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(Guardian)   Doctors confident of finding a cure for childhood peanut allergy. The cure is tentatively described as grabbing overprotective parents by the shoulders, shaking them, and telling them to quit being wusses   (guardian.co.uk ) divider line
    More: Cool, doormat, peanut, peanut allergy, American Association, Chinese food, pilot study, control group, intensive  
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12451 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Feb 2010 at 2:58 PM (6 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-02-21 12:50:19 PM  
Y'know, here's the deal. I'm 44. I went through my childhood in the late 60s and 70s. Went to a lot of schools as my dad was transferred around by his company. Every single day from kindergarten to 9th grade, I took a peanut butter and apple jelly sandwich to school for lunch. But this isn't about being OCD. It's about the fact that, through 13 grades, around 10 schools, thousands of kids, I never, not once, saw a kid blow up with a peanut reaction. Never had a single friend die. Never had a single classmate die. Never had a single classmate have to go running to the nurse's office with nasal polyps and a constricting trachea. No ambulances save for the rare broken bone from playing Smear the Queer at recess.

Peanut allergies were basically nonexistent. Until parents began sticking their kids in bubbles, taking them off the teat at the first opportunity (or not breastfeeding at all), sanitizing every single thing they touched, running for antibiotics at the barest sniffle, not letting them outside for fear of perverts, not letting them get dirty for fear of Bog knows what. Peanut allergies (and, for the most part, wheat, tree nut, corn, gluten, blah blah blah) are caused by our society's paranoias.

Parents, take a good hard look at yourselves. Your kids are the harvest of what you've sown.

/two kids
//wife breastfed the first one for 2.5 years, second one for 6 months (he weaned himself)
///no paranoia about dirt
////immunized for everything
//not allergic to anything
 
2010-02-21 12:57:47 PM  
And now that I went and RTFA, I'm even more amazed. One kid in 25? Really? So back when there were no labels on food, no restrictions on what I could bring to lunch, one kid in 25 was, what? Dying? Having to carry around an Epi-Pen? Not bloody likely. The boys I knew would have grabbed it and jammed it into the fat kid to see what it would do.

This is not "just something that happens". Virtually every kid I've ever known who came down with "severe allergies" began his/her life inside a parent-created bubble of antiseptic. Have you seen the little blankets that are created to put your kid in the shopping cart, but shield them from touching the cart? Heh. Both of my kids regularly leaned forward and teethed on the push handle of the cart (the part where every shopper puts their hands, and all of the healthy babies put their mouths).
 
2010-02-21 01:17:46 PM  
dahmers love zombie

What you describe is basically the foundation of the "Hygiene Hypothesis". The theory goes that over-sanitation and lack of exposure to benign infections agents as a child leads to the immune system not developing properly. Attacking things it shouldn't and causing all sorts of problems. Giving explanation to why autoimmune diseases are common in 1st world countries, but mostly unheard of in the developing world.

Think of what would happen if you took a 4 year old and locked them in a closet for a decade? They'll come out knowing how to do the basics, eat, sleep, walk, poo, etc, but they won't know how to interact with others, what is the appropriate reaction to a given situation and what isn't. What is a problem and what isn't.

That is what we are doing to children's immune systems in today's overprotective society. The persons immune system doesn't know what is bad and what isn't. What an appropriate response is and what isn't. It doesn't even get along with the body of the person itis supposed to be protecting.

There has been research into treating Chrones disease by infecting patients with intestinal parasites. (Typically pig parasites that won't grow to maturity in humans.) Gives the immune system something to attack besides the persons own body.

When I went to school peanut allergies were unheard of and I went to school in the 90's
 
2010-02-21 01:32:02 PM  
Send your kids outside to play in the mud. Let them eat things without washing their hands. Just use plain Ivory soap or something instead of SUPER ANTIBIOTIC EBOLA-SLAUGHTERING LIQUID GOO.

I saw an ad recently for this stuff that you spray in your kid's face after she sneezes to disinfect her. WHAT.
 
2010-02-21 01:35:47 PM  
It might be worth noting that currently no one knows why allergies have become dramatically more prevalent in such a short period of time.

Maybe the hygiene hypothesis is correct, but maybe not. Just a thought, before you go spoon-feeding human feces to your children.
 
2010-02-21 01:43:53 PM  

soze: Send your kids outside to play in the mud. Let them eat things without washing their hands. Just use plain Ivory soap or something instead of SUPER ANTIBIOTIC EBOLA-SLAUGHTERING LIQUID GOO.

