If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Time)   For over 17,544 hours, Dragonfly Forest has offered a traditional 7200 minute summer camp experience for autistic children   (time.com) divider line 64
    More: Sappy, Dragonfly Forest, autism  
•       •       •

4695 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Apr 2010 at 8:01 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



64 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2010-04-25 04:26:48 PM
+1
But only because submistic actually figured leap year 2008 in his calculations.
 
2010-04-25 06:02:20 PM
dugitman: +1
But only because submistic actually figured leap year 2008 in his calculations.
 
2010-04-25 08:02:26 PM
I saw what you did there I saw what you did there I saw what you did there I saw what you did there I saw what you did there I saw what you did there
 
2010-04-25 08:06:26 PM
meh, i work at a non-profit organization that provides the same care to children with all types of developmental delays... while it's great that the camp featured in this article exists, i'm not entirely sure why its time magazine worthy... maybe i missed something
oh, and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference
 
2010-04-25 08:07:17 PM
I miss that show...


driftlessareareview.files.wordpress.com

/wait a minute...
 
2010-04-25 08:08:43 PM
panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?
 
2010-04-25 08:11:45 PM
robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?


It is just like Assistant Regional Manager and Assistant to the Regional Manager
 
2010-04-25 08:13:20 PM
robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?


Because when you say "autistic child" it implies that the kid is defined by his autism.

When you say "child with autism" it shows that they have autism, but are not ONLY autistic.

You know, like how we say, "child with black skin" instead of "black kid," or "person who is of large stature" instead of "fat man."
 
2010-04-25 08:13:48 PM
robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?


It's like saying "gay person" or "disabled person." It puts the emphasis on the condition/description rather than the person.

That said, it's also a matter of convenience and speed, and I'm far too farking lazy to say "person with X" instead of "Xish person."

/so there
 
2010-04-25 08:16:16 PM
LadyBinky: robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?

It's like saying "gay person" or "disabled person." It puts the emphasis on the condition/description rather than the person.

That said, it's also a matter of convenience and speed, and I'm far too farking lazy to say "person with X" instead of "Xish person."

/so there


Exactly. Fat guy. Black kid. Whatever.
 
2010-04-25 08:16:33 PM
tototototo: dugitman: +1
But only because submistic actually figured leap year 2008 in his calculations.


Thanks. I hoped someone would notice.
 
2010-04-25 08:17:39 PM
ScottTenorman: Because when you say "autistic child" it implies that the kid is defined by his autism.

When you say "child with autism" it shows that they have autism, but are not ONLY autistic.


Conversely, many of the individuals themselves view the term "person with autism" as implying that they are broken and need to be fixed, much as the phrase "child with blackness" could be taken. They prefer "autistic" as expressing an inherent aspect of their identity.
 
2010-04-25 08:17:40 PM
I look at it another way. Saying "autistic person" says they have any of the various disabilities on the autistic spectrum (NOS-PDD, Fragile X, Aspergers, etc) ... where as saying "person with autism" makes it clear that they have classic autism and not one of the things listed above. This is actually a huge pet peeve of mine.

/6 year old son with Autism.
//just stole my Sprite.
 
2010-04-25 08:21:06 PM
Update: Sprite retrieved. No casualties.
 
2010-04-25 08:21:09 PM
panamahighway: meh, i work at a non-profit organization that provides the same care to children with all types of developmental delays... while it's great that the camp featured in this article exists, i'm not entirely sure why its time magazine worthy... maybe i missed something
oh, and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference


So from now on I expect to be called The Guy With the Weight Disorder(or TGWWD for short) and not The Fat Guy. After all I don't want to be defined by my conditions or attributes.
 
2010-04-25 08:23:31 PM
I cut to the chase and call all children with autism "tardos".



Tardo.
 
2010-04-25 08:25:53 PM
jimbodahobo: panamahighway: meh, i work at a non-profit organization that provides the same care to children with all types of developmental delays... while it's great that the camp featured in this article exists, i'm not entirely sure why its time magazine worthy... maybe i missed something
oh, and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

So from now on I expect to be called The Guy With the Weight Disorder(or TGWWD for short) and not The Fat Guy. After all I don't want to be defined by my conditions or attributes.


