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(The Consumerist)   I'm sorry, since we don't charge a lot for this particular dish, you cannot take your leftovers home with you. Sincerely, the management   (consumerist.com) divider line 389
    More: Amusing, chain restaurants, shrimps, exceptions, store managers, hamburgers, Federal Trade Commission  
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24531 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Mar 2010 at 2:56 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-03-13 03:38:48 PM
DrunkArse Quote 2010-03-13 03:20:31 PM
upright_apes_r_us: I had 7-11 try that price hike game with some coffee, I won. A court should find that their policy violates my right by a unfounded attempt to control food they don't own ergo void. It may even rise to a class action claim.


Oh, this is getting rich.

Do tell the circumstances around your 7-11 coffee. I was unaware there was a discount for loitering.

The trolling session is over I have to go.
It was fun, Later.
 
2010-03-13 03:39:15 PM
DrunkArse: upright_apes_r_us: I'm guessing that more than one of those who have commented in favor of the people involved here have cried discrimination to their local pizza place offering deals for carryout only.

When they try to control the property owned by another to detain that person so they can try to sell a few more drinks, I have go with greedy and most likely criminal.


You just keep getting better.

I'd offer you a discount for pick-up too. It must take a lot of gas to get out to your compound.

You are honestly assuming that someone other than you has cried foul on a pizza carry out deal...good job, Matlock. Apparently, we have much to learn from you.


Not anything on how to quote properly, though. This cat seems incapable of seperating post from quote. It's obnoxious to read through to see where the idiocy starts.
 
2010-03-13 03:41:50 PM
Sorry, just noticed the pizza thing was posted by Dan128, I'm assuming sarcastically.

It was tough to tell since upright doesn't know how to quote. It seemed in line with the 7-11 thing, though.

I thought we had a real consumer warrior on our hands.

All apologies.
 
2010-03-13 03:43:58 PM
a great example of why blindly making policies based on corporate black and red thinking is ineffective. this should be an issue that should be handled on a individual basis of discretion as opposed to an all-encompassing blanket of stupidity. someone who orders 10 cheeseburgers during happy hour should be denied a takeout box. this lady should have been given one without an issue.

/did not read any previous comments
 
2010-03-13 03:44:30 PM
upright_apes_r_us: DrunkArse Quote 2010-03-13 03:20:31 PM
upright_apes_r_us: I had 7-11 try that price hike game with some coffee, I won. A court should find that their policy violates my right by a unfounded attempt to control food they don't own ergo void. It may even rise to a class action claim.


Oh, this is getting rich.

Do tell the circumstances around your 7-11 coffee. I was unaware there was a discount for loitering.

The trolling session is over I have to go.
It was fun, Later.




Meh.

I started to figure as much. You got me.

At least tell me you started out serious.
 
2010-03-13 03:44:36 PM
DrunkArse:

All I'm saying is that from a management perspective, including my past experience, I would allow my paying dine-in customers to take their left-overs home. This is respect, and shows appreciation for sitting at my bar and buying some drinks. What's the other choice? Take that food and throw it out, and in the process potentially piss off that guy who just bought 3 $10 margaritas with his $2 hamburger? What do I benefit from that? It makes it easier to tell off people who want to do to-go orders, I suppose. I can hide behind "the rules" and not have to take responsibility for telling them "no." This is lazy.

Personally, I'm not one who would be affected by a rule like this, as I can finish a damn burger and beers in one sitting, so I have no vested interest in the policy, but I also understand some people may not be able to that. fark, my wife can't even do that. Every time we go out she takes home half her meal and eats it for lunch the next day. So I can understand feeling cheated when someone throws away food that you paid for and could have used as a meal later.
 
2010-03-13 03:45:25 PM
Dan128 Quote 2010-03-13 03:31:55 PM
upright_apes_r_us: When they try to control the property owned by another to detain that person so they can try to sell a few more drinks, I have go with greedy and most likely criminal.

who was being detained? the restaurant did not require anyone to stick around to finish the food, they only said the food couldn't leave. had they paid yet? if not, it wasn't owned by them.

I have to go and I answered that question several times.
When you order something it is yours by nature of a contract even if you still have to pay for it. Try not paying and you will find out just how much it is yours. Under your reasoning people could just take stuff off your plate at will. It just don't work that way. You have to pay for it even if you don't eat it because it is yours.
Later.
 
2010-03-13 03:47:34 PM
upright_apes_r_us
i know there is no point in arguing with you. i accept that.
but im still gonna, because if i was working as your server i couldnt say this shiat, because id be fired.. but hell, it's FARK!

you asked if drunkarse's moral's could be bought for $2.. i see it the opposite.
can your dignity be bought for $2?
you would really want to make everyone else's life miserable over $2?
dont say it's over an unjust rule, and you're just making a point.. because it's not unjust.. let's explain this one more time.. the god damn restaurant doesnt have to give you just a great deal. you realize that right?
maybe they're a little loose in their rules. maybe you dont agree with them. maybe there is no way legally they can enforce them... but do you have to be such a little biatch?

a little whiny, self-righteous, biatch.

im glad you got your 25 cents off your coffee. way to stick it to 7-11! the world need more people like you, standing up for the little guy.. or actually just making sure you get your way.
 