I saw an ad recently for this stuff that you spray in your kid's face after she sneezes to disinfect her. WHAT.


I think you misunderstood the ad. It's actually Children's Strength Pepper Spray, and it's supposed to keep the kid's snotty face away from you until they wipe their nose on something.

From the makers of Toddler Mace.
 
2010-02-21 02:04:50 PM  

dahmers love zombie: Y'know, here's the deal. I'm 44. I went through my childhood in the late 60s and 70s. Went to a lot of schools as my dad was transferred around by his company. Every single day from kindergarten to 9th grade, I took a peanut butter and apple jelly sandwich to school for lunch. But this isn't about being OCD. It's about the fact that, through 13 grades, around 10 schools, thousands of kids, I never, not once, saw a kid blow up with a peanut reaction. Never had a single friend die. Never had a single classmate die. Never had a single classmate have to go running to the nurse's office with nasal polyps and a constricting trachea. No ambulances save for the rare broken bone from playing Smear the Queer at recess.

Peanut allergies were basically nonexistent. Until parents began sticking their kids in bubbles, taking them off the teat at the first opportunity (or not breastfeeding at all), sanitizing every single thing they touched, running for antibiotics at the barest sniffle, not letting them outside for fear of perverts, not letting them get dirty for fear of Bog knows what. Peanut allergies (and, for the most part, wheat, tree nut, corn, gluten, blah blah blah) are caused by our society's paranoias.

Parents, take a good hard look at yourselves. Your kids are the harvest of what you've sown.

/two kids
//wife breastfed the first one for 2.5 years, second one for 6 months (he weaned himself)
///no paranoia about dirt
////immunized for everything
//not allergic to anything


2.5 years? Thats farking creepy
 
2010-02-21 02:27:40 PM  

hitchking: It might be worth noting that currently no one knows why allergies have become dramatically more prevalent in such a short period of time.

Maybe the hygiene hypothesis is correct, but maybe not. Just a thought, before you go spoon-feeding human feces to your children.


Because modern medicine has allowed runts to live and grow up and breed with other runts and have little runt children.

also....

1.bp.blogspot.com

Choosy doctors prefer Jiff.
 
2010-02-21 02:39:13 PM  

Crosshair: There has been research into treating Chrones disease by infecting patients with intestinal parasites. (Typically pig parasites that won't grow to maturity in humans.) Gives the immune system something to attack besides the persons own body.

When I went to school peanut allergies were unheard of and I went to school in the 90's


TO be fair though, it is possible to develop the allergy later in life. A neighbor of mine grew up loving Peanut Butter, but developed the allergy... I want to say as an adult. Its not a life threatening allergy, but it is serious enough she can no longer have peanuts.

So its not all over-reactive hysteria, there are people who genuinely suffer through no fault of their own or how they were raised.
 
2010-02-21 02:47:04 PM  

dahmers love zombie: So back when there were no labels on food, no restrictions on what I could bring to lunch, one kid in 25 was, what? Dying?


Pretty much.
www.whatsyourdrug.com
 
2010-02-21 03:05:02 PM  

dahmers love zombie: Peanut allergies were basically nonexistent. Until parents began sticking their kids in bubbles, taking them off the teat at the first opportunity (or not breastfeeding at all), sanitizing every single thing they touched, running for antibiotics at the barest sniffle, not letting them outside for fear of perverts, not letting them get dirty for fear of Bog knows what. Peanut allergies (and, for the most part, wheat, tree nut, corn, gluten, blah blah blah) are caused by our society's paranoia


IANAD, but if I remember correctly, allergies are actually caused by exposing babies to certain foods and other substances before their immune systems are developed enough to not go into a panic about them.
 
2010-02-21 03:05:56 PM  

An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: 2.5 years? Thats farking creepy


2.5 years is pretty normal. Weird attitudes about breastfeeding on the other hand are creepy.
 
2010-02-21 03:06:04 PM  

DrRatchet: dahmers love zombie: So back when there were no labels on food, no restrictions on what I could bring to lunch, one kid in 25 was, what? Dying?
Pretty much.


Umm, newborn mortality is a bit different from peanut allergies and that graph might have a bit more to do with medical care for premature babies than grade school sanitation.
 
