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(Canoe)   Man's property tax triples, so he tries to pay it in pennies. Government tells him to STFU and give them a check, because more than 25 pennies isn't considered "legal tender"   (cnews.canoe.ca) divider line 106
    More: Asinine, STFU, property taxes, city halls, Normand Czepial  
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13652 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2010 at 8:23 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-07-15 04:10:01 PM
Why can't the US have a cool law like that?
 
2010-07-15 04:31:17 PM
When I worked at a bank, a guy came into on one of the other branches in town and asked for thousands of dollars in pennies. They put in a special order for him, and, as they were helping him load up the truck, they asked him what they were for:

"The court ordered me to pay for my ex-wife's divorce lawyer"
 
2010-07-15 04:35:01 PM
Because attention-whoring and boning some low-level clerk or secretary who has to count it is how to deal with the tax bill.

Don't get involved in politics or, God forbid, run for office yourself.
 
2010-07-15 04:37:22 PM
disappointed no one has mentioned the $20 worth of pennies they shove up their ass every day. I bet you had one of my ass pennies today
 
2010-07-15 05:08:28 PM
Good 'ol Quebec.
 
2010-07-15 06:06:45 PM
El_Frijole_Blanco: disappointed no one has mentioned the $20 worth of pennies they shove up their ass every day. I bet you had one of my ass pennies today

You shiat yours back out? I keep mine inside. Isn't that what you're supposed to do?
 
2010-07-15 06:14:23 PM
More importantly, what the hell happened in that area for his property taxes to go up 167%?
 
2010-07-15 06:15:20 PM
Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: When I worked at a bank, a guy came into on one of the other branches in town and asked for thousands of dollars in pennies. They put in a special order for him, and, as they were helping him load up the truck, they asked him what they were for:

"The court ordered me to pay for my ex-wife's divorce lawyer"


I knew coin collectors who would request $200-500 worth of pennies/nickels/dimes at a time, then sort through them looking for coins of value. They claimed to have at least made their investment back.
 
2010-07-15 06:27:13 PM
UNC_Samurai: More importantly, what the hell happened in that area for his property taxes to go up 167%?

Douchebag assessor?

We had a superdouche township assessor who seemingly at random chose addresses to jack their assessments up sky high. When he was up for reelection, he challenged all of his opponent's petition signatures and since many of those people weren't at home in the middle of the day on the single day that the election officials called, the opponent was kicked off the ballot. The guy then ran as a write-in and won by a huge margin because the incumbent assessor was so universally hated.
 
2010-07-15 06:40:28 PM
ignatiusst: Why can't the US have a cool law like that?

Well, according to Snopes, "...the Coinage Act of 1965 specified that all U.S. coins are legal tender in any amount. However, even in cases where legal tender has been agreed to as a form of payment, private businesses are still free to specify which forms of legal tender they will accept."
 
2010-07-15 06:45:47 PM
DrySocket: I knew coin collectors who would request $200-500 worth of pennies/nickels/dimes at a time, then sort through them looking for coins of value.

I can remember doing something similar to this when my dad was stationed overseas. We'd go off base to the various stores that were owned by the locals and ask them for any Mercury Head Dimes, silver certificates, silver coins of any type and the old wheat back pennies. Straight-up trade, 1 Roosevelt dime for one Mercury dime.

/I wonder what ever happened to my coin collection
//bet dad cashed it in after I left home
 
2010-07-15 07:18:25 PM
To be fair, it's Canadian money.
 
2010-07-15 07:40:19 PM
UNC_Samurai: More importantly, what the hell happened in that area for his property taxes to go up 167%?

Its not uncommon at all in these new cookie-cutter suburbs. They build 70 miles from the city, have zero infrastructure, but when the houses are being developed they attract people to what is essentially an insta-city with low tax rates.

Then a few years later everyone realizes they're nowhere close to being able to fund schools, police, fire, whatever and jack up tax rates.

You're going to see a lot of ghost towns in these areas in 10-15 years. I know many people in this situation.
 
2010-07-15 08:25:58 PM
Wow that should get those Teabaggers mad as a hornet...

Let's see:
 
2010-07-15 08:26:14 PM
This trick is old and busted, but I still love when the government (U.S. or Canadian) tries to make the case that the legal tender it coins is only legal tender when it feels like it.
 
2010-07-15 08:26:36 PM
DrySocket: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: When I worked at a bank, a guy came into on one of the other branches in town and asked for thousands of dollars in pennies. They put in a special order for him, and, as they were helping him load up the truck, they asked him what they were for:

"The court ordered me to pay for my ex-wife's divorce lawyer"

I knew coin collectors who would request $200-500 worth of pennies/nickels/dimes at a time, then sort through them looking for coins of value. They claimed to have at least made their investment back.