2010-03-13 03:48:52 PM
DrunkArse: It was tough to tell since upright doesn't know how to quote. It seemed in line with the 7-11 thing, though.

eh, yeah, that got annoying. I couldn't tell what he was responding to or responding with on some of those. He's definitely got a bit more extreme take on the issue than I do, even though I think we agreed on the main point.
 
2010-03-13 03:49:45 PM
upright_apes_r_us: DrunkArse Quote 2010-03-13 03:20:31 PM
upright_apes_r_us: I had 7-11 try that price hike game with some coffee, I won. A court should find that their policy violates my right by a unfounded attempt to control food they don't own ergo void. It may even rise to a class action claim.


Oh, this is getting rich.

Do tell the circumstances around your 7-11 coffee. I was unaware there was a discount for loitering.

The trolling session is over I have to go.
It was fun, Later.


god damn it! i guessed that before, but i kept going.shiat. heh.
 
2010-03-13 03:55:46 PM
ReverendJasen: All I'm saying is that from a management perspective, including my past experience, I would allow my paying dine-in customers to take their left-overs home. This is respect, and shows appreciation for sitting at my bar and buying some drinks. What's the other choice? Take that food and throw it out, and in the process potentially piss off that guy who just bought 3 $10 margaritas with his $2 hamburger? What do I benefit from that? It makes it easier to tell off people who want to do to-go orders, I suppose. I can hide behind "the rules" and not have to take responsibility for telling them "no." This is lazy.


In practice, I agree. When I worked as a bartender/server, I never really enforced the no boxing rule within reason. It's just going to piss people off. That doesn't mean that it's an unreasonable rule, a grounds for a lawsuit, or a cause to advocate via the Consumerist.
 
2010-03-13 03:57:21 PM
upright_apes_r_us: You have to pay for it even if you don't eat it because it is yours.

so we have established that the price is the same whether you eat it all or not. when someone orders food knowing the stipulations surrounding it (it may not leave the restaurant, as was apparently posted on the menu), you cannot reasonably expect any special accommodation. You're going to pay $1.95 for half a hamburger or for a whole burger and fries, depending on how much you are capable of eating or willing to eat in that sitting. So where's the argument? The part that is yours is the part you choose to eat, because that is how much you paid for.
 
2010-03-13 03:59:29 PM
DrunkArse: That doesn't mean that it's an unreasonable rule, a grounds for a lawsuit, or a cause to advocate via the Consumerist.

Not lawsuit worthy, that's expensive.
Emails to the consumerist to vent about it are free though. :)
 
2010-03-13 04:00:28 PM
DrunkArse: ReverendJasen: All I'm saying is that from a management perspective, including my past experience, I would allow my paying dine-in customers to take their left-overs home. This is respect, and shows appreciation for sitting at my bar and buying some drinks. What's the other choice? Take that food and throw it out, and in the process potentially piss off that guy who just bought 3 $10 margaritas with his $2 hamburger? What do I benefit from that? It makes it easier to tell off people who want to do to-go orders, I suppose. I can hide behind "the rules" and not have to take responsibility for telling them "no." This is lazy.


In practice, I agree. When I worked as a bartender/server, I never really enforced the no boxing rule within reason. It's just going to piss people off. That doesn't mean that it's an unreasonable rule, a grounds for a lawsuit, or a cause to advocate via the Consumerist.


i feel the same way. i was bartender/server and if we had a rule like that, and it seemed like the person was going to start getting pissy about it, i would just do it.

but according to their story, they didnt really say anything about it. they just left, saw their movie and then wrote a letter to the manager. who rationally explained the issue.

i think this thread makes me dislike the consumerist more than anything else. why would they give this story credence?
 
2010-03-13 04:00:28 PM
here's a thought: instead of barring people from taking home their leftovers, how about imposing a drink minimum to purchase food from the happy hour menu?
 
2010-03-13 04:02:46 PM
phatbeatz: here's a thought: instead of barring people from taking home their leftovers, how about imposing a drink minimum to purchase food from the happy hour menu?

"$1.99 burger and fries at happy hour. Dine in only. No to go or take home."
 
2010-03-13 04:16:47 PM
Upright, if you buy something under the an agreement, you are bound to it. When they bought the food, they agreed that they would eat it there. Would you biatch about someone's rights if a place with a no-shirt-no-shoes-no-service policy asked a customer to leave if they took off their shirt?
 
2010-03-13 04:52:44 PM
Wal-Mart just implemented a new policy that you idiots will love. All pants are ONE DOLLAR for this weekend...but you have to wear them in the store and you can't take them home.

brandnewchair: who rationally explained the issue.

he didn't "rationally" explain anything, he parroted off the policy like it's carved in farking stone.

Mr Hifi Banjostrings: no-shirt-no-shoes-no-service policy

there's a big difference between a health and safety policy and just being dicks.
 
