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(Network World)   "This Year's 25 Geekiest 25th Anniversaries": From the Amiga 1000 to MacGyver and Windows 1.0   (networkworld.com) divider line 111
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18054 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Feb 2010 at 10:04 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-02-06 08:31:45 AM
Me.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2010-02-06 08:34:44 AM
25 years ago I had a girlfriend.

Can somebody transcribe the slideshow for us lazy and/or browser-impaired people?
 
2010-02-06 10:07:22 AM
Slideshow. Ergo, not worth viewing. Not that any "25 greatest" list is worth viewing in any format.
 
2010-02-06 10:11:32 AM
Click....loading.....Click.....loading.....Click.....ah nevermind
 
2010-02-06 10:14:34 AM
That list made me feel old.
 
2010-02-06 10:14:49 AM
Okay, I"m 28, turning 29 this year...damn, some of these are making me feel old.

And, no, I'm not gonna copypasta the entries.
 
2010-02-06 10:15:57 AM
Sitting_Duk: Click....loading.....Click.....loading.....Click.....ah nevermind

Do you have an internet connection from 25 years ago?
 
2010-02-06 10:16:32 AM
Okay, maybe this one I'll copypasta.

First dot-com names registered

Beginning with Symbolics.com on March 15, the year would see the registration of the first half-dozen dot-com domain names. The other five: BBN.com, Think.com, MCC.com, DEC.com and Northrop.com.
 
2010-02-06 10:17:49 AM
I have Number 26! It's hard to find or emulate a computer old enough to run it. once t runs, there's not much to it. kind of pointless, just use DOS. Windows 2.11 was a giant leap forward. I really like the polygon function in that version of MS-Paint.
 
2010-02-06 10:22:59 AM
Now we have cellphone watches.

/got to play with one the other day
//had never seen one
 
2010-02-06 10:36:29 AM
The only thing on that list that really matters is the Amiga.
 
2010-02-06 10:39:24 AM
I wanted an Amiga! But I settled for an old Atari 800XL instead. Still have it. (It and the 5.25" DD worked when I last hooked it up about 10 years ago.)
 
2010-02-06 10:44:35 AM
ShavedApe: Sitting_Duk: Click....loading.....Click.....loading.....Click.....ah nevermind

Do you have an internet connection from 25 years ago?


I'll have you know I'm using a state of the art Commodore64 to connect to Compuserve via 9600 baud modem... Why do you ask?
 
2010-02-06 10:44:45 AM
TFA, sans pics and clicks:


AM and FM ... from a watch!

The release of Citizen's AM/FM Watch in 1985 redefines cool. No, really, it was cool back then ... in a Dick Tracy kind of way.

Amiga 1000 arrives

Commodore rents New York's Lincoln Center to debut its Amiga 1000 personal computer, which features 256KB of RAM and a price tag of $1,595. A decade later, Byte magazine called the Amiga 1000 "the first multimedia computer... so far ahead of its time that almost nobody -- including Commodore's marketing department -- could fully articulate what it was all about."

Say hello to AOL

What remains of AOL will be celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, even though the brand now seems as distantly quaint as a Meg Ryan/Tom Hanks romantic comedy.

Apple launches LaserWriter

The first laser printer for the Mac, Apple LaserWriter featured a resolution of 300 dpi and speed of 8 ppm. The price tag would be presumed to be a typo today: $6,995.

"Back to the Future" hits theaters

Opening July 3, the first of three "Back to the Future" films will be the year's top box office draw. Marty McFly travels to 1955 and brings back $380 million in ticket revenue.

Blockbuster does Dallas

The first Blockbuster store opens in Dallas on Oct. 26. The first late fee is collected two days afterward.

BT's red telephone boxes hang it up ... slowly

Perhaps foretelling the demise of the pay phone, British Telecom announces on Jan. 17 that it will begin phasing out its iconic red telephone kiosks. That phase-out has taken its sweet time since more than 12,500 remain in use from a high of 75,000.

Wall to wall buckyballs

Formally known as buckminsterfullerene C60, the buckyball -- a molecule composed entirely of carbon -- is discovered by Robert Curl, Harold Kroto and Richard Smalley, who will win the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their efforts. Spherical fullerenes look like the large gray object in the image ... or a soccer ball.

You can't beat the Chess'N Math Assoc.

Yes, this is a Canadian organization but how can it not make this list? The chess club and the math club get together in a marriage made in geek heaven. This year you can send its members silver.

Coke chokes

On April 23, the 100th anniversary of Coca-Cola's debut, the company commits a product launch that has come to define failure: New Coke. How big of deal was this change? Surveys showed 80% of Americans knew of it within two days. After a firestorm of protest, the original formula returned July 10 as Coke Classic.

