with me.
 
2010-07-27 01:53:25 PM  
pinknightmares: On our oldest son's 2nd birthday, we told him 2 year old's are "big boys" and cannot have a pacifier anymore so we tied it to a balloon and let fly away, we waved and said, "bye, bye paci..." he cried for a minute but wanted to be a big boy so he was ok-ish after that.

Aww that is so cute. Balloons flying away always depress me though because I assume some little kid lost each one and is crying because they lost it.

My sister had a blankie and sucked her thumb until she was like 3 or 4. My mom just kept cuttie the blankie into smaller and smaller pieces (plus if my sister lost her blankie she'd freak out) but when my sister had to go to preschool she finally decided it'd be ok to leave her blankie at home. I think she'd still suck her thumb on occasion and people just had to remind her to stop.

/she was so cute and now she is so teenager-y
 
2010-07-27 01:53:31 PM  
farm5.static.flickr.com

I had to give up my pacifier too early; this explains a lot.

Tell the Binky Fairy I'm going to need a stack of singles, and stat!
 
2010-07-27 01:55:58 PM  
Noobian Noob: yesterday's parents were mean, selfish and injured their children. today's type of parents dont want their kids to go through what they did because they know firsthand that IT DIDNT WORK.

If it didn't work, then there would be no "today's type of parents." This is not to say that yesterday's parents were perfect, but their main failing has been an inability to pass on wisdom and experience to their children, particularly in the area of child-rearing skills. This has been going on for several generations, actually, with each generation getting less and less functional than the one preceding it (and no, my generation did not get out unscathed either). The helicopter/snowflake phenomenon we've been seeing in years is a direct result of this: the accumulated generations of parental fail is starting to reach a critical mass, but there aren't so many people left who actually remember how to reliably raise a functioning human being.

how long can a child really hang on to a pacifier? eventually they'll let it go in exchange for other things.

How long can a child hold onto a pacifier? You could use a Google search to find out, but I really don't recommend it at all.

Your theory is nice, but it depends on children being born with the minds of adults, and that simply doesn't occur. They'll hang on as long as they're allowed to do so, up to and past the point where it leaves scars on them as adults.

taking a pacifier by a certain date is more for the benefit of the parent's appearance than for the child's.

The medical evidence just isn't with you on this one. Pacifiers are terrible for dental health: not much of a problem when the kid doesn't have teeth yet anyway, but once they start growing, it's time to think about getting rid of the thing.

Honestly, I'd argue that modern parenting is more about the parents than the kids. Parents don't want to do the unpleasant work of teaching a minimal level of self-discipline, so they just hope against hope that the kids will figure it out for themselves, and then come out shocked when it never actually happens. End result: kids who are "Spocked when they should have been spanked," a phrase quoted by Dr. Spock himself when, years after his famous book, he came to understand the damage his hypotheses had wrought.
 
2010-07-27 01:57:17 PM  
My little sister had a blanket that she carried around with her till she was three years old. The way my folks got her to part with the raggedy but beloved thing was with was bargaining. They found something that she wanted (in her particular case it was a set of unicorn printed bed sheets,but anything the kid really wanted, especially if it was something that could be associated with being a bigger kid instead of a baby, could work)and then made her make the decision to give the blanket up of her own free will in exchange for the new sheet set.

It worked great and is good practice for how things really work in the world. You make choices. You make sacrifices to get what you want. No lies needed. No tears cried.
 
2010-07-27 01:57:44 PM  
When I was 3, I was bribed into quitting sucking my thumb. My parents told me that if I could quit sucking my thumb they'd buy me a birthstone ring, and apparently I wanted the ring enough that it was motivation to stop. Now, it's probably open for debate about whether you should be buying 3 year olds gold jewelry with semi-precious stones, but I still have the ring and it probably stopped my teeth from getting anymore messed up so it probably saved them some on orthodontics bills when I got older.

