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(Daily Mail)   After a man goes blind trying to descend Mt. Everest, his fellow mountain climbers risk their lives making sure he made it back safely. Just kidding. The abandoned him and left him to die   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 370
    More: Sad, Mount Everest, mountaineers, highest mountain, blindness, coordination, cerebral hemorrhages, Montana  
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37901 clicks; posted to Main » on 02 Jun 2010 at 12:15 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-06-02 01:17:11 AM
Your Average Witty Fark User: Andromeda: In the middle of reading Into Thin Air right now and this seems par for the intense conditions on the mountain (because if they didn't leave this guy they would have died themselves). The amount of pain and danger even the people who safely get to the top (and back!) are so intense that I couldn't imagine ever doing it.

The worst possible book you could read on the '96 Everest disaster. Krakauer is an arrogant, pompous asshole who laid the bulk of the blame on the one man who did the most to save the lost and dying. Read "The Climb" by Anatoli Boukreev. Not only was Boukreev an accomplished climber who knew his shiat, he actually tried to save people, not just whine about it after the fact.


THIS.

killed not long after on Annapurna (IIRC).
 
2010-06-02 01:17:41 AM
jshine: ohnonotfloridaagain: Thank you for not answering the question - asked in good faith - of what the sherpas do that is the opposite of fettering.

"Fetter" means to restrain from progress. The Sherpas are known for assisting climbers.

I wasn't trying to be a dick about it, but I honestly thought that the definition would speak for itself.


It seems that there's a missing definition in the listing for that word.
 
2010-06-02 01:18:37 AM
Death rate on K2, 23.24%, Nanga Parbat 22.40%, Annapurna 42.85%. Guess which one has been climbed the least? If you want safe, Cho Oyu 1.46%.
 
2010-06-02 01:19:52 AM
WhyteRaven74: Abox: I think the Everest climb is more foolhardy than brave.

All told, Everest isn't the deadliest mountain around, not by a long shot. Among mountains over 8,000 meters, it's actually one of the safer ones. Now K2 or Annapurna or even Nanga Parbat? Yeah, those are seriously dangerous.



But what is the permit cost for those mountains? That factors into the death zone decision making process by both climbers and guides.
 
2010-06-02 01:20:07 AM
category_five: FTA:
Over four hours they managed to reach an area called Mushroom Rock at about 28,200ft - well in the 'death zone' above 26,000ft, where it is impossible for the human body to acclimatise.

The rescue team did everything in their power to help Peter for about 12 hours coming dangerously close to needing their own rescue and not returning themselves


Yeah, spending twelve hours in a "death zone" waiting for Brain-Bubbles McGee to magically regain his vision - not gonna happen. See ya!

Moving on from the justification for leaving him, let's discuss what a tremendous prick Blind Guy was; This asshole knew about the intermittent blindness beforehand and "seemed unsurprised" when it occurred. He put his entire party at risk by going up with known neurological problems. He got was what coming and tried to take as many people as possible out with him.

Seriously, it's like Special-Ed Fred using the Americans with Disabilities Act to force his way onto first string of your high school football team, except instead of lawyering his way in he just hid his condition and instead risking the loss of a game he risked everyone's lives.


I'm guessing a followup article will say that he found out he was dying and wanted to finish the Seven Summit Challenge before he croaked. The first time he went blind resulted in him to going to the doctor where he learned the horrible truth.

At least I assume he went to a doctor the first time he went blind.
 
2010-06-02 01:20:51 AM
WhyteRaven74: Death rate on K2, 23.24%, Nanga Parbat 22.40%, Annapurna 42.85%. Guess which one has been climbed the least? If you want safe, Cho Oyu 1.46%.

I have a mound of dirt in my yard that is 100% safe to climb.

Even if you fall from the summit there's this soft, grasslike substance to break your fall.
 
2010-06-02 01:20:53 AM
I often wonder what would be the use of carrying a helium canister and balloon, and floating off the mountain should conditions deteriorate.

That would be badass.
 
2010-06-02 01:21:42 AM
They almost the whole party.
 
2010-06-02 01:22:10 AM
Gilligann: category_five: FTA:
Over four hours they managed to reach an area called Mushroom Rock at about 28,200ft - well in the 'death zone' above 26,000ft, where it is impossible for the human body to acclimatise.

