Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Daily Kos)   BP execs were on the Deepwater Horizon rig at a party celebrating its safety record when explosion occurred   (dailykos.com ) divider line 50
    More: Ironic, Deepwater Horizon, drilling rigs, big fish, UC Berkeley, Bea, cement, satellite phone, portable toilets  
•       •       •

2181 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 May 2010 at 3:40 PM (5 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



50 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2010-05-08 02:18:24 PM  
gotta love how the execs were allowed to call home but not the workers. they were silenced.
 
2010-05-08 02:36:19 PM  
Image from the scene:
scrapetv.com
 
2010-05-08 02:39:47 PM  
Behind the table was a row of portable toilets. And as the crew members approached, each was handed a cup for a mandatory drug test. The search for an explanation would begin with them. That search continues.

These guys are pieces of work. Quick! Let's see if we can find something quick and easy to blame rather than our well-documented and shiatty safety record!

F*ck BP. Bankruptcy for them is the least of what should happen.
 
2010-05-08 03:20:53 PM  
So?
 
2010-05-08 03:22:43 PM  
I wonder if they'll find a way to blame this on a couple rank and file guys?
 
2010-05-08 03:37:36 PM  

Weaver95: I wonder if they'll find a way to blame this on a couple rank and file guys?


You know they will. How else are they going to avoid the metric shiatton of lawsuits headed their way? "Oh look, a janitor tested positive for marijuana. That's the cause."
 
2010-05-08 03:42:25 PM  
Too bad they didn't go down with the ship.
 
2010-05-08 03:49:07 PM  

Shostie: So?


Yea. I wonder why the company that built and actually ran the rig is never mentioned: Transocean. The same company that suspended bonuses for top execs due to safety lapses. Maybe demonizing BP is too easy?

/used to own stock in Transocean
 
2010-05-08 04:08:47 PM  
Hau Ruck: These guys are pieces of work. Quick! Let's see if we can find something quick and easy to blame rather than our well-documented and shiatty safety record!

F*ck BP. Bankruptcy for them is the least of what should happen.


I disagree, at the time they had no idea what happened or why beyond "something just blew up" . You can't wait a few weeks or months before testing people for intoxication but you can easily argue that they'd be negligent if they didn't take that possibility into account.

I think your reading too much into this test. I wouldn't be surprised if this was a standard (legally required even) procedure whenever anything goes wrong.

Wait until they actually try to blame it on the stoned janitor then be outraged.
 
2010-05-08 04:12:08 PM  

Uakronkid: Too bad they didn't go down with the ship.


I'm sure they'll do the honorable thing and fall on their swords.
 
2010-05-08 04:27:36 PM  
Bp executive: >CLICK
 
2010-05-08 04:32:45 PM  
This is a repeat. We knew this last week.
 
2010-05-08 04:43:38 PM  

1000Monkeys: I disagree, at the time they had no idea what happened or why beyond "something just blew up" . You can't wait a few weeks or months before testing people for intoxication but you can easily argue that they'd be negligent if they didn't take that possibility into account.


Yes, BP is doing the usual "let's cover our asses" procedure because they know they're in a shiatload of trouble. Defend them if you want, but it's pretty transparent what they're doing, the reports are already out there. Wanting to drug test workers right after the explosion was the latest in a "are you f*cking kidding me" report with BP.

It's well documented that the evacuated workers were kept in rescue boats for 15 hours (or more) before being transported, under heavy guard (and no press), to a hotel where BP wanted to take statements (PR flacks, lawyers, etc.) As Hobodeluxe already pointed out, the execs were allowed to call their families, rig workers were not until statements were taken. This was 3:00am or later local time, after being held in boats in the gulf after the evacuation.

But do go on defending BP, they're model corporate citizens. As their previous record indicates.
 
2010-05-08 04:56:02 PM  
The bigger news is that the clathrate ices on the floors of the worlds oceans have more carbon-based fuels then the entire world's oil reserves known and unknown - if we can get them out without blowing up the rigs.
 