/my parents apparently had a thing for expensive bribes
//my older brother was bribed into stopping crying in kindergarten with the promise of a telescope
///yep, they bought a 4 year old a 6" reflecting telescope
////he still has it and used it a lot over the years
 
2010-07-27 01:58:10 PM  
Noobian Noob: aimtastic: Any time I got a toy that my mom deemed too messy (Play Doh was on the top of that list), she would disappear it. I'd play with it one day then a few days later decide I wanted to play with it again but it was nowhere to be found. When I'd ask my mom where it was, she'd say, "Wherever you left it."

Between that and my grandma giving me a really nice necklace then sneaking it out of my jewelry box to give to someone else, I grew up thinking that I had a horrible inexplicable inclination for losing things. I still avoid expensive jewelry because I assume I'll lose it.

that way of parenting is the exact cause of this current way of parenting.

yesterday's parents were mean, selfish and injured their children. today's type of parents dont want their kids to go through what they did because they know firsthand that IT DIDNT WORK.

how long can a child really hang on to a pacifier? eventually they'll let it go in exchange for other things. taking a pacifier by a certain date is more for the benefit of the parent's appearance than for the child's.


Or, you can read the rest of the article, where the researchers point out that letting your kid control his fate at that age can cause all kinds of mouth problems and turn the kid into a little asshole that ends up on /b/, or, even worse, that show about Jersey.
 
2010-07-27 01:58:12 PM  
Parents need to tell their kids the truth. Lot of shiat parents (and shiat grandparents) up in here.
 
2010-07-27 01:58:30 PM  
www.sattlers.org

Scary Fairy
 
2010-07-27 01:59:05 PM  
patrick767: sxacho
Unfortunately, the doctor was unable to save the pacifier, and he never asked for it again. Although a few times in the following weeks/months he would kind of sigh in a sad way and tell us, "I miss my pacifier", in the way that you might tell someone that you miss your old puppy.

I think the lesson to parents from your story is that to get their kid off the pacifier, they just need to take junior out to the driveway and drop him on his face.


Well, we've got Boy #2 coming up on a year old now. I'll let you know how it works out. They look so cute with a front tooth missing.
 
2010-07-27 02:00:41 PM  
spidermilk: pinknightmares: On our oldest son's 2nd birthday, we told him 2 year old's are "big boys" and cannot have a pacifier anymore so we tied it to a balloon and let fly away, we waved and said, "bye, bye paci..." he cried for a minute but wanted to be a big boy so he was ok-ish after that.

Aww that is so cute. Balloons flying away always depress me though because I assume some little kid lost each one and is crying because they lost it.


Don't go to hot-air balloon festivals. You'll have to be on suicide watch. We regularly release little helium balloons to check the wind, pre-flight. The more pilots, the more "pi-bals" (pilot balloons).

/choking sea turtles since 1989
 
2010-07-27 02:01:32 PM  
gamesnet.vo.llnwd.net

/ Has something for the binky fairy
 
2010-07-27 02:01:38 PM  
I was watching my niece one day (when she was 2 or 3) and I told her it was bed time. Apparently her blanket was in her parent's car who had gone to a play, so there was no way to get it. She cried and cried and refused to go to bed. I finally turned off all the lights in the house beside the one in the living room (she was scared of the dark and I didn't want her wandering off), plugged in 'The Sound of Music', and turned it up louder than she could howl. About the time we had gotten to intermission she had calmed down. I asked if she was ready for bed, she was, and I put her in bed.

The next day it was nap time and my sister was frantically searching for the blanket again. She told me my niece absolutely HAD TO HAVE that blanket or she wouldn't sleep. My niece is screaming and throwing a fit again. I went to her and said "Go take your nap." She immediately quit crying, said okay, gave everyone a hug, and went to sleep. My sister was stunned, but then got extremely angry when I told her about the night before. Something about emotionally damaging her or something.

Seven years later she still carries that damned blanket around. I am about 100% positive I will be a better mom than my sister.