The rescue team did everything in their power to help Peter for about 12 hours coming dangerously close to needing their own rescue and not returning themselves


Yeah, spending twelve hours in a "death zone" waiting for Brain-Bubbles McGee to magically regain his vision - not gonna happen. See ya!

Moving on from the justification for leaving him, let's discuss what a tremendous prick Blind Guy was; This asshole knew about the intermittent blindness beforehand and "seemed unsurprised" when it occurred. He put his entire party at risk by going up with known neurological problems. He got was what coming and tried to take as many people as possible out with him.

Seriously, it's like Special-Ed Fred using the Americans with Disabilities Act to force his way onto first string of your high school football team, except instead of lawyering his way in he just hid his condition and instead risking the loss of a game he risked everyone's lives.

I'm guessing a followup article will say that he found out he was dying and wanted to finish the Seven Summit Challenge before he croaked. The first time he went blind resulted in him to going to the doctor where he learned the horrible truth.

At least I assume he went to a doctor the first time he went blind.


I went to the doctor the second and third time I went blind, but the fourth time I was all "Ah it'll go away" and now I'm not blind anymore.

/Wow am I ever getting tired.
 
2010-06-02 01:23:04 AM
arrogant adrenaline junkie who shouldn't have been there in the first place, dies. story at 11
 
2010-06-02 01:23:18 AM
Eh, I'll stick with even safer...

img694.imageshack.us
 
2010-06-02 01:23:23 AM
LavenderWolf: jshine: ohnonotfloridaagain: Thank you for not answering the question - asked in good faith - of what the sherpas do that is the opposite of fettering.

"Fetter" means to restrain from progress. The Sherpas are known for assisting climbers.

I wasn't trying to be a dick about it, but I honestly thought that the definition would speak for itself.

It seems that there's a missing definition in the listing for that word.


fettering in this context is basically a sherpa tying himself to a rich, unqualified climber and dragging that person up and down the mountain.
 
2010-06-02 01:23:47 AM
Elfich: you can feel free to attempt to carry the other end of the rope up to the summit

They have fixed ropes on Everest, lots of them. Some have been in place for ages, sure they have to be checked on and occasionally refixed but they hold up alright. There are even ladders on Everest.

Ow! That was my feelings!: killed not long after on Annapurna (IIRC).

Yep, the year after the Everest disaster.
 
2010-06-02 01:24:39 AM
CabinBoy: These are the types of stories I find amusing. There is always someone shocked when something goes awry while people are engaged in extremely risky behavior. My favorite stories are when people meet an untimely end during the Running of the Bulls, human popsicle posing on Mount Everest, or midnight rabid beaver juggling.

I'm seeing my fiancee for the first time in 4 months tomorrow. I plan to be doing some of this "midnight beaver juggling."
 
2010-06-02 01:24:59 AM
Abox: You spend tens of thousands of dollars and with all that money, time, and preparation at stake have to make life and death decisions in the brain addling thin air of the death zone.

Indeed. I'd rather spend the money addling my brain with beer. That shiat's crazy.
 
2010-06-02 01:25:19 AM
Sygerrik: Also, he had (possibly) a brain hemorrhage. That's not a safe place to have a potentially life threatening medical emergency.

I intend to climb Everest, and even training for it is punishing, expensive and brutal. It is one of the most difficult things human beings can do. Even in modern conditions, which are one step away from a guided tour, it requires specialist equipment and a team of incredibly skilled experts preparing every step of the way for you. Conditions must be perfect and, like a NASA launch, slightly bad conditions can doom an attempt. I feel bad for the guy, but he died doing one of the bravest and most incredible things people can do. These things happen.


Dying doing something that benefits nobody but yourself and has a high chance of death is not brave, it's stupid(call it foolhardy if you wish). Yes, it takes tons of training and expertise to pull it off and it's an impressive feat, but that doesn't make it any less stupid of a way to die.

Wikipedia says the death rate is about 1 per 20 total ascents, which makes it a little bit more dangerous than playing russian roulette with one bullet hidden in four revolvers...to put it in perspective.

Yeah, that's a stupid thing to do.
 
2010-06-02 01:25:27 AM
bulldg4life

Considering the frostbite you'd get from trying to eat a handful while climbing...you better really f*cking like skittles

Come to think of it, in extreme cold, those skittles would be about as useful as a handful of gravel.