2010-05-08 04:57:59 PM  

Hau Ruck: F*ck BP. Bankruptcy for them is the least of what should happen.


Honestly? After what happened on Thursday, I'd say if you placed some massive short positions on BP and blew up another one of their rigs, you probably could bring them down so hard they would be swallowed up by another oil company. Much like what happened to Bear Stearns.

But, you can never kill them. Not ever. Just a different name. Hell sometimes they even keep that because they don't want to spend the money changing the name.
 
2010-05-08 05:02:13 PM  

NewportBarGuy: Hau Ruck: F*ck BP. Bankruptcy for them is the least of what should happen.

Honestly? After what happened on Thursday, I'd say if you placed some massive short positions on BP and blew up another one of their rigs, you probably could bring them down so hard they would be swallowed up by another oil company. Much like what happened to Bear Stearns.

But, you can never kill them. Not ever. Just a different name. Hell sometimes they even keep that because they don't want to spend the money changing the name.


Well, Bear Stearns had no underlying assets anymore...nothing to make money with. BP has tremendous assets...lots to make money with. Even with any form of public anger, or government fines, BP is still immensely, intensely, incredibly profitable. They'll be fine.

And, frankly, the entire US would forgive BP in a heartbeat if they just did something like drop (wholesale) gas prices 1 cent.
 
2010-05-08 05:07:48 PM  
Which executives? I seems odd that the CEO would be hanging out on a drilling platform.
 
2010-05-08 05:08:33 PM  

Hau Ruck: Yes, BP is doing the usual "let's cover our asses" procedure because they know they're in a shiatload of trouble. Defend them if you want, but it's pretty transparent what they're doing, the reports are already out there. Wanting to drug test workers right after the explosion was the latest in a "are you f*cking kidding me" report with BP.


Not to defend BP or TransOcean here, but many companies have that as standard procedure after an accident, even if it turns out to be a freak act-of-nature. That could be a provision of the BP or Transocean policy because if an accident occurs as the result of the employee being intoxicated, it changes the legal dynamics of the situation. I wouldn't be surprised if they signed saying they would submit to random drug tests after an accident.

Hau Ruck: It's well documented that the evacuated workers were kept in rescue boats for 15 hours (or more) before being transported, under heavy guard (and no press), to a hotel where BP wanted to take statements (PR flacks, lawyers, etc.) As Hobodeluxe already pointed out, the execs were allowed to call their families, rig workers were not until statements were taken. This was 3:00am or later local time, after being held in boats in the gulf after the evacuation.


I just re-read the article. According to the source, it was a rumored that the Execs were calling their families, a possibility that I am open to. Another more likely option is that the Execs were using the phones to coordinate with the BP/TransOcean safety and crisis management teams while having assistants/secretaries call home to make sure their family knew they were OK.

I can see why the workers wouldn't be allowed outside contact. Again, not to defend BP here, but a lot of companies have "no media contact" as part of a crisis management plan. Since they were on boats, it was easy to keep them sequestered until they could be debriefed.

Did BP notify the families of the accident and the status of their loved ones?
 
2010-05-08 05:12:55 PM  

symbolset: The bigger news is that the clathrate ices on the floors of the worlds oceans have more carbon-based fuels then the entire world's oil reserves known and unknown - if we can get them out without blowing up the rigs.


What the hell is that supposed to mean?
 
2010-05-08 05:16:36 PM  
Hau Ruck: 1000Monkeys: I disagree, at the time they had no idea what happened or why beyond "something just blew up" . You can't wait a few weeks or months before testing people for intoxication but you can easily argue that they'd be negligent if they didn't take that possibility into account.

Yes, BP is doing the usual "let's cover our asses" procedure because they know they're in a shiatload of trouble. Defend them if you want, but it's pretty transparent what they're doing, the reports are already out there. Wanting to drug test workers right after the explosion was the latest in a "are you f*cking kidding me" report with BP.


