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(The Consumerist)   FTC finally realizes there is an issue with privacy on the internet   (consumerist.com) divider line 27
    More: Followup, Federal Trade Commission, film series, marketing campaign, e-commerce, Consumer Reports, consumer privacy  
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5335 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 May 2010 at 1:06 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



27 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2010-05-05 01:02:53 AM  
I would love to say something snarky as hell, but you already know who I am so.... Oh Hai!
 
2010-05-05 01:12:47 AM  
What? Their porn has been cut off?!? Why woke them up?

/Dr. Pepper sure is a tasty treat!
 
2010-05-05 01:14:15 AM  
Oh, . . . . SECOND!!11!

Nothing beats the fiss of a Dr. Pepper
 
2010-05-05 01:16:08 AM  
Who woke them up is what I meant. GO PENS!

/Dr. Pepper rush!
 
2010-05-05 01:18:11 AM  
I might have had something to say about this, but anyone who has really paid attention to what I've been saying under this alias should have had no difficulty determining who i am with a modicum of google-fu.

I'm just counting on my being so boring that nobody would actually care.
 
2010-05-05 01:19:43 AM  
Asa Phelps: I'm just counting on my being so boring that nobody would actually care.

Advertisers and marketing firms would care. Luckily they aren't too bright when it comes to technology.
 
2010-05-05 01:21:28 AM  
country_boy: Who woke them up is what I meant. GO PENS!

/Dr. Pepper rush!


Ok dude I am drunk and don't right like that ;D. GO Bers!
 
2010-05-05 01:29:28 AM  
There's nothing wrong with privacy on the internet, the free market economy has it totally under contr

--- THIS MESSAGE HAX0RED BY BOB ---
MRERICSIR'S BANKING PASSWORD IS 5643
HIS FARK PASSWORD IS ILUVPUPPIES69
--- BOB WAS HERE ---

ol. I know my privacy is totally safe.
 
2010-05-05 02:10:53 AM  
YesItsTom: I would love to say something snarky as hell, but you already know who I am so.... Oh Hai!


www.tgttm.com
Hello Tom
 
2010-05-05 02:34:04 AM  
Citing lengthy privacy policies, confusing information about how personal data is used, and a lack of transparency in behavioral marketing campaigns

I've always wondered when it was going to really hit people that the number of things the law seemingly expects the average guy to know is a standard way, way beyond impossible. I doubt people even have time to conceivably look at all of this junk, much less understand it.

How long ago was Gideon v. Wainwright? Way back then it was obvious that a layman had zero chance at knowing enough of the law to operate in a court trial. It should have been clear that the direction things were headed was the same becoming true for everyday life.
 
2010-05-05 03:04:09 AM  
MrEricSir: There's nothing wrong with privacy on the internet, the free market economy has it totally under contr

--- THIS MESSAGE HAX0RED BY BOB ---
MRERICSIR'S BANKING PASSWORD IS 5643
HIS FARK PASSWORD IS ILUVPUPPIES69
--- BOB WAS HERE ---

ol. I know my privacy is totally safe.


Was Bob being spoofed by Eve again?

That biatch.
 
2010-05-05 04:55:41 AM  
Con Fabulous: is a standard way, way beyond impossible.

I think one of the major points of internet privacy, that what you post in public for others to see isn't really private anymore, shouldn't be beyond the grasp of anyone.
 
2010-05-05 05:41:32 AM  
TheBlackrose: Was Bob being spoofed by Eve again?

That biatch.


imgs.xkcd.com
 
2010-05-05 05:43:02 AM  
tomcatadam:
I think one of the major points of internet privacy, that what you post in public for others to see isn't really private anymore, shouldn't be beyond the grasp of anyone.

No the major point of Internet privacy, or lack thereof, is that your personal information can get way, way out of your control in the time it takes to click the "back" button, in a manner unprecedented by any previous technology. All it takes is for one "trusted" website to change ownership and/or quietly change their privacy policy, or for one site to be hacked, and suddenly your name, address, credit card numbers, underwear size, children's names and about 50 other things are in the hands of a hundred "selected marketing partners" or just the Russian Mafia. Even major banks etc. have committed gross acts of negligence resulting in security breaches that, a few decades ago, would have required the thieves to drive away with a tractor-trailer full of filing cabinets.

I know that sounds alarming, but it's the truth and it's a big problem. And sites like Facebook are not helping by taking such a cavalier and underhanded approach to protecting privacy. A privacy policy should be "we will never share your info with anyone, ever" (which many sites use), and not "we've quietly changed everything, and unless you de-select a deeply-buried profile option that we haven't told you about, we will share all your login info with whoever pays for it".
 
