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(Some Guy)   Eleven year old builds a home made motion detector as a science project at school. Administrators do the only sensible thing   (sdnn.com) divider line 264
    More: Asinine, motion sensors, middle schools, coast guard, classmates, MTV News, teachable moments, doozy, fireworks  
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38727 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jan 2010 at 9:56 AM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-01-16 11:14:45 PM
Naughty Zoot: The technology school doesn't seem to understand Google cache either.

Staff directory now (new window), cached directory (new window)

I guess VP Willie Neil has been getting too much feedback.


Or he's been canned.
 
2010-01-16 11:21:29 PM
The personnel then confiscated it and issued an all-clear about 3 p.m., Luque said. Nearby Gompers High School was unaffected by the incident, according to police.

"The personnel" contact a patent attorney, the kid calls a tort lawyer. Everybody's happy, ESPECIALLY the lawyers.
 
2010-01-16 11:42:39 PM
1-phenylpropan-2-amine: "It had a very sinister appearance, it had a battery behind it, and wires."

So does my tamagotchi from the 1990s


Oh man, my grandma got me one of those. After about 30 minutes of it's constant whining, I threw it in my dresser and let the damn thing starve to death.

/I was 10
 
2010-01-17 12:09:58 AM
Should have brought this kind of motion detector.
kd7nnv.net
 
2010-01-17 12:21:32 AM
Man, if I had had such stupid admistrators and teacher as this 11 yr old had, when I was in school, they would have called the HazMat team amd swat team. I had chemicals, devices and all kind of contraptions at chemistry and physics class. Teachers loved me and I loved them. Got at 6 yr degree in chemistry and engineering in the medical profession. What a bunch of idiots.
 
2010-01-17 01:40:52 AM
ElVee: Those that can, do.
Those that can't, teach.
Those that can't teach, administrate.
Those that can't administrate get elected.


OH DEAR GOD THIS

Sorry about that, it scratched my itch.
 
2010-01-17 01:44:17 AM
The incident was caught on the school's video surveillance (new window)
 
2010-01-17 03:06:02 AM
FarOutMan: I wonder if the school had blown up, how many of you would be blaming the administrator for not doing more to stop it?

Motion detectors don't blow up. You're thinking of a bomb.
 
2010-01-17 04:07:08 AM
Somacandra: FarOutMan: I wonder if the school had blown up, how many of you would be blaming the administrator for not doing more to stop it?

Motion detectors don't blow up. You're thinking of a bomb.


which is really why the article is useless without a picture, or even a line drawing, or something. Especially if it were unlabelled and just lying there in a classroom, without the boy there to explain what it was until after the administrator and/or teacher called the cops in.
 
2010-01-17 04:08:19 AM
to add to that, I can't view the surveillance video (if that was what zefal actually posted) to see what really happened, but I suspect that it isn't actually that video, anyway.
 
2010-01-17 04:19:55 AM
Fear the Clam: skinink: "Officials decided to call in the explosives team to look over the object - which an administrator had confiscated and taken into a principal's office - as a precaution."

Well thank heaven there was a person stupid enough brave enough to move a suspicious device.

To the principal's office. Seriously, if you're brave enough to move something that you really and truly believe is a hazard to the kids in your care, why put it in the principal's office as opposed to, I dunno, the parking lot?


Actually I can't think of a better place to take a potential bomb, they should get all the id10ts involved with this gathered real close to inspect it. Tick, tick, tick...
 
2010-01-17 08:30:21 AM
TsukasaK: maceinator: MacGabhain: Not tech or math related, but my wife just had an ENTIRE college class not be able to tell what she wrote on the board because it was in cursive. It was two words, and she has very good handwriting

Yeah, not taught anymore. My nephews, in college:

- can barely write legibly in block letters,
- can't solve for 'x' in x+5=13 (seriously),
- can't read or write cursive; a signature is a graphical image to them. They "sign" their names in block letters.

We have a very deep hole to dig out of. It will take decades to get back where we were, and that will still put us behind the rest of the world.

The only one that doesn't belong in that sequence is writing in cursive. Seriously, it's a dead art, like speaking latin. There is no reason beyond curiosity for it to be taught nowadays.


You talk like one of the blind men analyzing the elephant, sir. Cherry-picking is irrelevant here. As for cursive, I won't argue, though I don't agree. But as for Latin- you can't avoid it, as every line in your post demonstrates. Any more than we can avoid Rome.
 
2010-01-17 01:24:27 PM
Anodos: Somacandra: FarOutMan: I wonder if the school had blown up, how many of you would be blaming the administrator for not doing more to stop it?

Motion detectors don't blow up. You're thinking of a bomb.

which is really why the article is useless without a picture, or even a line drawing, or something. Especially if it were unlabeled and just lying there in a classroom, without the boy there to explain what it was until after the administrator and/or teacher called the cops in.


At a school with a technical or science focus, shouldn't one of the adults be able to look at it and see what it was? What good would labels do if the adults cannot see what a things is or is not with their own eyes? Should I wish to do damed, should I just wheel in my bushel of homemade explosives with a sign reading "Not a Bomb"?

As for motivation based on zero tolerance and fear of law suits, schools need to give back the authority to make reasonable judgments to the teachers. If you can't trust the teachers and administrators to make reasonable judgments then do not hire them. School district lawyers need to grow a pair and say, "Sue us and we will counter-sue for filing frivolous lawsuit." The reason schools are more afraid of law suits than corporations are is that businesses know that law suits can be double edge swords. If people sue the school then the schools can sue the students and the parents right back, and when it all settles we'll see who the jury thinks is at fault and to what degree. A waste of resources, but better than letting education be held hostage to the mere threat of legal action.
 
2010-01-17 01:28:27 PM
Aunt Crabby: Anodos: Somacandra: FarOutMan: I wonder if the school had blown up, how many of you would be blaming the administrator for not doing more to stop it?

Motion detectors don't blow up. You're thinking of a bomb.

which is really why the article is useless without a picture, or even a line drawing, or something. Especially if it were unlabeled and just lying there in a classroom, without the boy there to explain what it was until after the administrator and/or teacher called the cops in.

At a school with a technical or science focus, shouldn't one of the adults be able to look at it and see what it was? What good would labels do if the adults cannot see what a things is or is not with their own eyes? Should I wish to do damed, should I just wheel in my bushel of homemade explosives with a sign reading "Not a Bomb"?

As for motivation based on zero tolerance and fear of law suits, schools need to give back the authority to make reasonable judgments to the teachers. If you can't trust the teachers and administrators to make reasonable judgments then do not hire them. School district lawyers need to grow a pair and say, "Sue us and we will counter-sue for filing frivolous lawsuit." The reason schools are more afraid of law suits than corporations are is that businesses know that law suits can be double edge swords. If people sue the school then the schools can sue the students and the parents right back, and when it all settles we'll see who the jury thinks is at fault and to what degree. A waste of resources, but better than letting education be held hostage to the mere threat of legal action.


believe me, I'm not a fan of the school's (over)reaction, I'm just playing Devil's Advocate, I guess... I'd imagine it was a case of some paranoid/dense administrator, at a school where that isn't a good attribute, but who holds that job for certain institutional reasons in the education profession, and they likely wouldn't know a bomb from a "my first circuits" play-board.
 
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