2010-03-13 04:53:46 PM
I ued to own a fine-dining family-oriented restaurant. Because few parents want to order $15-$25 entrees for their little tykes, we offerd a nice menu for children under 12, including a hamburger plate for $4. We didn't make any money off the children's food (and it was excellent food, not crappy institutional stuff), it was an accommodation for the parents.

But a lot of adults wanted to purchase the $4 burger for themselves. We would always refuse, but as long a there was at least one child at the table for every child's burger that was ordered, I didn't care. Most adults rationalized their request to me as being that they only wanted a hamburger or sandwich for dinner; the price was not important to their decision. So I finally offered an "adult" hamburger with a larger portion, a salad and choice of vegetable. Never sold the first one and never lost any sleep over the adults who insisted on ordering a child's meal just because they were cheap.

Sorry, not so on-topic for this story. The subject restaurant had a reasonable justification for its policy (their largess was being abused), the policy was fairly enforced, notice was given, the manager rsponded quickly and professionally to the complaint and the woman just wanted some whine with her meal.
 
2010-03-13 05:04:17 PM
wambu: We didn't make any money off the children's food....

I call bullshiat.
 
2010-03-13 05:06:32 PM
spleef420:

Mr Hifi Banjostrings: no-shirt-no-shoes-no-service policy

there's a big difference between a health and safety policy and just being dicks.


I won't argue that, but upright_apes_r_us was saying that the restaurant had no grounds to make and enforce a policy. I was stating they did and used that one as an example. I guess a "right to refuse service to anyone" would be a better example. The point remains that every commercial establishment has the right to make and enforce policies, even if we disagree with them. Maybe they were being dicks, but you make one exception then everyone will expect it and then your policy is meaningless. Selectively enforcing rules can lead to trouble for businesses, so most don't do it.
 
2010-03-13 05:18:07 PM
a pizza place I worked at would do an all you can eat thing for charity now and then, and deny people doggy-bags on this stuff to prevent people from ordering a second pizza, taking a bite, and taking it home. about 1% of customers made a stink about it.

Granted, that was for charity, but I see no problem with a restaurant trying to prevent people from scamming them on a special offer that is sold below cost.

Now, in our case, we ended up letting most people take food home. 1. The charity was a soup kitchen and throwing out food seemed wrong, :D
2. it was at waiters discretion to break the rule.
3. we told people up front when they ordered and seemed to be ordering with the intent of carry-out scamming that they wouldn't be allowed to take the leftovers home. They would then say thats fine, order a large pizza for themselves. I'd watch them eat most of it, then when they filled up I'd give him a box. Everybody wins.

Its amazing how far a little communication goes, and more amazing how many employees and businesses in the service industry don't understand that simple fact.

Food running late? Inform the guest.
Order farked up? Inform the guest.
Special rule? Inform the guest.
Your restaurant functions unlike most in some way? Inform the guest.

I gotta side with the bar here in terms of their rule, but in situations where its clear someone isn't scamming, just let em take it home. Thats just good service.
 
2010-03-13 05:20:07 PM
wambu: I ued to own a fine-dining family-oriented restaurant. Because few parents want to order $15-$25 entrees for their little tykes, we offerd a nice menu for children under 12, including a hamburger plate for $4. We didn't make any money off the children's food (and it was excellent food, not crappy institutional stuff), it was an accommodation for the parents.

But a lot of adults wanted to purchase the $4 burger for themselves. We would always refuse, but as long a there was at least one child at the table for every child's burger that was ordered, I didn't care. Most adults rationalized their request to me as being that they only wanted a hamburger or sandwich for dinner; the price was not important to their decision. So I finally offered an "adult" hamburger with a larger portion, a salad and choice of vegetable. Never sold the first one and never lost any sleep over the adults who insisted on ordering a child's meal just because they were cheap.

Sorry, not so on-topic for this story. The subject restaurant had a reasonable justification for its policy (their largess was being abused), the policy was fairly enforced, notice was given, the manager rsponded quickly and professionally to the complaint and the woman just wanted some whine with her meal.


I'm a bit confused. I'm not understanding why you're calling them cheap when a person just might not be that hungry in the first place, especially seniors. Another possibility, especially at a large table, is that perhaps a person didn't like any of the food choices on your "fine dining" adult menu but never picked the restaurant in the first place because it was a group event. I've been stuck in that situation before (often through work), at a "fine dining" restaurant where there is literally nothing on the menu I want to eat, end up ordering something disgusting, pick at it and then on the way back to the office go buy a sandwich. Yesterday, for example, I went to a fairly fancy restaurant for lunch, ordered a 6" pizza for $13 which came with a side of soup or salad. The waiter was quite confused when I told him I wanted neither side but since they wouldn't take any money off the $13, I told him to just pick something, that I didn't care what. because I wasn't going to eat it, but because I was paying for it, to bring it to the table anyway. He brought soup, happily convinced that I would try it and looked surprised when he came back later to see the soup untouched, asked me if I'd tried it and I told no, as I told him I wouldn't. Yes, it was food waste but I wanted what I paid for. He still got a reasonable tip, but he would have gotten an even bigger tip if he'd been allowed to even take $1 off the $13 and not brought the soup to go to waste.