You mean they broke even after they traded $200-500 in one form of legal tender for the same amount in another legal tender?
Ya don't say...
 
2010-07-15 08:27:11 PM
He should change all those pennies in for nickles, or farking Loons
 
2010-07-15 08:30:17 PM
If the guy has a lot of spare time on his hands, and perhaps he does, he could always pay his bill 25 cents at a time. I doubt there's any law that says you have to pay your tax bill in one single payment.
 
2010-07-15 08:31:37 PM
SwallowTheKnife: DrySocket: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: When I worked at a bank, a guy came into on one of the other branches in town and asked for thousands of dollars in pennies. They put in a special order for him, and, as they were helping him load up the truck, they asked him what they were for:

"The court ordered me to pay for my ex-wife's divorce lawyer"

I knew coin collectors who would request $200-500 worth of pennies/nickels/dimes at a time, then sort through them looking for coins of value. They claimed to have at least made their investment back.

You mean they broke even after they traded $200-500 in one form of legal tender for the same amount in another legal tender?
Ya don't say...


Ahh well played butthead :)

I meant that they had found old coinage worth several hundred dollars beyond what the legal value was worth. They would remove the old coins, then return the coins to the bank and exchange it for more coins.
 
2010-07-15 08:32:23 PM
Good.

I'll give the first guy who did it points for creativity even if it misguidedly punished some grunt wage slave who had no control over whatever issue he was protesting, but these lame-ass unoriginal d-bags can fark off.

Somebody already did it, asshole.
 
2010-07-15 08:33:09 PM
greaser_77: He should change all those pennies in for nickles, or farking Loons

Nope. According to the Currency Act:

Limitation
(2) A payment in coins referred to in subsection (1) is a legal tender for no more than the following amounts for the following denominations of coins:

(a) forty dollars if the denomination is two dollars or greater but does not exceed ten dollars;

(b) twenty-five dollars if the denomination is one dollar;

(c) ten dollars if the denomination is ten cents or greater but less than one dollar;

(d) five dollars if the denomination is five cents; and

(e) twenty-five cents if the denomination is one cent.
 
2010-07-15 08:33:24 PM
if you can't spend it, then don't farking mint it.

Kill the 1 cent or devalue the dollar(s) to make them worth something. Damn USPS keeps the penny alive on this side. Delaware always rounds to nearest $.

On a trip to Germany within the last 2 months, only the grocery stores issues cent/euro coins. Everywhere else just got it to 5 euro cent min (or even 10).
 
2010-07-15 08:34:28 PM
aimtastic: UNC_Samurai: More importantly, what the hell happened in that area for his property taxes to go up 167%?

Douchebag assessor?

We had a superdouche township assessor who seemingly at random chose addresses to jack their assessments up sky high. When he was up for reelection, he challenged all of his opponent's petition signatures and since many of those people weren't at home in the middle of the day on the single day that the election officials called, the opponent was kicked off the ballot. The guy then ran as a write-in and won by a huge margin because the incumbent assessor was so universally hated.


That needs to happen more at all levels of government.
 
2010-07-15 08:41:48 PM
ass pennies? i have ass loonies. go ahead, sniff the loonies in your pocket. hehe.
 
2010-07-15 08:41:59 PM
I'm sorry, but how can it be not legal tender?!?!? It's money issued by their government, and each penny if tendered alone would be honored -- so why should more of them not equal money? That sounds like a nuisance law, rather than a law-law...
 
2010-07-15 08:42:52 PM
I have a credit card from a Canadian bank that is designed for use outside of Canada and is billed in US dollars. I once had a bill for $27.17 (just one small purchase on the card), and went to the bank to pay it off in US cash, bring exact change. The bank refused to accept any US change, despite billing me in USD.

So I paid the $27 in US cash, then made the bank sell me $0.17 in US currency. I had a special account that allowed for currency transactions to be fee-free (except the prevailing exchange rate, of course), so I had to pay something along the lines of C$0.21 to buy US$0.17 to then transfer into my credit card account. That certainly cost them more in time and paperwork than it was worth to refuse my US$0.17 in the first place.
 
2010-07-15 08:45:20 PM
GreenAdder: To be fair, it's Canadian money.

Extreme parity we Canadian dollar also.
 
2010-07-15 08:45:46 PM
Are the result of paying property taxes "payment for any product or service?" Service, possibly, but that's really reaching.

Anyone whose taxes go from $2,400 to $6,400 has all rights to biatch and complain, and even deliver payment in the form of sacks of pennies in my opinion.

/maybe he was well overdue for an assessment.
//maybe the article is lacking in its completeness of info.
 