Sorry.

You're a Fat Guy On Fark, so you're doubly screwed.
 
2010-04-25 08:27:09 PM
Gyrfalcon: jimbodahobo: panamahighway: meh, i work at a non-profit organization that provides the same care to children with all types of developmental delays... while it's great that the camp featured in this article exists, i'm not entirely sure why its time magazine worthy... maybe i missed something
oh, and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

So from now on I expect to be called The Guy With the Weight Disorder(or TGWWD for short) and not The Fat Guy. After all I don't want to be defined by my conditions or attributes.

Sorry.

You're a Fat Guy On Fark, so you're doubly screwed.


Ok fine then, The Guy with the Weight Disorder whom enjoys Fark and Farklike websites(TGWWDWEFFW for short)
 
2010-04-25 08:27:57 PM
Gyrfalcon: You're a Fat Guy On Fark, so you're doubly you've never been screwed.

/FTFY.
 
2010-04-25 08:28:27 PM
"To all those people who made fun of me, I just wanna say...I did the zipline and I'm in a record book."

img28.imageshack.us

/Attempting to snark...
//Unable to snark!
 
2010-04-25 08:28:37 PM
You know who also hated autistic children and had them systematically exterminated along with various other groups of people?

/true story.
 
2010-04-25 08:29:00 PM
jimbodahobo: panamahighway: meh, i work at a non-profit organization that provides the same care to children with all types of developmental delays... while it's great that the camp featured in this article exists, i'm not entirely sure why its time magazine worthy... maybe i missed something
oh, and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

So from now on I expect to be called The Guy With the Weight Disorder(or TGWWD for short) and not The Fat Guy. After all I don't want to be defined by my conditions or attributes.


You're seriously putting being overweight (caused by you) with being autistic (not of your choosing)?
 
2010-04-25 08:29:41 PM
Blah they're just terms. Although in this case the group in question might be highly fixated on what terms you use. That is they care about how you are defining them. Which is to say the manner of their description is of high importance to them. Furthermore they will list in rapt attention to any accounts of them. This is certainly a subject to which they will pour over every detail said. They will focus intently on the matter. They won't be able to think of anything else. Each word-, w-o-r-d will matter to, t-o them. They may even notice, n for nice, naughty, nihilistic, neurotic, patterns that the rest of us, USA, usury, can't even fathom. Even the text of this reply, the dark gradient, not night black but darker than the wall in my room, and darker than the mug near me. Anyways they'll care what you say about them.
 
2010-04-25 08:30:26 PM
JPSimonetti: You know who also hated autistic children and had them systematically exterminated along with various other groups of people?

/true story.


Vaccine makers?

/Jenny said it, so it must be true.
 
2010-04-25 08:31:33 PM
ScottTenorman: robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?

Because when you say "autistic child" it implies that the kid is defined by his autism.

When you say "child with autism" it shows that they have autism, but are not ONLY autistic.

You know, like how we say, "child with black skin" instead of "black kid," or "person who is of large stature" instead of "fat man."


HAHAHAHA!

Or PC idiot vs. idiot of PC.
 
2010-04-25 08:32:50 PM
LadyBinky: robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?

It's like saying "gay person" or "disabled person." It puts the emphasis on the condition/description rather than the person.

That said, it's also a matter of convenience and speed, and I'm far too farking lazy to say "person with X" instead of "Xish person."

/so there


So, "person with gaytism" instead of "fag"? Got it.
 
2010-04-25 08:34:28 PM
ScottTenorman: robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?

Because when you say "autistic child" it implies that the kid is defined by his autism.

When you say "child with autism" it shows that they have autism, but are not ONLY autistic.

You know, like how we say, "child with black skin" instead of "black kid," or "person who is of large stature" instead of "fat man."


Wed do? What do we use the words "pickaninny" and "lardass" for, then?
 
2010-04-25 08:35:33 PM
Hot water burn baby HOT WATER BURN BABEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!
 