/more into rock climbing.
 
2010-06-02 01:25:39 AM
Kaiku: Maybe he was just gay?

So why did he find it so hard to go down?
 
2010-06-02 01:26:03 AM
WhyteRaven74: Abox: I think the Everest climb is more foolhardy than brave.
All told, Everest isn't the deadliest mountain around, not by a long shot. Among mountains over 8,000 meters, it's actually one of the safer ones. Now K2 or Annapurna or even Nanga Parbat? Yeah, those are seriously dangerous.


Nanga Parbat? Pssshhh. Try walking through Tijuana after 10:00 PM while white. Now that's danger.


AbbeySomeone: I dunno. MrS likes to juggle my beaver and his end has always been timely.

Do you hear that sound? It's the sound of hundreds of farkers suddenly crying out in anguish after clicking Abbey's profile and finding no pics.
 
2010-06-02 01:26:59 AM
Ow! That was my feelings!: LavenderWolf: jshine: ohnonotfloridaagain: Thank you for not answering the question - asked in good faith - of what the sherpas do that is the opposite of fettering.

"Fetter" means to restrain from progress. The Sherpas are known for assisting climbers.

I wasn't trying to be a dick about it, but I honestly thought that the definition would speak for itself.

It seems that there's a missing definition in the listing for that word.

fettering in this context is basically a sherpa tying himself to a rich, unqualified climber and dragging that person up and down the mountain.


All we need to do is start bribing sherpas into leaving them there.

/going up a mountain unqualified is like going up in the space shuttle after a tour of a NASA facility.
 
2010-06-02 01:29:06 AM
SharkInfested: my book on the flight(s) to Nepal? Touching the Void. Bad choice!

An unfortunate strong memory? I remember where I was when I heard Michael Hutchins died. In a café in Nepal with a lot of weepy Aussies. Man up, sissy pants!


Who the hell is Michael Hutchins?
 
2010-06-02 01:29:43 AM
Good.

/dnrta
 
2010-06-02 01:31:13 AM
CabinBoy: These are the types of stories I find amusing. There is always someone shocked when something goes awry while people are engaged in extremely risky behavior. My favorite stories are when people meet an untimely end during the Running of the Bulls, human popsicle posing on Mount Everest, or midnight rabid beaver juggling.


I must hear more about this. Link, please?
 
2010-06-02 01:31:30 AM
I've never heard of going down causing blindness before.
 
2010-06-02 01:31:43 AM
gadian: I'm curious as to why they didn't bag him and rope him down. I've seen some really amazing technical rope work on higher peaks. Maybe they tried, well, I hope they tried.

Sherpas only put up with the low pay, heavy workload, and no recognition for those perfect moments when they can sacrifice a foreigner to Chomolangma. A small revenge for the indignity of having to serve arrogant tourists who come to fornicate on one of their sacred places(they hate that), leaving trash everywhere while insisting on being dragged to the top 'because it's there'.
 
2010-06-02 01:32:35 AM
Gilligann:
I'm guessing a followup article will say that he found out he was dying and wanted to finish the Seven Summit Challenge before he croaked. The first time he went blind resulted in him to going to the doctor where he learned the horrible truth.
At least I assume he went to a doctor the first time he went blind.


Seriously, I'm guessing inoperable brain tumor.
 
2010-06-02 01:32:47 AM
WhyteRaven74: Elfich: you can feel free to attempt to carry the other end of the rope up to the summit

They have fixed ropes on Everest, lots of them. Some have been in place for ages, sure they have to be checked on and occasionally refixed but they hold up alright. There are even ladders on Everest.


I agree with you. There are ropes/ladders that are kept clear to allow people to climb the mountain with a reduced likely-hood of death.

Installing a one-way zip-line that allows someone a rapid decent off the summit is another animal entirely. As a couple of other people mentioned above you would need to have a high tension cable that is tens of thousands of feet long and capable of withstanding the elements, and having a reliable method of keeping ice from building up on the cable.

My real fear is if the cable was successfully installed: Ice build up would prevent use of the zip line and trap someone several hundred feet in the air and unable to ascend or descend. This of course assumes that the weight of the ice on the cable doesn't pull the whole thing down.
 