I'm not defending BP I'm defending the procedure. I was also outraged until I thought about it. It does make sense to test everyone as soon as is safely possible as a standard procedure in the event of a disaster.

If this was a standard procedure then be outraged over something else. There's plenty to chose from as you pointed out.

If it turns out that they did this as a one off test specifically to look for scapegoats then I'll join you in condemning them for it. Until then I'll just condemn then for everything else they did.

/ They'd better have tested those execs as well

It's well documented that the evacuated workers were kept in rescue boats for 15 hours (or more) before being transported, under heavy guard (and no press), to a hotel where BP wanted to take statements (PR flacks, lawyers, etc.) As Hobodeluxe already pointed out, the execs were allowed to call their families, rig workers were not until statements were taken. This was 3:00am or later local time, after being held in boats in the gulf after the evacuation.

Now that IS outrageous and I hope the workers find grounds to sue.

But do go on defending BP, they're model corporate citizens. As their previous record indicates.

One problem I always had with corporations as they currently exist is that no-one really seems to responsible for anything it does.
 
2010-05-08 05:25:52 PM  

1000Monkeys: If it turns out that they did this as a one off test specifically to look for scapegoats then I'll join you in condemning them for it. Until then I'll just condemn then for everything else they did.


Its always to look for scapegoats. If a person was negligent, they were negligent, but you can bet they're probably hoping that one of the survivors smoked marijuana before he got onto the rig, so they can blame him for everything, or at the very least so they can deny him any benefits or compensation for injury.

/ They'd better have tested those execs as well

You know they didn't.

1000Monkeys:
One problem I always had with corporations as they currently exist is that no-one really seems to responsible for anything it does.


Easy way to solve it, implement what would be in effect the doctrine of command responsibility as a legal liability for corporations and their agents.
 
2010-05-08 05:37:34 PM  
I'd have loved seeing their collectively shocked faces, when they realized that sound wasn't Champagne bottles being uncorked.
 
2010-05-08 05:45:51 PM  

1000Monkeys: One problem I always had with corporations as they currently exist is that no-one really seems to responsible for anything it does.


Easy solution - change the laws so that the executive officers and board members are held legally liable for the actions of the corporations, and if it can be proven that a specific manager was responsible as well, allow them to be charged along with the big dogs.
 
2010-05-08 05:51:18 PM  

mavrickatubc: And, frankly, the entire US would forgive BP in a heartbeat if they just did something like drop (wholesale) gas prices 1 cent.


Make it 10 cents and I agree. We are a nation of whores.
 
2010-05-08 05:52:31 PM  
What was TFA's line towards the end about how the gas traveled up through the pipe, into the drilling room, and then into an "adjacent room with exposed ignition sources"?

I kept picturing that ignition source as some stereotypical rich white fat cat's cigar. While he was lighting it in his tanned, 65-year-old face.

So cinematic!
 
2010-05-08 06:18:51 PM  
So a drunk, cocaine covered hooker with some splooge in her eye stumbled into a valve.



Well at least we know how it happened.
 
2010-05-08 06:38:12 PM  

Hau Ruck:

It's well documented that the evacuated workers were kept in rescue boats for 15 hours (or more) before being transported, under heavy guard (and no press), to a hotel where BP wanted to take statements (PR flacks, lawyers, etc.) As Hobodeluxe already pointed out, the execs were allowed to call their families, rig workers were not until statements were taken. This was 3:00am or later local time, after being held in boats in the gulf after the evacuation.


You are missing the point that the executives likely had very important meetings, dinners, and tee times that would have to be rescheduled. They are very highly trained, special people. Like thoroughbred racehorses in beautiful suits.

As to drugtesting the human capital units after the incident, well, one has to inspect the tools after a mishap to check for proper calibration and maintenance, and to see if repair costs exceed replacement value on any of them. It's just good business.
 
2010-05-08 06:40:21 PM  
...
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
...
YOUR SOCIOPATHIC, BIOSPHERE-THREATENING COMPANY LOGO HERE
...
.
..
.
...
.
..
.
...
 