2010-02-21 03:06:56 PM  

hitchking: It might be worth noting that currently no one knows why allergies have become dramatically more prevalent in such a short period of time.

Maybe the hygiene hypothesis is correct, but maybe not. Just a thought, before you go spoon-feeding human feces to your children.


Yep. Food allergies are definitely real (and are not just helicopter parents making stuff up), but we don't actually know why they seem to be more prevalent nowadays. I'm not just going to go with the "common sense"/folk wisdom on this one, as it's a scientific question that has a scientific answer.
 
2010-02-21 03:07:27 PM  
www.concretepiano.com

I guess this man diabolical plot of world domination is thwarted once and for all.
 
2010-02-21 03:08:13 PM  

An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: dahmers love zombie: Y'know, here's the deal. I'm 44. I went through my childhood in the late 60s and 70s. Went to a lot of schools as my dad was transferred around by his company. Every single day from kindergarten to 9th grade, I took a peanut butter and apple jelly sandwich to school for lunch. But this isn't about being OCD. It's about the fact that, through 13 grades, around 10 schools, thousands of kids, I never, not once, saw a kid blow up with a peanut reaction. Never had a single friend die. Never had a single classmate die. Never had a single classmate have to go running to the nurse's office with nasal polyps and a constricting trachea. No ambulances save for the rare broken bone from playing Smear the Queer at recess.

Peanut allergies were basically nonexistent. Until parents began sticking their kids in bubbles, taking them off the teat at the first opportunity (or not breastfeeding at all), sanitizing every single thing they touched, running for antibiotics at the barest sniffle, not letting them outside for fear of perverts, not letting them get dirty for fear of Bog knows what. Peanut allergies (and, for the most part, wheat, tree nut, corn, gluten, blah blah blah) are caused by our society's paranoias.

Parents, take a good hard look at yourselves. Your kids are the harvest of what you've sown.

/two kids
//wife breastfed the first one for 2.5 years, second one for 6 months (he weaned himself)
///no paranoia about dirt
////immunized for everything
//not allergic to anything

2.5 years? Thats farking creepy


No that is normal.........US has it messed up.
 
2010-02-21 03:08:47 PM  

dahmers love zombie: Every single day from kindergarten to 9th grade, I took a peanut butter and apple jelly sandwich to school for lunch. But this isn't about being OCD. It's about the fact that, through 13 grades, around 10 schools, thousands of kids, I never, not once, saw a kid blow up with a peanut reaction. Never had a single friend die


I sat next to my best friend in 3rd grade every day at lunch. He had a bad peanut allergy. I ate a peanut butter and jelly sandwich most days, and frequently had nutty bars as well. Nothing ever happened.
 
2010-02-21 03:09:11 PM  
I'm not allergic to peanuts but I have a bad reaction to pigeon droppings.
 
2010-02-21 03:09:14 PM  

An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: dahmers love zombie: Y'know, here's the deal. I'm 44. I went through my childhood in the late 60s and 70s. Went to a lot of schools as my dad was transferred around by his company. Every single day from kindergarten to 9th grade, I took a peanut butter and apple jelly sandwich to school for lunch. But this isn't about being OCD. It's about the fact that, through 13 grades, around 10 schools, thousands of kids, I never, not once, saw a kid blow up with a peanut reaction. Never had a single friend die. Never had a single classmate die. Never had a single classmate have to go running to the nurse's office with nasal polyps and a constricting trachea. No ambulances save for the rare broken bone from playing Smear the Queer at recess.

Peanut allergies were basically nonexistent. Until parents began sticking their kids in bubbles, taking them off the teat at the first opportunity (or not breastfeeding at all), sanitizing every single thing they touched, running for antibiotics at the barest sniffle, not letting them outside for fear of perverts, not letting them get dirty for fear of Bog knows what. Peanut allergies (and, for the most part, wheat, tree nut, corn, gluten, blah blah blah) are caused by our society's paranoias.

Parents, take a good hard look at yourselves. Your kids are the harvest of what you've sown.

/two kids
//wife breastfed the first one for 2.5 years, second one for 6 months (he weaned himself)
///no paranoia about dirt
////immunized for everything
//not allergic to anything

2.5 years? Thats farking creepy


The benefits for the child are there, and thats what boobies are made to do. They aren't just funbags for mens enjoyment. In many cultures children are breast fed even longer- till 4 or 5. Personally I think once a child of school age they should be cut off but I don't think that 2.5 years old is inappropriate.
 