Maybe it's a regional thing but I've never been at restaurants where there's an age restriction on certain menu items - senior meals can be ordered by kids, kids meals by adults, adult meals by kids, etc. because the meals are priced for the amount of food, not for giving the customer a deal based on their age. The only time I've ever ordered from a children's menu was at Quizno's because the Cheesy Cheese sub isn't listed on the adult menu as an option.
 
2010-03-13 05:40:39 PM
MaritimeGirl: wambu: I ued to own a fine-dining family-oriented restaurant. Because few parents want to order $15-$25 entrees for their little tykes, we offerd a nice menu for children under 12, including a hamburger plate for $4. We didn't make any money off the children's food (and it was excellent food, not crappy institutional stuff), it was an accommodation for the parents.

But a lot of adults wanted to purchase the $4 burger for themselves. We would always refuse, but as long a there was at least one child at the table for every child's burger that was ordered, I didn't care. Most adults rationalized their request to me as being that they only wanted a hamburger or sandwich for dinner; the price was not important to their decision. So I finally offered an "adult" hamburger with a larger portion, a salad and choice of vegetable. Never sold the first one and never lost any sleep over the adults who insisted on ordering a child's meal just because they were cheap.

Sorry, not so on-topic for this story. The subject restaurant had a reasonable justification for its policy (their largess was being abused), the policy was fairly enforced, notice was given, the manager rsponded quickly and professionally to the complaint and the woman just wanted some whine with her meal.

I'm a bit confused. I'm not understanding why you're calling them cheap when a person just might not be that hungry in the first place, especially seniors. Another possibility, especially at a large table, is that perhaps a person didn't like any of the food choices on your "fine dining" adult menu but never picked the restaurant in the first place because it was a group event. I've been stuck in that situation before (often through work), at a "fine dining" restaurant where there is literally nothing on the menu I want to eat, end up ordering something disgusting, pick at it and then on the way back to the office go buy a sandwich. Yesterday, for example, I went to a fairly fancy restaurant for lunch, ordered a 6" pizza for $13 which came with a side of soup or salad. The waiter was quite confused when I told him I wanted neither side but since they wouldn't take any money off the $13, I told him to just pick something, that I didn't care what. because I wasn't going to eat it, but because I was paying for it, to bring it to the table anyway. He brought soup, happily convinced that I would try it and looked surprised when he came back later to see the soup untouched, asked me if I'd tried it and I told no, as I told him I wouldn't. Yes, it was food waste but I wanted what I paid for. He still got a reasonable tip, but he would have gotten an even bigger tip if he'd been allowed to even take $1 off the $13 and not brought the soup to go to waste.

Maybe it's a regional thing but I've never been at restaurants where there's an age restriction on certain menu items - senior meals can be ordered by kids, kids meals by adults, adult meals by kids, etc. because the meals are priced for the amount of food, not for giving the customer a deal based on their age. The only time I've ever ordered from a children's menu was at Quizno's because the Cheesy Cheese sub isn't listed on the adult menu as an option.


the problem is, you never leaned how sit down restaurants work.
at all.
i dont blame you.
 
2010-03-13 05:47:09 PM
Conclusion: the three words "no take out" are not sufficient to express the intent of the restaurant's policy to customers.
 
2010-03-13 06:12:02 PM
Mr Hifi Banjostrings: the restaurant had no grounds to make and enforce a policy.

while they do have that right they're going to quickly learn that idiotic "zero-tolerance" policies like this one aren't good for business.

There was a casino in Vegas that tried this. They're out of business because people stopped going there. No amount of cheap booze is going to save a bar with a shiat policy.

Companies that do dumb shiat like this NEED to be told when their policies are farking moronic, otherwise they never learn and they die.

MaritimeGirl: He still got a reasonable tip, but he would have gotten an even bigger tip if he'd been allowed to even take $1 off the $13 and not brought the soup to go to waste.

but did the waiter tell you to go piss up a rope when you asked for a to go box?

$13 for a 6" pizza? what. the. hell. That had better have been the best goddamned pizza in history.
 
2010-03-13 06:18:45 PM
MaritimeGirl:

I'm a bit confused. I'm not understanding why you're calling them cheap when a person just might not be that hungry in the first place, especially seniors. Another possibility, especially at a large table, is that perhaps a person didn't like any of the food choices on your "fine dining" adult menu but never picked the restaurant in the first place because it was a group event. I've been stuck in that situation before (often through work), at a "fine dining" restaurant where there is literally nothing on the menu I want to eat, end up ordering something disgusting, pick at it and then on the way back to the office go buy a sandwich. Yesterday, for example, I went to a fairly fancy restaurant for lunch, ordered a 6" pizza for $13 which came with a side of soup or salad. The waiter was quite confused when I told him I wanted neither side but since they wouldn't take any money off the $13, I told him to just pick something, that I didn't care what. because I wasn't going to eat it, but because I was paying for it, to bring it to the table anyway. He brought soup, happily convinced that I would try it and looked surprised when he came back later to see the soup untouched, asked me if I'd tried it and I told no, as I told him I wouldn't. Yes, it was food waste but I wanted what I paid for. He still got a reasonable tip, but he would have gotten an even bigger tip if he'd been allowed to even take $1 off the $13 and not brought the soup to go to waste.