/Both my nieces obey me without lip
//Never raised a hand or yelled at them either
///It is called not taking bullshiat from a toddler
 
2010-07-27 02:01:58 PM  
My parents were adamant about depriving me of every single item of my infancy and toddlerhood several months earlier than is considered rational, because they thought I was "gifted" and didn't find (or shouldn't find) comfort in such things.

Two decades later, I'm an AB, I buy all those things on a fairly regular basis, and I suck my thumb whenever nobody's looking, and sometimes when they are. Keep THAT in mind the next time you want to inflict premature adulthood on your snowflakes.
 
2010-07-27 02:03:29 PM  
palladiate: It's not so much the truth and the ability to handle it, it's about misdirecting the irrational emotions of a toddler onto someone other than you.

Everything from missing toys to scraped elbows can be instantly forgotten if you know how to distract those little buggers. The reality of a kid is pretty pliant.


As a young guy who has no kids, I 100% agree with this. When firends visit with their kids, and one falls or something, the first thing you gotta do is go "WHOA YEAH!!! THAT WAS AWESOME!!" and not "OH MY GOD ARE YOU OKAY!!"
 
2010-07-27 02:05:27 PM  
I still have my binky. Seriously. I love it. It's been, well, like a binky to me. It's very old. Very old.
 
2010-07-27 02:08:04 PM  
Noobian Noob: aimtastic: Any time I got a toy that my mom deemed too messy (Play Doh was on the top of that list), she would disappear it. I'd play with it one day then a few days later decide I wanted to play with it again but it was nowhere to be found. When I'd ask my mom where it was, she'd say, "Wherever you left it."

Between that and my grandma giving me a really nice necklace then sneaking it out of my jewelry box to give to someone else, I grew up thinking that I had a horrible inexplicable inclination for losing things. I still avoid expensive jewelry because I assume I'll lose it.

that way of parenting is the exact cause of this current way of parenting.

yesterday's parents were mean, selfish and injured their children. today's type of parents dont want their kids to go through what they did because they know firsthand that IT DIDNT WORK.

how long can a child really hang on to a pacifier? eventually they'll let it go in exchange for other things. taking a pacifier by a certain date is more for the benefit of the parent's appearance than for the child's.


What happened to aimtastic was pure evil. We have a mother and a grandmother teaching lying, thievery, insincerity and on top of all mind-farkery and distrust. I can't imagine giving a gift, taking the gift away, then lying about taking the gift away. That's teaching a kid that you don't trust them, they should not trust themselves, and truth is a convenience. Then folks wonder why kids do as they see, not as they're told. I also agree with you about parent's appearance than the child's. So what if a kid has a blanket (or a pacifier)? Like others have stated here in personal anecdotes, it comes down to the kid making a decision that something else is more important to hold onto. But lying about Binky Fairies, way to teach your kids not to trust you.
 
2010-07-27 02:08:53 PM  
Mr Guy: Noobian Noob: aimtastic: Any time I got a toy that my mom deemed too messy (Play Doh was on the top of that list), she would disappear it. I'd play with it one day then a few days later decide I wanted to play with it again but it was nowhere to be found. When I'd ask my mom where it was, she'd say, "Wherever you left it."

Between that and my grandma giving me a really nice necklace then sneaking it out of my jewelry box to give to someone else, I grew up thinking that I had a horrible inexplicable inclination for losing things. I still avoid expensive jewelry because I assume I'll lose it.

that way of parenting is the exact cause of this current way of parenting.

yesterday's parents were mean, selfish and injured their children. today's type of parents dont want their kids to go through what they did because they know firsthand that IT DIDNT WORK.

how long can a child really hang on to a pacifier? eventually they'll let it go in exchange for other things. taking a pacifier by a certain date is more for the benefit of the parent's appearance than for the child's.

Or, you can read the rest of the article, where the researchers point out that letting your kid control his fate at that age can cause all kinds of mouth problems and turn the kid into a little asshole that ends up on /b/, or, even worse, that show about Jersey.


have YOU personally ever seen a child hang on to a pacifier long enough to cause dental damage?

sure it can happen but the likelihood is slim to none. you can find the science to scare you into doing or not doing anything.

my son never liked the pacifier. my daughter on the other hand, was sucking her thumb in-vitro.

i have no intention on ever taking her pacifier from her. she'll get rid of it when she's good and ready (which i expect to happen within the year--she turned one this month).
 