2010-05-05 06:34:11 AM  
I wonder if the FTC has heard of Consumerist.com?
 
2010-05-05 09:15:51 AM  
AR55: Asa Phelps: I'm just counting on my being so boring that nobody would actually care.

Advertisers and marketing firms would care. Luckily they aren't too bright when it comes to technology.


So the overriding, impending, unimaginable horror awaiting us is that... marketer's might send us an ad for a product we'd be interested in?

EVERYBODY PANIC!!!!!!
 
2010-05-05 09:35:20 AM  
bemis23: I wonder if the FTC has heard of Consumerist.com?

They will.
 
2010-05-05 10:01:56 AM  
nothing gets past them...
 
2010-05-05 10:26:21 AM  
Strange...Facebook doesn't randomly pull information about you out of it's ass...you put it on there. Don't put information online you wouldn't give to a total stranger. Simple as that. Assume every site you visit shares everything you tell them with people that have large Amazon wish lists.
 
2010-05-05 11:05:50 AM  
No Such Agency: tomcatadam:
I think one of the major points of internet privacy, that what you post in public for others to see isn't really private anymore, shouldn't be beyond the grasp of anyone.

No the major point of Internet privacy, or lack thereof, is that your personal information can get way, way out of your control in the time it takes to click the "back" button, in a manner unprecedented by any previous technology. All it takes is for one "trusted" website to change ownership and/or quietly change their privacy policy, or for one site to be hacked, and suddenly your name, address, credit card numbers, underwear size, children's names and about 50 other things are in the hands of a hundred "selected marketing partners" or just the Russian Mafia. Even major banks etc. have committed gross acts of negligence resulting in security breaches that, a few decades ago, would have required the thieves to drive away with a tractor-trailer full of filing cabinets.

I know that sounds alarming, but it's the truth and it's a big problem. And sites like Facebook are not helping by taking such a cavalier and underhanded approach to protecting privacy. A privacy policy should be "we will never share your info with anyone, ever" (which many sites use), and not "we've quietly changed everything, and unless you de-select a deeply-buried profile option that we haven't told you about, we will share all your login info with whoever pays for it".


This.
 
2010-05-05 11:06:39 AM  
bemis23: I wonder if the FTC has heard of Consumerist.com?

Yes, since I assume they receive about 100 trolls from them per day.
 
2010-05-05 11:58:57 AM  
Don't fall for it. The government does not give a flying fark about any of your rights. They certainly don't believe we have a right to privacy - certainly not from them. This is just the government trying once again to get its foot in the door of internet content regulation.


Here is the FTC trying to use Wall Street problems as the excuse:
Link (new window)

Sorry government farks, but I can read the fine print in any contract I agree to. I don't need you to "protect" me from the evils of marketers.
 
2010-05-05 12:20:43 PM  
HOLY shiat WHAT YOU PUT ON FACEBOOK ENDS UP ON FACEBOOK NO farkING WAY LETS GREENLIGHT OVER 9000 ARTICLES WITH POUTRAGE ABOUT FACEBOOK'S "LACK OF PRIVACY" FOR PEOPLE THAT VOLUNTARILY PUT THEIR OWN INFORMATION ON FACEBOOK AND DON'T SET THEIR PRIVACY SETTINGS CORRECTLY!
 
2010-05-05 12:33:58 PM  
On the one hand, I understand there are real problem with privacy as it applies to financial transactions and perhaps even more insidiously, targeted advertisements.

On the other hand, it doesn't help that a good chunk of the population is more than happy to put pictures of last weekend's kegger on Facebook.
 
2010-05-05 01:41:00 PM  
Just an idea... Everyone should "own" the rights to their personal information... all of it. If any company should want your name, address, phone number etc. they should be required to give you the option to sell it to them to use for a finite period of time.

This way, people who want to give up their information have that option and those of us who don't, won't have to. Companies would not be able to advertise to us, specifically, unless we give them that permission and sell them access to our information.

It'll never happen, but it's an intriguing idea. If "artists" and others are going demand payment for their creations, all of us should be able to demand payment for the use of our personal information and have control over it.
 
2010-05-05 03:13:37 PM  
I sure do hope they get around to doing something about it. Outfits like Radaris are downright creepy, beyond creepy.
 
2010-05-05 08:00:58 PM  
Fano: bemis23: I wonder if the FTC has heard of Consumerist.com?

Yes, since I assume they receive about 100 trolls from them per day.


*facepalm*
 
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