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(USA Today)   Our long nightmare is over: Marriott announces that VIP members at some elite hotels may no longer have to pay daily internet fees   (content.usatoday.com) divider line 47
    More: Hero, Marriott International, VIP, nightmares, hotels, fees  
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815 clicks; posted to Business » on 08 Mar 2010 at 12:52 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



47 Comments   (+0 »)
   

Archived thread
 
2010-03-08 12:32:14 PM
Well, the headline is a bit disingenuous since the Marriott non-VIP hotels, Residence Inn, Courtyard, Fairfield, and Spring Hill all have complimentary high-speed internet.

If you can afford to stay in a higher priced hotel, you can afford the high speed internet.
 
2010-03-08 12:51:46 PM
haemaker: Well, the headline is a bit disingenuous since the Marriott non-VIP hotels, Residence Inn, Courtyard, Fairfield, and Spring Hill all have complimentary high-speed internet.

If you can afford to stay in a higher priced hotel, you can afford the high speed internet.


While I suppose that's true, it always seemed odd to me that I had to pay for things I got free at cheaper hotels.
 
2010-03-08 12:53:43 PM
You still get the book of Mormon in each room.
 
2010-03-08 12:57:44 PM
The Onion called....
 
2010-03-08 01:07:24 PM
BalugaJoe: You still get the book of Mormon in each room.

Oh, you mean the book of rolling papers.
 
2010-03-08 01:08:56 PM
In other news, people over-paying for a hotel room are also likely to over-pay for food, drinks, and amenities.
 
2010-03-08 01:10:57 PM
Hero tag? Really?
 
2010-03-08 01:11:04 PM
The thing that always bugged me about paying for internet was that there was no guarantee of speed/bandwidth.
 
2010-03-08 01:12:44 PM
Over-paying for a hotel room?

Most Springhill Suites hotels have better rooms than most Marriotts.

Townplace Suites on the other hand....

/Marriott Gold
 
2010-03-08 01:12:51 PM
EvilEgg: it always seemed odd to me that I had to pay for things I got free at cheaper hotels.

Bingo.
img1.fark.net seems more appropriate for the half-assed gesture.

/HERO Tag Nazi is coming for you submitard
 
2010-03-08 01:13:53 PM
EvilEgg: haemaker: Well, the headline is a bit disingenuous since the Marriott non-VIP hotels, Residence Inn, Courtyard, Fairfield, and Spring Hill all have complimentary high-speed internet.

If you can afford to stay in a higher priced hotel, you can afford the high speed internet.

While I suppose that's true, it always seemed odd to me that I had to pay for things I got free at cheaper hotels.


True dat. If anyone can get free internet at a $50 a night Super 8, then maybe Marriott should pony up and offer it to anyone paying five times as much as that for a room in their hotels.
 
2010-03-08 01:14:29 PM
this word: HERO. I don't think it means what you think it means.
 
2010-03-08 01:20:24 PM
iPhone + jailbreak + PdaNet = not getting screwed by hotels charging for wifi
 
2010-03-08 01:20:43 PM
seconded. poor use of hero tag.
 
2010-03-08 01:27:26 PM
trapped-in-CH: seconded. poor use of hero tag.

I read the headline as a tongue-in-cheek Hero tag. I doubt that subby was serious.
 
2010-03-08 01:30:29 PM
as someone who paid for internet last week at the downtown Philly Marriott, I'm getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2010-03-08 01:43:36 PM
Arkanaut: trapped-in-CH: seconded. poor use of hero tag.

I read the headline as a tongue-in-cheek Hero tag. I doubt that subby was serious.


This. You guys don't get jokes/sarcasm huh?

