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(Washington Post)   Arab news services shocked at Iraq war result   (washingtonpost.com ) divider line
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87 clicks; posted to Main » on 09 Apr 2003 at 9:00 PM (13 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2003-04-09 04:44:56 PM  
WTF? I have to fill out a friggin demographic survey to look at washington post articles now?
 
2003-04-09 05:02:31 PM  
HAHAHA AHAHAH AHAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAH!! Whew...that was good.
 
2003-04-09 05:12:09 PM  
According to the survey I just filled out I was born in 1938 in Iraq.
 
2003-04-09 05:24:40 PM  
I usually say I was born in 2003 in Iraq. And I'm female.

That should make them scratch their heads. No females in Iraq are allowed to use computers.
 
2003-04-09 05:25:26 PM  
Tensionfilter your initials aren't SH are they?
 
2003-04-09 05:32:35 PM  
This article is jumping the gun. It's reading the editorial responses to TUESDAY'S activity, not TODAY'S. The Arab world's more interesting reaction will be what happens when they see how their fellow Arabs are happy about it all.

If they care to recognize the fact, that is.
 
2003-04-09 05:35:35 PM  
IN YOUR FACE, idiot reporters!

The Arab news needs to stop comparing America and Israel to the Nazis. That's just entirely absurd, and it trivializes the atrocities of the holocaust. And then there's the other guy in this article who basically says "Osama is just as bad as George Bush!" Wow, what a courageous moral statement.

Is it just me, or does most of the Arab world have its moral compass WAY out of whack? I know that the vast majority of Palestinians support bombing civilian men, women and children in Israel. I would like to know some figures on public opinion about "martyrs" in other Muslim countries, though. I bet support for those farktards is vomit-inducingly high in a lot of them. I think the Muslim world needs more women in places of power. Maybe they could chill the men out and restore some humanity and tolerance to that part of the world.
 
2003-04-09 06:07:02 PM  
Ramy Khoury, editor of the Daily Star in Beirut, Lebanon writes that "a realistic reading of the policy must conclude that the sacking of Baghdad is designed to send signals to all other Middle Eastern and Asian regimes that the U.S. finds annoying, threatening, distasteful, worrisome, or even just a little strange.

Precisely. Look, all we want is for them to quit getting so uppity, settle down, and sell us oil for a fair price. They always have to get all Jihad on us. No doubt someone will think that is a simplistic statement. It probably is. The average American doesn't care that some Imam in BF Syria thinks that McDonalds and tube-tops are the work of the great Satan. The average American cares that you fly large airplanes in buildings and threaten our way of life. See what happens when you do that? Christ, I don't like McDonalds (though the tube-tops are nice...leg warmers too but that's just me) but you don't see me flying any airplanes into buildings in Mecca, and I can fly a plane!
 
2003-04-09 06:30:32 PM  
C'mon, they're just rootin' for the home team...
 
2003-04-09 06:48:43 PM  
04-09-03 05:24:40 PM Numberz
I usually say I was born in 2003 in Iraq. And I'm female.


haha i put 1980 female afganistan. :)
 
2003-04-09 06:50:13 PM  
Arab Media Confront the 'New Rules of the Game'

By Jefferson Morley
washingtonpost.com Staff Writer
Wednesday, April 9, 2003; 12:39 PM


As U.S. forces took control of Baghdad, the opinion makers of the Arab world, almost unanimously opposed to war, confronted their impotence with realism and rage, denial and bitterness, and occasionally chastened hope.

The Arab television networks that came to prominence during the war with coverage emphasizing Iraqi resistance and civilian casualties are not flinching from showing the scenes of U.S. forces vanquishing the last vestiges of Saddam Hussein's regime.

The Arabic language Web site of the government-run Bahrain News Agency features a photo of an Arab giving a thumbs up to U.S. soldier on a tank.

The Kuwait News site shows a car dragging a statue of Saddam Hussein.

Al Jazeera's Web site features Baghdad residents waving to American soldiers.

Today's editorial reaction reflected the dismay and disbelief behind the images of the ongoing Iraqi collapse.

John Bradley, the managing editor of the Arab News, acknowledges delusions along with defeat.

"The pride the Arabs felt in the initial stages of the invasion, before those legendary 'pockets of resistance' halting the advance of the world's only superpower were revealed as a myth, has been replaced by immense shame and humiliation. The images of US soldiers taking a picnic in the heart of Baghdad will haunt the Arab psyche for generations to come "

"America now rules the world, either directly or by proxy; and there is nothing anyone can do about it," he concludes.

"Nothing, that is, but wait for history to take its course, for Fortune's wheel to turn as it inexorably does, crushing underneath those who once danced on top of it. But not in our lifetime. Yes, there will be more terrorism, and Osama Bin Laden - or at least his infamous voice - was heard once more yesterday, calling for suicide attacks and thus giving more easy justification, as he did on Sept. 11, to America's imperial ambition. Thanks, Osama, you've done us all about as much good as George W. Bush. Both are two sides of the same coin."

