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(Daily Mail)   The cutest pics of three cheetahs playing with a baby impala you'll see this hour   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 111
    More: Sappy, impalas, happy ending, Masai Mara  
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27445 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Feb 2010 at 5:38 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-02-03 09:44:58 AM
dahmers love zombie: They'll never prosper.

www.valleyfamily.us

/Approves.
//Didn't your mother ever tell you not to play with your food?
///I told the elephants to forget it, but they CAN'T.
 
2010-02-03 09:52:22 AM
upwhitetails.com

/first thing I thought of
 
2010-02-03 09:52:22 AM
moondo: I can already tell the sequence of the story. It had nothing to do with hunger...

"You little biatch, I bet you secretly masturbate to a picture of your mother playing with your brothers. It's time to come out of the closet."


"farker read my mind."


Those are two completely different sized impalas...
 
2010-02-03 09:58:35 AM
The head-pat picture might just be the cutest thing I've seen all year.
 
2010-02-03 10:01:10 AM
Looks like the Cheetahs are juveniles. One of them still has the ridge of fur on its neck/shoulders from youth. And fully-grown cheetahs are largely solitary so there wouldn't be three of them together like that.

Looks like maybe two boys and a girl.
 
2010-02-03 10:01:14 AM
Its entertaining/completely pathetic how people twist a made up story about cheetahs into a political thread.
 
2010-02-03 10:12:50 AM
The female cheetah, which raises the baby cheetah, likes to give the young cheetah something easy to kill for training purposes. They had to take the time to figure out what, exactly, to do with the yummy thing.

Adults, as far as I know, don't fark with their food quite that much. They know what to do.
 
2010-02-03 10:31:04 AM
"The cheetah may lie down with the impala, but the impala won't get much sleep".
 
2010-02-03 10:35:30 AM
PIP_the_TROLL: Looks like maybe two boys and a girl.

wow even though the guy who took the picture are pretty clear that it is 3 boys you are going to correct them? Amazing..

FTA
'These three brothers have been living together since they left their mother at about 18 months old,'
 
2010-02-03 10:48:20 AM
CapitolG: wow even though the guy who took the picture are pretty clear that it is 3 boys you are going to correct them? Amazing..

They also said the cheetahs didn't kill the antelope and were wrong about that.
 
2010-02-03 10:50:06 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EOB5S5IXCFg&feature=related


Video of said friendship. =)
 
2010-02-03 10:51:41 AM
abigsmurf: Cats enjoy toying with prey. They're one of the few types of animal on the planet which will hunt/kill for fun, rather than food.

You can't be serious.

1: Cats have these things called instincts, which lead them to do certain behaviors such as chasing and attacking furry moving things even when not hungry.
2: Dogs love to chase and "play with" squirrels for fun. And, I bet, so do just about every other hunting predator.
3: Fun? That's a human concept. You don't know what is going on in the mind of the cats. Don't anthropomorphize animals, they hate that.
 
2010-02-03 10:57:44 AM
lukelightning: Don't anthropomorphize animals, they hate that.

I LOLed
 
2010-02-03 11:08:46 AM
They're so cute and delicious.
 
2010-02-03 11:12:59 AM
lukelightning: 1: Cats have these things called instincts, which lead them to do certain behaviors such as chasing and attacking furry moving things even when not hungry.
2: Dogs love to chase and "play with" squirrels for fun. And, I bet, so do just about every other hunting predator.
3: Fun? That's a human concept. You don't know what is going on in the mind of the cats. Don't anthropomorphize animals, they hate that.


1: Just because something is instinctive doesn't mean they're not doing it for fun. Lots of biological and behavioural instincts are made enjoyable by the brain to ensure you do them as much as possible (eating, having sex).

2: Unless trained for it, dogs rarely kill for fun. They kill because they're threatened or scared in some way. They'll chase and run around for fun but won't deliberately kill for it.

3: Most animals are able to show that they're happy. Emotions aren't a human only thing.
 
