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(The New York Times)   Unique snowflake turns down $40k-per-year job, whines to the NYT about unemployment.   ( nytimes.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass  
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40558 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jul 2010 at 12:07 AM (7 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-07-07 05:52:10 PM  
I'm more with subby on this than not and found it almost amusing that the Times seems to refer to Scott Nicholson (or at least takes him as an example of) as "struggling." If he's 24, been out of school for two years and feels it's appropriate to turn down a 40K starting salary position then I suspect he's not burdened with student loans as he remains in the family hammock.

The father seems to be the most reasonable of the bunch.

Also, what's with the "...handsome as a Marine officer in a recruiting poster" line? Working up the nerve to ask him out, Louis?
 
2010-07-07 06:11:52 PM  
Poor thing. And he appears to be checking his mail at MESSKINS-BE-TAKIN-OUR-JORBS.ORG
 
2010-07-07 06:16:26 PM  
Hey he's a dumbass for turning down the 40K gig. What I loved was how his father and grandfather both were able to stay with one employer 20-30+ years. There's a luxury that's gone forever.
 
2010-07-07 07:09:51 PM  
Of the 20 college classmates with whom he keeps up, 12 are working, but only half are in jobs they "really like."

Boo-f'ing-hoo Scotty. When I graduated college I got to go make 8 bucks an hour for Dish Network. I was helping America's methiest idiots get the TV box working. I worked Wednesday through Sunday 6 AM - 2:30 PM and my "boss" was an 18 year old kid who made his own chain mail suits during his lunch break. I hated it, it sucked. But I did it until I got a better job at a better organization that paid about 26K and sucked a little less. I kept repeating that process until I had a job that I mostly liked.

Sack up, you spoiled dickbag.
 
2010-07-07 07:19:34 PM  
While I'm not doing anything, I may as well advertise in the NYTs that I'm a prima donna
 
2010-07-07 07:31:11 PM  

Iron Nacho Melt: If he's 24, been out of school for two years and feels it's appropriate to turn down a 40K starting salary position then I suspect he's not burdened with student loans as he remains in the family hammock.


His grandparents paid his tuition. But he's still mowing lawns while he waits for his 75k a year job to land in his lap. What a bootstrappy young man.
 
2010-07-07 07:58:55 PM  
Can't see the article unless i'm registered.
 
2010-07-07 08:23:40 PM  
"No one on either side of the family has ever gone through this," Mrs. Nicholson said, "and I guess I'm impatient. I know he is educated and has a great work ethic and wants to start contributing, and I don't know what to do."

Sounds like Snowflake isn't the only one disconnected from reality. When your son turns down the only job offer he's received because it doesn't validate his self-worth, he doesn't have a work ethic.
 
2010-07-07 08:25:15 PM  
Rather than waste early years in dead-end work, he reasoned, he would hold out for a corporate position that would draw on his college training and put him, as he sees it, on the bottom rungs of a career ladder.

Eugh, i know someone like this. They finished uni and expected to walk into a $90k a year job. They held out for two years before they realised that they would have to accept $50k. Now that person's spent the past 5 years bouncing around the industry because it doesn't take too long before the employer realises they have no real experience and either fires them or attempts to bump them down a few grades.
 
2010-07-07 08:33:38 PM  
This guy's about to be flamed by experts. Hell, we even had a warmup with the JFP thread....

Get yer popcorn!
 
2010-07-07 08:35:28 PM  
Via the Inflation calendar (new window) I saw $40k in today's dollars was about the same as I was making when I first started working entry level at my current company. Not great (live in NYC -- at home at the time), but I received raises and promotions pretty quickly. That was over 15 years ago and with the experience I attained (and the additional education on the company's dime) I could have left for much greener pastures after 5 years but chose not to for various reasons.

One thing this kid isn't taking into consideration is that employers question holes in the resume. They are going to wonder what he has been doing in the 2 years since college (well, they won;t when they Google him and find this). I was laid off 6 months after college during the Bush I recession and I took some temp jobs that, though far from glamorous, I could put on my resume (I had to take off the best paying one since that was blue collar and recruiters frowned on it) which resulted in finally getting a full time job.
 
2010-07-07 08:36:34 PM  
x-entertainment.comView Full Size


Clark: "How can they have nothing for their children?"
Ellen: "Well, he's been out of work for close to seven years."
Clark: "In seven years, he couldn't find a job?"
Ellen: "Cathrine says, he's been holding out for a management position."
 
