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(Yahoo)   Symantec buying VeriSign web security division. Paying online with a credit card will now consume 33% of your system resources   (finance.yahoo.com) divider line 64
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743 clicks; posted to Business » on 20 May 2010 at 4:39 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-05-20 03:14:04 PM
Norton Internet Security != Symantec AV. The retail box version is way ahead of the corporate one. Try any of the Norton ones since 2009. 2 processes, ~15 MB RAM and it only does stuff in the background.

Link (new window)

I still don't understand buying Verisign.
 
2010-05-20 03:45:24 PM
I used to work for Veritas Software, which was purchased by Symantec about 5 years ago. Symantec slowly crushed the Veritas employees. I luckily left after the first y ear. Symantec is like Computer Associates. They suck.

The Veritas products are still good though, for know.
 
2010-05-20 03:45:38 PM
Doctor Jan Itor: Norton Internet Security != Symantec AV. The retail box version is way ahead of the corporate one. Try any of the Norton ones since 2009. 2 processes, ~15 MB RAM and it only does stuff in the background.

Link (new window)


Too late. Norton could develop a lean, fast AV scanner like they did with 2009 and 2010 for two decades, and stuck-in-the-mud nerds will still reject it because Norton 2003 raped their mom and killed their dog. It's incredibly stupid that we continue to judge products based not on their current performance, but on the performance of their predecessors.
 
2010-05-20 04:01:18 PM
nabbyfan: Doctor Jan Itor: Norton Internet Security != Symantec AV. The retail box version is way ahead of the corporate one. Try any of the Norton ones since 2009. 2 processes, ~15 MB RAM and it only does stuff in the background.

Link (new window)

Too late. Norton could develop a lean, fast AV scanner like they did with 2009 and 2010 for two decades, and stuck-in-the-mud nerds will still reject it because Norton 2003 raped their mom and killed their dog. It's incredibly stupid that we continue to judge products based not on their current performance, but on the performance of their predecessors.


I'd bet it's more likely that stuck-in-the-mud nerds wouldn't bother going back because they've already moved on to AVG, Avast!, etc. and see no reason to go back.

That and it wouldn't matter if Norton gave you a blow job with every scan, it's not worth it to pay for AV when you only need a single license.
 
2010-05-20 05:05:59 PM
At the risk of getting back on topic, why would Symantec buy VeriSign's certificate business?

Well, I suppose it'd fit with Symantec's other business strategies of making expensive products that are no better than less-expensive products made by competitors.

GoDaddy certs are just as trusted as VeriSign in any browser, yet far cheaper ($12.99 for domain-verified certs if you Google search for "godaddy ssl", $99/year for EV certs issued for one year. Various discounts for longer-term purchases.). They even chain back to ValiCert, which is trusted by ancient browsers like Netscape, IE 5, etc. For paid certs, there's really no reason to pay more than that*.

If all one needs is a domain-validated cert and is too cheap to pay $12.99/year, StartSSL's free certs are also widely trusted (IE/Windows, Firefox, Android/iPhone, Chrome, etc.).

For the same service, VeriSign charges $399/year. For EV, it's $995-$1499/year, and they're still pimping
 
2010-05-20 05:07:20 PM
D'oh. Preview is my friend. Here's what I meant to post:

At the risk of getting back on topic, why would Symantec buy VeriSign's certificate business?

Well, I suppose it'd fit with Symantec's other business strategies of making expensive products that are no better than less-expensive products made by competitors.

GoDaddy certs are just as trusted as VeriSign in any browser, yet far cheaper ($12.99 for domain-verified certs if you Google search for "godaddy ssl", $99/year for EV certs issued for one year. Various discounts for longer-term purchases.). They even chain back to ValiCert, which is trusted by ancient browsers like Netscape, IE 5, etc. For paid certs, there's really no reason to pay more than that*.

If all one needs is a domain-validated cert and is too cheap to pay $12.99/year, StartSSL's free certs are also widely trusted (IE/Windows, Firefox, Android/iPhone, Chrome, etc.).

For the same service, VeriSign charges $399/year. For EV, it's $995-$1499/year, and they're still pimping their SGC certs, which were obsolete a decade ago (nobody uses export-limited browsers anymore). Highway robbery, really.