2010-02-03 11:14:32 AM
McMuttons

This was in the local papers here in Norway some days ago. They spoke with Yann Metrich at Biosphoto, the agency that took these pictures.

Apparently, he didn't know where the last picture in the series came from, but apparently the Daily Fail made the story up or were misled. In the original picture series, at least according to Biosphoto, the impala was killed and eaten after they'd played with it.


This was in the NY Daily News last weekend.

They said the let the impala go. And I didn't believe it for a second.
 
2010-02-03 11:38:16 AM
I'm thinkin' Mad Impala Disease.
 
2010-02-03 11:42:36 AM
i511.photobucket.com
 
2010-02-03 11:44:42 AM
lukelightning: abigsmurf: Cats enjoy toying with prey. They're one of the few types of animal on the planet which will hunt/kill for fun, rather than food.

You can't be serious.

1: Cats have these things called instincts, which lead them to do certain behaviors such as chasing and attacking furry moving things even when not hungry.
2: Dogs love to chase and "play with" squirrels for fun. And, I bet, so do just about every other hunting predator.
3: Fun? That's a human concept. You don't know what is going on in the mind of the cats. Don't anthropomorphize animals, they hate that.


1. Yes they do, they are predators and obligatory carnivores. In the wild they may go weeks at a time without feeding. They are hardwired to attack anything that runs away. They are killing machines, and they will kill for play if they are not hungry when a hunting opportunity arises. Hungry or not, they will often play with their prey before eating it. If you're going to anthromorphize an emotion for cats, then you have to include cruelty.
2. Dogs are motivated by defense or play, rarely predatory motives.
3. Fun is a human concept but animals are well known to play. The play that the juvenile cheetahs engaged in with the impala is hunting practice. Animals play fight and play hunt. Whether they're having "fun" as we define it is not known for sure.
 
2010-02-03 11:46:24 AM
Cheetahs' and leopards' camouflaged coloration means they can be both hidden and spotted at the same time.
 
2010-02-03 11:48:24 AM
abigsmurf: Emotions aren't a human only thing.

There's no evidence that animals have emotions. All animal behavior can be explained by stimulus response ingrained by evolution. We only know WE have emotions because we can feel them. There is a school of thought that says that animals that are incapable of reasoning are probably also incapable of emotion.

Most pet owners don't want to hear that because it means that Fido is simply performing a pack supporting social behavior when you thought he was happy to see you. Most pet owners insist that Fido really is happy, but that perception is total projection of our emotions on our pets. There's no way to know if they have emotions or not.
 
2010-02-03 11:50:39 AM
Ashtrey CapitolG: wow even though the guy who took the picture are pretty clear that it is 3 boys you are going to correct them? Amazing..

They also said the cheetahs didn't kill the antelope and were wrong about that.


The photographer, Michel Denis-Druot, and the agency to whom he sold the pictures, Biosphoto, were very clear on how the story ended. It was the DM who didn't print the complete sequence of pictures and then claimed the antelope was spared.
 
2010-02-03 11:56:57 AM
grizzlyjohnson: abigsmurf: Emotions aren't a human only thing.

There's no evidence that animals have emotions. All animal behavior can be explained by stimulus response ingrained by evolution. We only know WE have emotions because we can feel them. There is a school of thought that says that animals that are incapable of reasoning are probably also incapable of emotion.

Most pet owners don't want to hear that because it means that Fido is simply performing a pack supporting social behavior when you thought he was happy to see you. Most pet owners insist that Fido really is happy, but that perception is total projection of our emotions on our pets. There's no way to know if they have emotions or not.


We could measure neuron firings in the brain and see if there are any similarities to humans when feeling said emotion. I mean brains all work in a similar fashion do they not? Some just have more uses and are more developed than others.
 
2010-02-03 12:08:54 PM
Mosrael: grizzlyjohnson: abigsmurf: Emotions aren't a human only thing.

