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(io9)   Reflecting on once-prosperous days along the now-shrinking Salton Sea, which in fact is not a natural feature at all, but a dumbass human accident (pics)   (io9.com) divider line 126
    More: Spiffy, tourist destinations, dumbass, drainage, Salton Sea, gas station, motel, snapshots, grids  
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28647 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Mar 2010 at 5:15 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-03-23 02:19:28 PM
human accident? No.
 
2010-03-23 02:42:33 PM
The earthquake that formed it was caused by humans?

/They made a couple of good movies around that area. Salton Sea, with D'Onofrio as a totally wacko drug dealer, and Freeway, with Reese Witherspoon terrorizing Kiefer Sutherland.
 
2010-03-23 03:13:13 PM
*fap*fap*fap*
 
2010-03-23 03:24:39 PM
Don't open the vault.

xbox360media.gamespy.com
 
2010-03-23 03:54:18 PM
You want a man-made disaster, look up what happened to the Aral Sea. Where you once had a gigantic body of water the size of West Virginia there is now a desert with constantly raging radioactive/toxic dust storms.
 
2010-03-23 05:08:52 PM
Google Street View has actually mapped pretty much that entire little community. Reminds me of some of the environments in Fallout 3.

Weird. Eerie.
 
2010-03-23 05:17:11 PM
I rem going there as a child. It sucked.

/from orbit, just to be sure.
 
2010-03-23 05:17:39 PM
i106.photobucket.com
 
2010-03-23 05:18:08 PM
And I was just playing Fallout 3. . .
 
2010-03-23 05:19:14 PM
Salton Sea shrinking?

Obviously global warming. Open your eyes, sheeple.
 
2010-03-23 05:20:30 PM
Manic_Repressive

[pic]

Badass flick.
 
2010-03-23 05:21:16 PM
I think "The Beast that Challenged the World" was filmed there. The documentary narrated by John Waters is pretty fun to watch. It reminds me of parts of Western Oklahoma I grew up in. Seems that there are a lot more skanks here, though.
 
2010-03-23 05:22:26 PM
Welcome to the future of the Inland Empire.
 
2010-03-23 05:23:45 PM
Mono Lake is getting larger and Salton Sea is getting smaller. Hmmm...
 
2010-03-23 05:24:25 PM
It's still california. that means $50,000 for a crappy mobile home. (new window)
 
2010-03-23 05:24:30 PM
The Salton Sea was one of the few places of many road trips where we actually felt a little scared. Dead fish all over the place. Creepy birds staring you down. Not a single person around mid-week, mid-day.

Kept waiting for Leather Face to pop out with a chain saw.
 
2010-03-23 05:25:37 PM
Having visited there several times while hanging out in Indio I'd say the area is beautiful in a rather post apocalyptic sorta way. When it's 125 there it's staggering.
 
2010-03-23 05:25:43 PM
Somebody envisioned the Salton Sea to be a resort destination with the luxury of ocean water in the middle of the dessert. Who would be stupid enough to finance that project with all of the beautiful California coast competing with it?

The Salton Sea is the nastiest places I've ever visited in Southern California and that's saying a lot, I've been to a So Cal Arby's.
 
2010-03-23 05:26:55 PM
I own property at the salton sea somewhere. I decided to let Imperial County take it rather than pay the 39.00 in property taxes every year.
 
zez
2010-03-23 05:27:03 PM
nrdgrl: The Salton Sea was one of the few places of many road trips where we actually felt a little scared. Dead fish all over the place. Creepy birds staring you down. Not a single person around mid-week, mid-day.

Kept waiting for Leather Face to pop out with a chain saw.


or this guy

fans.donofriofans.com
 
2010-03-23 05:28:09 PM
toddalmighty: human accident? No.

Yes ^

The creation of the Salton Sea of today started in 1905, when heavy rainfall and snowmelt caused the Colorado River to swell, overrunning a set of headgates for the Alamo Canal. The resulting flood poured down the canal and breached an Imperial Valley dike, eroding two watercourses, the New River in the west, and the Alamo River in the east, each about 60 miles (97 km) long[3]. These two newly created rivers carried the entire volume of the Colorado River into the Salton Sink, filling it in approximately two years.
 