Maybe it's a regional thing but I've never been at restaurants where there's an age restriction on certain menu items - senior meals can be ordered by kids, kids meals by adults, adult meals by kids, etc. because the meals are priced for the amount of food, not for giving the customer a deal based on their age. The only time I've ever ordered from a children's menu was at Quizno's because the Cheesy Cheese sub isn't listed on the adult menu as an option.


You know, at first I sympathized with your reasoning for ordering off the children's menu, but then I read further and frankly you come off like a child in your thought process too.

You ordered the soup like a stubborn child might. You refused to even taste it. The story you type up makes it sound like you almost enjoy the fact that you stubbornly refused to play ball with the mean old waiter. Then you point out that if the rules the waiter had to follow were different, you would have tipped him more. If you simply must lash out at someone, the waiter is the wrong person. Adults understand that.

Beyond your issues with growing up, there are a boatload of restaurants across the US that have an age limit on the children's menu. You may have noticed the "ages xx and under" written on them. That your waiters are constantly ignoring the rule to avoid a potential tantrum from an overgrown toddler doesn't mean the rule doesn't exist.
 
2010-03-13 06:30:47 PM
I know lots of places that do that with their dine-in only specials- they make the money off the beer, so they don't want you to buy a ton of food and then only eat part of it at the restaurant and take the rest home. Some people would buy 3 meals worth of food at the happy hour price, then expect to take it all home with them.

I have no problem with places doing this, especially if the menu clearly states that there are no doggie bags for special-priced food. My local pub does this on half-prce pizza night and we are always happy to leave the leftovers behind- it's still a good price even if you don't eat the whole thing.
 
2010-03-13 06:41:17 PM
ifyouknew: we are always happy to leave the leftovers behind

so you enjoy wasting food?

the pub near me has half-price pizzas from 3-7 pm...and guess what, they let you take home what you don't eat. Hell, they'll even take call-in carry-out orders.

you may as well take that money you "saved" and burn it.
 
2010-03-13 06:49:06 PM
MaritimeGirl: He still got a reasonable tip, but he would have gotten an even bigger tip if he'd been allowed to even take $1 off the $13 and not brought the soup to go to waste.


"He would have gotten a bigger tip if he did something outside of his power, that was contrary to what I asked for."
 
2010-03-13 06:52:54 PM
Oznog 'TANSTAAFL.'

bravo, sir.
/Heinlein, FTW
 
2010-03-13 07:02:05 PM
MaritimeGirl:

Don't let them fool you. Your main problem is, and I'm sure you already know this, you're too goddamn picky.
Most of us can be dragged into any random restaurant in the world and have the ability to find *something* on the menu that is palatable, even if not great.
 
2010-03-13 07:09:07 PM
MaritimeGirl: Maybe it's a regional thing but I've never been at restaurants where there's an age restriction on certain menu items - senior meals can be ordered by kids, kids meals by adults, adult meals by kids, etc. because the meals are priced for the amount of food, not for giving the customer a deal based on their age. The only time I've ever ordered from a children's menu was at Quizno's because the Cheesy Cheese sub isn't listed on the adult menu as an option.

I guess you don't feel any shame in asking for a toddler's meal that comes with a 5-box of crayons, a puzzle mat, and a cardboard hat.

Also, I'm pretty sure Happy Meals are sold around the world.

Or in asking for a meal meant for toothless old people who are being given a break due to their "being on a fixed income" which means they can gobble down all the coffee and meatloaf before 4pm for their dinner. Some places actually make you show an AARP card or proof of age.
 
2010-03-13 07:09:44 PM
spleef420: ifyouknew: we are always happy to leave the leftovers behind

so you enjoy wasting food?

the pub near me has half-price pizzas from 3-7 pm...and guess what, they let you take home what you don't eat. Hell, they'll even take call-in carry-out orders.

you may as well take that money you "saved" and burn it.



Sounds like a different kind of deal. Good for them if they're willing and able to give away their product (especially from five to seven, which you would guess would be peak hours). It's got to be worked into their business model.

It's still different, though. It affects their bottom line differently. Either their pizza is really cheap, or they overcharge enough in the off-hours to make up for it. You can't apply the same logic and say everyone should adhere to this kind of plan.
 
2010-03-13 07:14:17 PM
Smackledorfer:
You know, at first I sympathized with your reasoning for ordering off the children's menu, but then I read further and frankly you come off like a child in your thought process too.

