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(The Consumerist)   CEO of Viacom says newspapers will be dead within two years. Sent to your Blackberry via SMS   (consumerist.com) divider line 63
    More: Unlikely, Viacom, CEO, Techdirt, blackberry, Sumner Redstone, tattoos  
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2988 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 May 2010 at 12:15 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-05-04 12:19:12 PM
Might take longer, but imagine that more than a few large city papers will die in that time.
 
2010-05-04 12:19:43 PM
What about these old fangled "book" things?
 
2010-05-04 12:22:51 PM
Which is exactly what a cable and tv network magnate could be expected to say.
 
2010-05-04 12:24:08 PM
Scaryduck: What about these old fangled "book" things?

They are going down very rapidly. Efiles are so much cheaper.
 
2010-05-04 12:27:20 PM
what will happen to news?
 
2010-05-04 12:28:50 PM
Sorry, printed media isn't going away anytime soon. When I'm on the throne browsing the web on a smartphone is vastly inferior to the Sunday paper, never gonna change.
 
2010-05-04 12:32:11 PM
What ever Viacom says is true and demand you pay $9.95 for saying Viacom.

I'm out $19.90 now.
 
2010-05-04 12:32:14 PM
Steezy: Sorry, printed media isn't going away anytime soon. When I'm on the throne browsing the web on a smartphone is vastly inferior to the Sunday paper, never gonna change.

"...On the throne"? Are you the king, or lordmaster of something important? Should I be genuflecting, or otherwise paying homage to your greatness? Or am I just misreading what you said? Sooooo confusing...
 
2010-05-04 12:33:35 PM
Hmmm.... so I suppose now would be a good time to invest in bird cage liners, kindling, and things for old ladies to hit dogs with...
 
2010-05-04 12:36:05 PM
Somebody better get the word to all those journalism majors being churned out across the country.
 
2010-05-04 12:36:27 PM
Redstone's a jerk, but nobody tops Kerry Packer for media tycoon asshat, threatening rival executives and actually brawling when they failed to accept mergers.
 
2010-05-04 12:39:52 PM
Steezy: Sorry, printed media isn't going away anytime soon. When I'm on the throne browsing the web on a smartphone is vastly inferior to the Sunday paper, never gonna change.


Not that hard to install an internet enabled touchscreen next to your hollow perch, your majesty.
 
2010-05-04 12:40:02 PM
Considering 56k dial up is a luxury in most parts of rural America, 2 years is a bit of a stretch.
 
2010-05-04 12:40:11 PM
Change 2 years to 20 and he's right
 
2010-05-04 12:41:33 PM
So much for media reform.
 
2010-05-04 12:41:55 PM
Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Change 2 years to 20 and he's right


Yea, bailouts will just prolong the suffering.
 
2010-05-04 12:42:21 PM
Steezy: Sorry, printed media isn't going away anytime soon. When I'm on the throne browsing the web on a smartphone is vastly inferior to the Sunday paper, never gonna change.

I agree, people like this are generally going to slow the inevitable death of paper media. However, this is a change that will most assuredly take place, as they die off. Kinda like evolution.
 
2010-05-04 12:42:56 PM
Shut up and release all the B&W Honeymooners episodes on DVD.
 
2010-05-04 12:46:56 PM
Don't worry, the iPad will save them!
 
2010-05-04 12:49:04 PM
DeadZone: Don't worry, the iPad will save them!

You shove newspapers into your vagina??
 
2010-05-04 12:49:41 PM
Nocens: Steezy: Sorry, printed media isn't going away anytime soon. When I'm on the throne browsing the web on a smartphone is vastly inferior to the Sunday paper, never gonna change.


Not that hard to install an internet enabled touchscreen next to your hollow perch, your majesty.


And you're going to want to use that internet enabled touchscreen after your teenaged son just spent 45 mins in the bathroom "shaving"? Methinks you have not thought your cunning plan all the way through.
 
2010-05-04 12:52:00 PM
They're not dead yet?

On a more serious note, they might survive if they adapt to the new instantaneous news culture. For example, aggregating news of interest for their viewers, i.e. "here's what happened in news yesterday in a nice aggregated format" or something similar.