/not subby
 
2010-03-08 01:47:55 PM
TofuTheAlmighty: iPhone + jailbreak + PdaNetWinMo = not getting screwed by hotels charging for wifi

Don't even have to void the warranty
 
2010-03-08 01:51:08 PM
TofuTheAlmighty: iPhone + jailbreak + PdaNet Nokia E72 + JoikuSpot Premium = not getting screwed by hotels charging for wifi

FTFY
 
2010-03-08 01:58:36 PM
I've never understood how "full service" hotels get away with offering fewer services than Courtyards, SpringHill Suites, etc... Nothing like paying $200+ a night and then having to pay for internet and breakfast.

/Currently building hotels so getting a kick, and all that.
 
2010-03-08 02:05:14 PM
It's all about the bed for me. As long as I have a nice comfortable bed and my back is happy..then I am happy.

I'll admit that I like the Holiday Inn Express or a Hilton Garden Inn over their pricier flags but Marriott has a way better bed than Hilton.
 
2010-03-08 02:19:16 PM
FrancoFile: In other news, people over-paying for a hotel room are also likely to over-pay for food, drinks, and amenities.

But it's aggravating when you get the room on the cheap from Priceline and then end up paying for parking, internet, breakfast, blah blah blah.
(I know, it's the risk you take.)
 
2010-03-08 02:22:38 PM
TheGreatGazoo: Most Springhill Suites hotels have better rooms than most Marriotts.

My usual experience is that the age of the building (or since renovation) is more important than the brand.

/yes in my experience a red roof open less than 6 months is better than a Marriott that hasn't been renovated in 30+ years
 
2010-03-08 02:25:21 PM
biscuit mcgravy: I've never understood how "full service" hotels get away with offering fewer services than Courtyards, SpringHill Suites, etc... Nothing like paying $200+ a night and then having to pay for internet and breakfast.

/Currently building hotels so getting a kick, and all that.


watch out for boardwalk and park place.
 
2010-03-08 02:25:32 PM
I stay at Courtyard Marriott quite regularly (at least 4 times per month), and I've been getting a kick out of their already free high speed intertubes.

/$85 per night government rate
//Former boss made me stay at La Quinta (for the same rate).
///I hope he gets ass cancer.
 
2010-03-08 02:40:08 PM
Even the Roadway Inn with stone slab mattresses in the middle of BFE has free internet
 
2010-03-08 02:47:07 PM
bhcompy: Even the Roadway Inn with stone slab mattresses in the middle of BFE has free internet

Hell, I've stayed in unbranded $40-$50 Patel-family places in mid-nowhere Nebraska who not only had Wifi and plenty of cable channels, but even offered unlimited US long distance calling. Through some VOIP provider... didn't cost them much.

The bigger downtown hotels make their nut on conferences and conventions. People stay in the hotel with the convention for (human to human) networking reasons. The stupid $10 incidentals go on the expense account.
 
2010-03-08 02:59:49 PM
What I don't understand is, where the is the money going? You're already paying $200 a night for the "elite" hotel, then more money for internet, parking, food, etc. while the $79 a night motel includes all this stuff for free. It seems like the elite hotels would be profitable as all hell.
 
2010-03-08 03:37:12 PM
Yeah you don't want a VIP to give a bad review on a tower's hotel room and you're stuck at three stars instead of going to four stars over paying for internet access.
 
2010-03-08 03:43:50 PM
mesmer242: True dat. If anyone can get free internet at a $50 a night Super 8, then maybe Marriott should pony up and offer it to anyone paying five times as much as that for a room in their hotels.

Eh, most of the Renaissance and Marriotts I stay at are $75-$120/night. They're more than a super 8, but they're not $300/night.
 
2010-03-08 05:06:53 PM
EvilEgg: While I suppose that's true, it always seemed odd to me that I had to pay for things I got free at cheaper hotels.

If you're willing to pay more for the hotel itself, you're willing to pay more in amenities. If you want to cheap out on the hotel, likely you'll just stay somewhere else if you have to pay for internet.

You may also get a single cable modem or DSL connection shared between all the guests in a place that's trying to offer something for free, versus a company that piggybacks on the fiber in the building for a higher-end pay-for-use setup.