You ordered the soup like a stubborn child might. You refused to even taste it. The story you type up makes it sound like you almost enjoy the fact that you stubbornly refused to play ball with the mean old waiter. Then you point out that if the rules the waiter had to follow were different, you would have tipped him more. If you simply must lash out at someone, the waiter is the wrong person. Adults understand that.

Beyond your issues with growing up, there are a boatload of restaurants across the US that have an age limit on the children's menu. You may have noticed the "ages xx and under" written on them. That your waiters are constantly ignoring the rule to avoid a potential tantrum from an overgrown toddler doesn't mean the rule doesn't exist.


I'll reiterate for you. I didn't order soup from the menu, I ordered pizza and wanted no side. It came with it though, so I didn't care what he brought to the table which is why I informed the waiter I didn't care what he brought - I only wanted the pizza. It was lunchtime, I wasn't hungry enough to want anything other than the pizza. Maybe it was his personal favourite soup - I don't know, but it didn't matter to me what he brought to the table as I knew I was paying for the side regardless. I didn't sit there and demand the waiter fetch his manager and I didn't fight about the price of the menu item. I simply asked once if there was an option to not get the side for a lesser price and when informed there was not, I was okay with paying the $13 for both items, despite the fact I'd only be eating one, and no, I didn't ask for it to go, in case you were wondering. I asked him to just pick one of the options for me because it didn't matter to me what came to the table. How is that lashing out at, or attempting to play ball with, the waiter? As it was, he got 20%. If he'd gone and asked to be allowed to separate the side from the meal for me for a slightly lesser cost, then that effort, regardless of success or failure, would have gained him another 10%, but that didn't happen, because he already knew the rule, so 20% it was. Let me guess, you would have given him 30%-40%?

Let me give you a different, yet fictional, example... let's say that you want to buy a specific car only available from the Auto Company but you know that the Auto Company only sells their cars in combos with a motorcycle for 50% more than the price that other companies sell single cars for. You only want the car, have zero use for the motorcycle but you're okay with paying the higher price. Would you tell Auto Company "You can keep the motorcycle." (which would allow them double profit since they can sell it "a second time" to the next customer) or take it anyway because you already paid for it and the company has already profited from it?

brandnewchair:
the problem is, you never leaned how sit down restaurants work.
at all.
i dont blame you.


Oh, I see. So I'm supposed to order and consume something that I can guarantee will have me doubled over in pain in the washroom a couple of hours later all to give the server and chef the "warm fuzzies"? Fascinating. Is that how "sit down" restaurants work? If you had learned how reading comprehension works, you would have seen in my post where I stated that this has happened at restaurants where I had no choice but to dine as I was forced to attend by my company. In those situations, I realize I have to be there but I'm not going to eat what is served to me if I know the ingredients will make me ill within a few hours. This applies to the most expensive place in the city (though price doesn't always mean quality) or if we just have a casual pizza party at a pool hall.

There are several high end, sit down restaurants in my city that I voluntarily patronize as their food is incredible, as is their service, and from experience, I can trust their menus have enough of a variety that I can safely dine there. Last weekend, a friend and I spent hours at an establishment (which is probably 3rd most expensive in the city) where she ordered filet mignon and I the striploin. Superb meal, excellent service - a fine dinner experience overall.
 
2010-03-13 07:16:52 PM
spleef420: Mr Hifi Banjostrings: the restaurant had no grounds to make and enforce a policy.

while they do have that right they're going to quickly learn that idiotic "zero-tolerance" policies like this one aren't good for business.

There was a casino in Vegas that tried this. They're out of business because people stopped going there. No amount of cheap booze is going to save a bar with a shiat policy.

Companies that do dumb shiat like this NEED to be told when their policies are farking moronic, otherwise they never learn and they die.


But it doesn't appear that this is a new policy and they don't seem to be having too much trouble with it. Based on most of the views here, most people understand that it's a sweet deal in the first place and don't see the need to biatch about being losing $1.25 after eating an $8 burger.
 
2010-03-13 07:22:26 PM
Fano:
I guess you don't feel any shame in asking for a toddler's meal that comes with a 5-box of crayons, a puzzle mat, and a cardboard hat.

Also, I'm pretty sure Happy Meals are sold around the world.

Or in asking for a meal meant for toothless old people who are being given a break due to their "being on a fixed income" which means they can gobble down all the coffee and meatloaf before 4pm for their dinner. Some places actually make you show an AARP card or proof of age.


I guess you've never been to Quizno's? No such thing as a toddler's meal and it came with a small drink and crackers, not a box of crayons, playmat and carboard hat. If there had been an enforced age restriction, I would have said "Okay, can I please have a foot long veggie sub with extra cheese and no veggies."

Must be quite the city you live in that dining is such a cut-throat experience.
 
2010-03-13 07:23:47 PM
Mr Hifi Banjostrings:Based on most of the views here, most people understand that it's a sweet deal in the first place and don't see the need to biatch about being losing $1.25 after eating an $8 burger.

since you have no issue with throwing out even $1.25 perhaps you'd be willing to send me the money you think you "saved". Maybe I'm just cheap, crazy, an idiot or all of the above but I don't give a flying fark if the burger was $1.25 or $125, I'm taking home what I don't finish. I'm not gonna toss a buck's worth of food that I could eat later and save myself ANOTHER $5 by not needing to buy food for that meal.
 