Probably not a very well thought out idea on my part, but I think it gets the point across.
 
2010-05-04 12:54:32 PM
Nocens: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Change 2 years to 20 and he's right


Yea, bailouts will just prolong the suffering.


Wouldn't surprise me in the least.
 
2010-05-04 12:54:51 PM
www.cinemablend.com
 
2010-05-04 12:56:25 PM
The problem is that the news has become a commodity. In today's world of Reuters and AP providing 90% of all news, the only difference is the experience. There are only two differences between any two types of media today, especially when you consider the Internet:

1. The experience - is your site a pleasure or pain to read?
2. Content - is your site producing original content?

If you can't answer both of those questions positively your newspaper is doomed to die. The news is a commodity, much like so many things before it. The fact that your newspaper serves a given community is moot, the fact that it has been around for decades or longer is moot, the only that matters is the experience and the content.

My point stands in fair value for things like radio and tv as well. TV produces original content to at least some degree, radio does not, therefore radio is in greater danger of failing as well.
 
2010-05-04 12:59:09 PM
I am literally taking a dump right now, so I'm getting a kick and all that.
 
2010-05-04 01:02:43 PM
Nocens: Incontinent_dog_and_monkey_rodeo: Change 2 years to 20 and he's right


Yea, bailouts will just prolong the suffering.


Not to sound like an anti-MSM freak, but if some newspapers take Federal funds to stay afloat, it really negates the "speak truth to power" thing. Do people really think they (newspaper reporters/editors) would still bite the hand that feeds them at that point? And do people think that Gov't officials that manage the money wouldn't want some sort of oversight?

/Yes, NPR & PBS gets some public funds, but that isn't their sole budget source and it isn't a bailout.
 
2010-05-04 01:02:48 PM
Khanmots: Nocens: Steezy: Sorry, printed media isn't going away anytime soon. When I'm on the throne browsing the web on a smartphone is vastly inferior to the Sunday paper, never gonna change.


Not that hard to install an internet enabled touchscreen next to your hollow perch, your majesty.

And you're going to want to use that internet enabled touchscreen after your teenaged son just spent 45 mins in the bathroom "shaving"? Methinks you have not thought your cunning plan all the way through.



God gave us Lysol for a reason.

Christ, talk to your kid once in awhile.
 
2010-05-04 01:05:40 PM
onyxruby: The problem is that the news has become a commodity. In today's world of Reuters and AP providing 90% of all news, the only difference is the experience. There are only two differences between any two types of media today, especially when you consider the Internet:

The wires do not provide 90 percent of all news; wtf do people come up with these random numbers.
 
2010-05-04 01:07:38 PM
Well, they are made from dead trees so they are pretty much dead already.

/Newspapers will always be needed because you can't swat your dog with a rolled up web page.
 
2010-05-04 01:08:43 PM
Knucklepopper: onyxruby: The problem is that the news has become a commodity. In today's world of Reuters and AP providing 90% of all news, the only difference is the experience. There are only two differences between any two types of media today, especially when you consider the Internet:

The wires do not provide 90 percent of all news; wtf do people come up with these random numbers.


62% of people just pull statistics out of their asshole.
 
2010-05-04 01:11:21 PM
Unlikely.

A whole lot of folks still like the ability to open a paper and read the news without having to stare at a tiny screen, a PC monitor sitting on a desk or a laptop. They like opening up the paper and finding the information right there without having to fart around with an ISP, links, adjust the text size or put up with unwanted, floating and annoying active ads.

News papers have an extensive history and reliability, which folks like. E-news doesn't.

I personally don't own any e-books. I like the feel of a real book, the ability to read the book when the power is out, to sprawl out on the couch, the bed, under a tree or out in the wild without being concerned about battery life.

When I put a book in my bookcase, I like being able to pull it out a year later and read it again without worrying if the data has become corrupted.

I can drop a book in a puddle and still read it when it dries off.

Try that with a laptop or those e-readers.

