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(ABC)   Ayatollah Khomeini throws his support to the anti-government protestors, futher destabilizing the repressive government. No, this isn't a repeat of 1979, but it's beginning to feel like it   (abcnews.go.com) divider line 80
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16244 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Feb 2010 at 11:15 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-02-23 11:16:20 AM  
It does seem familiar, Shah 'nuff.
 
2010-02-23 11:17:45 AM  
This makes me wonder how the balance of power is shifting between the theocratic and secular govenrments.

Any farkers out there have some insight?
 
2010-02-23 11:20:20 AM  
Whoever controls the Revolutionary Guard and the basijis is in charge.

Right now that is the bad guys.
 
2010-02-23 11:21:03 AM  
I did a double-take at the headline, considering Ayatollah Khomeini is dead. Subby fails reading comprehension.
 
2010-02-23 11:21:06 AM  
I really hope the military intervenes on the side of the protesters.
 
2010-02-23 11:21:10 AM  
Form?
 
2010-02-23 11:23:17 AM  
Almet: This makes me wonder how the balance of power is shifting between the theocratic and secular govenrments.

Any farkers out there have some insight?


Iran is a theocratic republic and I'm unsure as to why you used "governments" as there is only 1 in power. Unfortunately, still controlled by Ahmedinejad. In the past summer, Obama played the Iran situation the best of any president since the 70's and successfully avoided stumbling on this particular Middle East situation. A policy of non-action is more favorable as the young population is decidedly against the current theocratic regime. Khomeini seems to be making a move to secure his position if the young generation successfully usurps power. The Basij (military police, SP?) currently control the streets and have been receiving a great amount of resistance both passive and active.

Interesting fact, the Basij (sp?) are imported men from outside villages and other countries. There is a large amount of disdain for military police in Muslim countries.
 
2010-02-23 11:23:56 AM  
Not bad considering he's been dead for 20 years.
 
2010-02-23 11:26:09 AM  
TappingTheVein: Not bad considering he's been dead for 20 years.

Not the Grandson... although that could change.
 
2010-02-23 11:27:56 AM  
I think the shia is about to hit the fan...
 
2010-02-23 11:27:58 AM  
BIRANS
 
2010-02-23 11:28:01 AM  
IKanHazaBukkit: Almet: This makes me wonder how the balance of power is shifting between the theocratic and secular govenrments.

Any farkers out there have some insight?

Iran is a theocratic republic and I'm unsure as to why you used "governments" as there is only 1 in power. Unfortunately, still controlled by Ahmedinejad. In the past summer, Obama played the Iran situation the best of any president since the 70's and successfully avoided stumbling on this particular Middle East situation. A policy of non-action is more favorable as the young population is decidedly against the current theocratic regime. Khameini seems to be making a move to secure his position if the young generation successfully usurps power. The Basij (military police, SP?) currently control the streets and have been receiving a great amount of resistance both passive and active.

Interesting fact, the Basij (sp?) are imported men from outside villages and other countries. There is a large amount of disdain for military police in Muslim countries.


SP error. sorry.
 
2010-02-23 11:28:34 AM  
Did I read that right.

FTFA: "ginger-colored beard"

The Ayatollah Khomeini is a ginger?
 
2010-02-23 11:28:50 AM  
Well, I'm glad he used the repeat form otherwise we would have no idea that this is, indeed, a repeat.
 
2010-02-23 11:29:29 AM  
...and then he disappeared, never to be heard from again.

img694.imageshack.us
Ahmahdinejad is beside himself with grief.
 
2010-02-23 11:30:01 AM  
TappingTheVein: Not bad considering he's been dead for 20 years.

It works on any Ayatollah! Ayatollah Nakhbadeh, Ayatollah Zahedi... Even as we speak, Ayatollah Razmara and his cadre of fanatics are consolidating their power!

i29.photobucket.com

/Obvious
 
2010-02-23 11:31:18 AM  
cache.daylife.com

What a ginger-colored beard might look like
 
2010-02-23 11:33:00 AM  
IKanHazaBukkit: Almet: This makes me wonder how the balance of power is shifting between the theocratic and secular govenrments.

Any farkers out there have some insight?

Iran is a theocratic republic and I'm unsure as to why you used "governments" as there is only 1 in power. Unfortunately, still controlled by Ahmedinejad. In the past summer, Obama played the Iran situation the best of any president since the 70's and successfully avoided stumbling on this particular Middle East situation. A policy of non-action is more favorable as the young population is decidedly against the current theocratic regime. Khomeini seems to be making a move to secure his position if the young generation successfully usurps power. The Basij (military police, SP?) currently control the streets and have been receiving a great amount of resistance both passive and active.

Interesting fact, the Basij (sp?) are imported men from outside villages and other countries. There is a large amount of disdain for military police in Muslim countries.


I used governments as it seems there is some disconnect between the theocratic and secular elements.
 