Samir Ragad, chairman of the board of the Egyptian Gazette suggests the Americans won only because of treachery.

"Frankly, we believed that Baghdad would remain Iraq's impregnable citadel. We thought that Baghdad's walls would turn into swords to decapitate the invaders. Saddam Hussein had misled us into believing that the invaders would never take Baghdad. But the home of five million people collapsed in record time."

The blame, he says, lies with the Iraqi military failure.

"Why did the Iraqis not blow up the bridges over the Tigris and Euphrates to prevent the invaders from reaching their planned targets?" he asks. "It is a disgrace that these huge Iraqi troops relaxed idly and woke up to the roar of gunfire on all sides. It is now clear that the traitors are many and those who gave in to the Satan temptation outnumber them."

Some fulminated right up to the end, as if some outsiders might rescue Hussein's regime from the inevitable. In the government-controlled Syria Times, columnist M. Agha declared "The US-British aggression seems to be worse than the Nazis."

"In the Second World War, the West stood in confrontation of Hitler. Now, Bush is acting worse than Hitler. . . .The West, China, Japan and other freedom-loving nations elsewhere must close ranks to stop the Chief Cowboy, Bush. We believe that this Cowboy is not able to light his cigar without putting the whole forest on fire!!! Don't let this war criminal at large!"

But others sought to adjust to new political order in the Middle East.

Ramy Khoury, editor of the Daily Star in Beirut, Lebanon writes that "a realistic reading of the policy must conclude that the sacking of Baghdad is designed to send signals to all other Middle Eastern and Asian regimes that the U.S. finds annoying, threatening, distasteful, worrisome, or even just a little strange.


Khoury explicated what he said are "the new rules of the game now being explained to the world through the televised display of Mesopotamian show-and-tell."

"If Washington merely suspects that terrorists may one day emerge from your land, or that you might in future threaten your neighbors, you have only two options: You change course and shape up, or you are finished as a governing regime. If you behave as Baghdad behaved, defying the new rules of the game, you suffer the same fate as Baghdad is suffering."

The U.S. military victory, he predicts, will be followed by a "much more complicated political battle, in which the rest of the world tries to confront the US in a different arena:. . . who manages and pays for reconstruction in Iraq."

The editors of the Riyadh Daily warn that "the US cannot control a devastated country with promises of food and medicine shipments, while keeping all the transactions for itself.

Iraq, they note, has the most skilled population of any Arab country, including 4 million people working outside the country. These "human resources represent a valuable asset, provided that they are invested properly. The same can be said about the Palestinians. Arabs and Muslims have a lot of sympathy for them. But if Iraq becomes another Palestine, then matters will get out of control. If the US wants to secure the trust of Muslims and the world, it has to set aside its unilateral view of its coalition with Israel and look for its interests, regardless of the course of current events."

© 2003 Washingtonpost.Newsweek Interactive
 
2003-04-09 06:54:06 PM  
Ramy Khoury, editor of the Daily Star in Beirut, Lebanon writes that "a realistic reading of the policy must conclude that the sacking of Baghdad is designed to send signals to all other Middle Eastern and Asian regimes that the U.S. finds annoying, threatening, distasteful, worrisome, or even just a little strange.

Exactly right. Unlike the other Arab newsmen quoted he seems to actually get it. This war was about showing what happens when you decide to make waves, as a warning. Now how well this warning works depends upon what we do after the war. If we keep our word and help the Iraqis set up a new government then get out(the only model that has ever worked i.e. Japan and Germany)then we regain some respect. If however we do what everyone fears we'll do and set up a puppet government, steal all the oil and leave when Iraq has no resources left then we might as well have droped a nuke on Medina. Another advantage of helping and getting the fark out is that the younge Arabs will have that in there minds when they think of all that America has done. Now is the time to let Powell and Blair take over the reins from 'ol Rummy and Bush.
 
2003-04-09 06:55:18 PM  
I always put down female born in 1900 Zimbabwe.
 
2003-04-09 07:11:04 PM  
Here is is for those guys...

DOSE OF REALITY!
[image from seattlepi.nwsource.com too old to be available]
 
2003-04-09 07:23:15 PM  
Yeah, here's the F0x take on the Arab street reaction:

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,83704,00.html
 
2003-04-09 07:23:58 PM  
Or I could actually provide a link. Sorry.

 
2003-04-09 07:29:00 PM  
....and awed.
 
2003-04-09 08:08:59 PM  
From Undertoad's link:
"We discovered that all what the [Iraqi] information minister was saying was all lies," said Ali Hassan, a government employee in Cairo, Egypt. "Now no one believes Al-Jazeera anymore."