There's no evidence that animals have emotions. All animal behavior can be explained by stimulus response ingrained by evolution. We only know WE have emotions because we can feel them. There is a school of thought that says that animals that are incapable of reasoning are probably also incapable of emotion.

Most pet owners don't want to hear that because it means that Fido is simply performing a pack supporting social behavior when you thought he was happy to see you. Most pet owners insist that Fido really is happy, but that perception is total projection of our emotions on our pets. There's no way to know if they have emotions or not.

We could measure neuron firings in the brain and see if there are any similarities to humans when feeling said emotion. I mean brains all work in a similar fashion do they not? Some just have more uses and are more developed than others.


It's been done, but all that tells us is we experience similar resopnse to stimulus. It doesn't tell us what animals are feeling. Human emotions are complex and can result in some really inexplicable behavior. Dogs, on the other hand, are pretty uncomplicated. They generally respond the same way every time to a given stimulus. That argues for conditioning rather than emotion.

Human brains are pattern matching devices and we do that will all our senses and perceptions, so when we see a dog acting a certain way, we interpret that as matching a pattern our human brain has established and we project that perception on the dog. There's nothing wrong with that. From a practical standpoint, if you want to interpret your dog's greeting and joy in seeing you rather than just a specific social behavior in response to stimulus, it still serves the purpose it was intended for both of you. If you know how to respond to your dog with the correct behavior that makes him feel more safe and secure in the pack.
 
2010-02-03 12:15:43 PM
I'm sorry, I hate this.

The article is full of anthropomorphizing crap. Had mercy etc...? They just weren't hungry.

Do not ascribe human emotions to animals. No matter how cute they look.
 
2010-02-03 12:16:43 PM
We *are* animals, we have emotions, they came from somewhere in the course of evolution. We didn't spontaneously generate them, they came with us from our origins. If we have them, they have them.
 
2010-02-03 12:17:51 PM
abigsmurf: Unless trained for it, dogs rarely kill for fun. They kill because they're threatened or scared in some way. They'll chase and run around for fun but won't deliberately kill for it.

You must not have been around dogs that live where there are a bunch of squirrels, rabbits or rats. Trust me, dogs will quite deliberately kill something that is small, furry and runs away from them. Even domesticated dogs are still predators.
 
2010-02-03 12:22:31 PM
silvervial: We *are* animals, we have emotions, they came from somewhere in the course of evolution. We didn't spontaneously generate them, they came with us from our origins. If we have them, they have them.

THIS.

/Gets tired of people trying to pretend humans something other than just another mammal.
 
2010-02-03 12:41:36 PM
silvervial: We *are* animals, we have emotions, they came from somewhere in the course of evolution. We didn't spontaneously generate them, they came with us from our origins. If we have them, they have them.

Nope. We have lots of things that other animals don't have. Reasoning skills, object permanance, understanding of future and past, tool use, opposable thumbs.

Yes, our emotions came from somewhere, and that somewhere is probably our ability to reason and generalize that reasoning across past, present, future. There are probably higher primates that have those skills, but probably nothing lower on the evolutionary scale. To generalize emotions to cats and dogs whose ancestry diverged from humans, what, 60 million years ago?, is fallacious.
 
2010-02-03 12:41:55 PM
CapitolG: PIP_the_TROLL: Looks like maybe two boys and a girl.

wow even though the guy who took the picture are pretty clear that it is 3 boys you are going to correct them? Amazing..

FTA
'These three brothers have been living together since they left their mother at about 18 months old,'


Actually, I was more interested in the pictures than the accompanying text - which I simply glossed over. I didn't see that.

Sorry for offending you.
 
2010-02-03 12:45:28 PM
grizzlyjohnson Quote 2010-02-03 12:41:36 PM
silvervial: We *are* animals, we have emotions, they came from somewhere in the course of evolution. We didn't spontaneously generate them, they came with us from our origins. If we have them, they have them.