There are other factors too. Usually the level of tech support is reduced for a free connection, but since it's free it's less likely to generate a support call, reducing the total cost to provide the service. For a paid for connection you have to factor in the cost of people calling tech support looking for receipts, refunds, questioning the amount on the bill, etc. That inflates the cost even more, so simply charging for access makes it inherently more expensive.

I'm surprised that more hotels haven't done what Sheraton started with their Link concept, where access in the lobby is free if you're a registered guest (verified through a name/room # check), or you pay if you're not staying there. It reduces the number of people that treat the lobby like a library, while generating some revenue to offset the costs of providing the access without burdening the guests. That has a much larger up-front cost though, so it makes sense that other brands have been hesitant to copy it.

/yes. i did work in that industry
 
2010-03-08 05:24:37 PM
davidphogan: EvilEgg: While I suppose that's true, it always seemed odd to me that I had to pay for things I got free at cheaper hotels.

If you're willing to pay more for the hotel itself, you're willing to pay more in amenities. If you want to cheap out on the hotel, likely you'll just stay somewhere else if you have to pay for internet.

You may also get a single cable modem or DSL connection shared between all the guests in a place that's trying to offer something for free, versus a company that piggybacks on the fiber in the building for a higher-end pay-for-use setup.

There are other factors too. Usually the level of tech support is reduced for a free connection, but since it's free it's less likely to generate a support call, reducing the total cost to provide the service. For a paid for connection you have to factor in the cost of people calling tech support looking for receipts, refunds, questioning the amount on the bill, etc. That inflates the cost even more, so simply charging for access makes it inherently more expensive.

I'm surprised that more hotels haven't done what Sheraton started with their Link concept, where access in the lobby is free if you're a registered guest (verified through a name/room # check), or you pay if you're not staying there. It reduces the number of people that treat the lobby like a library, while generating some revenue to offset the costs of providing the access without burdening the guests. That has a much larger up-front cost though, so it makes sense that other brands have been hesitant to copy it.

/yes. i did work in that industry


I've seen too much incompetence in internet offerings. Doubletree - free internet in the lobby open to anybody but $10/day in your room. To get around this, just go to the lobby and login through their portal. Ta-da. You are granted a 24hr pass that works in your room.

/WRT router as a repeater does wonders also to get free lobby internet
 
SMX
2010-03-08 05:54:03 PM
EvilEgg: haemaker: Well, the headline is a bit disingenuous since the Marriott non-VIP hotels, Residence Inn, Courtyard, Fairfield, and Spring Hill all have complimentary high-speed internet.

If you can afford to stay in a higher priced hotel, you can afford the high speed internet.

While I suppose that's true, it always seemed odd to me that I had to pay for things I got free at cheaper hotels.


I always thought the same thing.

Starwood Brand Hotels (W, Westin, Sheraton etc) now are offering free internet to their Platinum members as well. Although I find it very annoying when the desk doesn't face the TV. It'd be much nicer to have wireless so that you could watch in the bed.
 
2010-03-08 05:57:22 PM
2theruns: I've seen too much incompetence in internet offerings. Doubletree - free internet in the lobby open to anybody but $10/day in your room. To get around this, just go to the lobby and login through their portal. Ta-da. You are granted a 24hr pass that works in your room.

/WRT router as a repeater does wonders also to get free lobby internet


That's the result of the equipment used. Most equipment uses the MAC address to validate the user, and if the in room and lobby equipment shares the same gateway once you're authenticated once, it's free anywhere. The right solution would depend on the hardware, but it sounds like they/their vendor just isn't concerned.

Most users don't notice things like this, and just pay. It goes on the expense report, and the companies involved know it. Plus if you make the lobby zone expire the MAC after 30 minutes most people will pay rather than return to the lobby every 30 minutes. Again, it depends on the hardware if/how this is configured, just a vague explanation to avoid NDA's.