That anyone would believe the Iraqi Information Minister after the new levels of lying he set is a sad statement on the perception of America by Arabs.
 
2003-04-09 08:13:08 PM  
That anyone would believe the Iraqi Information Minister after the new levels of lying he set is a sad statement on the perception of America by Arabs.

That's no lie. I never actually thought people believed him so much.
 
2003-04-09 08:17:21 PM  
If arabnews isn't farked, this is a good link about the issue here
 
2003-04-09 08:20:27 PM  
http://www.arabnews.com/Article.asp?ID=24987

good luck getting it
 
2003-04-09 08:29:49 PM  
Thanks for the link Impaler. Here it is click-friendly.
 
2003-04-09 08:30:33 PM  
...or maybe not. Copy & paste, y'all.
 
2003-04-09 08:48:05 PM  
LOL. I tried that too B0rg9.
 
2003-04-09 08:53:07 PM  
OT: Is it just me, or has Fark seriously tightened the reigns on active-linkable content, or do I just suck?

/suck
 
2003-04-09 08:56:24 PM  
After the war will be much more difficult than during the war. Even though many in the Arab world are now being forced to admit that maybe the Iraqis wanted liberation the Coalition Forces still have to be careful. As a rejected link says there is still some mistrust. Now more than ever the US needs to live up to its word and set up a free Iraqi government.
 
2003-04-09 08:58:13 PM  
Apparently my HTML linking skills have failed me. Here's the link, cut and past..http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=574&e=1&u=/nm/20030409/ wl_nm/iraq_sciri_dc_1
 
2003-04-09 09:00:35 PM  
I will try where others have failed!

Thales link!
 
2003-04-09 09:04:28 PM  
What, the US won?

My bracket surrenders. I had Iraq and India in the finals. Sigh...
 
2003-04-09 09:06:42 PM  
Hey...
I submitted this yesterday with an Arabic headline!!
 
2003-04-09 09:07:30 PM  
We have already w- ... oh, shiat.
 
2003-04-09 09:08:47 PM  
In other news, Iraqi media is as disillousioned as Christopher Darden from the OJ trial
 
2003-04-09 09:09:00 PM  
What's all this about a war? I thought Geraldo was just opening some tomb in the desert somewhere.
 
2003-04-09 09:09:40 PM  
Thanks seems I got dyslexic and reversed the r and e in href
 
2003-04-09 09:09:53 PM  
Ku_No_Ichi: That was funny!

aaah... Levity!
 
2003-04-09 09:10:14 PM  
There was another quote on a newswire from someone lamenting the fact that the Arab world had lost their "best dictator". Great.
 
2003-04-09 09:13:31 PM  
*chuckle*

Silly Arabs...
 
2003-04-09 09:14:08 PM  
John Bradley, the managing editor of the Arab News, acknowledges delusions along with defeat.

"America now rules the world, either directly or by proxy; and there is nothing anyone can do about it," he concludes.


China might has something to say about that statement.
 
2003-04-09 09:14:08 PM  
When did China become a freedom loving country?

Oh yeah, survey, what survey? Opera kicks ass.
 
2003-04-09 09:15:08 PM  
I don't think the problem was the paratroopers as much as the tanks.

But we could have always sent your caps lock and lack of spelling ability to crush Saddam's regime OMGZERGRUSH.
 
2003-04-09 09:15:10 PM  
these arabs still dont know how to give up. face it arabs, you suck.
 
2003-04-09 09:15:15 PM  
And they were so sure that God was going to help them defeat the Great Satan. Maybe your God is afraid to get his ass kicked, too.
 
2003-04-09 09:17:11 PM  
It's not over yet.
 
2003-04-09 09:17:16 PM  
Now all those poor farkers who bet money on Iraq will have to pay up
 
2003-04-09 09:17:40 PM  
The best dictator the arab world ever saw was probably the Egyptian pharoah Khufu

I mean, saddam had 40 foot statues and gold palaces. Khufu had a coffin that was bigger than anything in the world until the effil(SP?) tower....
And maybe Egyptian rule wasn't a true dictatorship, but it's not like anyone had a say in who got "elected"
 
2003-04-09 09:18:26 PM  
Well it's a good thing we went in there and got his WMD.


Seriously, though, I hope the aftermath goes well....
 
2003-04-09 09:19:35 PM  
good article
 
2003-04-09 09:19:35 PM  
Have we found the WMDs yet?

I'm very surprised that such an evil man who hated America never used them.
 
2003-04-09 09:19:42 PM  
Well, my little muslim brothers, you can't play "lord of the flies" forever. Growing-up is a painful and confusing process, but you'll get over it.
 
2003-04-09 09:19:57 PM  
On Wednesday, when asked about Iraqi President Saddam Hussein Al-Douri said he had no "relationship with Saddam."

Judas.


The rats are jumping ship. Where is Alexander Haig when you need him?
 
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