Nope. We have lots of things that other animals don't have. Reasoning skills, object permanance, understanding of future and past, tool use, opposable thumbs.

Yes, our emotions came from somewhere, and that somewhere is probably our ability to reason and generalize that reasoning across past, present, future. There are probably higher primates that have those skills, but probably nothing lower on the evolutionary scale. To generalize emotions to cats and dogs whose ancestry diverged from humans, what, 60 million years ago?, is fallacious.


______________

a) we are not the only tool-using animal, that has been debunked long ago.

b) mentally retarded humans who are incapable of reasoning across past, present, and future, still have emotions, so emotions are not tied to higher cognitive functions

c) you have clearly never lived with cats and dogs...hell even rats show joy at being tickled

d) we are ANIMALS, accept it
 
2010-02-03 12:49:49 PM
NobleHam: Moments after the adorable neck-licking...

Everyone can see that's a shop, right?

Right?
 
2010-02-03 12:55:59 PM
Can anyone say photoshop?
 
2010-02-03 01:04:32 PM
silvervial: grizzlyjohnson Quote 2010-02-03 12:41:36 PM
silvervial: We *are* animals, we have emotions, they came from somewhere in the course of evolution. We didn't spontaneously generate them, they came with us from our origins. If we have them, they have them.

Nope. We have lots of things that other animals don't have. Reasoning skills, object permanance, understanding of future and past, tool use, opposable thumbs.

Yes, our emotions came from somewhere, and that somewhere is probably our ability to reason and generalize that reasoning across past, present, future. There are probably higher primates that have those skills, but probably nothing lower on the evolutionary scale. To generalize emotions to cats and dogs whose ancestry diverged from humans, what, 60 million years ago?, is fallacious.


______________

a) we are not the only tool-using animal, that has been debunked long ago.

b) mentally retarded humans who are incapable of reasoning across past, present, and future, still have emotions, so emotions are not tied to higher cognitive functions

c) you have clearly never lived with cats and dogs...hell even rats show joy at being tickled

d) we are ANIMALS, accept it


a) I didn't say we were the only ones. I said that was ONE of the things that we have that not all other animals do. Like, oh, emotions. I'm also not saying that no other animals have emotions, I'm saying that current science thinks it's unlikely that animals lower than primates do.

b) You have no way of knowing that. You are assuming they do with no evidence to back it up. Not a good position to argue from.

c) Not only have I have both dogs and cats most of my life, I'm very well versed in their psychology, which is exactly why I'm familiar with this entire debate. There is a very good book on the subject called "When Elephants Weep" that will set you straight on this whole subject. Be careful, though, parts of that book will break your heart.

d) I accept that we are animals. I do not accept that you can generalize anything about humans to other animals without hard evidence, which is what you're doing. You want your dog to love you so you're not going to entertain any argument that maybe you're dog doesn't love in the same sense you do.
 
2010-02-03 01:05:03 PM
grizzlyjohnson: silvervial: We *are* animals, we have emotions, they came from somewhere in the course of evolution. We didn't spontaneously generate them, they came with us from our origins. If we have them, they have them.

Nope. We have lots of things that other animals don't have. Reasoning skills, object permanance, understanding of future and past, tool use, opposable thumbs.

Yes, our emotions came from somewhere, and that somewhere is probably our ability to reason and generalize that reasoning across past, present, future. There are probably higher primates that have those skills, but probably nothing lower on the evolutionary scale. To generalize emotions to cats and dogs whose ancestry diverged from humans, what, 60 million years ago?, is fallacious.

"Reasoning skills"
& "...understanding of future and past..."
Animal Cognition

"...object permanence..."
A test of object permanence in cotton top tamarins

"...tool use..."
Tool use by animals

"...opposable thumbs"
Primate (Note the following from that article: "Most also have opposable thumbs and some have prehensile tails.")

So, anything else you want to hold up as unique to the human animal?
 