2010-07-15 08:47:12 PM
amaranthe: I'm sorry, but how can it be not legal tender?!?!? It's money issued by their government, and each penny if tendered alone would be honored -- so why should more of them not equal money? That sounds like a nuisance law, rather than a law-law...

Under the Currency Act, nobody is obliged to accept more than 25 pennies as payment for any product or service


Sounds like an awesome law to protect an individual (not just the city) from some douchebag trying to pay him in pennies. It's not saying pennies aren't legal tender.
 
2010-07-15 08:49:37 PM
Friends of ours own a house in the Czech Republic. Their property taxes just went up 150%.

From $20 to $50.

They were pissed.
 
2010-07-15 08:50:55 PM
ranchguy: if you can't spend it, then don't farking mint it.

Kill the 1 cent or devalue the dollar(s) to make them worth something. Damn USPS keeps the penny alive on this side. Delaware always rounds to nearest $.

On a trip to Germany within the last 2 months, only the grocery stores issues cent/euro coins. Everywhere else just got it to 5 euro cent min (or even 10).


Huh? I spend pennies all the time. Just not assloads of them to low level representatives in my absolutely worthless attempt at sending a message to the higher ups.

This isn't complicated. You are completely within your rights to bring all those pennies to the bank and put them in your bank account. That's their business. With all due respect, if I'm pissed off about taxes, it seems rather hypocritical think that making the process of collecting them more expensive constitutes a valid point. If everyone paid in pennies, that would cost the government, which would cost you and I. If you really wanna make a point, we have this thing called a democracy and politics, and you're more than welcome to become involved in the debate.

And Delaware rounds to the nearest dollar (on state taxes, I assume you're alluding at)? What on earth does this have to do with using pennies to pay taxes? His taxes could have been right on the even dollar mark, and he still would have used the lowest and most inconvenient denomination to attempt to make his point. Does Delaware not have pennies?
 
2010-07-15 08:56:29 PM
Doink_Boink: Are the result of paying property taxes "payment for any product or service?" Service, possibly, but that's really reaching.

Anyone whose taxes go from $2,400 to $6,400 has all rights to biatch and complain, and even deliver payment in the form of sacks of pennies in my opinion.

/maybe he was well overdue for an assessment.
//maybe the article is lacking in its completeness of info.


I'm not sure you understand what a right is. People's rights are not derived from lone or shared opinions until they are codified. I'm not even sure why you would state that he has this right and then realize that we don't know everything about this case.

All I know is no matter how unjust his tax hike was, attempting to pay in pennies wouldn't have done squat to change it and amounts to a simple temper tantrum.
 
2010-07-15 08:59:02 PM
If the Canadian government decided that any quantity of pennies over 25 wasn't legal tender, then they will have to start repackaging rolls of 50 into 25.
 
2010-07-15 08:59:46 PM
greaser_77: He should change all those pennies in for nickles, or farking Loons

They wont take coins and you think they will take a couple of birds having sex?
 
2010-07-15 09:00:21 PM
Friskya: ignatiusst: Why can't the US have a cool law like that?

Well, according to Snopes, "...the Coinage Act of 1965 specified that all U.S. coins are legal tender in any amount. However, even in cases where legal tender has been agreed to as a form of payment, private businesses are still free to specify which forms of legal tender they will accept."


Cool.. did not know that. Does that hold true for the government, though? 'Cause I'd really like to see some tea-bagger try to pay his/her "illegally levied tax" in pennies and have some local mayor be able to legally say, "oh, hell no."
 
2010-07-15 09:02:58 PM
Banks should just charge a premium for shiat like that. You want $10,000 in pennies? Give me $12,000, jackass.
 
2010-07-15 09:03:12 PM
i291.photobucket.com

/i smell calzones!
 
2010-07-15 09:03:41 PM
Hide your chickens: If the Canadian government decided that any quantity of pennies over 25 wasn't legal tender, then they will have to start repackaging rolls of 50 into 25.

Let's just re-paste the big text above.

Under the Currency Act, nobody is obliged to accept more than 25 pennies as payment for any product or service

'nobody is obliged'

You want to hand me a kiddie pool of pennies to pay for that shiat you bought? I can say "nah brah"
 
2010-07-15 09:12:07 PM
ranchguy: On a trip to Germany within the last 2 months, only the grocery stores issues cent/euro coins. Everywhere else just got it to 5 euro cent min (or even 10).

No. I live here.
 
2010-07-15 09:12:41 PM
Canada, you crazy farkers. Pennies are no good, but then you have this damn thing:

www.luxuo.com
 
2010-07-15 09:22:56 PM
howdoibegin:
All I know is no matter how unjust his tax hike was, attempting to pay in pennies wouldn't have done squat to change it and amounts to a simple temper tantrum.