2010-03-23 05:28:57 PM
zez: nrdgrl: The Salton Sea was one of the few places of many road trips where we actually felt a little scared. Dead fish all over the place. Creepy birds staring you down. Not a single person around mid-week, mid-day.

Kept waiting for Leather Face to pop out with a chain saw.

or this guy


Zactly. Except it was well before that movie was made.

/my lawn, get off
 
2010-03-23 05:29:15 PM
mpfjr: I own property at the salton sea somewhere. I decided to let Imperial County take it rather than pay the 39.00 in property taxes every year.

Dang, I woulda bought it. I like buying weird remote unusable plots of land. I gearing up to buy some florida swamp land.
 
2010-03-23 05:29:57 PM
oldebayer: The earthquake that formed it was caused by humans?

/They made a couple of good movies around that area. Salton Sea, with D'Onofrio as a totally wacko drug dealer, and Freeway, with Reese Witherspoon terrorizing Kiefer Sutherland.


Yeah, but it's full of man-eating snails.

exclamationmark.files.wordpress.com
 
2010-03-23 05:30:15 PM
Sure, it's not much to look at... but the meth is fantastic!!!
 
2010-03-23 05:31:21 PM
Dubai Vol: toddalmighty: human accident? No.

Yes ^

The creation of the Salton Sea of today started in 1905, when heavy rainfall and snowmelt caused the Colorado River to swell, overrunning a set of headgates for the Alamo Canal. The resulting flood poured down the canal and breached an Imperial Valley dike, eroding two watercourses, the New River in the west, and the Alamo River in the east, each about 60 miles (97 km) long[3]. These two newly created rivers carried the entire volume of the Colorado River into the Salton Sink, filling it in approximately two years.


Heavy rainfall and snowmelt are caused by human accident? Did you go to school in Texas?

/Thunder is angels bowling
 
2010-03-23 05:31:49 PM
oldebayer: The earthquake that formed it was caused by humans?

Wiki: "The creation of the Salton Sea of today started in 1905, when heavy rainfall and snowmelt caused the Colorado River to swell, overrunning a set of headgates for the Alamo Canal. The resulting flood poured down the canal and breached an Imperial Valley dike, eroding two watercourses, the New River in the west, and the Alamo River in the east, each about 60 miles long. These two newly created rivers carried the entire volume of the Colorado River into the Salton Sink, filling it in approximately two years.

The Southern Pacific Railroad attempted to stop the flooding by dumping earth into the headgates area, but the effort was not fast enough, and as the river eroded deeper and deeper into the dry desert sand of the Imperial Valley, a massive waterfall was created that started to cut rapidly upstream along the main stem of the Colorado River. This waterfall was initially 15 feet high but grew to a height of 30 feet before the flow through the breach was finally stopped. It was originally feared that the waterfall would recede upstream into the Nevada-Arizona area, attaining a height of up to 100 to 300 feet, from where it would be even more difficult to fix the problem. As the basin filled, the town of Salton, a Southern Pacific Railroad siding and Torres-Martinez Indian land were submerged. The sudden influx of water and the lack of any drainage from the basin resulted in the formation of the Salton Sea."


Sounds like a nature induced failure of a man made structure to me.
 
2010-03-23 05:32:33 PM
Check out pic #2.

I'm usually against grafitti, but "THE HILLS HAVE EYES" is a nice touch.
 
2010-03-23 05:32:59 PM
what's your favorite color?
 
2010-03-23 05:34:39 PM
You maniacs! You blew it up! Ah, damn you! God damn you all to hell!
 
2010-03-23 05:36:21 PM
chapman: I've been to a So Cal Arby's

You must have been really hungry.

/obscure.
 
2010-03-23 05:37:32 PM
Looks like that place is Superfund candidate.
 
2010-03-23 05:38:19 PM
So far, no one has mentioned the stench. The whole valley smells like a perpetual low tide.
 