Hail the Cray-2

A supercomputer unveiled by Cray Research in 1985, the Cray-2 toppled the same company's X-MP from the top spot on the list of the world's fastest computers. Capable of 1.9 GFLOPS, the Cray-2 would remain champ for five years.

Discovery Channel debuts

Backed by $5 million from the BBC and American investors, John Hendricks launches The Discovery Channel. Twenty-five years later it's difficult to imagine life without Mythbusters.

First dot-com names registered

Beginning with Symbolics.com on March 15, the year would see the registration of the first half-dozen dot-com domain names. The other five: BBN.com, Think.com, MCC.com, DEC.com and Northrop.com.

Free software movement takes root

In March, Richard Stallman publishes his GNU Manifesto in Dr. Dobb's Journal of Software Tools and on Oct. 4 he founds the non-profit Free Software Foundation.

The return of The Jetsons

Yes, the original Jetsons cartoon was a child of the '60s, but roughly two-thirds of the 75 episodes knocking around syndication were created during the show's second production run, which began in 1985 and ended two years later.

MacGyver redefines DIY

The series debuted in 1985 and had run its course by 1992. Yet even people who've never seen the show and couldn't pick Richard Dean Anderson out of a lineup today know that MacGyver was the master of making something out of nothing, with that something often as not spelling the difference between life and death.

Meet the MIT Media Lab

From its Web site: "The MIT Media Lab applies an unorthodox research approach to envision the impact of emerging technologies on everyday life - technologies that promise to fundamentally transform our most basic notions of human capabilities." Founded in 1985, you don't get much geekier than the MIT Media Lab.

Jobs needed one, so ... NeXT

Forced out at Apple in September, Steve Jobs founds NeXT, Inc., a maker of computer workstations -- that would not make all that many of them -- before the company was bought by Apple in 1996.

Nintendo invasion begins

The Nintendo Entertainment System hits U.S. stores on Oct. 18 after making its American debut at the Consumer Electronics Show in June. Super Mario Bros. is among 18 game titles released that fall.

Ozone layer found lacking over Antarctica

A trio of British Antarctic Survey scientists published a paper in the May issue of Nature in which they described a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica. Fortunately, the hole was patched by MacGyver and there's nothing to worry about today.

Sinclair C-5 ... seriously?

A battery-assisted recumbent tricycle that tops out at 15 miles per hour. Who wouldn't want one? Well, it was Sir Clive Sinclair's baby and took Great Britain by ... only 12,000 were sold.

A Titanic discovery

Aboard the R/V Knorr and on the Navy's dime, Robert Ballard and his team discover the wreck of the R.M.S. Titanic on Sept. 1.

Unabomber claims first fatality

Unabomber Ted Kaczynski is at his most prolific in 1985, sending four bombs over the course of the year. On Dec. 11, one of them kills Hugh Scrutton, a computer rental store owner, who is Kaczynski's first murder victim.

Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego?

Developers at Broderbund Software decide there's no better way to learn about geography than through a computer game. Or they just figured the series would make a boatload of money. Right on both counts.

Welcome Windows 1.0

Microsoft releases Windows 1.0 (actually it was Windows 1.01) on Nov. 20, a full two years after the "operating environment" was introduced to industry watchers.
 
2010-02-06 10:46:34 AM
At work I have a old 486 running Windows 1.01, just for shaits and giggles. I have Windows 2 on a different HD as well.

Can't believe NES is 25yrs old...damn I'm old.
 
2010-02-06 10:47:22 AM
dennysgod: At work I have a old 486 running Windows 1.01, just for shaits and giggles. I have Windows 2 on a different HD as well.

Can't believe NES is 25yrs old...damn I'm old.


I know, that one got me, too. Love me some Mario Bros, though.

Heh...I used to love the Warp Tunnels.
 
2010-02-06 10:48:23 AM
Ow My Balls: I wanted an Amiga! But I settled for an old Atari 800XL instead. Still have it. (It and the 5.25" DD worked when I last hooked it up about 10 years ago.)

Defender of the Crown on the 500 was the best.
 
2010-02-06 10:49:16 AM
I remember having a hard-on waiting for the Amiga to come out. Its basketball game had players that didn't look like stick figures, had a wood-grain court, and sound effects that even included the squeaks of the sneakers... in STEREO! Then the first T.V. ad was aired and I froze with anticipation. But instead of showing off what the Amiga could do, they had hired some artsy-fartsy agency that would make Apple blush. All you could see of the system was the back of the monitor while some middle-aged gray-haired dude turned it on, the screen lit up his face, and he smiled. I had the epiphany that Amiga was now doomed, and I went to get a girlfriend.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2010-02-06 10:50:46 AM
Capable of 1.9 GFLOPS, the Cray-2 would remain champ for five years.