2010-02-03 01:09:48 PM
grizzlyjohnson: Mosrael: grizzlyjohnson: abigsmurf: Emotions aren't a human only thing.

There's no evidence that animals have emotions. All animal behavior can be explained by stimulus response ingrained by evolution. We only know WE have emotions because we can feel them. There is a school of thought that says that animals that are incapable of reasoning are probably also incapable of emotion.

Most pet owners don't want to hear that because it means that Fido is simply performing a pack supporting social behavior when you thought he was happy to see you. Most pet owners insist that Fido really is happy, but that perception is total projection of our emotions on our pets. There's no way to know if they have emotions or not.

We could measure neuron firings in the brain and see if there are any similarities to humans when feeling said emotion. I mean brains all work in a similar fashion do they not? Some just have more uses and are more developed than others.

It's been done, but all that tells us is we experience similar resopnse to stimulus. It doesn't tell us what animals are feeling. Human emotions are complex and can result in some really inexplicable behavior. Dogs, on the other hand, are pretty uncomplicated. They generally respond the same way every time to a given stimulus. That argues for conditioning rather than emotion.

Human brains are pattern matching devices and we do that will all our senses and perceptions, so when we see a dog acting a certain way, we interpret that as matching a pattern our human brain has established and we project that perception on the dog. There's nothing wrong with that. From a practical standpoint, if you want to interpret your dog's greeting and joy in seeing you rather than just a specific social behavior in response to stimulus, it still serves the purpose it was intended for both of you. If you know how to respond to your dog with the correct behavior that makes him feel more safe and secure in the pack.


So how is feeling more safe and secure in the pack different from happy? and what makes you think dogs feel safe and secure anymore than they feel happy? or have fun? For the record I'm firmly in the animals have feelings camp. I just had to point out that you are saying we can't know whether animals have emotions or not and then turning around and subscribing feelings to them.
 
2010-02-03 01:16:01 PM
Teufelaffe: So, anything else you want to hold up as unique to the human animal?

No. Thanks for all the pedantry, but re-read my post. I never said any of those things were unique to humans. Clearly a feature of primates is an opposable thumb. I said they were things that humans had that not all other animals have. That was in response to the argument that humans have emotions so other animals must as well. I also never said that other animals don't have emotions.

So maybe you oughtta read this stuff before you go wasting your time researching a response to something no one said.
 
2010-02-03 01:18:53 PM
Peppermint Rose: So how is feeling more safe and secure in the pack different from happy?

You can feel happy without being safe and secure and vise versa, ergo they are two different things. Safe and secure is an observed condition. Are there threats? No. I'm safe and secure. Happy is an obscure emotion that people have that can come and go and have nothing whatsoever to do with your current situation. People can get happy or unhappy just thinking about things regardless of physical situation.
 
2010-02-03 01:21:47 PM
You cannot have empirical evidence of emotions in animals because they have no common language with us with which to communicate.

As for humans are animals? As in, we are not plants or minerals? Sure.

On the other hand, humans build rockets, write sonnets, compose symphonies, use language (yes, only humans do that) and know how to use a barbecue.

As someone said earlier, we have a sense of the past, present and future as distinct concepts.

We have object permanence, and most importantly, we have the ability to introspect.

Literally, we have thoughts about thoughts.

It doesn't matter if other animals do or dont have these things, because there is no EVIDENCE we can cite that says they do.

All of you Disney infected anthropomorphizing folk out there get it through your heads.

Animals are not fuzzy humans who talk when we aren't looking.
 
2010-02-03 01:25:07 PM
And yes, I've seen the Tamarin video also.

That does demonstrate a rudimentary sense of object permanence but it sure as hell is not the ability to play chess, which necessitates long term planning and complex computations of multiple possible outcomes.

Animals may habe some of the same skills but the don't have them all. Introspection, again, is the really important one.

They don't write poetry, they don't build machines etc... Even if they have these abilities in a very basic sense, they have them to such a lesser degree that the comparison almost doesn't exist.
 