I've books close to 100 years old and can still read them. I've data disks from the 1980s that can't be read on my current computer. I don't have any idea if those early, huge floppy disks could still be read, if you could find a big drive they need.

My books and newspapers can't be hacked.

Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn aren't going to hide spyware or a virus someone figured out how to sneak into the programs.

There's something about the printed text on paper that just can't be replaced.

There's also far too many ways to screw up and hijack current electronic media and far too many ways to screw consumers over costs.

Look at Comcast. It's found all sorts of ways to charge consumers more while giving them less.

No. I'll keep my newspaper and my real books, thank you.
 
2010-05-04 01:16:04 PM
bighairyguy: Well, they are made from dead trees so they are pretty much dead already.

/Newspapers will always be needed because you can't swat your dog with a rolled up web page.


But spank him with an iPad and he'll get the message.
 
2010-05-04 01:17:20 PM
Wake up and smell the ink! I used to work for the only major newspaper in town. People were being "encouraged" to take early retirement, award winning senior reporters were leaving left and right, people still employed were doing twice as much work for (maybe) a 1-2% annual raise. Even the long-time publisher left. All the news department did was regurgitate AP and UP press releases.
The local free weekly does a much better job of covering local events. I could get a paper for free, but why bother? The digital age is here and all the dinosaur industries out there just either don't realize the comet has hit or are in a state of desperate denial.
 
2010-05-04 01:17:55 PM
Rik01: Unlikely...

Stay off this guy's lawn.

/i b trollin, haters b hatin
 
2010-05-04 01:19:06 PM
Elrond Hubbard: The local free weekly does a much better job of covering local events. I could get a paper for free, but why bother? The digital age is here and all the dinosaur industries out there just either don't realize the comet has hit or are in a state of desperate denial.

Hm. Maybe they'll figure out someday how to post their content onto this "Internet" thing I keep hearing about.
 
2010-05-04 01:21:40 PM
I read exactly one newspaper in the last 3 months, and only because it was already sitting on the table next to me at McDonald's.
 
2010-05-04 01:23:16 PM
harryjrf: They're not dead yet?

On a more serious note, they might survive if they adapt to the new instantaneous news culture. For example, aggregating news of interest for their viewers, i.e. "here's what happened in news yesterday in a nice aggregated format" or something similar.

Probably not a very well thought out idea on my part, but I think it gets the point across.


Well, this is what the free dailies do, and they're fairly successful -- a small staff, a lot of wire copy and pictures, some columnists and (in some cases) shorter versions of stories that appear in the parent company's major daily.

Voila, a 24-to-48-page tabloid newspaper that gives people on public transportation 200-word versions of all yesterday's major stories, and a dash of opinion, and can be read from cover to cover during a 25-minute subway commute.

So yeah ... it's going to be tough to get rid of newspapers completely, but that's definitely the direction they're headed in. Not so good for actual quality journalism, but not a terrible business model in large cities with strong public transit (we have three in Toronto).
 
2010-05-04 01:24:59 PM
There are plenty of free local papers doing just fine and they aren't going anywhere.

The subscriber dependent papers with real journalism. Probably.
 
2010-05-04 01:25:46 PM
Knucklepopper: onyxruby: The problem is that the news has become a commodity. In today's world of Reuters and AP providing 90% of all news, the only difference is the experience. There are only two differences between any two types of media today, especially when you consider the Internet:

The wires do not provide 90 percent of all news; wtf do people come up with these random numbers.


Those numbers are random, but for a whole bunch of newspapers, not too far from the truth.

/works for a newspaper that's probably at 75-80% wires.
 
2010-05-04 01:28:46 PM
onyxruby: The problem is that the news has become a commodity. In today's world of Reuters and AP providing 90% of all news, the only difference is the experience. There are only two differences between any two types of media today, especially when you consider the Internet:

1. The experience - is your site a pleasure or pain to read?
2. Content - is your site producing original content?

If you can't answer both of those questions positively your newspaper is doomed to die. The news is a commodity, much like so many things before it. The fact that your newspaper serves a given community is moot, the fact that it has been around for decades or longer is moot, the only that matters is the experience and the content.