2010-07-07 08:41:04 PM  
This guy needed two years to get profiled in the NY Times? Sucker. I got that out of the way the week I graduated.

/had a job three months later
//would have taken the same job for half the pay, so fark this kid
 
2010-07-07 08:43:58 PM  

FriarReb98: This guy's about to be flamed by experts. Hell, we even had a warmup with the JFP thread....

Get yer popcorn!


Did I miss an epic thread? I just came back to TF in the last hour after the whole weekend off.
 
2010-07-07 08:45:28 PM  
For free access to this article and more, you must be a registered user of NYtimes.com Member ID or
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What a great article!
 
2010-07-07 08:50:51 PM  
"My parents are subtly pointing out that beyond room and board, they are also paying other expenses for me, like my cellphone charges and the premiums on a life insurance policy."

Why do they need life insurance on the kid? It's not like he's providing for anyone. Funeral expenses?
 
2010-07-07 08:54:12 PM  
Read this this morning and wondered how long it'd take to get the story greenlit.

My favorite part is him thinking he'll bus tables if he doesn't find anything by August. Yeah dude, you'll feel really smart turning down 40k for that! That and the fact that he thinks his poli sci major is worth something.
 
2010-07-07 08:54:17 PM  
I also love how oblivious everyone in the article seems to be that the most effective way to form connections is to GET TO WORK. You want to work for a big corporation? You should have taken that job. Chances are you would have eventually done business for one.

I like what his grandfather is saying but he definitely comes off as somewhat narrow-minded.
 
2010-07-07 08:55:13 PM  
I had a roommate in college who was like this moron. He was totally convinced that he would graduate with a bachelor's in accounting and land a 90k a year job right out of school. I didn't bother to follow up on the guy as I could barely stand to be in the same room with him, but the idiot in this article reminds me a lot of him.

Wonder how this guy's job search will go now that his name is linked to an article describing in painstaking detail just how picky he is and turned down a 40k per year job at age 24. HR departments are becoming increasingly Google savvy and this dope just shot himself in the foot with something that will likely be around for years.
 
2010-07-07 09:10:02 PM  
. . . he mailed off a résumé and cover letter - four or five a week, week after week.

Four or five a week? That's not a job search, friend. That's pretending to search for a job while leeching off your parents. If you are serious about a job search, you should be doing a minimum of 4-5 a day, not a week.

/Unless you are set on that CEO job. Those don't come up too often.
 
2010-07-07 09:10:06 PM  
FTA: "When he found one, he mailed off a résumé and cover letter - four or five a week, week after week."

Four or five a WEEK? Oh, my. That poor baby. If he's not careful, he could sprain his precious widdle wrist trying to keep up a blistering pace like slightly less than one per business day.

When *I* was out of work, if I didn't send out at least a dozen résumés a goddamned DAY, I felt so guilty, I could barely cry myself to sleep. And then, to turn up your nose at a $40K a year job that "didn't meet your standards"? And blubber to the effing Times about it besides?!?

This guy's such a turbo-douche, they should hang his picture above the feminine hygiene products aisle at the f**king supermarket.
 
2010-07-07 09:13:10 PM  
I spent a year unemployed after university partying. I still managed to spend a day a week working on a personal project that just happened to impress the right person at the right time to land me a job just as I ran out of money.
 
2010-07-07 09:13:28 PM  
MaxxLarge:

Haha. Beat you to it by 0:00:04.
 
2010-07-07 09:13:42 PM  
I'll take the same farking job for $10k a year right now. And I'm probably qualified for it.
 
2010-07-07 09:16:49 PM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: Haha. Beat you to it by 0:00:04.


You finish fast a lot?
 
2010-07-07 09:19:22 PM  

MaxxLarge: Three Crooked Squirrels: Haha. Beat you to it by 0:00:04.

You finish fast a lot?


Yes.
 
2010-07-07 09:19:29 PM  
fark these assholes, I chalk them right up there with the Farkers I see constantly posting BS about how there's NO JOBS AT ALL ANYWHERE.

The best thing this guy's parents can do for this asshole is to hand him $1,000 cash and throw his ass out on the street and tell him not to call or write until he has made his own way in the world.

Or so, that's what I would do.

/graduated from the school of hard knocks
//best farking school in the world
 
2010-07-07 09:19:50 PM  

Three Crooked Squirrels: Four or five a week? That's not a job search, friend. That's pretending to search for a job while leeching off your parents. If you are serious about a job search, you should be doing a minimum of 4-5 a day, not a week.