This is also the reason that it's common to see free WiFi in a lobby (cheap up front cost), but paid for in-room wired access. Since the wired NIC has a different MAC than the WiFi NIC you'll have to pay in room. That and adding AP's after a hotel built can be a nightmare. It's easier to throw a WAP in the lobby, turn down the power so it works in a limited area, and call that free WiFi. The cheapasses will use it and not complain, and the people who want access in their room are usually willing to pay.

From the logs I've seen the free lobby access is in large part used to look up things like restaurants, local attractions, airline check ins, booking other hotel rooms, buy tickets to sports events/Sea World/zoos, etc. Things that tied up hotel staff.

All these factors get counted in. Yes, some people use the free lobby access for email and similar but as internet on phones has showed up, this is something people are less likely to pay for in the first place. By offering free access to a system that saves them money at minimal cost while still leaving revenue opportunities they've been able to maximize their profit for the investment put into it.
 
2010-03-08 06:02:40 PM
davidphogan: By offering free access to a system that saves them money at minimal cost while still leaving revenue opportunities they've been able to maximize their profit for the investment put into it.

Re-reading my post, I'm embarrassed I posted such corporate sales-talking-guy speak on Fark. Sorry Fark.
 
2010-03-08 07:03:30 PM
that is because they already paid for it in their room fee.
 
2010-03-08 07:06:15 PM
bhcompy: Road



yea, but the roadway inn is not full of inbred, retarded aristocrats who aren't smart enough to know they're being cornholed.

and since they are well off/wealthy, it doesn't make any difference to them.
 
2010-03-08 07:07:14 PM
Linux_Yes: bhcompy: Road



yea, but the roadway inn is not full of inbred, retarded aristocrats who aren't smart enough to know they're being cornholed.

and since they are well off/wealthy, it doesn't make any difference to them.




sort of like the dumb, purebread dog who cannot compete with the smart mutt.
 
2010-03-08 09:09:04 PM
Can you expert travelers help me out? I'm staying at a Marriot, and I can't get this farking armchair out of this tiny ass window.

Any tips?
 
2010-03-08 09:53:14 PM
BalugaJoe: You still get the book of Mormon in each room.

Well, if they refresh after I've been there. I keep them with my collection of airline barfbags and lifejackets.
 
2010-03-08 10:11:07 PM
AmazingRuss: Can you expert travelers help me out? I'm staying at a Marriot, and I can't get this farking armchair out of this tiny ass window.

Any tips?


If you look on the sides of the windows, there are plastic guards that can easily be removed. This will enable you to open the windows fully.

I recommend you step through the window first before you send the chair, just to be sure it works.
 
2010-03-08 10:56:35 PM
I own a 19 room bed and breakfast. Take it from me: "Luxury" hotels will nickel and dime your ass to death, only because they can. People on vacation or with big expense accounts rarely shop around.
 
2010-03-08 11:29:59 PM
gravy chugging cretin.: BalugaJoe: You still get the book of Mormon in each room.

Well, if they refresh after I've been there. I keep them with my collection of airline barfbags and lifejackets.


That's stealing. However, leaving a used condom in them is a thoughtful gift.
 
2010-03-09 08:01:42 AM
davidphogan: 2theruns: I've seen too much incompetence in internet offerings. Doubletree - free internet in the lobby open to anybody but $10/day in your room. To get around this, just go to the lobby and login through their portal. Ta-da. You are granted a 24hr pass that works in your room.

/WRT router as a repeater does wonders also to get free lobby internet

That's the result of the equipment used. Most equipment uses the MAC address to validate the user, and if the in room and lobby equipment shares the same gateway once you're authenticated once, it's free anywhere. The right solution would depend on the hardware, but it sounds like they/their vendor just isn't concerned.

Most users don't notice things like this, and just pay. It goes on the expense report, and the companies involved know it. Plus if you make the lobby zone expire the MAC after 30 minutes most people will pay rather than return to the lobby every 30 minutes. Again, it depends on the hardware if/how this is configured, just a vague explanation to avoid NDA's.