2010-02-21 03:09:28 PM  

DrRatchet: dahmers love zombie: So back when there were no labels on food, no restrictions on what I could bring to lunch, one kid in 25 was, what? Dying?

Pretty much.


Jesus. George Washington Carver was a mass-murderer!
 
2010-02-21 03:09:35 PM  

An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: 2.5 years? Thats farking creepy


Nah, it's fine.
 
2010-02-21 03:09:43 PM  
Have witnessed and treated true anaphylaxis from peanut allergy and came away very, very impressed. Cricothyroidotomy and anoxic brain injury kind of impressed
 
2010-02-21 03:09:54 PM  

dahmers love zombie:
Peanut allergies were basically nonexistent. Until parents began sticking their kids in bubbles, taking them off the teat at the first opportunity (or not breastfeeding at all), sanitizing every single thing they touched, running for antibiotics at the barest sniffle, not letting them outside for fear of perverts, not letting them get dirty for fear of Bog knows what. Peanut allergies (and, for the most part, wheat, tree nut, corn, gluten, blah blah blah) are caused by our society's paranoias.

Parents, take a good hard look at yourselves. Your kids are the harvest of what you've sown.

/two kids
//wife breastfed the first one for 2.5 years, second one for 6 months (he weaned himself)
///no paranoia about dirt
////immunized for everything
//not allergic to anything


Just because you have no experience with it in your family doesn't mean someone did something wrong to cause it. My younger brother has severe peanut allergies. We were not in the bubble environment you describe, we were all breast-fed, spent most of our younger years outdoors, and my other brothers and sisters (seven kids total) do not have any allergies. The simple truth is no one knows what causes it yet.
 
2010-02-21 03:10:21 PM  

hitchking: It might be worth noting that currently no one knows why allergies have become dramatically more prevalent in such a short period of time.

Maybe the hygiene hypothesis is correct, but maybe not. Just a thought, before you go spoon-feeding human feces to your children.


Food preservatives, paranoia about germs, etc.
 
amo
2010-02-21 03:10:24 PM  

here4few: No that is normal.........US has it messed up.


I think "when they grow teeth" is a good indicator as to appropriate weaning time. There's at least two reasons baby teeth ar sharp.
 
2010-02-21 03:10:34 PM  
Rubber baby buggy bumpers.
 
2010-02-21 03:10:53 PM  

blazemongr: IANAD, but if I remember correctly, allergies are actually caused by exposing babies to certain foods and other substances before their immune systems are developed enough to not go into a panic about them.


This. Or at least, this is what likely happened to me. My parents were not overprotective by any stretch of the definition. But when the doctors decided to test my autonomous system by feeding me peanut butter, that sent my whole system into a spiral it hasn't ever recovered from.

/Sucks having to read every ingredient list for nuts
//At least I don't have to carry an Epipen
///Not allergic to slashies
 
2010-02-21 03:11:04 PM  
I know people with actual peanut allergies and people with imaginery ones.

We had catered food once, supposedly nut-free, that sent my brother-in-law to the emergency room. Later the caterer apologized, they mistakenly put nuts in the food.

I also met parents who keep peanuts away, thinking their kids are allergic. But they DO feed them peanut butter, that's "different". I kept my mouth shut, that is industrial-strength stupidity which cannot be countered.
 
2010-02-21 03:11:24 PM  
Not directly realetd to the story, but also if i remember reading correctly the places w/ the least amount of bacteria found on the human body were the places that are harder to reach, such as the back...
 
2010-02-21 03:11:42 PM  
You have to look at the genetic aspect of the allergies as well though.

50 years ago most childhood nut allergy cases were fatal, whether the deaths were diagnosed as an allergy or not. That meant those children couldn't pass along that gene. Now that more of those people who have been saved through medicine are breeding, that trait spreads, becoming more and more common.
 
2010-02-21 03:11:57 PM  
Sorry, all you life-was-better-when-I-was-young-and-kids-today-suck-because-their-parents people. My kid had a peanut reaction when he was two. Scariest farking thing in the world. Don't wish it on any of you miserable farks.
 