Interesting that typical code on a PC won't go any faster today. While peak rates are ~8 flops per cycle per core, your average college student writing code is not likely to get anywhere near that even if he remembers to use -O.

Though perhaps to be fair one should treat 1.9 is the guaranteed-not-to-exceed rate and compare it to ~30 (4 SSE mul, 4 SSE add per cycle at ~2 GHz, but that's single precision). But then to be fairer one would compare memory bandwidth per flop and see how badly modern computers suck.
 
2010-02-06 10:53:30 AM
I was born in 1985, so I'm getting a kick out of this.
 
2010-02-06 10:55:06 AM
I bought the Amiga 1000 in 1986 and traded it in for a 2000 with a whopping 10MB hard drive in 1988! I still have the 2000, but haven't tried to turn it on in at least 15 years.
 
2010-02-06 10:57:38 AM
Gordon Bennett: The only thing on that list that really matters is the Amiga.

I absolutely LOVED my Amiga!
(even though it was way outdated before I even got it)
I wrote a shiatload of awesome music on a program called SONIX that fit on a farking floppy disc. It took years, but was worth it.
 
2010-02-06 10:58:05 AM
Sitting_Duk: ShavedApe: Sitting_Duk: Click....loading.....Click.....loading.....Click.....ah nevermind

Do you have an internet connection from 25 years ago?

I'll have you know I'm using a state of the art Commodore64 to connect to Compuserve via 9600 baud modem... Why do you ask?



Did you initialize with the right @-commands?

Also, Amiga was kewl. Especially if you were clever enough to shoplift game floppies out of the boxes, then return the disks to the original box next time. *sniff* those were the days... when national chains didnt even have security cameras *sniffle* oh im gettin all choked up now
 
2010-02-06 11:00:45 AM
I'm surprised the Tru Internet Geeks are not up in arms over the idea that AOL is geek fodder.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2010-02-06 11:02:53 AM
FeedTheCollapse

AOL was fine (i.e. mostly harmless) until it connected to usenet.
 
2010-02-06 11:03:36 AM
In commemoration of that approaching high holy day of geekdom, can one of the more artistically talented farkers out there do something to remedy the sad lack of a good GeOS-tan character?
 
2010-02-06 11:09:03 AM
Ah, nothing better than the NES. All these newfangled systems have too many buttons and pixels.
 
2010-02-06 11:13:01 AM
Oh the nerdy deja-vu. I had 2 amigas, started writing 3d apps on them to prepare myself for the non-existant 3d animation industry of the 1980s. At the time among users the Commodore marketing plan was known as 'ready, fire, aim'.
 
2010-02-06 11:13:43 AM
The Cray-2 was capable of 1.9 GFLOPS peak performance. It looked awesome, like a supercomputer should look.

The computer you're using to download porn and post on Fark is capable of 6 times the GFLOPS. Your video card, 100 times the GFLOPS.
 
2010-02-06 11:15:39 AM
PizzaJedi81: Okay, I"m 28, turning 29 this year...damn, some of these are making me feel old.

And, no, I'm not gonna copypasta the entries.


1981 here. I felt old when my half brother turned 18 on the 20th of January.
 
2010-02-06 11:21:20 AM
I turned 27 today. I feel old as well..
 
2010-02-06 11:22:32 AM
Ah, the Amiga A1000. I've got one of these but it has been nearly a decade since it was last powered up.

Had Commodore made a few better marketing decisions and a few better technical decisions then the positions of Apple and Commodore would be reversed today.
 
2010-02-06 11:23:35 AM
My dad had an Amiga when I was a kid. It is still pretty cool to compare the Amiga version to the PC version of old games. The Amiga kicked ass!
 
2010-02-06 11:24:05 AM
ZORK

'nuff said
 
2010-02-06 11:25:46 AM
Dang so many of those I grew up with. Now I feel old.
 
2010-02-06 11:30:41 AM
farm3.static.flickr.com
You know I hate to say this but the aging, budget desktop I'm using has an AMD Anthlon 64 processor and it's as powerful as Cray 2.
farm3.static.flickr.com
Do I use that power to create models of colliding galaxies for astrophysicists? Do I use that power to predict weather patterns over the entire Earth using computational fluid dynamics? Do I use that power to analyze fluctuation in the economic markets of all the World's nations? No, I use it for this:
farm3.static.flickr.com
...and posting on Fark of course.
 