2010-03-13 07:26:54 PM
MaritimeGirl: As it was, he got 20%. If he'd gone and asked to be allowed to separate the side from the meal for me for a slightly lesser cost, then that effort, regardless of success or failure, would have gained him another 10%, but that didn't happen, because he already knew the rule, so 20% it was.


If I were to guess, you're fibbing a little. Twenty is good, not "reasonable" like you originally wrote. I think if you really left twenty you would have said that from the start.

If I'm wrong, good for you. That means a "good" tip from you would be well over twenty. In which case, you're allowed to ask for mind reading and rule bending. Because that is pretty much what you're doing.
 
2010-03-13 07:31:49 PM
Occam's Chainsaw: I'm sorry, the sign on the wall clearly stated that unattended children would be sold into slavery. Here's the number to call their pimp if you'd like to purchase them back. Thaaaaanks!

If you go into a place with such a conspicuous sign on the wall, eat there, and then act like you're all suprised when they do what they said they're gonna do, you really don't have anyone to blame but yourself.

Buyer beware. If you don't like it, go elsewhere.
 
2010-03-13 07:33:52 PM
TsukasaK: Occam's Chainsaw: I'm sorry, the sign on the wall clearly stated that unattended children would be sold into slavery. Here's the number to call their pimp if you'd like to purchase them back. Thaaaaanks!

If you go into a place with such a conspicuous sign on the wall, eat there, and then act like you're all suprised when they do what they said they're gonna do, you really don't have anyone to blame but yourself.

Buyer beware. If you don't like it, go elsewhere.


This neverminding the fact that I am in full agreement with this policy. :)
 
2010-03-13 07:36:00 PM
spleef420: Maybe I'm just cheap, crazy, an idiot or all of the above


Yes. All of those. You just got a burger for two dollars. A really good burger. You don't get to take it home. Eat it, don't complain.
 
2010-03-13 07:39:18 PM
Meh. I am drinking and too damn lazy to read through the previous 300 posts, so I'll just say this...
If I come in for happy hour, you'd better believe I will probably drink my weight in alcohol, but I'll order a hamburger so I won't feel like such a drunk.
When the burger comes, I'll have topped off my stomach capacity with booze and no more than a bite will be able to fit.
You'd better give me a to go box, biatches, or you'll see an angry broad on your hands.
I know I'm going to need that 3/4 sammich later just to try to stabalize.
 
2010-03-13 07:41:32 PM
I know I'm late to the party here, and way too lazy to read this whole thread. That being said, I'd like to say that maybe someone should tell this chick's boyfriend to man up. If you can't eat a whole 8 oz cheese burger and half an order of fries, something is wrong with you.
 
2010-03-13 07:49:03 PM
DrunkArse: MaritimeGirl: As it was, he got 20%. If he'd gone and asked to be allowed to separate the side from the meal for me for a slightly lesser cost, then that effort, regardless of success or failure, would have gained him another 10%, but that didn't happen, because he already knew the rule, so 20% it was.


If I were to guess, you're fibbing a little. Twenty is good, not "reasonable" like you originally wrote. I think if you really left twenty you would have said that from the start.

If I'm wrong, good for you. That means a "good" tip from you would be well over twenty. In which case, you're allowed to ask for mind reading and rule bending. Because that is pretty much what you're doing.


For restaurants, depending on the meal price, 15%-20% for no screw-ups. Typically the 20% is for the cheaper meals ($13 being a cheaper meal) since the difference between 15% and 20% is pocket change. As for when I go to massage therapy, haircuts and aesthetics appointments, I'm quite certain for shorter aesthetics appointments, she actually gets more in tips from me than she does from their employer in pay for twice that time. As for my massage therapist, she has repeatedly questioned me asking if I meant to give her that much, asked if I wanted change back and asked if I was sure. I get 80% coverage from my health insurance for the appointments, so since I'm only paying 20% co-pay, I can reward her nicely and I've still gotten a kick-ass massage for a steal of a price including her tip. Plus, now that she's self-employed, I want to see her succeed, so her tips from me are a bit higher than they used to be when she worked for a salon. I've also tried to think of places for her to advertise to increase her business and taken her business cards to distribute.

Seriously, I wish you guys knew how good she is... when she finishes by massaging my face, neck and scalp, I'm pretty much gone to la-la land. Of course, the added bonus is that she is really nice, we get along great and chit-chat like girls on a sleepover during the session. She is worthy every cent :)
 
2010-03-13 07:49:37 PM
DrunkArse: Yes. All of those

so I'm an idiot for wanting what the fark I paid for? good to know, farkhead.
 