2010-02-21 03:12:58 PM  

here4few: An-Unnecessarily-Long-Name: dahmers love zombie: Y'know, here's the deal. I'm 44. I went through my childhood in the late 60s and 70s. Went to a lot of schools as my dad was transferred around by his company. Every single day from kindergarten to 9th grade, I took a peanut butter and apple jelly sandwich to school for lunch. But this isn't about being OCD. It's about the fact that, through 13 grades, around 10 schools, thousands of kids, I never, not once, saw a kid blow up with a peanut reaction. Never had a single friend die. Never had a single classmate die. Never had a single classmate have to go running to the nurse's office with nasal polyps and a constricting trachea. No ambulances save for the rare broken bone from playing Smear the Queer at recess.

Peanut allergies were basically nonexistent. Until parents began sticking their kids in bubbles, taking them off the teat at the first opportunity (or not breastfeeding at all), sanitizing every single thing they touched, running for antibiotics at the barest sniffle, not letting them outside for fear of perverts, not letting them get dirty for fear of Bog knows what. Peanut allergies (and, for the most part, wheat, tree nut, corn, gluten, blah blah blah) are caused by our society's paranoias.

Parents, take a good hard look at yourselves. Your kids are the harvest of what you've sown.

/two kids
//wife breastfed the first one for 2.5 years, second one for 6 months (he weaned himself)
///no paranoia about dirt
////immunized for everything
//not allergic to anything

2.5 years? Thats farking creepy

No that is normal.........US has it messed up.


Hell, I'm 35 and still enjoy breastfeeding...
 
2010-02-21 03:13:10 PM  

DrRatchet: Pretty much.


So the decrease from ~20/1000 to 7/1000 is due to food labeling? Even ignoring all the other allergies and all the other medical advances and assuming those 7 are ignoring food labels, we're still missing more than half the children that should have been dying due to peanut allergies alone by that chart.
That would seem to be counter to what you were trying to prove.
 
2010-02-21 03:14:25 PM  
I wonder:

(a) Could this technique have application in addressing hazardous levels of arsenic in drinking water?

(b) Assuming it did, how would you feel about the government mandating its use in order to economize water treatment?
 
2010-02-21 03:15:17 PM  
Oh goody. I was getting so bored this afternoon. Now, in answer to my prayers, a thread that is sure to bring out all the helicopter/snowflake&crotchfruit/peanutty/getoffmy lawner types. Something to appeal to everyone!

/Breaking out the Fiddle Faddle: popcorn WITH peanuts!
 
2010-02-21 03:15:29 PM  
Ponzholio
Hell, I'm 35 and still enjoy breastfeeding...
So, uh, how does your mom feel about that?
 
2010-02-21 03:16:26 PM  
Subby is an ass. Both my wife and I have seen the effects of severe allergies. It has nothing to do with overprotective parents. Breastfeeding has been shown to be effective in resisting allergies but my niece was born with an allergy to milk so was not able to breast feed. The parents didn't have a chance to be overprotective before she had her first allergy, then they had to be because exposure to nuts would kill her.
Also had a colleague who was in her fifties, grew up in rural US among the dirt, blah, blah, blah. I opened a bag a popcorn near her and she practically passed out because she had an allergic reaction.
Friends of mine can't eat gluten--not because of an allergy but because of a disease Link (new window)
I'm not saying we don't oversanitize but nobody (including the well educated subby) knows why allergies have risen.
I will also point out that the peanut allergies seem to be more prevalent in the wealthier school districts than in the poorer ones.
 
2010-02-21 03:16:29 PM  
4%? I thought it was more like 1 in 1000.
 
2010-02-21 03:16:51 PM  

Malicoire_: You have to look at the genetic aspect of the allergies as well though.

50 years ago most childhood nut allergy cases were fatal, whether the deaths were diagnosed as an allergy or not. That meant those children couldn't pass along that gene. Now that more of those people who have been saved through medicine are breeding, that trait spreads, becoming more and more common.


Two generations, starting from such a low distribution, just wouldn't be enough time for an evolutionary effect - particularly on something becoming survival-neutral, at best, not enhancing survival/reproduction.
 
2010-02-21 03:17:15 PM  
And sometimes it can happen even when you don't put your kid in a bubble. If you have a parent with allergies, their kids are more likely to have allergies - any allergies. So my wife is allergic to cats, grass pollen and a particular tree. My daughter gets peanut allergy, yay (and Asthma from her grandfather, which apparently also increases the risk of allergies). This despite rooting around on the ground, having her dog in her face from birth, and going to daycare and being exposed to other kids. She rarely gets sick.