2010-07-27 02:11:29 PM  
Subby has no children.

Lying is essential in limiting tantrums to 10 or so per day in a 2-year-old.
 
2010-07-27 02:11:46 PM  
headncloudz: Scary Fairy


Hmm. he has the makings of a nice ass. He has a nice ass. That gut is doing him no favors, though. Better clothing, lose the gut, Fabio.
 
2010-07-27 02:11:52 PM  
My son hit 2 and we cut the tip of the binky off, we figured he'd ditch it when it wasn't 'the same'. When he went for it the next day, he looked at it, then looked at me with the most amazingly grown-up look of distrust then threw it in the trash. It was pretty chilling (kiddo is blond, and looked a bit like Gabe from Pet Sematary at the time).
Only mentioned it to ask if he could have a new one later that day, and I told him that we couldn't, he was too big now.
 
2010-07-27 02:12:01 PM  
Noobian Noob: Mr Guy: Noobian Noob: aimtastic: Any time I got a toy that my mom deemed too messy (Play Doh was on the top of that list), she would disappear it. I'd play with it one day then a few days later decide I wanted to play with it again but it was nowhere to be found. When I'd ask my mom where it was, she'd say, "Wherever you left it."

Between that and my grandma giving me a really nice necklace then sneaking it out of my jewelry box to give to someone else, I grew up thinking that I had a horrible inexplicable inclination for losing things. I still avoid expensive jewelry because I assume I'll lose it.

that way of parenting is the exact cause of this current way of parenting.

yesterday's parents were mean, selfish and injured their children. today's type of parents dont want their kids to go through what they did because they know firsthand that IT DIDNT WORK.

how long can a child really hang on to a pacifier? eventually they'll let it go in exchange for other things. taking a pacifier by a certain date is more for the benefit of the parent's appearance than for the child's.

Or, you can read the rest of the article, where the researchers point out that letting your kid control his fate at that age can cause all kinds of mouth problems and turn the kid into a little asshole that ends up on /b/, or, even worse, that show about Jersey.

have YOU personally ever seen a child hang on to a pacifier long enough to cause dental damage?

sure it can happen but the likelihood is slim to none. you can find the science to scare you into doing or not doing anything.

my son never liked the pacifier. my daughter on the other hand, was sucking her thumb in-vitro.

i have no intention on ever taking her pacifier from her. she'll get rid of it when she's good and ready (which i expect to happen within the year--she turned one this month).


I hope you will at least make her take it out for her senior pictures.
 
2010-07-27 02:12:58 PM  
sxacho: My boy was probably about 1-1/2 when he was running in our driveway and fell flat on his face while he had the pacifier in there. Blood was everywhere and one of his front teeth was knocked out so we packed him up and took him to the ER. While waiting to see the doctor, he stuck the pacifier in his mouth and then took it right back out. Looking at it very carefully, he said, "My pacifier's broken. It doesn't work anymore."



Are you claiming your 18-month old child spoke in complete sentences?
 
2010-07-27 02:13:49 PM  
I had a pacifier until my dad gave me his Atari 2600.

I'm thankful for that...
 
2010-07-27 02:14:02 PM  
Noobian Noob: have YOU personally ever seen a child hang on to a pacifier long enough to cause dental damage?

sure it can happen but the likelihood is slim to none. you can find the science to scare you into doing or not doing anything.

my son never liked the pacifier. my daughter on the other hand, was sucking her thumb in-vitro.

i have no intention on ever taking her pacifier from her. she'll get rid of it when she's good and ready (which i expect to happen within the year--she turned one this month).


Yes. I went to school with a girl who sucked her thumb up until third grade. The parents were fruity and had the same attitude you did of "She will stop thumb sucking when she is good and ready." I was actually raised in an area where children were taught to be polite, so none of us kids teased her about it. Just "Oh you still suck your thumb? Weird..." but nothing more.