2010-05-08 06:59:59 PM  

Paris1127: Image from the scene:

i49.photobucket.com
BP exec

 
2010-05-08 07:12:33 PM  
My old platform had an explosion and fire last year. Was not there. Friends sent pics of "small equipment fire".

After making them spend the night out there with no power, water or fire fighting equipment, after being told not to put out the fire because it could cause pollution (natural gas compressor station), they were all immmediately drug tested to look for some scapegoat to blame for their incompetent neglect of this problem (third fire in exhaust stack) that had been reported before.

Just trying to maximize profit with total disregard of safety of personnel. They don't practice what they preach.

Link (new window)

Link (new window)

Link (new window)

Link (new window)


WHAT SMALL EQUIPMENT FIRE RESULTS MAY LOOK LIKE

But I cannot legally put these images on here, although they "let me go" in 2008, so, fark 'em.
 
2010-05-08 07:27:33 PM  
Point 1: The executives were 'rumored' to be calling their families when the rest of the workers were sequestered.

Point 2: In industrial settings a drug test is often required after an incident. It's SOP get over it.

Point 3: What's wrong with having a celebration of a safety milestone? It happens a lot in other industrial settings. The celebration was probably a speech a few photos and probably some cake for gods sake.

Point 4: The described chain of events sound like a horrible accident not anything that was caused by laziness or a poor plan.

Point 5: DAILY KOS can bite me. What are the odds that these jokers actually asked BP or Transocean for comment on what actually happened?
 
2010-05-08 07:51:13 PM  

kpottruff: Point 1: The executives were 'rumored' to be calling their families when the rest of the workers were sequestered.


You're right, as others have pointed out, execs have secretaries that can make calls for them. Rig workers don't.

Point 2: In industrial settings a drug test is often required after an incident. It's SOP get over it.

Sure. But let's make sure you do this first, before letting workers involved in a major accident call their families to let them know they're OK. Were the execs drug tested to? Just curious, they were there as well. I'll make a huge bet they weren't.

Point 3: What's wrong with having a celebration of a safety milestone? It happens a lot in other industrial settings. The celebration was probably a speech a few photos and probably some cake for gods sake.

Hopefully someone got those photos as the fireball engulfed the platform. For documentation purposes.

Point 4: The described chain of events sound like a horrible accident not anything that was caused by laziness or a poor plan.

See your point 3 for reference. And then let me know if you're still being serious with this post.

Point 5: DAILY KOS can bite me. What are the odds that these jokers actually asked BP or Transocean for comment on what actually happened?

What are the odds they would have gotten a comment from either of them?

Run along, sparky. Come back when you have something useful to say.
 
2010-05-08 07:52:40 PM  
Celebrating a good safety record before and accident?

THE IS AN OUTRAGE IRONY!
 
2010-05-08 08:03:28 PM  

Republicat: Did BP notify the families of the accident and the status of their loved ones?


See this NPR link ^

It would be many hours more, according to lawyers and survivors, before they could see family and, for many, even telephone loved ones to say they were safe.
 
2010-05-08 08:04:24 PM  

Hau Ruck: kpottruff: Point 1: The executives were 'rumored' to be calling their families when the rest of the workers were sequestered.

You're right, as others have pointed out, execs have secretaries that can make calls for them. Rig workers don't.

Point 2: In industrial settings a drug test is often required after an incident. It's SOP get over it.

Sure. But let's make sure you do this first, before letting workers involved in a major accident call their families to let them know they're OK. Were the execs drug tested to? Just curious, they were there as well. I'll make a huge bet they weren't.

Point 3: What's wrong with having a celebration of a safety milestone? It happens a lot in other industrial settings. The celebration was probably a speech a few photos and probably some cake for gods sake.

Hopefully someone got those photos as the fireball engulfed the platform. For documentation purposes.