2010-02-23 11:37:11 AM  
Almet: IKanHazaBukkit: Almet: This makes me wonder how the balance of power is shifting between the theocratic and secular govenrments.

Any farkers out there have some insight?

Iran is a theocratic republic and I'm unsure as to why you used "governments" as there is only 1 in power. Unfortunately, still controlled by Ahmedinejad. In the past summer, Obama played the Iran situation the best of any president since the 70's and successfully avoided stumbling on this particular Middle East situation. A policy of non-action is more favorable as the young population is decidedly against the current theocratic regime. Khomeini seems to be making a move to secure his position if the young generation successfully usurps power. The Basij (military police, SP?) currently control the streets and have been receiving a great amount of resistance both passive and active.

Interesting fact, the Basij (sp?) are imported men from outside villages and other countries. There is a large amount of disdain for military police in Muslim countries.

I used governments as it seems there is some disconnect between the theocratic and secular elements.


Ah, well it's a self described Islamic Republic so everything government related is thereby non-secular.
 
2010-02-23 11:38:24 AM  
Ponderoid: I did a double-take at the headline, considering Ayatollah Khomeini is dead. Subby fails reading comprehension.

Ayatollah is an honorific for the Muslim equivalent of a priest. THE Ayatollah Khomeini's grandson happens to be an Ayatollah as well, making the headline technically accurate
 
2010-02-23 11:40:06 AM  
Almet: This makes me wonder how the balance of power is shifting between the theocratic and secular govenrments.

Any farkers out there have some insight?


The theocratic government is giving way to a military lead nation, the generals are taking over. The question is if the pro-democratic forces can hit at the right point of this transition, when the military and technocracy are both weakened. Other wise, the military leadership will just take over and could last for quite awhile
 
2010-02-23 11:40:51 AM  
I'm just happy Obama has so far slowed the push to start bombing things in Iran.

Also, Ayatollah Khamenei is who is actually in charge in Iran, not Ahmadinejad. Khamenei is the supreme leader.
 
2010-02-23 11:41:37 AM  
Ponderoid: I did a double-take at the headline, considering Ayatollah Khomeini is dead. Subby I fail reading comprehension.

FTFY
 
2010-02-23 11:42:13 AM  
zedster: The theocratic government is giving way to a military lead nation, the generals are taking over



[citation needed]
 
2010-02-23 11:42:27 AM  
Magorn: Ponderoid: I did a double-take at the headline, considering Ayatollah Khomeini is dead. Subby fails reading comprehension.

Ayatollah is an honorific for the Muslim equivalent of a priest. THE Ayatollah Khomeini's grandson happens to be an Ayatollah as well, making the headline technically accurate


I came here to say this. For some reason, people think his first name is "Ayatollah", and that would be like thinking Glenn Beck's first name is "Douchebag".
 
2010-02-23 11:42:52 AM  
Is he an Ayatollah?
 
2010-02-23 11:45:54 AM  
Ayatollah Khomeini to lead revolution against Ayatollah Khomeini's revolution?
 
2010-02-23 11:46:35 AM  
Mainrodax: zedster: The theocratic government is giving way to a military lead nation, the generals are taking over



[citation needed]


Have you seriously not heard this? The only people that are denying this that I can find is the Iranian leadership. Everyone else thinks thats exactly what happened in the aftermath of the last election.
 
2010-02-23 11:47:13 AM  
bartink: Is he an Ayatollah?

Yes, I believe of rakh a'droll'ah
 
2010-02-23 11:47:24 AM  
Khomeini's grandson is using his own silence to build a position of power by letting people pin their fantasies on the luster of an apparently pleasant personality and his superstar-status name. In the possible event of revolution (putting it at 20% chance), he'll be positioned to reap the political benefits. If Ahmahdinejad maintains his hold on power until his term expires (give it a 50%), he'll walk out a little smelly to the establishment but unhurt since he didn't get too involved in the politics and he has Grandpa's surname. If the military says enough's enough and lays the smack down on the kids(15%), he's still fine, and if the military sides with the kids (15%), he's around where Grandpa was, positioned to be the hero of the hour.

Basically, he's in a win-win.
 
2010-02-23 11:47:37 AM  
bartink: Is he an Ayatollah?

If Ayatollah once, Ayatollah a million times, yes!
 
2010-02-23 11:48:41 AM  
IKanHazaBukkit: Ah, well it's a self described Islamic Republic so everything government related is thereby non-secular.

While technically everything is subject to a direct vote, there are layers and layers of Bureaucracy allowing the ruling council considerable power on who is allowed to run for office and who is allowed to advance politically. Even pro-reform candidates are carefully screened and allowed to run by the Mullahs so as not to be too radical and throw a bone to the masses.


upload.wikimedia.org

Which is why, essentially, the government can do whatever they want.
 