2010-04-25 08:38:14 PM
AmazingRuss: ScottTenorman: robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?

Because when you say "autistic child" it implies that the kid is defined by his autism.

When you say "child with autism" it shows that they have autism, but are not ONLY autistic.

You know, like how we say, "child with black skin" instead of "black kid," or "person who is of large stature" instead of "fat man."

Wed do? What do we use the words "pickaninny" and "lardass" for, then?


You got me. But I know here in the Humble Midwest, we use nice terms for everyone. For instance, you say "Ginger," we say "person with disgusting, reprehensible hair." Or you say "Lupus face," we say "person who looks like Seal."
 
2010-04-25 08:42:18 PM
Ha, fail, everyone knows autistic kids would count the time in seconds.
 
2010-04-25 08:42:44 PM
I work with autistic kids and their parents, teachers and attorneys, and I have yet to hear anyone say "children with autism" instead of autistic kids. And I live in So. Cal. the birthplace of PCdiocy.

If anyone told me they preferred the "children with autism" term, I'd use it, but so far, nobody has requested it yet.
 
2010-04-25 08:47:18 PM
ScottTenorman: You know, like how we say, "child with black skin" instead of "black kid,"

You still say their height and build after it, right? You know- just in case.
 
2010-04-25 08:48:35 PM
So when do we get to see their beautiful creations?
 
2010-04-25 08:53:31 PM
ScottTenorman: jimbodahobo: panamahighway: meh, i work at a non-profit organization that provides the same care to children with all types of developmental delays... while it's great that the camp featured in this article exists, i'm not entirely sure why its time magazine worthy... maybe i missed something
oh, and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

So from now on I expect to be called The Guy With the Weight Disorder(or TGWWD for short) and not The Fat Guy. After all I don't want to be defined by my conditions or attributes.

You're seriously putting being overweight (caused by you) with being autistic (not of your choosing)?


OH, I get it... you are just another self-important douche with a crusade.
 
2010-04-25 08:56:47 PM
robohobo: panamahighway: and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference

Um, why?


Because it's politically correct to not be hurtin' feelinz.

Like Carlin said, call it like it is. A cripple, a cracker, a ni..er, an asshole. It is what it is. It's the context that the word is used that matters. If you want to be mean, you can use the word in a hurtful manner. Otherwise, chill out people.

I used to be fat. I'm not offended by the word, I'd be more offended if someone used the word to hurt me. If my doc says, "hey guy, youre fat, maybe you should diet", then I'm not going to be offended. If my doc walks in and calls me a fat shiat, then I might raise an eyebrow...and a middle finger. It's all about context.

/pussification of america
//lowercase 'A' because a capital would be a compliment.
///context
 
2010-04-25 08:59:20 PM
Gyrfalcon: I work with autistic kids and their parents, teachers and attorneys, and I have yet to hear anyone say "children with autism" instead of autistic kids. And I live in So. Cal. the birthplace of PCdiocy.

If anyone told me they preferred the "children with autism" term, I'd use it, but so far, nobody has requested it yet.


Since I'm no skilled diagnostician, I'm gonna go with "retards", if thats ok.

/the public school system made me this way
 
2010-04-25 09:04:53 PM
My nephew told me he prefers to be called "Hunter", because that's his name. If his atypical neurology needs to be mentioned, he says, "I'm Hunter, and I have Autism." He hates being called an "Autistic kid", because he's just average enough to know he's different, and it hurts him. Saying he *has* Autism, to him, makes it no different from his Aunt Nicolle having asthma or his youngest brother having glasses.

More often then not, he says he doesn't have Autism. He claims, "No, Anthony has a broken brain, not me!" It's a spectrum, and thus the subtleties of it are beyond his comprehension. He hears that he and his brother have Autism and refuses to believe it. He doesn't want to be lumped in with his low-functioning "retarded" brother. It's heartbreaking to hear him freak out and insist he's normal. We'd love to say he has Aspbergers, to give him a different term to use that separates him from Anthony,but he's not quite that high-functioning and we don't want to lie.

