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(Salon)   From the "I swear we're not making this up" department: Outgoing MMS regulator gave Transocean a "Safety Award for Excellence" last year   (salon.com) divider line 81
    More: Fail, Transocean, Arab Americans, Naomi Watts, Miss USA, Elena Kagan, Outgoing MMS, playgrounds, Arlen Specter  
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4635 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 May 2010 at 5:51 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-05-17 08:34:01 PM  
i41.tinypic.com

goddamnitsomuch
 
2010-05-17 08:38:17 PM  
From the "I swear I saw this last week" department.
 
2010-05-17 09:07:48 PM  
In related news, outgoing MMS director receives a position at Transocean.
 
2010-05-18 12:30:23 AM  
Actually, from what I've seen, it seems Transocean did have a good safety record prior to the Fark Up Of The Century.
 
2010-05-18 05:54:33 AM  
Not getting how this is a fail. Transocean's accident happened this year, not last.
 
2010-05-18 06:01:57 AM  
Oh no! You mean to tell me a company that had an excellent safety record couldn't possibly make a mistake? Say it ain't so! The outgoing MMS director should be ashamed for not being capable of seeing into the future like subby! FAIL indeed!
 
2010-05-18 06:09:52 AM  
Well did they?
It would be fail if they got it this year.
 
2010-05-18 06:15:42 AM  
I love the ISWNMTU department. They always seemed so honest to me, unlike those bastards in the MMS.
 
2010-05-18 06:25:51 AM  
I blame Bush.
 
2010-05-18 06:27:09 AM  
irwhiteboi: Oh no! You mean to tell me a company that had an excellent safety record couldn't possibly make a mistake? Say it ain't so! The outgoing MMS director should be ashamed for not being capable of seeing into the future like subby! FAIL indeed!

Honey, you might be a mechanical engineer, so says your profile. But my daddy has been for many a decade. And the common theme has always been that industry is going to cut corners and ignore rules when it can. They're going to run machinery into the ground, they're going to cut corners to the bone on safety, and they're going to work supervisors into zombies. And then award themselves hugs.
It wasn't a mistake, it was neglect. And its rampant and standard.
 
2010-05-18 06:37:41 AM  
See but libs see only perfection as worthy of an award (obama=president)

The drilling industry is a dangerous business, that why you have companies like boots and coots and Red Adair. You do the best you can, some times Nature throws you a curve and men die. Some times some dumbass roughneck forgets to do his job and men die.

Life is inherent with risk, learn that fact.
 
2010-05-18 06:40:35 AM  
soy_bomb: I blame Bush.

Actually, you could make a case for blaming Cheney. Remember those secret meetings he had with energy corporations before 9/11 and his energy policies? He was instrumental in setting lax safety standards.

Actually, you could make a case for blaming pretty much anything on Cheney. Not sure if he has any redeeming qualities whatsoever.
 
2010-05-18 06:40:43 AM  
soy_bomb: I blame Bush.

They were doing "one heckuvajob"
 
2010-05-18 06:42:55 AM  
siyuntz: Actually, from what I've seen, it seems Transocean did have a good safety record prior to the Fark Up Of The Century.

Yah, pretty much how that girl you knew from high school was a safe driver. Until she ran into a work crew, while speeding and talking on her cell phone through an orange cone zone.
 
2010-05-18 06:49:30 AM  
A lot of people do not understand the safety standards BP has. I do a lot of contract work for them in the rockies and those guys are NAZIS when it comes to safety. Every step of every task is analyzed and if there is even a remote chance of something unsafe then the job is stopped until a safer way can be devised to accomplish the task.

What this whole thing comes down to is that you can have the safest most well trained crews on the planet running the most state of the art rig with the best safety record on the planet and all it takes are a few mistakes and the thing goes to hell. It is the human condition to make mistakes. There is no fool proof system. Nothing is 100% safe.

It is a terrible tragedy but everyone is on a witch hunt to pin blame on one specific person or government entity. The sad fact is that the person who probably made the mistake is probably dead, the ultimate penalty for failure.
 
2010-05-18 06:51:36 AM  
Buffalo77: See but libs see only perfection as worthy of an award (obama=president)

The drilling industry is a dangerous business, that why you have companies like boots and coots and Red Adair. You do the best you can, some times Nature throws you a curve and men die. Some times some dumbass roughneck forgets to do his job and men die.

Life is inherent with risk, learn that fact.