My point stands in fair value for things like radio and tv as well. TV produces original content to at least some degree, radio does not, therefore radio is in greater danger of failing as well.



The AP writes local newspaper articles? And I wasn't aware Reuters was sending someone to the city council meetings.

I know, lets "hire" a teenage blogger to cover council budget meetings for clips.
 
2010-05-04 01:34:19 PM
This is a moot point. Is the format of delivering information going to change? Hell, yeah, it will most likely be digital rather than on paper. Will high-quality, beautifully and smartly laid-out reporting and information still be in demand? Hell yeah. Any newspaper with a brain is working on a digital tablet/iPad/E-Reader version. Will people pay money for this sort of thing? ...
 
2010-05-04 01:34:50 PM
RedEyedWings: Knucklepopper: onyxruby: The problem is that the news has become a commodity. In today's world of Reuters and AP providing 90% of all news, the only difference is the experience. There are only two differences between any two types of media today, especially when you consider the Internet:

The wires do not provide 90 percent of all news; wtf do people come up with these random numbers.

Those numbers are random, but for a whole bunch of newspapers, not too far from the truth.

/works for a newspaper that's probably at 75-80% wires.


Glad to see you're also providing us with hard numbers.
 
2010-05-04 01:36:04 PM
It won't disappear over night, it'll slowly fade away as the old farts who support it also fade away.
/the porch
//off it
 
2010-05-04 01:42:09 PM
What will bird owners paper the cage with?

What will I put out for my dogs to shiat upon if they can't get out?

How will the end of print journalism affect old loons who hoard newspapers?
 
2010-05-04 01:47:17 PM
harryjrf: bighairyguy: Well, they are made from dead trees so they are pretty much dead already.

/Newspapers will always be needed because you can't swat your dog with a rolled up web page.

But spank him with an iPad and he'll get the message.


And you'll only be out a mere $499 for some real quality dog training.

I like to read at night in bed. Oftentimes I doze right off and then wake up to find the book I was reading on the floor. So far I'm out $0 in book replacement costs from having them drop. When an iPad or similar expensive electronic device can handle the same "mistreatment", I'll seriously consider switching.
 
2010-05-04 02:03:40 PM
harryjrf: bighairyguy: Well, they are made from dead trees so they are pretty much dead already.

/Newspapers will always be needed because you can't swat your dog with a rolled up web page.

But spank him with an iPad and he'll get the message.


I make him pay extra for that.
 
2010-05-04 02:35:06 PM
Steezy: Sorry, printed media isn't going away anytime soon. When I'm on the throne browsing the web on a smartphone is vastly inferior to the Sunday paper, never gonna change.

If you're on the can long enough for a newspaper to be necessary you need to eat more fiber.

onyxruby: If you can't answer both of those questions positively your newspaper is doomed to die. The news is a commodity, much like so many things before it. The fact that your newspaper serves a given community is moot, the fact that it has been around for decades or longer is moot, the only that matters is the experience and the content.

This is especially true as video, audio and transcripts of local government meetings are being made available online, and social networking sites like Twitter are becoming more popular. (For example, a building collapsed in my city and I got faster and more detailed coverage for free using Twitter.)

The only other service that local papers offer that aren't available elsewhere are obituaries and wedding/engagement announcements. Everything else (state news, national news, world new, classifieds, comics, editorials) are available elsewhere.
 
2010-05-04 02:36:47 PM
Persnickety: I like to read at night in bed. Oftentimes I doze right off and then wake up to find the book I was reading on the floor. So far I'm out $0 in book replacement costs from having them drop. When an iPad or similar expensive electronic device can handle the same "mistreatment", I'll seriously consider switching.

There's a word for this. It's called narcolepsy
 
2010-05-04 02:37:52 PM
TheDirtyNacho: The AP writes local newspaper articles? And I wasn't aware Reuters was sending someone to the city council meetings.

I know, lets "hire" a teenage blogger to cover council budget meetings for clips.


A company in my town is using an automated video recording system linked to the microphones to provide streaming and recorded coverage of city council meetings.

Next complaint?
 
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