Point 4: The described chain of events sound like a horrible accident not anything that was caused by laziness or a poor plan.

See your point 3 for reference. And then let me know if you're still being serious with this post.

Point 5: DAILY KOS can bite me. What are the odds that these jokers actually asked BP or Transocean for comment on what actually happened?

What are the odds they would have gotten a comment from either of them?

Run along, sparky. Come back when you have something useful to say.


ok let's play there sunshine.

1.) Do you know for a fact that the execs weren't involved in the disaster response teams for BP? If you can't say what they were or were not doing then you should just shut up.

2.) Were the execs tested or not? We don't know. Also were they doing actual work on the platform? Since a drug test is supposed to show whether WORKERS were under the influence.

3 and 4.) Good grief shut up. I am going on a limb and guessing you have never worked on an oil rig or industrial site have you? I have and safety is a THE most important thing.

5.) Responsible journalists don't spout off like without researching the WHOLE story.
 
2010-05-08 08:17:09 PM  

kpottruff: ok let's play there sunshine.

1.) Do you know for a fact that the execs weren't involved in the disaster response teams for BP? If you can't say what they were or were not doing then you should just shut up.

I'm sure they were. In the capacity of "oh shiat, we're f*cked now."

2.) Were the execs tested or not? We don't know. Also were they doing actual work on the platform? Since a drug test is supposed to show whether WORKERS were under the influence.

OK, so execs aren't actually WORKERS. Good to know, but why do they make so much money?

3 and 4.) Good grief shut up. I am going on a limb and guessing you have never worked on an oil rig or industrial site have you? I have and safety is a THE most important thing.

Oil rig? No. Industrial site? Yes. The fact that jackass execs were dog-and-pony-show playing here isn't surprising but is sick in this case.

5.) Responsible journalists don't spout off like without researching the WHOLE story.

See my other link above. I didn't link to KOS. If you want to biatch about NPR, have fun there, you're still an apologist.
 
2010-05-08 09:08:41 PM  
BP should just be shut down by the government.

The British royal family can go live under a bridge for all I care.
 
2010-05-08 10:10:51 PM  
 
2010-05-08 11:03:04 PM  

Hau Ruck: Rig workers don't.


Rig workers have HR and Safety flunkies to make next-of-kin calls for them.

Hau Ruck: See this NPR link ^


Link does not answer my question.

Did someone from BP or Transocean contact the families of the rig workers and inform them that their loved ones were OK while they were being "debriefed?" Companies have an emergency contact/next-of-kin on file for situations just like this.
 
2010-05-08 11:52:27 PM  
I don't know what is funnier, that the DK gets a green or that people actually believe the DK. When you follow the click trail, there is NOTHING that says BP was on the rig celebrating the safety record.

Dems are dumasses for sure for this.

What happened? The rig took a kick, the kick ignited, the rig blew up, 11 people were either blown off the rig or cremated on the spot, the rig sank, and oil is leaking from the rock like an open faucet.

And then the dems go batshiat crazy believing every lie on the planet.
 
2010-05-09 12:55:18 AM  

ThematicDevice: Easy way to solve it, implement what would be in effect the doctrine of command responsibility as a legal liability for corporations and their agents.


Oil Pollution Act of 1990

§1002(a) Provides that the responsible party for a vessel or facility from which oil is discharged, or which poses a substantial threat of a discharge, is liable for: (1) certain specified damages resulting from the discharged oil; and (2) removal costs incurred in a manner consistent with the National Contingency Plan (NCP).

§1002(d) Provides that if a responsible party can establish that the removal costs and damages resulting from an incident were caused solely by an act or omission by a third party, the third party will be held liable for such costs and damages.

/Transocean
 
2010-05-09 01:17:09 AM  
This source shows about a 7 hour lag. Not bad for a middle-of-the-ocean explosion. The reason any "executives" were able to make contact faster is they probably have blackberry's, while a laborer most likely does not.

Non-story.
 