There is a difference between knowing that there are inherent risks while doing what you can to mitigate them, and ignoring those risks altogether or at the very least not taking them seriously.

I love how in this case it's just some dumbass and we can absolve everyone else of responsibility.

Please don't forget to towel dry that corporate cock when you are done sucking it.
 
2010-05-18 06:53:12 AM  
irwhiteboi: Oh no! You mean to tell me a company that had an excellent safety record couldn't possibly make a mistake? Say it ain't so! The outgoing MMS director should be ashamed for not being capable of seeing into the future like subby! FAIL indeed!

Well, this would be a great commentary, if they had an excellent safety record.
 
2010-05-18 06:55:36 AM  
spencurai: A lot of people do not understand the safety standards BP has. I do a lot of contract work for them in the rockies and those guys are NAZIS when it comes to safety. Every step of every task is analyzed and if there is even a remote chance of something unsafe then the job is stopped until a safer way can be devised to accomplish the task.

What this whole thing comes down to is that you can have the safest most well trained crews on the planet running the most state of the art rig with the best safety record on the planet and all it takes are a few mistakes and the thing goes to hell. It is the human condition to make mistakes. There is no fool proof system. Nothing is 100% safe.

It is a terrible tragedy but everyone is on a witch hunt to pin blame on one specific person or government entity. The sad fact is that the person who probably made the mistake is probably dead, the ultimate penalty for failure.


I guess that is the new talking point.

It was just some dumbass and we should all sing kumbaya and praise BP

Where is this being disseminated? Fox? Talk radio? Blog?
 
2010-05-18 07:11:23 AM  
I live in a world populated by complete morons.

I hope subby runs off the road and flips his/her car 7 times, then lands upside down in a water filled ditch this morning. That way I can come back and say "Allstate gave this person a 'safe driver discount' last year because they hadn't had an accident!"
 
2010-05-18 07:12:30 AM  
Outstanding Achievement in the Field of Excellence
 
2010-05-18 07:13:29 AM  
madgecko13: Honey, you might be a mechanical engineer, so says your profile. But my daddy has been for many a decade. And the common theme has always been that industry is going to cut corners and ignore rules when it can. They're going to run machinery into the ground, they're going to cut corners to the bone on safety, and they're going to work supervisors into zombies. And then award themselves hugs.
It wasn't a mistake, it was neglect. And its rampant and standard.


I used to work in the oil field and from 01-04 Transocean rigs paid more attantion to safety than any of the other rigs I was on.
 
2010-05-18 07:22:22 AM  
crab66: spencurai: A lot of people do not understand the safety standards BP has. I do a lot of contract work for them in the rockies and those guys are NAZIS when it comes to safety. Every step of every task is analyzed and if there is even a remote chance of something unsafe then the job is stopped until a safer way can be devised to accomplish the task.

What this whole thing comes down to is that you can have the safest most well trained crews on the planet running the most state of the art rig with the best safety record on the planet and all it takes are a few mistakes and the thing goes to hell. It is the human condition to make mistakes. There is no fool proof system. Nothing is 100% safe.

It is a terrible tragedy but everyone is on a witch hunt to pin blame on one specific person or government entity. The sad fact is that the person who probably made the mistake is probably dead, the ultimate penalty for failure.

I guess that is the new talking point.

It was just some dumbass and we should all sing kumbaya and praise BP

Where is this being disseminated? Fox? Talk radio? Blog?


Actually, they do have very stringent safety requirements. My employer has been working to become "certified" by BP because it means that we meet the standards of all the other oil companies (whereas the vice versa is not necessarily true).

That said, I'm not saying they didn't screw this up....just saying that the whole safety standard thing is not exactly a talking point.
 
2010-05-18 07:23:11 AM  
soy_bomb: I blame Bush.

Well its about freaking time SOMEBODY blamed Bush! You'd think the guy is made of Teflon or something the way he gets off scott free around here.
 
2010-05-18 07:25:23 AM  
I blame Obama.
 
2010-05-18 07:33:08 AM  
img.photobucket.com
 
2010-05-18 07:33:13 AM  
redundantman: soy_bomb: I blame Bush.

Well its about freaking time SOMEBODY blamed Bush! You'd think the guy is made of Teflon or something the way he gets off scott free around here.


No it can't be Bush's fault. He is not responsible for anything he did.
 