It sucks, but we deal. We have to avoid some restaurants where peanut shells are thrown on the floor or where we can't check the ingredients, and certain ethnic foods, but we sure as hell haven't bubbled her up, either. Her old daycare served PB&J weekly, and she sat right there at the table eating a Jelly-only with everyone else, no problems. She has an epipen wherever she goes, we check labels, and she's learned not to accept food from anyone without asking first. Other than that, life goes on.

A treatment that could eliminate the risk of a severe reaction would be a godsend, though - it is a pain in the ass to always have to be checking things, especially at restaurants.
 
2010-02-21 03:17:39 PM  
Could it also be related to the level of parental hysterics? Cuz Ive seen parents just fly off the rails at waiters when they thought the enviroment was contaminated w/ gluten, peanuts, etc. Could some of it be placebo effect?
 
2010-02-21 03:19:04 PM  

ErinPac: DrRatchet: Pretty much.

So the decrease from ~20/1000 to 7/1000 is due to food labeling? Even ignoring all the other allergies and all the other medical advances and assuming those 7 are ignoring food labels, we're still missing more than half the children that should have been dying due to peanut allergies alone by that chart.
That would seem to be counter to what you were trying to prove.


I'm pretty sure having 911 / EMS and subcuanteous epinephrine has helped.
 
2010-02-21 03:19:15 PM  

cookiefleck: Could it also be related to the level of parental hysterics? Cuz Ive seen parents just fly off the rails at waiters when they thought the enviroment was contaminated w/ gluten, peanuts, etc. Could some of it be placebo effect?


I think there is a heck of a lot of that.
 
2010-02-21 03:20:32 PM  
I'm really glad my kids don't have these problems. I'm too freaking busy to run around scrubbing the hell out of everything in case it came into contact with a peanut. I'd also hate to be "that parent" you know the one on orientation day and informs the whole class of all the ailments affecting Brittany or Jacob and demands you don't pack things in your own kid's lunch because of their problems.

On the last middle school field trip I chaperoned I had one of the mothers trying to squirt my kids down with sanitizer because she couldn't believe I didn't force check if 14 year olds had washed their hands before eating. Back off wacko. (Not the same thing as allergies but it's always the same parents doing it.)
 
2010-02-21 03:20:51 PM  
dahmers love zombie

Research on the Hygiene Hypothesis suggests that there is only about a one year window between the ages of 1-2 in which exposing them to pathogens/bacteria seems to prevent some development of allergies.

So having your 4-10 year old playing in the mud does nothing to help them immune-wise.
 
2010-02-21 03:21:30 PM  
BTW in the area of "young children not dying", we (the US) lag behind the Civilized World and Canada:

www.whatsyourdrug.com

Must be all that socialized medicine/socialized medical insurance they have in civilized countries.

/yes, I know, not all died of peanuts. Some died due to lack of vaccination and emulating WWE performances.
 
2010-02-21 03:21:42 PM  

TurboCojones: I'm pretty sure having 911 / EMS and subcuanteous epinephrine has helped.


Oh it has, surely. However, it just isn't going to account for the percentages noted.
 
2010-02-21 03:22:31 PM  
Noticed the whole "NO PEANUTS" thing is more common in more "exclusive" schools, such as private schools, charter schools, an "art academy," and what not. Kind of harder to regulate in the larger public schools. My sister's school had a table which was a "peanut free table" but that was about it.

This is a broad statement, and is no way a blanket for all the kids with these "peanut allergies," but just my observation. The kids I've seen with the peanut allergies were the same ones with coke bottle glasses, inhalers and prescriptions for every known ailment, and were the type of kid you'll pick last in gym class and is the target in every dodgeball game.

Typically, these kids come from overbearing helicopter moms that don't really have any control over anything at home, so they want to try and control things at the schools by limiting what other kids can or can not bring to school. It's an illusion of power.
 
2010-02-21 03:23:49 PM  

basemetal: Because modern medicine has allowed runts to live and grow up and breed with other runts and have little runt children.fark you!

/runt

 
2010-02-21 03:24:14 PM  

hadji: I will also point out that the peanut allergies seem to be more prevalent in the wealthier school districts than in the poorer ones.


Which is something that plays well for the "hygiene hypothesis," no? Wealthier parents are more likely to be able to spend time/money on kids...

\it might not just be the hygiene hypothesis, but I'd bet quite a bit that its more than half the problem
 
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