That's the point. You will do more than that if you don't have the luxury of at least getting in the vicinity of what you want to do, but he does.

That still doesn't excuse him from turning down that first job. Is he such a momma's boy that he enjoys remaining under his family's thumb? The author gets at this a little bit by writing about how our generation has been doted upon with attention and optimism, but COME ON. No wonder he wants to work for a huge corporation. He must love getting shat on and controlled. I bet his sex life sure is interesting. Or it would be if he didn't live in his parents' house.
 
2010-07-07 09:24:16 PM  
This kid needs a kick to the face.
 
2010-07-07 09:26:10 PM  
We make our own hell.
 
2010-07-07 09:27:06 PM  
40k/year?

They call that "living"?

/seriously?
 
2010-07-07 09:28:02 PM  

August11: We make our own hell.


"Hell is other people."
-Sartre
 
2010-07-07 09:28:24 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: 40k/year?

They call that "living"?

/seriously?


Single? Early-20s? Yeah, you can live comfortably on that.
 
2010-07-07 09:29:44 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: 40k/year?

They call that "living"?


When you're 24, you shouldn't have shiat for bills. Rent, phone, student loan. 40k at 24 would have made me feel like a pimp.

If you make 40K your whole life, you're likely to be hurting come retirement age.
 
2010-07-07 09:32:14 PM  
I have a Master's degree and am landscaping until I get to teach again in the fall. It sucks, but it beats the alternative.
 
2010-07-07 09:32:33 PM  

GreenAdder: August11: We make our own hell.

"Hell is other people."
-Sartre


I love that play. But I have recently run into scores of adult idiots who are just making bad decisions. They are creating these little hell pockets--I am free to avoid them, fortunately. I could tell you stories about these people. And this kid is definitely one of them.
 
2010-07-07 09:36:57 PM  
Hey douchebag, I have a college degree from a pretty decent school, and I just finished my first day working a retail job. So I guess my point is: go cry more, you entitled little shiat.
 
2010-07-07 09:37:55 PM  

August11: I love that play. But I have recently run into scores of adult idiots who are just making bad decisions. They are creating these little hell pockets--I am free to avoid them, fortunately. I could tell you stories about these people. And this kid is definitely one of them.


I've been filling out real applications and online applications, and I've been bothering my college's "employment services" phone number daily. I'll take a McJob right now, as long as it gets me money to work toward my master's degree. I can't believe this little prick turning down a $40k/year job. He could at least live on that money while he searched for greener pastures.
 
2010-07-07 09:38:46 PM  

Gilligann: Can't see the article unless i'm registered.


Same here. When did Fark start greening this kind of crap?
 
2010-07-07 09:39:48 PM  
I get that he sounds like he's got entitlement issues, but what kind of a salary is 40k/yr in the Boston area? I know several of my classmates were offered jobs with Homeland Security in Boston right out of college (04), but they were only willing to offer about $28k/yr, and I KNOW that's not enough to live off of in a northeastern metro area.

Now 40k here in eastern NC? You can actually start making a decent nest egg with that kind of money.
 
2010-07-07 09:40:45 PM  

August11: I could tell you stories about these people. And this kid is definitely one of them.


Well... this is the right thread. Might as well go for broke.
 
2010-07-07 09:45:14 PM  

UNC_Samurai: I get that he sounds like he's got entitlement issues, but what kind of a salary is 40k/yr in the Boston area? I know several of my classmates were offered jobs with Homeland Security in Boston right out of college (04), but they were only willing to offer about $28k/yr, and I KNOW that's not enough to live off of in a northeastern metro area.

Now 40k here in eastern NC? You can actually start making a decent nest egg with that kind of money.


I live in Washington D.C., I make $42k, and I don't even pay attention to how much money I spend because I know I have enough. Boston isn't much more expensive than D.C. unless you think it's your birthright to live in some ungodly expensive area.
 
2010-07-07 09:54:34 PM  

FishyFred: I live in Washington D.C., I make $42k, and I don't even pay attention to how much money I spend because I know I have enough. Boston isn't much more expensive than D.C. unless you think it's your birthright to live in some ungodly expensive area.


$40k is more than enough to live in Michigan. Then again, I'm pretty sure you can buy Michigan for $50k right now.
 
2010-07-07 09:57:18 PM  
American Dream Is Elusive for New Generation

GRAFTON, Mass. - After breakfast, his parents left for their jobs, and Scott Nicholson, alone in the house in this comfortable suburb west of Boston, went to his laptop in the living room. He had placed it on a small table that his mother had used for a vase of flowers until her unemployed son found himself reluctantly stuck at home.