2010-05-18 07:35:07 AM  
Buffalo77: You do the best you can

They didn't. That's the problem. A $500,000 piece of safety equipment probably would have prevented this. Or if they had actually maintained the existing safety equipment in good working order with best practices. But neither of those things happened.

There's a difference between necessary risk and preventable risk. So far it looks like this accident was entirely preventable.

You're the same sort of dumbass who sits around chuckling about "those dumb naive liberals", aren't you?
 
2010-05-18 07:37:45 AM  
BillCo: I blame Obama.

Well its about freaking time SOMEBODY blamed Bush O'bama! You'd think the guy is made of Teflon th stuff George Bush was made of Ronald Reagan or something the way he gets off scott free around here.
 
2010-05-18 07:52:00 AM  
Sid_6.7: Buffalo77: You do the best you can

They didn't. That's the problem. A $500,000 piece of safety equipment probably would have prevented this. Or if they had actually maintained the existing safety equipment in good working order with best practices. But neither of those things happened.

There's a difference between necessary risk and preventable risk. So far it looks like this accident was entirely preventable.

You're the same sort of dumbass who sits around chuckling about "those dumb naive liberals", aren't you?


BP Supplied that peice of equipment. BOP's are supplied by the Customer. Transocean has a history of safety. that is why Transocean is the largest offshore deepwater drilling company. I know safety reps that refuse work on BP jobs. You can have high safety standards, but if you fail to maintain and live up to them they are just peices of paper. I can speak on Shell's safety policies and while they are not as high as BP's they are much more rigorously enforced. So Shell will always have a better record. Hell you should see what a Shell platform has to go through to get a variance on anything. It is crazy.
 
2010-05-18 07:56:30 AM  
How about: "Resigning Obama administration official gave Transocean a safety award last year". You know they would've done it to Bush.
 
2010-05-18 07:57:17 AM  
globalwarmingpraiser: BP Supplied that peice of equipment. BOP's are supplied by the Customer. Transocean has a history of safety. that is why Transocean is the largest offshore deepwater drilling company. I know safety reps that refuse work on BP jobs. You can have high safety standards, but if you fail to maintain and live up to them they are just peices of paper. I can speak on Shell's safety policies and while they are not as high as BP's they are much more rigorously enforced. So Shell will always have a better record. Hell you should see what a Shell platform has to go through to get a variance on anything. It is crazy.

I only worked on BP rigs on land. Only rig I ever went to where I had to take a drug test. I assumed that they would extend that kind of stringency to all their operations.
 
2010-05-18 08:01:45 AM  
I didn't realize we had so many cast members of Armageddon on Fark.
 
2010-05-18 08:05:43 AM  
Excellent 60 Minutes piece on this from Sunday.

The summary was that the first well failed because they were rushed, BP pushed them on the second well which they completed. BP then wanted to rush the capping of the well, transition said no, BP said they were in charge so that's what they did and that along with an unreported problem and broken equipment caused the explosion according to this report.
 
2010-05-18 08:06:44 AM  
rezin8: I live in a world populated by complete morons.

I hope subby runs off the road and flips his/her car 7 times, then lands upside down in a water filled ditch this morning. That way I can come back and say "Allstate gave this person a 'safe driver discount' last year because they hadn't had an accident!"


um... the MMS was skipping all sorts of inspections, so how the fact that they issued the safety award is pretty farking ironic/sick/fail/dumbass.
 
2010-05-18 08:11:29 AM  
globalwarmingpraiser: BP Supplied that peice of equipment. BOP's are supplied by the Customer.

Sure about that? I thought Cameron International supplied the BOP for this rig.

Transocean has a history of safety. that is why Transocean is the largest offshore deepwater drilling company. I know safety reps that refuse work on BP jobs. You can have high safety standards, but if you fail to maintain and live up to them they are just peices of paper. I can speak on Shell's safety policies and while they are not as high as BP's they are much more rigorously enforced. So Shell will always have a better record.

I do work for both Shell and BP, and it's actually BP that has the better safety record: Link
 
2010-05-18 08:25:43 AM  
Sid_6.7: They didn't. That's the problem. A $500,000 piece of safety equipment probably would have prevented this. Or if they had actually maintained the existing safety equipment in good working order with best practices. But neither of those things happened.

There's a difference between necessary risk and preventable risk. So far it looks like this accident was entirely preventable.


"If only they'd built it with 6001 hulls! When will they learn?!?"