She had to be put into head gear in fourth grade because her teeth were bent so far inside her mouth she couldn't eat without is causing her pain. Had braces until she graduated from college. She will always tell you she wished her parents had made her stop thumbsucking.

My parents made me quit at age one. They put the icky tasting stuff on my thumb for a couple weeks and that was the end of it.
 
2010-07-27 02:14:20 PM  
hailin: I was watching my niece one day (when she was 2 or 3) and I told her it was bed time. Apparently her blanket was in her parent's car who had gone to a play, so there was no way to get it. She cried and cried and refused to go to bed. I finally turned off all the lights in the house beside the one in the living room (she was scared of the dark and I didn't want her wandering off), plugged in 'The Sound of Music', and turned it up louder than she could howl. About the time we had gotten to intermission she had calmed down. I asked if she was ready for bed, she was, and I put her in bed.

The next day it was nap time and my sister was frantically searching for the blanket again. She told me my niece absolutely HAD TO HAVE that blanket or she wouldn't sleep. My niece is screaming and throwing a fit again. I went to her and said "Go take your nap." She immediately quit crying, said okay, gave everyone a hug, and went to sleep. My sister was stunned, but then got extremely angry when I told her about the night before. Something about emotionally damaging her or something.

Seven years later she still carries that damned blanket around. I am about 100% positive I will be a better mom than my sister.

/Both my nieces obey me without lip
//Never raised a hand or yelled at them either
///It is called not taking bullshiat from a toddler




Darn right, I'm 100% positive you'll be better too. Her kids are going to grow up being self centered brats. I do sort of feel bad for them the day they encounter real life, they'll have no idea how to cope and it won't be their fault. Kids learn what you teach them.
 
2010-07-27 02:14:27 PM  
JonnyBGoode 2010-07-27 01:26:27 PM
Am I the only one thinking WTF is a "binky"?

it's blanket, usually referred to as a security blanket. it's from childhood, usually.

/someone already told you, right?
 
2010-07-27 02:15:24 PM  
enad58: palladiate: It's not so much the truth and the ability to handle it, it's about misdirecting the irrational emotions of a toddler onto someone other than you.

Everything from missing toys to scraped elbows can be instantly forgotten if you know how to distract those little buggers. The reality of a kid is pretty pliant.

As a young guy who has no kids, I 100% agree with this. When firends visit with their kids, and one falls or something, the first thing you gotta do is go "WHOA YEAH!!! THAT WAS AWESOME!!" and not "OH MY GOD ARE YOU OKAY!!"



Mostly agree with the thinking of not making a big deal of falling down, but generally speaking I treat a fall like I treat any other inane happening in our house. "Oh, you fell. Well, get back up." If I even choose to acknowledge it at all. I'm not really inclined to praise my kid for falling on his face. That's probably how Evel Knievel got started.

If my kid eats pavement riding his bike and starts crying before I even react (mine are 6 and 3), I just make sure there's no major blood and just say "Well, everyone falls riding their bike. I think you're OK, so get back on and try again."
 
2010-07-27 02:16:23 PM  
Millennium: beavens: and when did people stop calling it a pacifier??

I don't know, but the term 'binky' has been in popular use for at least 30 years in the Mid-Atlantic region of the US.


I never heard the term "binky" until I started going to parties where I learned of a new race called "candykids"

/terrifying creatures
//D'n'b & Hardcore was good repellent
///hugs from a 300 pound rainbow brite, oh god the horror
////I need my blankie now :(
 
2010-07-27 02:18:34 PM  
hailin: I was actually raised in an area where children were taught to be polite, so none of us kids teased her about it.

What glorious land of unicorns and rainbows is this?
 