The daily routine seldom varied. Mr. Nicholson, 24, a graduate of Colgate University, winner of a dean's award for academic excellence, spent his mornings searching corporate Web sites for suitable job openings. When he found one, he mailed off a résumé and cover letter - four or five a week, week after week.

Over the last five months, only one job materialized. After several interviews, the Hanover Insurance Group in nearby Worcester offered to hire him as an associate claims adjuster, at $40,000 a year. But even before the formal offer, Mr. Nicholson had decided not to take the job.

Rather than waste early years in dead-end work, he reasoned, he would hold out for a corporate position that would draw on his college training and put him, as he sees it, on the bottom rungs of a career ladder.

"The conversation I'm going to have with my parents now that I've turned down this job is more of a concern to me than turning down the job," he said.

He was braced for the conversation with his father in particular. While Scott Nicholson viewed the Hanover job as likely to stunt his career, David Nicholson, 57, accustomed to better times and easier mobility, viewed it as an opportunity. Once in the door, the father has insisted to his son, opportunities will present themselves - as they did in the father's rise over 35 years to general manager of a manufacturing company.

"You maneuvered and you did not worry what the maneuvering would lead to," the father said. "You knew it would lead to something good."

Complicating the generational divide, Scott's grandfather, William S. Nicholson, a World War II veteran and a retired stock broker, has watched what he described as America's once mighty economic engine losing its pre-eminence in a global economy. The grandfather has encouraged his unemployed grandson to go abroad - to "Go West," so to speak.

"I view what is happening to Scott with dismay," said the grandfather, who has concluded, in part from reading The Economist, that Europe has surpassed America in offering opportunity for an ambitious young man. "We hate to think that Scott will have to leave," the grandfather said, "but he will."

The grandfather's injunction startled the grandson. But as the weeks pass, Scott Nicholson, handsome as a Marine officer in a recruiting poster, has gradually realized that his career will not roll out in the Greater Boston area - or anywhere in America - with the easy inevitability that his father and grandfather recall, and that Scott thought would be his lot, too, when he finished college in 2008.

"I don't think I fully understood the severity of the situation I had graduated into," he said, speaking in effect for an age group - the so-called millennials, 18 to 29 - whose unemployment rate of nearly 14 percent approaches the levels of that group in the Great Depression. And then he veered into the optimism that, polls show, is persistently, perhaps perversely, characteristic of millennials today. "I am absolutely certain that my job hunt will eventually pay off," he said.

For young adults, the prospects in the workplace, even for the college-educated, have rarely been so bleak. Apart from the 14 percent who are unemployed and seeking work, as Scott Nicholson is, 23 percent are not even seeking a job, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The total, 37 percent, is the highest in more than three decades and a rate reminiscent of the 1930s.

The college-educated among these young adults are better off. But nearly 17 percent are either unemployed or not seeking work, a record level (although some are in graduate school). The unemployment rate for college-educated young adults, 5.5 percent, is nearly double what it was on the eve of the Great Recession, in 2007, and the highest level - by almost two percentage points - since the bureau started to keep records in 1994 for those with at least four years of college.

Yet surveys show that the majority of the nation's millennials remain confident, as Scott Nicholson is, that they will have satisfactory careers. They have a lot going for them.

"They are better educated than previous generations and they were raised by baby boomers who lavished a lot of attention on their children," said Andrew Kohut, the Pew Research Center's director. That helps to explain their persistent optimism, even as they struggle to succeed.

So far, Scott Nicholson is a stranger to the triumphal stories that his father and grandfather tell of their working lives. They said it was connections more than perseverance that got them started - the father in 1976 when a friend who had just opened a factory hired him, and the grandfather in 1946 through an Army buddy whose father-in-law owned a brokerage firm in nearby Worcester and needed another stock broker.

From these accidental starts, careers unfolded and lasted. David Nicholson, now the general manager of a company that makes tools, is still in manufacturing. William Nicholson spent the next 48 years, until his retirement, as a stock broker. "Scott has got to find somebody who knows someone," the grandfather said, "someone who can get him to the head of the line."

While Scott has tried to make that happen, he has come under pressure from his parents to compromise: to take, if not the Hanover job, then one like it. "I am beginning to realize that refusal is going to have repercussions," he said. "My parents are subtly pointing out that beyond room and board, they are also paying other expenses for me, like my cellphone charges and the premiums on a life insurance policy."