2010-06-02 01:32:52 AM
socalnewwaver: Andromeda:

"In the middle of reading Into Thin Air right now"

do yourself a favor and read this book after you finish into thin air. krakauer is a pretty sloppy writer, and has been challenged in several instances as being very loose with the facts...

/i've read both


i second this
the Boukreev book is way better.
and he didn't just hide in his tent the whole time like Krakauer
 
2010-06-02 01:32:57 AM
Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: Damn you, The. DAMN YOU!!!

The mods have been blind lately.
 
2010-06-02 01:33:54 AM
Also, FTFA: "Mr Kinloch was attempting the Seven Summit Challenge - taking on the tallest mountains on all seven continents. It has been achieved by only a handful of people."
AND
"Mr Kinloch, a police civilian worker described as 'supremely physically fit and not the sort of person to take risks'"


Ha, doing it wrong.
 
2010-06-02 01:33:55 AM
scrapetv.com

/too easy ....
 
2010-06-02 01:37:06 AM
category_five: Nanga Parbat? Pssshhh. Try walking through Tijuana after 10:00 PM while white. Now that's danger.

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2010-06-02 01:37:30 AM
Abox: But what is the permit cost for those mountains?

For K2 the permit has hardly cheap, and getting there is a bunch harder than getting to Everest.
 
2010-06-02 01:38:14 AM
J. Boone Pickens: tzzhc4: Sygerrik: I intend to climb Everest

Why?

Because it's there.


That is exactly why. No joke.

Explodo:
Dying doing something that benefits nobody but yourself and has a high chance of death is not brave, it's stupid(call it foolhardy if you wish). Yes, it takes tons of training and expertise to pull it off and it's an impressive feat, but that doesn't make it any less stupid of a way to die.

Wikipedia says the death rate is about 1 per 20 total ascents, which makes it a little bit more dangerous than playing russian roulette with one bullet hidden in four revolvers...to put it in perspective.

Yeah, that's a stupid thing to do.


Everybody dies of something. It's there, and it's hard, and it's my life. It's a challenge. It's the kind of thing that is out there to do, and if I lay somewhere dying without having done it, I will regret it. If you don't understand the motivation to do something like climbing Everest, I totally understand your position and don't begrudge it to you, but I doubt I could ever communicate my reasons for wanting to do it. Just wish me luck, and know that, if Fark is still around when I do it (tenuously scheduled for 2017) I will post all about it.
 
2010-06-02 01:40:33 AM
Rashnu: Sherpas only put up with the low pay, heavy workload, and no recognition for those perfect moments when they can sacrifice a foreigner to Chomolangma. A small revenge for the indignity of having to serve arrogant tourists who come to fornicate on one of their sacred places(they hate that), leaving trash everywhere while insisting on being dragged to the top 'because it's there'.

Daaaarling,

The ascent of Everest is going quite well. The sled arrived in serviceable condition. We are having trouble finding Sherpas large enough to fit the harness, but lord willing we will fill the last two spots. Will write again after the we descend.

Love,

Your snookie wookums.
 
2010-06-02 01:42:51 AM
His fault. Don't climb mount Everest. It's dangerous. Thanks.
 
2010-06-02 01:43:06 AM
Explodo: has a high chance of death

Current death rate on Everest is about 4.4%. Not the most dangerous thing one can attempt, not by a long shot.

Elfich: As a couple of other people mentioned above you would need to have a high tension cable that is tens of thousands of feet long and capable of withstanding the elements,

There's an even bigger problem. There really isn't a route on Everest that would make it possible.
 
2010-06-02 01:43:51 AM
category_five: Love,

Your snookie wookums.


God, even after all these years I still miss her so much.
 
2010-06-02 01:44:15 AM
As for dangerous activities, the water speed record. Of the last four people to attempt it, three have died trying.
 
2010-06-02 01:44:32 AM
Explodo: Wikipedia says the death rate is about 1 per 20 total ascents, which makes it a little bit more dangerous than playing russian roulette with one bullet hidden in four revolvers...to put it in perspective.

I'd say now is the perfect time to go then.
 
2010-06-02 01:46:18 AM
A year ago I was at Santa Fe for the Wilderness Medicine conference. (new window) I wholeheartedly recommend it. A bunch of the speakers there had served at the clinic in Base Camp.