The middle brother Anthony, on the other hand, is low-functioning. He knows he has Autism, but doesn't give a fark. When asked about himself, he giggles, says "I'm Autistic!" and goes back to speaking Arabic/Chinese/Japanese/everything else but English. He doesn't care about the politics of 'person first' referencing, because it isn't trains, Pokemon, or a foreign langauge.

Spectrum disorders are fun!
 
2010-04-25 09:44:13 PM
My son is on the Autism spectrum - and he will say that he has Autism, not that he's autistic. He's very high functioning, and at age 15, is learning what situations will be challenging for him. Fortunately, he was diagnosed early, and we've had lots of help - and he's in a model Asperger's program that will allow him to graduate with a HS diploma in a college prep program....and WILL go on to college. After that, who knows? He's defining his own world, it's not defined for him.

He's been in Scouting since age 7, and very rarely do they ever need to make an accommodation for him. He's on track for Eagle, and he's doing it all by himself. Last summer, I went down to Seabase with him, and we had a blast.


Funny things - he used to be very particular about what types of food he would eat....and now he's choosing things that I would find unusual. He also used to be afraid of amusement park rides....now he will take on any roller coaster that you can get him to. This summer, we have Kindgda Ka and Top Thrill Dragster on our list.

/Awesome kid. Wouldn't change anything about him.
 
2010-04-25 09:50:44 PM
kokomo61: My son is on the Autism spectrum - and he will say that he has Autism, not that he's autistic. He's very high functioning, and at age 15, is learning what situations will be challenging for him. Fortunately, he was diagnosed early, and we've had lots of help - and he's in a model Asperger's program that will allow him to graduate with a HS diploma in a college prep program....and WILL go on to college. After that, who knows? He's defining his own world, it's not defined for him.

He's been in Scouting since age 7, and very rarely do they ever need to make an accommodation for him. He's on track for Eagle, and he's doing it all by himself. Last summer, I went down to Seabase with him, and we had a blast.


Funny things - he used to be very particular about what types of food he would eat....and now he's choosing things that I would find unusual. He also used to be afraid of amusement park rides....now he will take on any roller coaster that you can get him to. This summer, we have Kindgda Ka and Top Thrill Dragster on our list.

/Awesome kid. Wouldn't change anything about him.


Do you mind if I copypasta this post and send it to my sister? My nephew is 11, and making progress daily. I think this will bring her hope.

/Hunter will eat spaghetti, bananas, mac'n'cheese, pretzels, pizza, and french fries. We give him vitamins to supplement, but we want him to eat better.
 
2010-04-25 09:57:26 PM
Tarheel_Madness: Like Carlin said, call it like it is. A cripple, a cracker, a ni..er, an asshole. It is what it is. It's the context that the word is used that matters. If you want to be mean, you can use the word in a hurtful manner. Otherwise, chill out people.

I try not to be an insensitive douchenozzle, but I tend to follow the Carlin Gospel when it comes to these sorts of things. We all have varying forms of autism in our family and my hubby and I make a lot of Rain Man jokes when we're having one of those days where we can't think because there's too much background noise or one of us rattles off a random thought string off subject or when my son starts spinning and flapping and repeating the same line over and over again or when my daughter goes into word salad so jumbled that we can only scratch our heads and laugh.
 
2010-04-25 10:04:02 PM
kokomo61: My son is on the Autism spectrum - and he will say that he has Autism, not that he's autistic. He's very high functioning, and at age 15, is learning what situations will be challenging for him. Fortunately, he was diagnosed early, and we've had lots of help - and he's in a model Asperger's program that will allow him to graduate with a HS diploma in a college prep program....and WILL go on to college. After that, who knows? He's defining his own world, it's not defined for him.

He's been in Scouting since age 7, and very rarely do they ever need to make an accommodation for him. He's on track for Eagle, and he's doing it all by himself. Last summer, I went down to Seabase with him, and we had a blast.


Funny things - he used to be very particular about what types of food he would eat....and now he's choosing things that I would find unusual. He also used to be afraid of amusement park rides....now he will take on any roller coaster that you can get him to. This summer, we have Kindgda Ka and Top Thrill Dragster on our list.

/Awesome kid. Wouldn't change anything about him.