This is also the reason that it's common to see free WiFi in a lobby (cheap up front cost), but paid for in-room wired access. Since the wired NIC has a different MAC than the WiFi NIC you'll have to pay in room. That and adding AP's after a hotel built can be a nightmare. It's easier to throw a WAP in the lobby, turn down the power so it works in a limited area, and call that free WiFi. The cheapasses will use it and not complain, and the people who want access in their room are usually willing to pay.

From the logs I've seen the free lobby access is in large part used to look up things like restaurants, local attractions, airline check ins, booking other hotel rooms, buy tickets to sports events/Sea World/zoos, etc. Things that tied up hotel staff.

All these factors get counted in. Yes, some people use the free lobby access for email and similar but as internet on phones has showed up, this is something people are less likely to pay for in the first place. By offering free access to a system that saves them money at minimal cost while still leaving revenue opportunities they've been able to maximize their profit for the investment put into it.


A++++ would read again!!


Lawnchair: The stupid $10 incidentals go on the expense account.

davidphogan: It goes on the expense report, and the companies involved know it.

Phil McKraken: People on vacation or with big expense accounts rarely shop around.


And there you have it. If your clients are mostly business folk no one bats an eye.
 
2010-03-09 12:24:17 PM
mekkab: davidphogan: 2theruns: I've seen too much incompetence in internet offerings. Doubletree - free internet in the lobby open to anybody but $10/day in your room. To get around this, just go to the lobby and login through their portal. Ta-da. You are granted a 24hr pass that works in your room.

/WRT router as a repeater does wonders also to get free lobby internet

That's the result of the equipment used. Most equipment uses the MAC address to validate the user, and if the in room and lobby equipment shares the same gateway once you're authenticated once, it's free anywhere. The right solution would depend on the hardware, but it sounds like they/their vendor just isn't concerned.

Most users don't notice things like this, and just pay. It goes on the expense report, and the companies involved know it. Plus if you make the lobby zone expire the MAC after 30 minutes most people will pay rather than return to the lobby every 30 minutes. Again, it depends on the hardware if/how this is configured, just a vague explanation to avoid NDA's.

This is also the reason that it's common to see free WiFi in a lobby (cheap up front cost), but paid for in-room wired access. Since the wired NIC has a different MAC than the WiFi NIC you'll have to pay in room. That and adding AP's after a hotel built can be a nightmare. It's easier to throw a WAP in the lobby, turn down the power so it works in a limited area, and call that free WiFi. The cheapasses will use it and not complain, and the people who want access in their room are usually willing to pay.

From the logs I've seen the free lobby access is in large part used to look up things like restaurants, local attractions, airline check ins, booking other hotel rooms, buy tickets to sports events/Sea World/zoos, etc. Things that tied up hotel staff.

All these factors get counted in. Yes, some people use the free lobby access for email and similar but as internet on phones has showed up, this is something people are less likely to pay for in the first place. By offering free access to a system that saves them money at minimal cost while still leaving revenue opportunities they've been able to maximize their profit for the investment put into it.

A++++ would read again!!


Lawnchair: The stupid $10 incidentals go on the expense account.

davidphogan: It goes on the expense report, and the companies involved know it.

Phil McKraken: People on vacation or with big expense accounts rarely shop around.


And there you have it. If your clients are mostly business folk no one bats an eye.


And it sucks ass because that's the same type of cost inflation that plagues the health industry. A decent amount of intermediaries will pay for it, so we'll charge everyone more!
 
2010-03-11 11:16:51 AM
You know what's awesome? $56 for internet last week when I was staying at the Hilton.

Monthly internet bill at home: $39

Yhay for corporate expense account!
 
2010-03-11 07:41:02 PM
brugger1982: You know what's awesome? $56 for internet last week when I was staying at the Hilton.

Monthly internet bill at home: $39

Yhay for corporate expense account!


That's exactly what they want.

That and there actually are costs involved in providing the service that make the margins a lot less obscene than you'd expect.
 
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