2010-03-13 08:04:50 PM
MaritimeGirl: DrunkArse: MaritimeGirl: As it was, he got 20%. If he'd gone and asked to be allowed to separate the side from the meal for me for a slightly lesser cost, then that effort, regardless of success or failure, would have gained him another 10%, but that didn't happen, because he already knew the rule, so 20% it was.


If I were to guess, you're fibbing a little. Twenty is good, not "reasonable" like you originally wrote. I think if you really left twenty you would have said that from the start.

If I'm wrong, good for you. That means a "good" tip from you would be well over twenty. In which case, you're allowed to ask for mind reading and rule bending. Because that is pretty much what you're doing.

For restaurants, depending on the meal price, 15%-20% for no screw-ups. Typically the 20% is for the cheaper meals ($13 being a cheaper meal) since the difference between 15% and 20% is pocket change. As for when I go to massage therapy, haircuts and aesthetics appointments, I'm quite certain for shorter aesthetics appointments, she actually gets more in tips from me than she does from their employer in pay for twice that time. As for my massage therapist, she has repeatedly questioned me asking if I meant to give her that much, asked if I wanted change back and asked if I was sure. I get 80% coverage from my health insurance for the appointments, so since I'm only paying 20% co-pay, I can reward her nicely and I've still gotten a kick-ass massage for a steal of a price including her tip. Plus, now that she's self-employed, I want to see her succeed, so her tips from me are a bit higher than they used to be when she worked for a salon. I've also tried to think of places for her to advertise to increase her business and taken her business cards to distribute.

Seriously, I wish you guys knew how good she is... when she finishes by massaging my face, neck and scalp, I'm pretty much gone to la-la land. Of course, the added bonus is that she is really nice, we get along great and chit-chat like girls on a sleepover during the session. She is worthy every cent :)


You know how I know you're gay?

Oh....wait...Never mind...Carry on. That's kind of hot.
/I hope you tip extra for the Happy Ending
 
2010-03-13 08:04:56 PM
spleef420: DrunkArse: Yes. All of those

so I'm an idiot for wanting what the fark I paid for? good to know, farkhead.


if you knew going into it that the policy is you can't take the leftovers, then you paid for whatever you can eat in that sitting.
 
2010-03-13 08:04:56 PM
spleef420: Mr Hifi Banjostrings:Based on most of the views here, most people understand that it's a sweet deal in the first place and don't see the need to biatch about being losing $1.25 after eating an $8 burger.

since you have no issue with throwing out even $1.25 perhaps you'd be willing to send me the money you think you "saved". Maybe I'm just cheap, crazy, an idiot or all of the above but I don't give a flying fark if the burger was $1.25 or $125, I'm taking home what I don't finish. I'm not gonna toss a buck's worth of food that I could eat later and save myself ANOTHER $5 by not needing to buy food for that meal.


I'd be tempted to stick the burger in my mouth and walk out, if only to see the look on their face. ;) It's technically not a doggie bag.
 
2010-03-13 08:06:32 PM
MaritimeGirl: DrunkArse: MaritimeGirl: As it was, he got 20%. If he'd gone and asked to be allowed to separate the side from the meal for me for a slightly lesser cost, then that effort, regardless of success or failure, would have gained him another 10%, but that didn't happen, because he already knew the rule, so 20% it was.


If I were to guess, you're fibbing a little. Twenty is good, not "reasonable" like you originally wrote. I think if you really left twenty you would have said that from the start.

If I'm wrong, good for you. That means a "good" tip from you would be well over twenty. In which case, you're allowed to ask for mind reading and rule bending. Because that is pretty much what you're doing.

For restaurants, depending on the meal price, 15%-20% for no screw-ups. Typically the 20% is for the cheaper meals ($13 being a cheaper meal) since the difference between 15% and 20% is pocket change. As for when I go to massage therapy, haircuts and aesthetics appointments, I'm quite certain for shorter aesthetics appointments, she actually gets more in tips from me than she does from their employer in pay for twice that time. As for my massage therapist, she has repeatedly questioned me asking if I meant to give her that much, asked if I wanted change back and asked if I was sure. I get 80% coverage from my health insurance for the appointments, so since I'm only paying 20% co-pay, I can reward her nicely and I've still gotten a kick-ass massage for a steal of a price including her tip. Plus, now that she's self-employed, I want to see her succeed, so her tips from me are a bit higher than they used to be when she worked for a salon. I've also tried to think of places for her to advertise to increase her business and taken her business cards to distribute.

Seriously, I wish you guys knew how good she is... when she finishes by massaging my face, neck and scalp, I'm pretty much gone to la-la land. Of course, the added bonus is that she is really nice, we get along great and chit-chat like girls on a sleepover during the session. She is worthy every cent :)



Oooookaaaay.... You're a kind person in general. Kudos.

Brass tax though, no rub down. How much did you tip on your $13 pizza and maybe a beverage. You were a little upset by the whole "no discount soup/salad" thing, upset enough to mention it.

Typically if you're not industry, over twenty is unusual. I'm not talking about people you have long term relationships with, like your masseuse or whatever.

I could be wrong, but given your initial post I'm guessing a buck on 15.
 
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