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(Science Daily)   Scientists develop land mine detector using off-the-shelf hardware for 1% of the cost of existing systems. But since when has pure research helped anyone?   (sciencedaily.com ) divider line
    More: Cool  
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5172 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Jun 2010 at 6:35 AM (6 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



33 Comments     (+0 »)
 
 
2010-06-17 06:44:44 AM  
I wonder what mass-producing this Cambodian guy would cost.

/Balls of DU
 
2010-06-17 06:45:30 AM  
This will get shut down, there is no commercial interest in a system that costs only $10,000. Every defense contractor out there will try to buy the system and bury it. Preferably in a minefield.
 
2010-06-17 06:45:41 AM  
Monkeys, kittens and children are free. Take that science!
 
2010-06-17 06:58:36 AM  
For the love of god just keep them away from the ice. and don't let them stack any cannonballs...
 
2010-06-17 07:03:10 AM  

Tikiman1000: For the love of god just keep them away from the ice. and don't let them stack any cannonballs...


so it goes
 
2010-06-17 07:16:45 AM  
OMG Microwaves!11 They'll all get teh cancer!

/This is awesome
 
2010-06-17 07:27:09 AM  
Cool invention. But wrt the headline, how is this "pure" research? This comes straight out of applied research...
 
2010-06-17 07:42:16 AM  
State_College_Arsonist: I wonder what mass-producing this Cambodian guy would cost.

Holy shiat.
 
2010-06-17 07:44:11 AM  

BolloxReader: This will get shut down, there is no commercial interest in a system that costs only $10,000. Every defense contractor out there will try to buy the system and bury it. Preferably in a minefield.


I figure they'll probably want to sell it to humanitarian groups, like that badass Cambodian guy from the Boobies. As you said, there's not really any money in it, so unless they planned on selling it to a defense contractor from the first they surely intended it for more altruistic purposes.
 
2010-06-17 07:59:00 AM  

outatime: State_College_Arsonist: I wonder what mass-producing this Cambodian guy would cost.

Holy shiat.


Yes, friend, you are looking at the toughest, most hardcore motherfarker you will ever see in your entire life. I can't remember the ballpark number, but that guy has done that shiat thousands of times. He has, in all likelihood, saved the lives and/or limbs of hundreds of people. He also trains others to do that, which I would never do because compared to that guy I am a sniveling little girl who pisses her panties when a small dog barks at her.

To paraphrase one of the youtube comments, he only used those tools for the camera. Generally he just farks the mine and it disarms. The only fear he knows is that his gigantic balls might set off a landmine, as they drag along the ground when he's walking through the jungle looking for landmines.
 
2010-06-17 08:07:00 AM  

BolloxReader: This will get shut down, there is no commercial interest in a system that costs only $10,000. Every defense contractor out there will try to buy the system and bury it. Preferably in a minefield.


No, it won't. It will get co-opted, but it will have to be brought up to Mil-Spec by an ISO9000/CMMI level 5 company and extensive process will be applied and testing done and then...

well, it'll cost a bit more. But it will still be cheaper. And the gov't will use BOTH the old system and the new system.

/Defense contractors are out to give the gov't whatever they want. And what they want is crazy shiat. "Make it cheap, but make it conform to a rigid development process." A contradictory statement if there ever was one.
 
MIU
2010-06-17 08:11:53 AM  

BigDamn: Cool invention. But wrt the headline, how is this "pure" research? This comes straight out of applied research...


Came here to say something similar.
 
2010-06-17 08:23:52 AM  
Technically speaking, military-industrial made machinery costs alot because they take a great deal of research and development only to result in a minuscule production run of high quality things (That is before you count the cost of "build it in my state" politics).

If you then use the knowledge of how that something works and replicate the end product using stuff you find at the local radio shack and unskilled labor, the price drops drastically.
 
2010-06-17 08:27:30 AM  
Good news, military is willing to buy it at a 3000% markup.
 
2010-06-17 08:32:10 AM  
Oh great, now those third world countries will be able to bypass our perimeter defense systems.
 