You can always 'just spend a little bit more' and make something a bit safer. At some point you have to draw the line. Hindsight is great because you can say "if only they'd bought that one, single inexpensive safety measure!" when an accident happens and ignore that there are 10,000 safety measures that also cost $500,000 that would prevent any number of unlikely accidents.
 
2010-05-18 08:31:09 AM  
abigsmurf: there are 10,000 safety measures that also cost $500,000 that would prevent any number of unlikely accidents.

[Citation Needed]
 
2010-05-18 08:32:30 AM  
Outgoing MMS regulator gave Transocean a "Safety Award for Excellence" last year after receiving a hefty bribe.

FTFY
 
2010-05-18 08:37:47 AM  
Not crazy at all. Crazy is getting the award NEXT year.

This isn't yet the largest gulf spill, yet. The Mexican IXOT-1 rig will hold the record for another several weeks. Great article on the matter in the current Economist.
 
2010-05-18 08:48:24 AM  
crab66: abigsmurf: there are 10,000 safety measures that also cost $500,000 that would prevent any number of unlikely accidents.

[Citation Needed]


They could spend $500,000 on shark repellent. You can never be sure they won't ram or bite the pipes!

You could hire a safety supervisor supervisor to ensure the safety supervisor is being safe! You could then hire a safety supervisor supervisor supervisor for extra safety!

They could post scuba fitted security guards with harpoon guns underwater 24/7 to protect against evil terrorists!
 
2010-05-18 08:58:27 AM  
Isn't this the same department where the people who REGULATE the oil industry were literally in bed with people who LOBBY for the oil industry? And where some employees were snorting meth off of a toaster oven?


/Makes some popcorn...
 
2010-05-18 08:59:23 AM  
Well, it is possible. I mean, a person can have a sterling driving record the year before they plow through a farmers market and kill a quartet of nuns, too.
 
2010-05-18 09:00:32 AM  
abigsmurf: crab66: abigsmurf: there are 10,000 safety measures that also cost $500,000 that would prevent any number of unlikely accidents.

[Citation Needed]


DERP



That's nice.
 
2010-05-18 09:22:55 AM  
spencurai - A lot of people do not understand the safety standards BP has. I do a lot of contract work for them in the rockies and those guys are NAZIS when it comes to safety. Every step of every task is analyzed and if there is even a remote chance of something unsafe then the job is stopped until a safer way can be devised to accomplish the task.


Apparently that wasn't the case on the Deepwater Horizon.

From this "60 Minutes" clip, a professor hired by the government to find out what happened notes the testimony of Mike Williams, one of the few crew members who survived the disaster (that part starts at 2:10). He tells the story of a fight between a manager from BP and one from the drilling crew about how to cap off the hole they just drilled. Short version - BP guy demanded the quicker and far less safe method and he got his way. That part of the story picks up around 4:20 of the video.

Link (new window)

And here's the text of the story: Link (new window)
 
2010-05-18 09:25:44 AM  
Rubberband Girl: one of the few crew members who survived the disaster

Not to nitpick, but 115 of the 126 people on board survived.
 
2010-05-18 09:34:45 AM  
mhpbooks.com

"EXCELLENCE!"
 
2010-05-18 09:36:28 AM  
The plaque is at the bottom of the ocean covered in oil right now.
 
2010-05-18 09:43:20 AM  
irwhiteboi: Oh no! You mean to tell me a company that had an excellent safety record couldn't possibly make a mistake? Say it ain't so! The outgoing MMS director should be ashamed for not being capable of seeing into the future like subby! FAIL indeed!


I'm not seeing how Transocean failed at all.

They leased a rig to BP and it operated perfectly until Halliburton & BP blew it up through incompetence.

What part of the well drilling & sealing did Trans take part in?
 
2010-05-18 09:44:34 AM  
Yes, giving the feds control of healthcare is a great idea.
 
2010-05-18 09:46:09 AM  
Why the hell is this so dumbfounding? Oil and gas exploration, like mining, is dangerous. Accidents, you know, the kind of thing that can't wholly be anticipated, sometimes happen. It takes a special breed of man to be in these kind of industries: tough, pioneering men with calluses on their hands from actual work, as opposed to banging out endless Fark posts, spooging in your pants, hoping to get greenlighted. If anyone on Fark every had the raw cajones to do something other than sit back in their ergonomic IT chairs to finish sucking on a latte (or something else, in the case of just over ten percent of you), you'd get out there, put your ass on the line over SOMETHING worthwhile, and maybe earn a few dollars while doing it. Chumps.
 
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