2010-03-23 05:38:56 PM
I like the idea I read on wikipedia to simply create a canal to the sea of cortez. At 220+ feet below sea level you could have one kick-ass inland port that would really pour a ton of money into the area and make that swampy salt crap-hole into a really nice bay.
 
2010-03-23 05:40:46 PM
Explodo: I like the idea I read on wikipedia to simply create a canal to the sea of cortez. At 220+ feet below sea level you could have one kick-ass inland port that would really pour a ton of money into the area and make that swampy salt crap-hole into a really nice bay.

As an added bonus, it'd negate some small portion of that sea-level rising we keep hearing about.
 
2010-03-23 05:41:28 PM
MrSteve007: oldebayer: The earthquake that formed it was caused by humans?

Wiki: "The creation of the Salton Sea of today started in 1905, when heavy rainfall and snowmelt caused the Colorado River to swell, overrunning a set of headgates for the Alamo Canal. The resulting flood poured down the canal and breached an Imperial Valley dike, eroding two watercourses, the New River in the west, and the Alamo River in the east, each about 60 miles long. These two newly created rivers carried the entire volume of the Colorado River into the Salton Sink, filling it in approximately two years.

The Southern Pacific Railroad attempted to stop the flooding by dumping earth into the headgates area, but the effort was not fast enough, and as the river eroded deeper and deeper into the dry desert sand of the Imperial Valley, a massive waterfall was created that started to cut rapidly upstream along the main stem of the Colorado River. This waterfall was initially 15 feet high but grew to a height of 30 feet before the flow through the breach was finally stopped. It was originally feared that the waterfall would recede upstream into the Nevada-Arizona area, attaining a height of up to 100 to 300 feet, from where it would be even more difficult to fix the problem. As the basin filled, the town of Salton, a Southern Pacific Railroad siding and Torres-Martinez Indian land were submerged. The sudden influx of water and the lack of any drainage from the basin resulted in the formation of the Salton Sea."

Sounds like a nature induced failure of a man made structure to me.


But if the gates weren't there, wouldn't that body of water have formed anyway? Or am I misunderstanding how it happened?
 
2010-03-23 05:43:02 PM
Explodo: As an added bonus, it'd negate some small portion of that sea-level rising we keep hearing about.

But won't all that water be really heavy and make California fall into the sea?

Wait....

One second thought, lets get started on that.
 
2010-03-23 05:43:55 PM
We used to live in San Bernardino back in the 60s and 70s and the Salton Sea was a place my dad liked to take us. Problem was even wayyyy back then, it was a freaking cesspool. Sand that crunches if you don't step on something sharp like broken metal or glass. Super salinated and stinky water the color of Guiness Stout that was so hot you looked for cool spots. The running joke was that if you fell off your water skis you might come up with a turd draped over your nose.

The only thing fun about going down there was riding sand buggys in the desert and getting high with my cousins.

Yeah, I know, Cool Story Bro.....

As Lt Cheese Weasel so elegantly said "nuke it from orbit. it's the only way to be sure"

/good riddance
//never should have tried to build marinas
///stinky god forsaken hell hole
 
2010-03-23 05:44:45 PM
Crosshair: all that water be really heavy and make California fall into the

As it lies on the fault, it would be interesting to see what the effect of all that new weight would do, but the earthquakes would settle down after probably 20-100 years.
 
2010-03-23 05:45:47 PM
GORDON: Salton Sea shrinking?

Obviously global warming. Open your eyes, sheeple.


We don't say dumb things like global warming anymore. We say climate change. In other words, the climate is changing. Like it might be raining one day, and sunny the next. Don't try to tell me you've never seen it.
 
2010-03-23 05:46:39 PM
1.bp.blogspot.comMMMMMmmmm....Patty Melt....NOM NOM NOM....eh...not really...
 
2010-03-23 05:46:58 PM
Y'ha-nthlei cannot be far from here
 
2010-03-23 05:47:30 PM
silentneep: MrSteve007: oldebayer: The earthquake that formed it was caused by humans?