2010-06-17 08:49:00 AM  
"an ultrasound technique to first shake the ground and then a microwave component to detect ground motion that indicates location of the land mine"

Shaking the ground containing line mines?! I suspect you won't need a sophisticated detector after that - just look out for the 'FLASH - BOOM' which happens next.
 
2010-06-17 08:51:33 AM  

State_College_Arsonist: I wonder what mass-producing this Cambodian guy would cost.

/Balls of DU


i228.photobucket.com

Cigrit??
 
2010-06-17 08:55:40 AM  

BolloxReader: This will get shut down, there is no commercial interest in a system that costs only $10,000. Every defense contractor out there will try to buy the system and bury it. Preferably in a minefield.


Of course there is, commercial interest wants the best price and the best equipment, sounds like this is exactly that. Anyone on the buying end would look to this. What you mean to say is the military has no interest in this due to governmental and bureaucratic bullshiat, since it's not made by one of their current contractors.
 
2010-06-17 08:58:05 AM  

The_Time_Master: Oh great, now those third world countries will be able to bypass our perimeter defense systems.


Not sure if serious, but the US only uses Claymore mines, which you don't need a detector to see, and are almost never deployed for automatic detonation. These detectors would be pretty useless against Claymores.
 
2010-06-17 08:58:13 AM  

mekkab: It will get co-opted, but it will have to be brought up to Mil-Spec by an ISO9000/CMMI level 5 company and extensive process will be applied and testing done and then...


To be used by the U.S. military, anyway. Because defense contractors don't like competition.

Nothing stopping this guy from using the technology now, which is slightly more important because to U.S. troops, landmines are a future, probable threat. They can afford to dick around to increase its reliability to the point where even 17-year-old dropouts can't break it. To the people this guy's helping, landmines are an immediate, real threat. He needs it NOW.

/ I swear, most mil-spec standards are more to protect equipment against 17-year-old dropout idiocy than bullets
// No wonder the standards are so strict
 
2010-06-17 09:34:58 AM  
img1.fark.net

Seriously. Landmines are barbaric. It disgusts me that the US hasn't banned them.
 
2010-06-17 09:48:16 AM  

Darth Otter: Seriously. Landmines are barbaric. It disgusts me that the US hasn't banned them.


We haven't banned them because they are a major part of our defense of the Korean DMZ. We don't use them indiscriminately and then leave them for civilians to run into. Banning them wouldn't do anything but hurt our ability to slow down NK.
 
2010-06-17 10:26:03 AM  

State_College_Arsonist: I wonder what mass-producing this Cambodian guy would cost.

/Balls of DU


wow - amazing. How does he find them?!?
Looks like some are made of plastic, and just one leaf or an 1/8" of dirt on top and blammo.

Impressive guy. thanks for the video link.
 
2010-06-17 10:29:47 AM  

IcyBlackHand: Darth Otter: Seriously. Landmines are barbaric. It disgusts me that the US hasn't banned them.

We haven't banned them because they are a major part of our defense of the Korean DMZ. We don't use them indiscriminately and then leave them for civilians to run into. Banning them wouldn't do anything but hurt our ability to slow down NK.


And when this NK business finally gets settled, there's going to be a shiatload of landmines that will be forgotten about.

Which is why they are a bad idea.
 
2010-06-17 10:31:20 AM  

State_College_Arsonist: I wonder what mass-producing this Cambodian guy would cost.

/Balls of DU



If you press this, it'll blow up (tap tap tap) this right here (tap) don't ever press this at all (tap tap tap tap) it'll go boom (tap tap)
 
2010-06-17 11:07:19 AM  
They have existed for years, they are called "orphans" duuuhhhh
 
2010-06-17 12:19:51 PM  
"Land mines are an enormous problem around the world for both military personnel and civilians," explains Scales. "We've developed an ultrasound technique to first shake the ground and then a microwave component to detect ground motion that indicates location of the land mine. We hope that the two components together enable us to detect the land mines in a safe fashion, from a distance."

And we're back to the problem of overselling a solution when the product is not even functional for sale yet.