2010-05-09 01:30:22 AM  

meade2001: This source shows about a 7 hour lag. Not bad for a middle-of-the-ocean explosion. The reason any "executives" were able to make contact faster is they probably have blackberry's, while a laborer most likely does not.

Non-story.


Blackberries work 50 miles off the coast?

Reeeeaaaaalllly.
 
2010-05-09 01:38:09 AM  
If a judge were to actually accept the, "it's not our fault! That dude smokes weed! Blame him!" excuse, they should be executed for treason. Or at least fired.

Agency law. Learn it. Understand it. Be a better citizen.
 
2010-05-09 07:59:27 AM  

bigdavediode: meade2001: This source shows about a 7 hour lag. Not bad for a middle-of-the-ocean explosion. The reason any "executives" were able to make contact faster is they probably have blackberry's, while a laborer most likely does not.

Non-story.

Blackberries work 50 miles off the coast?

Reeeeaaaaalllly.


Satellite communications (Coastel/Petrocomm) work just fine. The rates are a lot higher, but some rigs have normal tower communications as well. (Stratus/Shell microwave).

Been there, done that.
 
2010-05-09 09:52:40 AM  

meade2001: This source shows about a 7 hour lag. Not bad for a middle-of-the-ocean explosion. The reason any "executives" were able to make contact faster is they probably have blackberry's, while a laborer most likely does not.

Non-story.


The reason for a lag would be that blackberries, cell phones, etc don't work when you are bobbing in the water puking your guts out in the evacuation capsule.

been there done that too.
 
2010-05-09 11:59:27 AM  

nugatory2: bigdavediode: meade2001: This source shows about a 7 hour lag. Not bad for a middle-of-the-ocean explosion. The reason any "executives" were able to make contact faster is they probably have blackberry's, while a laborer most likely does not.

Non-story.

Blackberries work 50 miles off the coast?

Reeeeaaaaalllly.

Satellite communications (Coastel/Petrocomm) work just fine. The rates are a lot higher, but some rigs have normal tower communications as well. (Stratus/Shell microwave).

Been there, done that.


Rigs have cell phone repeaters on them?

I find that difficult to believe and think that would be the exception and not the rule.
 
2010-05-09 01:07:14 PM  

bigdavediode: nugatory2: bigdavediode: meade2001: This source shows about a 7 hour lag. Not bad for a middle-of-the-ocean explosion. The reason any "executives" were able to make contact faster is they probably have blackberry's, while a laborer most likely does not.

Non-story.

Blackberries work 50 miles off the coast?

Reeeeaaaaalllly.

Satellite communications (Coastel/Petrocomm) work just fine. The rates are a lot higher, but some rigs have normal tower communications as well. (Stratus/Shell microwave).

Been there, done that.

Rigs have cell phone repeaters on them?

I find that difficult to believe and think that would be the exception and not the rule.


Almost every drilling rig I have been to in Canada (where I live) has them.
 
2010-05-09 05:55:18 PM  

bigdavediode: nugatory2: bigdavediode: meade2001: This source shows about a 7 hour lag. Not bad for a middle-of-the-ocean explosion. The reason any "executives" were able to make contact faster is they probably have blackberry's, while a laborer most likely does not.

Non-story.

Blackberries work 50 miles off the coast?

Reeeeaaaaalllly.

Satellite communications (Coastel/Petrocomm) work just fine. The rates are a lot higher, but some rigs have normal tower communications as well. (Stratus/Shell microwave).

Been there, done that.

Rigs have cell phone repeaters on them?

I find that difficult to believe and think that would be the exception and not the rule.


My rig did. It is a natural gas compressor station and is 77 miles south of the TX/LA border.

The microwave and satellite companies liked it, as it had a 150 foot tower and we always had power with our Solar power generation and manned 24/7, 365 days of the year.

i49.photobucket.com
 
2010-05-10 09:59:55 AM  
*snicker*

Hey Nigel, hold my gin and tonic and watch this *snicker*
 
Displayed 50 of 50 comments



This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report