No, a temper tantrum would be if he was just yelling and complaining about how unfair it was and taking no action.

What he did was a publicity stunt. He drew attention to his cause and got a hell of a lot of publicity since this story is now in the local paper and on Fark.

Getting the word out is a good first step to enacting change.
 
2010-07-15 09:23:32 PM
Under the Currency Act, nobody is obliged to accept more than 25 pennies as payment for any product or service

Even if the US had a law like this, he wasn't paying for a product or service. He was paying a debt (his property tax).

In the US, businesses are free to keep you from paying with whatever form they don't want you to pay with (i.e. "no bills over $20 accepted, etc.). I don't think this applies to debts of any kind (paper money has a "this note is legal tender for all debts, public or private"; I believe coinage is covered under the same rules). Going shopping? They can say they don't take cash. Paying your taxes? Different rules.
 
2010-07-15 09:24:35 PM
ignatiusst: Friskya: ignatiusst: Why can't the US have a cool law like that?

Well, according to Snopes, "...the Coinage Act of 1965 specified that all U.S. coins are legal tender in any amount. However, even in cases where legal tender has been agreed to as a form of payment, private businesses are still free to specify which forms of legal tender they will accept."

Cool.. did not know that. Does that hold true for the government, though? 'Cause I'd really like to see some tea-bagger try to pay his/her "illegally levied tax" in pennies and have some local mayor be able to legally say, "oh, hell no."


That's statement is poorly worded. All coins, in any amount are legal tender for all debts. If you owe someone money, they are legally obliged to accept whatever legal tender you provide in repayment. If they do not accept legal tender as payment, the debt is void.

However, there's no law preventing a private citizen from canceling a sale or refusing service because he doesn't like whatever form of payment you are offering.


Also, all currency ever issued by the Federal government of the United States is still legal tender, so, in theory, you could pay a debt off with half-cents. (Though that would be stupid, since half-cents are worth much more than face value to collectors.)
 
2010-07-15 09:24:40 PM
GoldDude: I have a credit card from a Canadian bank that is designed for use outside of Canada and is billed in US dollars. I once had a bill for $27.17 (just one small purchase on the card), and went to the bank to pay it off in US cash, bring exact change. The bank refused to accept any US change, despite billing me in USD.

So I paid the $27 in US cash, then made the bank sell me $0.17 in US currency. I had a special account that allowed for currency transactions to be fee-free (except the prevailing exchange rate, of course), so I had to pay something along the lines of C$0.21 to buy US$0.17 to then transfer into my credit card account. That certainly cost them more in time and paperwork than it was worth to refuse my US$0.17 in the first place.


Not really, they have plans to move that paper currency as needed, they also have a few people who might want the currency who would not be significantly put out if they say, received 4 20s and 2 10s as opposed to 5 20s.

Handling two separate sets of coins however, adds logistics which isn't worth it. They can't do what most companies do (pretend they're the national coin and just keep it in the float) because they're a bank and those shenanigans are frowned upon.
 
pla
2010-07-15 09:25:13 PM
SwallowTheKnife : Sounds like an awesome law to protect an individual (not just the city) from some douchebag trying to pay him in pennies. It's not saying pennies aren't legal tender.

Free hint - If someone ever comes your way and tries to pay you in pennies?

You deserve it. Use the time it will take you to count all those pennies to reevaluate your life choices. Even if nothing more than choosing to work for a shiatty employer, you chose to work there.
 
pla
2010-07-15 09:29:18 PM
howdoibegin : I'm not sure you understand what a right is.

And I don't quite feel certain you know what it means to have a fiat currency. If you accept something other than gold bullion (or food) as a form of payment for your labor, your government (even if no one else) damned well better accept it back at face value.
 
2010-07-15 09:30:52 PM
I like the concept but I think 99 or 100 should be the number. If someone owes $.26 cents they can't pay in pennies? That's as dumb as someone trying to pay 200,000 in pennies.
 
2010-07-15 09:37:15 PM
Easy solution. Pay the property tax in a series of installments of 25 pennies each in rapid succession. Now not only are you being a douche, you're wasting everyone else's time!
 
2010-07-15 09:43:36 PM
ignatiusst: Why can't the US have a cool law like that?

I haven't checked the statutes but I "heard" once that more than $3.00 in pennies wasn't considered to be "legal tender" regarding payment of a debt.
 
2010-07-15 09:45:15 PM
Friskya: ignatiusst: Why can't the US have a cool law like that?

Well, according to Snopes, "...the Coinage Act of 1965 specified that all U.S. coins are legal tender in any amount. However, even in cases where legal tender has been agreed to as a form of payment, private businesses are still free to specify which forms of legal tender they will accept."


Thanks for that info. I should have read your reply before I posted.
 
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