Sounds like a lot of his success is due to the fact that you didn't coddle him or treat him differently. I hold the same standards for my children and I've been told that it shows. I've forced social situations (pre-school) and each of my 2 autistic children are now enrolled in an activity for enrichment and self-discipline (my son made purple belt recently in karate and my 7 y.o. daughter has been playing piano since 5 and is really good at it).

Good for you and your attitude. Your son will go far. The world needs more parents like you. I only wish my parents had known when I was a kid, but back then autism was only "Rain Man". I've learned a lot about myself thanks to my daughter and her diagnosis. My own diagnosis has enabled me to figure out the answers to so many questions. Because of that, I have managed to do well in my current job that's paying for me to complete my master's.
 
2010-04-25 10:10:03 PM
Temple Grandin on autism. This. video. rocks.
 
2010-04-25 10:17:46 PM
Megris_Vernin: Blah they're just terms. Although in this case the group in question might be highly fixated on what terms you use. That is they care about how you are defining them. Which is to say the manner of their description is of high importance to them. Furthermore they will list in rapt attention to any accounts of them. This is certainly a subject to which they will pour over every detail said. They will focus intently on the matter. They won't be able to think of anything else. Each word-, w-o-r-d will matter to, t-o them. They may even notice, n for nice, naughty, nihilistic, neurotic, patterns that the rest of us, USA, usury, can't even fathom. Even the text of this reply, the dark gradient, not night black but darker than the wall in my room, and darker than the mug near me. Anyways they'll care what you say about them.

Sheer farking genius, this.
 
2010-04-25 10:18:38 PM
eccares.uoregon.edu

What an artistic child might look like.
/hot like the hinges of hades
 
2010-04-25 10:18:57 PM
www.randi.org

Autism is very easy to diagnose and even easier to treat! I just clicked my heels and it turns out it was all just a dream.
 
2010-04-25 10:42:23 PM
huntercr: Autism is very easy to diagnose and even easier to treat! I just clicked my heels and it turns out it was all just a dream.

My wife was about vaccines and if I thought they caused autism. She's also reading (or was) Jenny's book "Belly Laughs" so I was not totally surprised.

/saw the picture, made me think of that
//i know cs, b
 
2010-04-25 11:00:28 PM
panamahighway:
oh, and its children with autism, not autistic children... a small change in wording but a big difference


Definitely makes a big difference. Definitely. Definitely. Definitely makes a big difference. Definitely.
 
2010-04-25 11:01:07 PM
dj_bigbird: Temple Grandin on autism. This. video. rocks.

I watched the movie Temple Grandin not too long ago (my youngest son has Asperger's and my oldest has ADHD, is bipolar with some serious Asperger's indicators - my life is never dull!) and I couldn't get through it without sobbing like a baby.

I recognized so many of my son's behaviors in the portrayal of Temple, and her mother's insistence that Temple was "different, not less" just hit home.

I've always told my boys that there is nothing *wrong* with them. Their brains are not broken. They are both way above average intelligence, they just process information differently than other kids.

They both think outside the box, and it's a quality I hope they both keep for the rest of their lives.

/ gonna go hug my boys now...
 
2010-04-25 11:06:15 PM
BallsackConundrum:
/Hunter will eat spaghetti, bananas, mac'n'cheese, pretzels, pizza, and french fries. We give him vitamins to supplement, but we want him to eat better.


I totally hear ya. My son Paul (he's my little Aspie) will only eat mac n cheese, pizza, hot dogs, corn dogs, bananas, zebra cakes, chips, and his favorite cereal. His doctor said that it's ok, just make sure we give him vitamin supplements, try to get him to increase fruit / veggie intake by having him drink 100% juices, and make sure he gets plenty of exercise.

Lately, though, he's expressed interest in some new foods. He'll eat the popcorn chicken, chicken fryze and burgers at school and actually requests that we set aside a big slice or two of pork loin for him whenever we fix it at home. Sometimes he'll eat fish too if I make it *just* right.
 
2010-04-25 11:19:04 PM
Yeah
 
Displayed 50 of 64 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all



This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report