2010-02-23 11:49:59 AM  
Brick-House: What a ginger-colored beard might look like

why is it that in every photo of Amadinnerjacket where he's laughing or talking with some guy, he looks like he's thinking "you laugh now my friend, but you shall be fed to the dogs next..." and then continues laughing. he looks like an iranian equivalent of a mobster
 
2010-02-23 11:51:34 AM  
Ohplease Ohplease Ohplease.

I don't think Khomeini is the most wonderful guy ever, but any movement at the top toward the protesters means less deaths when things get worse (again).
 
2010-02-23 11:53:46 AM  
vernonFL: Whoever controls the Revolutionary Guard and the basijis is in charge.

Right now that is the bad guys.


Just which side IS that, they BOTH look pretty bad from where I'm sitting.

Ayatollah ONCE, Ayatollah a HUNDRED times....i236.photobucket.com
 
2010-02-23 11:53:55 AM  
Ayatollah of rock 'n rollah?
www.pinkraygun.com
 
2010-02-23 11:55:08 AM  
cache.daylife.com

media.nj.com

Separated at birth?
 
2010-02-23 11:56:00 AM  
Dear Mr. Ayatollah,

Go fark yourself.
 
2010-02-23 11:58:23 AM  
We should just nuke Iran, a lot. It will be like the planet did a facepalm.

punditkitchen.files.wordpress.com
 
2010-02-23 12:00:15 PM  
Aidan: Ohplease Ohplease Ohplease.

I don't think Khomeini is the most wonderful guy ever, but any movement at the top toward the protesters means less deaths when things get worse (again).


I'm looking forward to the fun of realizing that we're once again working with a Khomeini to destablize the secular government of Iran.
 
2010-02-23 12:02:35 PM  
Came here for the MadMax reference, leaving satisfied
 
2010-02-23 12:04:50 PM  
FormlessOne: I'm looking forward to the fun of realizing that we're once again working with a Khomeini to destablize the secular government of Iran.

Where's Jimm Carter when you need him?
www.chinadaily.com.cn
 
2010-02-23 12:05:21 PM  
FormlessOne: Aidan: Ohplease Ohplease Ohplease.

I don't think Khomeini is the most wonderful guy ever, but any movement at the top toward the protesters means less deaths when things get worse (again).

I'm looking forward to the fun of realizing that we're once again working with a Khomeini to destabilize the secular government of Iran.


Aroo? I wasn't aware that the secular government had any real power. Obviously they've got enough to keep the streetlights on, as it were, and to destabilize that would indeed be bad. I just don't think they'll manage to avoid the repercussions of the electorate trying to change the Guardian Council. They're kind of squashed in the middle.

Well I suppose Ahmadinejad is secular, in the same way I'm catwalk material.
 
2010-02-23 12:06:58 PM  
bartink: Mainrodax: zedster: The theocratic government is giving way to a military lead nation, the generals are taking over



[citation needed]

Have you seriously not heard this? The only people that are denying this that I can find is the Iranian leadership. Everyone else thinks thats exactly what happened in the aftermath of the last election.


Oh I've heard it from our government, specifically from Hillary Clinton, but our government has a terrible track record when it comes to public declarations of the status of the middle east. You might remember the whole "saddam has wmd's" as our basis for invasion as a great example of our accuracy in the state of middle eastern affairs. Idk who you think 'everyone else' is. The postelection stuff in Iran has been between liberal and conservative factions of the government, with everyone from the secular politicians to the clerical establishment leaning left or right. In fact as far as I've heard the only group that has been relatively distanced from this has been the military.
 
2010-02-23 12:11:53 PM  
My Ayatollah don't want none unless you got buns, hun.
 
2010-02-23 12:15:21 PM  
chu2dogg: IKanHazaBukkit: Ah, well it's a self described Islamic Republic so everything government related is thereby non-secular.

While technically everything is subject to a direct vote, there are layers and layers of Bureaucracy allowing the ruling council considerable power on who is allowed to run for office and who is allowed to advance politically. Even pro-reform candidates are carefully screened and allowed to run by the Mullahs so as not to be too radical and throw a bone to the masses.


i.imgur.com


Which is why, essentially, the government can do whatever they want.


The chart looks a little screwy.
 
2010-02-23 12:22:20 PM  
airsupport: It does seem familiar, Shah 'nuff.

And we're done on one.

/I see what you did there
 
2010-02-23 12:27:57 PM  
Every country should have a good healthy revolution every thirty years, or so. Just to keep things fresh.
 
2010-02-23 12:31:41 PM  
IKanHazaBukkit: Interesting fact, the Basij (sp?) are imported men from outside villages and other countries. There is a large amount of disdain for military police in Muslim countries.

From what I understand most of the time that you see people dancing and shooting guns in celebration of terrorist attacks are also people bussed in from rural villages for these photo-ops.

Seems to be a common tactic in the middle east, bus in the ignorant because those with the least bit of education won't stay on message.
 
2010-02-23 12:33:19 PM  
PandaPorn: Ayatollah of rock 'n rollah?

"Just walk away!"
 
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