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(CommonWealth)   Company denies liability for defective railroad ties on grounds of "unreasonable misuse." Apparently they were left outside in bad weather and heavy trains rolled over them   ( commonwealthmagazine.org) divider line
    More: Unlikely, sleepers, MBTA, liability, transit authority, Braintree, Rocla  
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2544 clicks; posted to Business » on 02 Jul 2010 at 1:13 PM (7 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments     (+0 »)
 
 
2010-07-02 01:17:42 PM  
Those ties were strictly ornamental, the state should have realized this.
 
2010-07-02 01:18:22 PM  
Should have used Rearden Steel. I hear it's magical blend makes it super strong and flexible.
 
2010-07-02 01:26:52 PM  
The way i read it, the manufacturer's defense, from a legal standpoint, is that they manufactured the ties to meet the engineering specs that were known at the time, and that reality turned out to exceed those specs.

It's their way of saying "our product sucks, but we were not negligent in creating a sucky product"
 
2010-07-02 01:26:59 PM  
i have seen the ties in question - they are inferior to other concrete ties. BNSF threw there rep out of the office.
 
2010-07-02 01:35:55 PM  

asciibaron: i have seen the ties in question - they are inferior to other concrete ties. BNSF threw there rep out of the office.


Do you know how they were inferior? Lower-quality concrete? Shape deficiencies? Dried wrong? It's been a while since I actually learned anything on this site so I'd appreciate any help.

Also, how did the RRs that did buy the stuff end up with it if it was so obviously inferior. All the RRs named in that article are governments or Amtrak, but that could be coincidence.
 
2010-07-02 01:41:45 PM  

Cookbook's Anarchist: Should have used Rearden Steel. I hear it's magical blend makes it super strong and flexible.


They are about to. I hear Obama personally forced the owner to give up the rights to the medal...
 
2010-07-02 01:42:21 PM  
^*metal

//thats just sad.
 
2010-07-02 02:18:15 PM  
Thermite.
 
2010-07-02 02:35:48 PM  

Manfred J. Hattan: Also, how did the RRs that did buy the stuff end up with it if it was so obviously inferior. All the RRs named in that article are governments or Amtrak, but that could be coincidence.


Of course it's not coincidence. Lowest bidder system. The public entity writes up a spec, gets bids on the spec, and has to go with the lowest bidder. Rewrite the spec to exclude the crappy one, and you're asking for a lawsuit. Doubly so if the low bidder is a minority-female-veteran-owned SBA-approved contractor. A private RR looks at 4 samples, does lifespan analysis (even if it's just Joe at the yard going 'dis is shiat'), and picks the right one.
 
2010-07-02 02:41:14 PM  

Cookbook's Anarchist: Should have used Rearden Steel. I hear it's magical blend makes it super strong and flexible


FTFM, I promise I'm not stupid and do know the difference.
 
2010-07-02 02:46:40 PM  
That does sound like a great business plan, though.

1. produce cheaper product that will last about 10 years
2. Warranty it will last 50 years
3. Sell it at significantly higher price than competition
4. Profit
5. Declare bankruptcy when the claims start to pile up.
 
2010-07-02 03:17:52 PM  
Once I built a railroad, I made it run, made it race against time.
Once I built a railroad; now it's done. Brother, can you spare a dime?
 
2010-07-02 03:47:07 PM  

labman: That does sound like a great business plan, though.

1. produce cheaper product that will last about 10 years
2. Warranty it will last 50 years
3. Sell it at significantly higher price than competition
4. Profit
5. Declare bankruptcy when the claims start to pile up.


That's the American Way! USA! USA! USA!

/remember, kids: it's government that's stupid and can't do anything right and is always to blame; private corporations are universally faultless.
 
2010-07-02 03:57:27 PM  

CitizenTed: remember, kids: it's government Democrats that's stupid and can't do anything right and is always to blame; private corporations Republitardscans are universally faultless.


/amidoinitright?
 
2010-07-02 04:05:37 PM  
Should've sprung for the Monster Ties. They have a special gas injected into them that prevents the train's electrons from destabilizing its trajectory, a phenomenon known as "choo choo riding dirty."
 
2010-07-02 04:15:23 PM  
labman

2. Warranty it will last 50 years

2a. Promise it will last 50 years.
2b. Warranty it for 15 years.

/fixed
 
2010-07-02 04:19:39 PM  
labman : 2. Warranty it will last 50 15 years. Then get salesmen to say it will last 50 years, off the record.

Fixed

/Read the article.
 
2010-07-02 05:17:25 PM  

asciibaron: i have seen the ties in question - they are inferior to other concrete ties. BNSF threw there rep out of the office.


Today I learned that crossties are sometimes made from something other than wood.
 
2010-07-02 05:34:40 PM  

Stibium: asciibaron: i have seen the ties in question - they are inferior to other concrete ties. BNSF threw there rep out of the office.

Today I learned that crossties are sometimes made from something other than wood.


Concrete has been used for decades, worldwide. Steel types are getting popular on low use lower speed lines in Germany. They don't use track circuits for signaling, so it the electrical connection between rails doesn't matter.
 
2010-07-02 07:29:35 PM  
Action Seal Should've sprung for the Monster Ties. They have a special gas injected into them that prevents the train's electrons from destabilizing its trajectory, a phenomenon known as "choo choo riding dirty."

"choo choo riding dirty" sounds like a good time.
 
2010-07-02 08:13:05 PM  
Concrete rail ties can be done well.

I bet they needed a coat of UGL Drylock, or some other water proofing. You take a rigid substance, cast it in forms (where it gets surface bubbles), then take it out and set it in the rain and snow.

As I think about it, one major railway to go with concrete was in Southern Australia. The one with the worlds longest straightaway. If you made ties to their needs, you'd wind up with crap that can't take a New England winter.

I wonder how the Euro rail specs compare to what was made.
 
2010-07-02 09:12:57 PM  

wildcardjack:

I wonder how the Euro rail specs compare to what was made.


Depends on what country. France uses a steel/concrete composite. Germany uses full pre-stressed concrete, though direct fixation and steel types are popular now. Other countries vary. I think Florida was where concrete first showed up in the US, back in the 60's or 70's.

Properly made and properly maintained, concrete beats wood, period. Most US transit agencies don't maintain their track well, and thus have issues...
 
2010-07-02 11:43:29 PM  

PsychoPhil: Concrete has been used for decades, worldwide. Steel types are getting popular on low use lower speed lines in Germany. They don't use track circuits for signaling, so it the electrical connection between rails doesn't matter.


I've seen some advertisements for resin ties; no idea if anyone has used them however.

However, I'm a big fan of direct tract fixation for rail. Mainly because the tunneling/heavy construction company I used to work for did that for a few New Jersey Transit tunnels and any other track work / tie installation we'd sub out...
 
2010-07-03 01:08:04 PM  
sounds like something an american lawyer would say. something really dumb.
 
2010-07-04 12:44:14 PM  
http://www.lr55-rail-road-system.co.uk/

'Nuff said.
 
2010-07-04 08:43:57 PM  
They should have used Thompson's WaterSeal!
 
2010-07-05 04:16:32 AM  

zefal: They should have used Thompson's WaterSeal!


When I read that, I read it in Walter's voice.

www.dynintel.com
 
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