Good luck on that Marketing Failure Club.

// Oh and thank you Newt Gingrich + Republican jackasses for destroying the requirement for patents to have "A functional working real-world product of detailed specification" prior to achieving a patent grant. Republican Revolution my ass!
// So much nicer now that "One-Click Patent Approvals" can cover things which never function, are vaguely described, or simply do not exist and can never (by the laws of physics) ever exist.
 
2010-06-17 12:56:38 PM  

Barakku: Not sure if serious, but the US only uses Claymore mines. . .


Maybe in video games. In the real world, the US has over a dozen (new window) types of land mines in the inventory.
 
2010-06-17 01:36:43 PM  

Mighty_Joe: In the real world, the US has over a dozen (new window) types of land mines in the inventory.


Dude, the Pentagon will buy $20 million in stuffed pink rabbits if Senator Senile's nephew owns stock in the company. Whenever anyone comes within sniffing distance of the DoD's corruption, the Republicans scream "NATIONAL DEFENSE!!" and all the auditors are shown the door by jingoistic yes men. There is not a single person within the entire chain of command who uses money efficiently, because if you do, well, you're an eyesore. So I fully believe we do have landmines in inventory. Over a dozen, even.

However, I'll be somewhat surprised if we actually use them for anything other than filling a hangar staffed by "top men", because they're not all that appealing as a tool for our military's modus operandi. We haven't seen a land invasion since the 19th century. We typically take and patrol territory, and often do so because some corporation or other lobbied us to go to war in the first place. Land mines are a sort of "scorched earth" tactic designed to prevent people from crossing A to B ever again. It's not like they vanish or disarm when the war's over. You can't patrol a minefield. You can't farm a minefield. You can't build a factory or pipeline on a minefield. In fact, the very reason why the hero in TFA is digging up mines is because they prevent investors from sending engineers to build stuff in an area where they might get their legs blown off. As a result, the devastation isn't so much in the sad pictures of legless children as the children are also starving because the land is useless until it's declared safe by minesweepers.
 
2010-06-17 03:31:31 PM  

TsukasaK: IcyBlackHand: Darth Otter: Seriously. Landmines are barbaric. It disgusts me that the US hasn't banned them.

We haven't banned them because they are a major part of our defense of the Korean DMZ. We don't use them indiscriminately and then leave them for civilians to run into. Banning them wouldn't do anything but hurt our ability to slow down NK.

And when this NK business finally gets settled, there's going to be a shiatload of landmines that will be forgotten about.

Which is why they are a bad idea.


I would suspect that we didn't place them all willy nilly in the jungle, but instead used them at specific locations. Nothing a few thousand pounds of bombs won't clear up. Bombs, is there anything they can't do?
 
2010-06-17 04:09:43 PM  

johan heggs tiny man nipples: They have existed for years, they are called "orphans" duuuhhhh


Was going to say the same thing, but include a picture of said landmine detectors.
 
2010-06-17 09:51:25 PM  

DeathByGeekSquad: TsukasaK: IcyBlackHand: Darth Otter: Seriously. Landmines are barbaric. It disgusts me that the US hasn't banned them.

We haven't banned them because they are a major part of our defense of the Korean DMZ. We don't use them indiscriminately and then leave them for civilians to run into. Banning them wouldn't do anything but hurt our ability to slow down NK.

And when this NK business finally gets settled, there's going to be a shiatload of landmines that will be forgotten about.

Which is why they are a bad idea.

I would suspect that we didn't place them all willy nilly in the jungle, but instead used them at specific locations. Nothing a few thousand pounds of bombs won't clear up. Bombs, is there anything they can't do?


Yes, because the farmer who wants to put down crops in that field full of mines would love to have it turned into a field of smoking craters. And that engineer will just adore you for turning what WAS good foundations for buildings into gravel with sustained bombing.

Please use your brain before pulling out the "DURP BOMB IT" approach.
 
2010-06-18 06:09:29 AM  
And they built it in a cave. FROM A BOX OF SCRAPS!
 
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