Scott Nicholson also has connections, of course, but no one in his network of family and friends has been able to steer him into marketing or finance or management training or any career-oriented opening at a big corporation, his goal. The jobs are simply not there.

The Millennials' Inheritance

The Great Depression damaged the self-confidence of the young, and that is beginning to happen now, according to pollsters, sociologists and economists. Young men in particular lost a sense of direction, Glen H. Elder Jr., a sociologist at the University of North Carolina, found in his study, "Children of the Great Depression." In some cases they were forced into work they did not want - the issue for Scott Nicholson.

Military service in World War II, along with the G.I. Bill and a booming economy, restored well-being; by the 1970s, when Mr. Elder did his retrospective study, the hardships of the Depression were more a memory than an open sore. "They came out of the war with purpose in their lives, and by age 40 most of them were doing well," he said, speaking of his study in a recent interview.

The outlook this time is not so clear. Starved for jobs at adequate pay, the millennials tend to seek refuge in college and in the military and to put off marriage and child-bearing. Those who are working often stay with the jobs they have rather than jump to better paying but less secure ones, as young people seeking advancement normally do. And they are increasingly willing to forgo raises, or to settle for small ones.

"They are definitely more risk-averse," said Lisa B. Kahn, an economist at the Yale School of Management, "and more likely to fall behind."

In a recent study, she found that those who graduated from college during the severe early '80s recession earned up to 30 percent less in their first three years than new graduates who landed their first jobs in a strong economy. Even 15 years later, their annual pay was 8 to 10 percent less.

Many hard-pressed millennials are falling back on their parents, as Scott Nicholson has. While he has no college debt (his grandparents paid all his tuition and board) many others do, and that helps force them back home.

In 2008, the first year of the recession, the percentage of the population living in households in which at least two generations were present rose nearly a percentage point, to 16 percent, according to the Pew Research Center. The high point, 24.7 percent, came in 1940, as the Depression ended, and the low point, 12 percent, in 1980.

Striving for Independence

"Going it alone," "earning enough to be self-supporting" - these are awkward concepts for Scott Nicholson and his friends. Of the 20 college classmates with whom he keeps up, 12 are working, but only half are in jobs they "really like." Three are entering law school this fall after frustrating experiences in the work force, "and five are looking for work just as I am," he said.

Like most of his classmates, Scott tries to get by on a shoestring and manages to earn enough in odd jobs to pay some expenses.

The jobs are catch as catch can. He and a friend recently put up a white wooden fence for a neighbor, embedding the posts in cement, a day's work that brought Scott $125. He mows lawns and gardens for half a dozen clients in Grafton, some of them family friends. And he is an active volunteer firefighter.

"As frustrated as I get now, and I never intended to live at home, I'm in a good situation in a lot of ways," Scott said. "I have very little overhead and no debt, and it is because I have no debt that I have any sort of flexibility to look for work. Otherwise, I would have to have a job, some kind of full-time job."

That millennials as a group are optimistic is partly because many are, as Mr. Kohut put it, the children of doting baby boomers - among them David Nicholson and his wife, Susan, 56, an executive at a company that owns movie theaters.

The Nicholsons, whose combined annual income is north of $175,000, have lavished attention on their three sons. Currently that attention is directed mainly at sustaining the self-confidence of their middle son.

"No one on either side of the family has ever gone through this," Mrs. Nicholson said, "and I guess I'm impatient. I know he is educated and has a great work ethic and wants to start contributing, and I don't know what to do."

Her oldest, David Jr., 26, did land a good job. Graduating from Middlebury College in 2006, he joined a Boston insurance company, specializing in reinsurance, nearly three years ago, before the recession.

"I'm fortunate to be at a company where there is some security," he said, adding that he supports Scott in his determination to hold out for the right job. "Once you start working, you get caught up in the work and you have bills to pay, and you lose sight of what you really want," the brother said.

He is earning $75,000 - a sum beyond Scott's reach today, but not his expectations. "I worked hard through high school to get myself into the college I did," Scott said, "and then I worked hard through college to graduate with the grades and degree that I did to position myself for a solid job." (He majored in political science and minored in history.)

It was in pursuit of a solid job that Scott applied to Hanover International's management training program. Turned down for that, he was called back to interview for the lesser position in the claims department.

"I'm sitting with the manager, and he asked me how I had gotten interested in insurance. I mentioned Dave's job in reinsurance, and the manager's response was, 'Oh, that is about 15 steps above the position you are interviewing for,' " Scott said, his eyes widening and his voice emotional.