Wiki: "The creation of the Salton Sea of today started in 1905, when heavy rainfall and snowmelt caused the Colorado River to swell, overrunning a set of headgates for the Alamo Canal. The resulting flood poured down the canal and breached an Imperial Valley dike, eroding two watercourses, the New River in the west, and the Alamo River in the east, each about 60 miles long. These two newly created rivers carried the entire volume of the Colorado River into the Salton Sink, filling it in approximately two years.

The Southern Pacific Railroad attempted to stop the flooding by dumping earth into the headgates area, but the effort was not fast enough, and as the river eroded deeper and deeper into the dry desert sand of the Imperial Valley, a massive waterfall was created that started to cut rapidly upstream along the main stem of the Colorado River. This waterfall was initially 15 feet high but grew to a height of 30 feet before the flow through the breach was finally stopped. It was originally feared that the waterfall would recede upstream into the Nevada-Arizona area, attaining a height of up to 100 to 300 feet, from where it would be even more difficult to fix the problem. As the basin filled, the town of Salton, a Southern Pacific Railroad siding and Torres-Martinez Indian land were submerged. The sudden influx of water and the lack of any drainage from the basin resulted in the formation of the Salton Sea."

Sounds like a nature induced failure of a man made structure to me.

But if the gates weren't there, wouldn't that body of water have formed anyway? Or am I misunderstanding how it happened?


If the gates weren't there then the man made canal wouldn't be there so the water would have stayed in the Colorado.
 
2010-03-23 05:48:12 PM
silentneep: Sounds like a nature induced failure of a man made structure to me.

But if the gates weren't there, wouldn't that body of water have formed anyway? Or am I misunderstanding how it happened?


Correct. Without those man-made structures there the Colorado would have dumped its extra water into the Gulf of California and possibly flooded some lowlands along its riverbanks. The Sea is not natural in any way.
 
2010-03-23 05:50:28 PM
Spanky3woods: The only thing fun about going down there was riding sand buggys in the desert and getting high with my cousins.

We actually took it a step farther, and went about a few miles east into the desert and did our water skiing in the All American Canal behind the dune buggys that were up on the side of the thing. Clean water, though you had to constantly lean away from the side the buggy was on or eat the wall. Oh yeah and it was a good idea to let go WAY before the bridges that divided it into sections. We'd pretty much only see the sea when we went back to the highyway for gas and beer, and camped out in the desert
 
2010-03-23 05:50:32 PM
Explodo: As it lies on the fault, it would be interesting to see what the effect of all that new weight would do, but the earthquakes would settle down after probably 20-100 years.

I was being sarcastic, but at 220' below sea level that would be a LOT of water.
 
2010-03-23 05:52:09 PM
MrSteve007: Sounds like a nature induced failure of a man made structure to me.


Pretty sure the Alamo Canal is not a natural feature. In addition it had to bust through a dike and two other manmade watercourses... In what way is that natural? If those manmade structures hadn't been built then there would be no Salton Sea. In what alternate universe is the Salton Sea a naturally formed lake? Who are you, Phil Jones from the CRU or something?
 
2010-03-23 05:52:10 PM
silentneep: But if the gates weren't there, wouldn't that body of water have formed anyway? Or am I misunderstanding how it happened?

Though the gates were a point of failure, it was the presence of the canal that provided the water supply. The canal would still have overflowed, possibly filling some other inland depression. The dikes surrounding the canal could have failed whether the gates were there or not, though it would have probably been less likely.
 
2010-03-23 05:53:45 PM
Am I nutters for wanting to go explore that area?

Then again I also want to visit the irradiated area around Chernobyl.

Yeah, I'm an idiot, but I get to see cool stuff!
 
2010-03-23 05:55:57 PM
Hmm that's near Salvation Mountain
www.desertusa.com

And Slab City (former military base that has been taken over by people squatting):
www.desertusa.com

Pretty crazy shiat going on out there. One of the days, I'm gonna have to visit.
 
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