2010-07-27 02:18:56 PM  
hailin: Noobian Noob: have YOU personally ever seen a child hang on to a pacifier long enough to cause dental damage?

sure it can happen but the likelihood is slim to none. you can find the science to scare you into doing or not doing anything.

my son never liked the pacifier. my daughter on the other hand, was sucking her thumb in-vitro.

i have no intention on ever taking her pacifier from her. she'll get rid of it when she's good and ready (which i expect to happen within the year--she turned one this month).

Yes. I went to school with a girl who sucked her thumb up until third grade. The parents were fruity and had the same attitude you did of "She will stop thumb sucking when she is good and ready." I was actually raised in an area where children were taught to be polite, so none of us kids teased her about it. Just "Oh you still suck your thumb? Weird..." but nothing more.

She had to be put into head gear in fourth grade because her teeth were bent so far inside her mouth she couldn't eat without is causing her pain. Had braces until she graduated from college. She will always tell you she wished her parents had made her stop thumbsucking.

My parents made me quit at age one. They put the icky tasting stuff on my thumb for a couple weeks and that was the end of it.


P-A-C-I-F-I-E-R

not thumb, pacifier. have you ever seen dental damage caused by sucking a pacifier too long?? im pretty confident that my daughter will eventually grow out of the maggie simpson schtick without an intervention.

our star basketball player in college sucked his thumb while wearing braces. he went on to play pro in France. not sure if he ever stopped sucking his thumb, though.
 
2010-07-27 02:19:16 PM  
The wife and I had a helluva time getting our son to give up the pacifier.

We tried the "but you're a big boy, now" spin, we tried bribery, we tried threats...nothing would work. We were at a loss and were concerned that the other kids would start making fun of him.

This went on for quite a while and he finally gave up the binky only after his poli sci professor said something to him.

Kids...
 
2010-07-27 02:19:23 PM  
Noobian Noob:

my son never liked the pacifier. my daughter on the other hand, was sucking her thumb in-vitro.

i have no intention on ever taking her pacifier from her. she'll get rid of it when she's good and ready (which i expect to happen within the year--she turned one this month).



My daughter sucked her thumb starting when she was about two weeks old. She also nursed about every 60-75 minutes for the first month of her life. She was very oral.

She kept sucking her thumb until she was 11 months old, when she got that Coxsackie virus that makes you get the little blisters on the inside of your mouth. A couple days of it (apparently) being uncomfortable to suck her thumb and she was done cold turkey. She was a little harder to get to sleep for maybe a month after that, but it was a fortunate turn of events.
 
2010-07-27 02:20:32 PM  
I'll just leave this here.
img217.imageshack.us

Pacifiers. The plugs that stop the noise from coming out.
 
2010-07-27 02:21:13 PM  
lennavan: Darn right, I'm 100% positive you'll be better too. Her kids are going to grow up being self centered brats. I do sort of feel bad for them the day they encounter real life, they'll have no idea how to cope and it won't be their fault. Kids learn what you teach them.

My youngest niece is a terror too. She bites things, destroys property, talks back, climbs on things, throws stuff around, and is just generally a snot. She is four this year. I told my sister they wouldn't be allowed at my house if my niece picked the flowers in my garden (she destroyed all my tulips while they were house sitting). My sister actually had the nerve to say "Well I don't know what you expect me to do. I can't control her or watch her 24/7." REALLY? Maybe I expect you to...oh I don't know...BE THE farkING MOM! I'm still mad about the tulips (At my sister mostly), but my youngest niece does nothing but color and behave when I watch her. I even made her help me plant my petunias and she was actually good at it.
 
2010-07-27 02:22:08 PM  
todesesser: The story goes my mother cut the tip off mine and said 'oops, it's broken now' and threw it away. I shrugged and went on with my toddler life.



I did that with my daughter when she was almost three. I didn't throw it away, but I trimmed the tip a little bit each day until she no longer had any interest in it.
 
2010-07-27 02:24:03 PM  
bikerific: hailin: I was actually raised in an area where children were taught to be polite, so none of us kids teased her about it.

What glorious land of unicorns and rainbows is this?


Montana. It was also kind of a preppy school in a richer neighborhood. We actually had manner classes from K-3.
 
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