They really hammered home the point about the extreme environment. Even at sea level, over rough terrain it takes a minimum of 8 people to carry 1 incapacitated patient continuously (4 man carry with 4 relief bearers). At extreme altitude, the climbers and Sherpas are barely able to carry their own body and equipment weight, much less the weight of the patient. As most of the posters here have correctly pointed out, leaving the patient was really the only course of action that wouldn't have resulted in more dead bodies.

Medical care is an extreme challenge even at Base Camp. One doc described watching a group of climbers and Sherpas trying to bring back her friend, a Sherpa who had started to have abdominal cramping. The patient deteriorated from ambulatory to litter (appendicitis IIRC) and despite being within line of sight and visible distance from the entrance to the medical tent at Base Camp, the poor guy died before he could get back to Base Camp.

Compare that story to the situation in TFA. Mr. Kinloch was only 800 feet from the summit, above the dead zone. If you can't move on your own, you're already dead.

TL:DR version - Subby doesn't know what he's talking about.
 
2010-06-02 01:47:43 AM
scrapetv.com

next...
 
2010-06-02 01:48:25 AM
Once they abandoned him, it was all downhill from there.
 
2010-06-02 01:50:27 AM
WelldeadLink: Once they abandoned him, it was all downhill from there.

Aaaaaand we're done.
 
2010-06-02 01:51:33 AM
WhyteRaven74: Annapurna 42.85%

boukreef died there in 1997. avalanche yo. never doing annapurna.
 
2010-06-02 01:52:34 AM
Abox: WhyteRaven74: Abox: I think the Everest climb is more foolhardy than brave.

All told, Everest isn't the deadliest mountain around, not by a long shot. Among mountains over 8,000 meters, it's actually one of the safer ones. Now K2 or Annapurna or even Nanga Parbat? Yeah, those are seriously dangerous.


But what is the permit cost for those mountains? That factors into the death zone decision making process by both climbers and guides.


25000 american duckets.
 
2010-06-02 01:54:26 AM
WhyteRaven74: Explodo: has a high chance of death

Current death rate on Everest is about 4.4%. Not the most dangerous thing one can attempt, not by a long shot.

Elfich: As a couple of other people mentioned above you would need to have a high tension cable that is tens of thousands of feet long and capable of withstanding the elements,

There's an even bigger problem. There really isn't a route on Everest that would make it possible.


Just shoot the line over to Annapurna.
 
2010-06-02 01:54:27 AM
WelldeadLink: Once they abandoned him, it was all downhill from there.

I wonder if he saw it that way
 
2010-06-02 01:54:42 AM
RayD8: Explodo: Wikipedia says the death rate is about 1 per 20 total ascents, which makes it a little bit more dangerous than playing russian roulette with one bullet hidden in four revolvers...to put it in perspective.

I'd say now is the perfect time to go then.


www.gamestar.com
Likes those odds

/sorry, couldn't find a screen cap of him juggling revolvers...
 
2010-06-02 01:56:02 AM
rabidferret: A year ago I was at Santa Fe for the Wilderness Medicine conference. (new window) I wholeheartedly recommend it. A bunch of the speakers there had served at the clinic in Base Camp.

They really hammered home the point about the extreme environment. Even at sea level, over rough terrain it takes a minimum of 8 people to carry 1 incapacitated patient continuously (4 man carry with 4 relief bearers). At extreme altitude, the climbers and Sherpas are barely able to carry their own body and equipment weight, much less the weight of the patient. As most of the posters here have correctly pointed out, leaving the patient was really the only course of action that wouldn't have resulted in more dead bodies.

Medical care is an extreme challenge even at Base Camp. One doc described watching a group of climbers and Sherpas trying to bring back her friend, a Sherpa who had started to have abdominal cramping. The patient deteriorated from ambulatory to litter (appendicitis IIRC) and despite being within line of sight and visible distance from the entrance to the medical tent at Base Camp, the poor guy died before he could get back to Base Camp.

Compare that story to the situation in TFA. Mr. Kinloch was only 800 feet from the summit, above the dead zone. If you can't move on your own, you're already dead.

TL:DR version - Subby doesn't know what he's talking about.


subby knows exactly what he's talking about. The headline calls it as it happened.
 
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