* The university I used to work for used Comodo certs because they didn't require individual departments to validate the second-level domain (e.g. university.edu), but could instead validate individual department subdomains (e.g. department.university.edu).
 
2010-05-20 08:30:56 PM
Lt. Cheese Weasel: 'You can't patch Stupid.'

You can patch stupid with education but I have to admit that most people don't want it.

At least it keeps the people who applied the patch themselves protected and employed.
 
2010-05-20 09:27:30 PM
shiate Disturber: Yeah...they bought VeriSign for $1.2 BILLION in friggin' CA$H, spent a couple of million on a gathering of ass-wipes from sales in Las Vegas a couple of months ago, while I've been slogging away in technical support and haven't had a raise from those farkers for 2 god damn years while the cost of living has gone up more than 5% each year and housing has gone up over 20% in the last 18 months.

/shakes tiny fist of cube dwelling rage


Get your MBA and become one of the ass-wipes. Customer Service and technical personnel who code, diagnose and actually MAKE the software always earn less than the executives and salespeople that SELL the software (even though said higher ups don't understand half of it). Tell me you're not just now realizing this?

It's the primary reason why companies are screwed up--they keep the managers but fire all the drones. Can't make new product that way, and can't fix the broken stuff, either.

/Sympathies but seriously, it's bad like this ALL OVER
//Surprised their million dollar party didn't result in your coffee pot getting yanked; gotta make that fat cash back somehow
 
2010-05-21 12:51:14 AM
shadowself:
shiate Disturber and BigJuanTehFurby - hats off to you both for dealing with the rage you must get from every single customer who has stupidly installed a Norton product. I don't know how you do it. I work ISP support and end up helping many Symantec customers when that awful software does what it will inevitably do. I always recommend one of the fine free AV solutions - that is, if they can remove all of the pieces Norton leaves behind after an uninstall.

That is when you pull out the trusty old Norton Removal Tool since it is a pain to remove by hand bit by bit. It pretty sad you need to find all the antivirus removal tools to fix the damage they do to your systems.
 
2010-05-21 04:07:47 AM
nabbyfan: Doctor Jan Itor: Norton Internet Security != Symantec AV. The retail box version is way ahead of the corporate one. Try any of the Norton ones since 2009. 2 processes, ~15 MB RAM and it only does stuff in the background.

Link (new window)

Too late. Norton could develop a lean, fast AV scanner like they did with 2009 and 2010 for two decades, and stuck-in-the-mud nerds will still reject it because Norton 2003 raped their mom and killed their dog. It's incredibly stupid that we continue to judge products based not on their current performance, but on the performance of their predecessors.


Actually it's the 2004 version that raped their moms, the 2005 version ate them, and 2006 pooped them out again.
 
2010-05-21 10:14:47 AM
Those fake antivirus programs are annoying but usually easy to get rid of. Start in safe mode and log in on an alternate account (if one does not exist create one). Install MBAM and clean up the system. If it is an even more clever malware just boot the system from a Live CD and clean.
 
2010-05-21 11:46:31 AM
ghare: Symantec products, every one, are malware.



use Linux and you won't need to use antivirus products at all.
 
2010-05-21 01:17:03 PM
Linux_Yes: use Linux and you won't need to use antivirus products at all.

Last I checked, there's over 800 pieces of Linux-specific malware that exist in the wild. Similarly, there's many pieces of Mac malware.

Personally, I'd rather have some sort of anti-malware protection, even on a system that's purported to be highly resistant to malware, just to be on the safe side. Otherwise, how would one know if one's computer had been infected?

Unfortunately, all the designed-for-the-end-user Linux anti-malware programs I've attempted to use don't work in Ubuntu. Go figure.
 
2010-05-21 02:29:03 PM
Not sure what kind of outdated systems you Symantec haters are running, but their newer products are not resource hogs. I use Symantec Endpoint Protection. It's lightweight, fast, *and* has built-in intrusion prevention. How many of your free products have that? This is where security products have been headed for a while.

Antivirus alone doesn't cut it anymore. AV won't protect you from an active attack.

If you're in IT security and you don't have some sort of intrusion prevention system (not talking about a firewall), you're doing it wrong.
 
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