2010-02-03 01:32:17 PM
grizzlyjohnson: I said they were things that humans had that not all other animals have.

Actually, you said "We have lots of things that other animals don't have." Given your initial lack of qualifying that statement, one could easily interpret that to mean you were referring to all animals, not just some. However, I am more than willing to concede that was your initial intent and fully support the idea that just because humans have something doesn't mean all other animals have it too. On the other hand, I also support the idea that just because we cannot quantify or proove something in another animal species, does not mean that it does not exist in that species.
 
2010-02-03 01:42:36 PM
King_Web: use language (yes, only humans do that)

Koko the gorilla would like to have a word with you. ;)

Seriously though, that really depends on how you define "language". Does the sign lanugage used by Koko, or the computer-aided communication devices used in various experiments with other primates count as language? If so, then humans are definitely not the only language using animals on this planet.

Even if you discount the situations where humans have become directly involved with teaching the animals alternate forms of communication, there are many that believe that animals such as dolphins and whales have a language. There is plenty of evidence that suggests that other animals posses language.
 
2010-02-03 01:46:30 PM
grizzlyjohnson: Peppermint Rose: So how is feeling more safe and secure in the pack different from happy?

You can feel happy without being safe and secure and vise versa, ergo they are two different things. Safe and secure is an observed condition. Are there threats? No. I'm safe and secure. Happy is an obscure emotion that people have that can come and go and have nothing whatsoever to do with your current situation. People can get happy or unhappy just thinking about things regardless of physical situation.


Okay so happy and feeling safe and secure can be different things. I will concede that point. However, I don't buy that you can observe feeling safe and secure better than you can other emotions. You can observe the state of being safe and secure but not feeling that way. For instance I have a phobia of snakes that I have generalized to lizards. Now if a lizard crawls on me absent any other factor I am in the state of being completely safe and secure. However, if a lizard crawls on me I do not feel safe and secure. Animals can display what appears to be phobic reactions and behavior to innocuous stimuli just as humans do which would imply they can feel unsafe when by the standards of observation of there not being a threat they would be safe and secure. If you want to go completely animals are all stimulus/response and instincts you can not say they feel safe and secure anymore than you can say they feel anything else. You can say that a dog displays behavior that their owner finds more acceptable when the owner plays to their instincts but feeling safe and secure is just as intangible as any other emotion.
 
2010-02-03 01:47:01 PM
Me thinks they are gonna try to fatten him up. Grain fed, free range impala. mmmmmmm
 
2010-02-03 01:50:28 PM
Teufelaffe: Koko the gorilla would like to have a word with you. ;)

And that word is "nipples."
 
2010-02-03 02:04:31 PM
PIP_the_TROLL: Looks like the Cheetahs are juveniles. One of them still has the ridge of fur on its neck/shoulders from youth. And fully-grown cheetahs are largely solitary so there wouldn't be three of them together like that.

Looks like maybe two boys and a girl.


*stares, .... real creepylike at you*
What nationality of troll are you?
 
2010-02-03 02:57:51 PM
Teufelaffe: So, anything else you want to hold up as unique to the human animal?

Sex for procreation only.

"Lower animals" have sex 'cuz it feels good and feel a drive to do so. We do too, but we also know that sex causes offspring. They don't get the cause/effect.
 
2010-02-03 03:01:01 PM
R.A.Danny: Teufelaffe: So, anything else you want to hold up as unique to the human animal?

Sex for procreation only.

"Lower animals" have sex 'cuz it feels good and feel a drive to do so. We do too, but we also know that sex causes offspring. They don't get the cause/effect.


But what about all the animal buttsecks?
 
2010-02-03 03:11:20 PM
keypusher: But what about all the animal buttsecks?

Let's keep your personal life out of this...
 
2010-02-03 03:18:44 PM
R.A.Danny: keypusher: But what about all the animal buttsecks?

Let's keep your personal life out of this...


*flees, weeping*
 
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