Scott acknowledges that he is competitive with his brothers, particularly David, more than they are with him. The youngest, Bradley, 22, has a year to go at the University of Vermont. His parents and grandparents pay his way, just as they did for his brothers in their college years.

In the Old Days

Going to college wasn't an issue for grandfather Nicholson, or so he says. With World War II approaching, he entered the Army not long after finishing high school and, in the fighting in Italy, a battlefield commission raised him overnight from enlisted man to first lieutenant. That was "the equivalent of a college education," as he now puts it, in an age when college on a stockbroker's résumé "counted for something, but not a lot."

He spent most of his career in a rising market, putting customers into stocks that paid good dividends, and growing wealthy on real estate investments made years ago, when Grafton was still semi-rural. The brokerage firm that employed him changed hands more than once, but he continued to work out of the same office in Worcester.

When his son David graduated from Babson College in 1976, manufacturing in America was in an early phase of its long decline, and Worcester was still a center for the production of sandpaper, emery stones and other abrasives.

He joined one of those companies - owned by the family of his friend - and he has stayed in manufacturing, particularly at companies that make hand tools. Early on, he and his wife bought the home in which they raised their sons, a white colonial dating from the early 1800s, like many houses on North Street, where the grandparents also live, a few doors away.

David Nicholson's longest stretch was at the Stanley Works, and when he left, seeking promotion, a friend at the Endeavor Tool Company hired him as that company's general manager, his present job.

In better times, Scott's father might have given his son work at Endeavor, but the father is laying off workers, and a job in manufacturing, in Scott's eyes, would be a defeat.

"If you talk to 20 people," Scott said, "you'll find only one in manufacturing and everyone else in finance or something else."

The Plan

Scott Nicholson almost sidestepped the recession. His plan was to become a Marine Corps second lieutenant. He had spent the summer after his freshman year in "platoon leader" training. Last fall he passed the physical for officer training, and was told to report on Jan. 16.

If all had gone well, he would have emerged in 10 weeks as a second lieutenant, committed to a four-year enlistment. "I could have made a career out of the Marines," Scott said, "and if I had come out in four years, I would have been incredibly prepared for the workplace."

It was not to be. In early January, a Marine Corps doctor noticed that he had suffered from childhood asthma. He was washed out. "They finally told me I could reapply if I wanted to," Scott said. "But the sheen was gone."

So he struggles to get a foothold in the civilian work force. His brother in Boston lost his roommate, and early last month Scott moved into the empty bedroom, with his parents paying Scott's share of the $2,000-a-month rent until the lease expires on Aug. 31.

And if Scott does not have a job by then? "I'll do something temporary; I won't go back home," Scott said. "I'll be a bartender or get work through a temp agency. I hope I don't find myself in that position."
 
2010-07-07 09:58:32 PM  

damageddude: Via the Inflation calendar (new window) I saw $40k in today's dollars was about the same as I was making when I first started working entry level at my current company. Not great (live in NYC -- at home at the time), but I received raises and promotions pretty quickly. That was over 15 years ago and with the experience I attained (and the additional education on the company's dime) I could have left for much greener pastures after 5 years but chose not to for various reasons.


Raises and promotions don't exist anymore. Title & job description changes, however, happen quite frequently when they decide to keep the dead weight and the overachievers and lay off the middle third of their workforce.

/Clawed my way from being able to afford to rent a nice place to foodstamps in 10 years! In another 10 years, I'll be picking cans!
 
2010-07-07 10:01:40 PM  

Goimir: Raises and promotions don't exist anymore.


Having received a raise and a promotion (separate from the raise) this year, I'm really getting a kick out of your reply.
 
2010-07-07 10:09:34 PM  
He's lucky

When I was young I had to get up in the morning at ten o'clock at night half an hour before I went to bed, drink a cup of sulfuric acid, work twenty-nine hours a day down mill, and pay mill owner for permission to come to work, and when we got home, our Dad and our mother would kill us and dance about on our graves singing Hallelujah.

And you try and tell the young people of today that ..... they won't believe you.
 
2010-07-07 10:10:56 PM  
Turning down a 40K/yr job as your first job? Yeah, this kid needs a few cockpunches. I make a little more than that and I've been in this job for almost 10 years. You can live very well off 40K in New England if you're careful with your money, even in the Boston area.
 
2010-07-07 10:12:25 PM  
Well if companies weren't knocking down the kid's door to get a piece of this go-getter before the article, I'm sure they will be now.
 
2010-07-07 10:21:23 PM  
I wonder which member of his family got him this interview.
 
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