2010-02-06 11:33:58 AM
I remember spending many, many, many hours playing Empire on the old Amiga!
 
2010-02-06 11:34:07 AM
The Jetsons really only had 75 episodes?
 
2010-02-06 11:44:20 AM
Lots of Amiga love in this thread. Nice to see it!

Great Game Companies:
Psygnosis
Cinemaware
Team 17

Great titles:
Moonstone
Shadow of the Beast
Another World (Out of this World)
Pinball Dreams

Great time waster:
BBS dialing

Ultimate Nerd Check:
Amiga 500 hard drive!
 
2010-02-06 11:44:30 AM
MAYORBOB: Slideshow. Ergo, not worth viewing. Not that any "25 greatest" list is worth viewing in any format.

you sound fat.
 
2010-02-06 11:44:51 AM
I watched an episode of McGuyver on the Sleuth Channel this morning in bed and receiving kicks right now.
 
2010-02-06 11:45:16 AM
RonEdwards: The Jetsons really only had 75 episodes?

Between the original and the 80's reissue. The show was effectively a flop in the 60's and only ran a few months. They only did 24 episodes in the 60's, the rest in the 80's.

Wiki says:

"The Jetsons is a prime-time animated sitcom that was produced by Hanna-Barbera. The original incarnation of the series aired Sunday nights on ABC from September 23, 1962 to March 3, 1963."

On a different subject - wasn't the Laserwriter more or less the first laser printer out there for desktop class computers?
 
2010-02-06 11:48:55 AM
I'm suprized at the lack of MacGyver love.
 
2010-02-06 11:56:32 AM
I seem to remember think.com was registered by IBM. Anyone confirm/correct me on this?

The Jetsons one surprised me. I thought they all were made in the 60s. I learned something new today.

I was going to complain about the lack of the Transformer toys on the list, but a little research showed they debuted in the US in 1984, and Europe and Japan (under Hasbro) in 1985. The original Transformers movie was 1986.
 
2010-02-06 12:03:57 PM
It'll be the 25th anniversary of The Goonies.

And you know DAMN WELL that I'll be celebrating... probably with some Rocky Road ice cream, a water cooler (until I shatter the damn thing), and a scathing diatribe directed at Troy's bucket.

Good times.
 
2010-02-06 12:07:57 PM
PsychoPhil: On a different subject - wasn't the Laserwriter more or less the first laser printer out there for desktop class computers?

From Wiki:

"The first laser printer designed for use in an office setting was released with the Xerox Star 8010 in 1981. Although it was innovative, the Star was an expensive ($17,000) system that was purchased by only a relatively small number of businesses and institutions. After personal computers became more widespread, the first laser printer intended for a mass market was the HP LaserJet 8ppm, released in 1984, using a Canon engine controlled by HP software. The HP LaserJet printer was quickly followed by laser printers from Brother Industries, IBM, and others. First-generation machines had large photosensitive drums, of circumference greater than the paper length. Once faster-recovery coatings were developed, the drums could touch the paper multiple times in a pass, and could therefore be smaller in diameter.

As with most electronic devices, the cost of laser printers has fallen markedly over the years. In 1984, the HP LaserJet sold for $3500, had trouble with even small, low resolution graphics, and weighed 71 pounds (32 kg). Low end monochrome laser printers often sell for less than $75 as of 2008. These printers tend to lack onboard processing and rely on the host computer to generate a raster image (see Winprinter), but still will outperform the LaserJet Classic in nearly all situations."


As usual, Apple copied someone else, put it in a shiny package, and then charged twice as much. And Xerox wasted a chance to be the industry leader. I had a reconditioned HP LaserJet II my Dad purchased in 1989. Didn't get rid of it until 2004.
 
2010-02-06 12:09:29 PM
Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: It'll be the 25th anniversary of The Goonies.

And you know DAMN WELL that I'll be celebrating... probably with some Rocky Road ice cream, a water cooler (until I shatter the damn thing), and a scathing diatribe directed at Troy's bucket.

Good times.


Also Back to the Future, which forever changed the image of the DeLorean DMC-12 and hampered the proper pronunciation of the prefix "giga-" for a generation.
 
2010-02-06 12:11:55 PM
had an Amiga 1000

that is all
 
2010-02-06 12:12:45 PM
Fond memories of Bard's Tale, Wings, Empire, Lemmings and oh sweet Jesus CIV!!!
 
2010-02-06 12:15:19 PM
marcand: Great Game Companies:
Psygnosis


two words, Blood Money
 
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