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(Some Guy)   The bad news is your dog goes missing. The good news is it's found by the SPCA. The asinine news? The SPCA adopts it out to another family less than 72 hours later while not returning your phone calls   (thechronicleherald.ca) divider line 207
    More: Asinine, Samantha Mccullough, good news, not found, legal recourse, family courts, spca, Christmas season, enjoyment  
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16955 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jan 2010 at 12:40 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2010-01-03 12:08:31 PM  
And this is why you actually GO to the responsible authority and LOOK for your pet yourself. If you can't be bothered to do that, what the hell are you doing with a pet, anyway? You had 3 farking days!
 
2010-01-03 12:43:53 PM  
If it's an "Ol' Yeller" dog, doesn't that mean its rabid and needs to be shot?
 
2010-01-03 12:44:02 PM  
Not a surprise at all. The SPCA never calls anyone back you have to go and look. Also they say them scan for chips but I've heard stories that they don't do it all the time, but don't have any first hand experience.
 
2010-01-03 12:44:07 PM  
And happy 13th birthday to my dog:

AWWWW! HAPPY BIRTHDAY, HAPPY birthday to your BEAUTIFUL dog!


Oh and if anyone tries to do that to my dog, I'll slice their neck!
 
2010-01-03 12:44:45 PM  
Count me in with the "you should have tagged and/or micro-chipped your dog" crowd...
 
2010-01-03 12:45:35 PM  
I saw a notice of a lost cat the other day. It made me sad because it has barely cracked zero for the past few days and won't for the next week. It froze to death if anything.

/Cool story etc.
 
2010-01-03 12:47:16 PM  
Is there some reason these idiot people did not physically go down to the center to try to see if the dog was there? If your calls are not answered its time to escalate your approach, I do not think these people did what was necessary to find their dog; thus they don't deserve him back.

try not to loose your next dog.
 
2010-01-03 12:48:20 PM  
Adopting out your lost pet is the only punitive action the SPCA can take against you.

"If you loved your dog half as much as we do he wouldn't have gotten out! Now we will punish you and you're family."
 
2010-01-03 12:52:17 PM  
I smell a 72 hour trifecta in play...
 
2010-01-03 12:52:40 PM  
bombsaway814: Count me in with the "you should have tagged and/or micro-chipped your dog" crowd...

And neutered. They (apparently) hadn't had their 5 year old dog neutered. Can a brutha get a WTF?
 
2010-01-03 12:53:04 PM  
If the family loved their dog half as much as they should have, the dog would have been wearing tags.
 
2010-01-03 12:53:04 PM  
KiwDaWabbit: I saw a notice of a lost cat the other day. It made me sad because it has barely cracked zero for the past few days and won't for the next week. It froze to death if anything.

/Cool story etc.


Aw.. thats sad, but honestly cats can survive in pretty cold temperatures, they have fur and tend to look for shelter(which a lot of times is a heat source, like your house heating under your deck).

Pretty much if your cat goes missing, one of two things happened: A) Some random person decided to "adopt" the "stray" and took your cat, or B) It got hit by a car.

When I lost my cat, I went with option A.
 
2010-01-03 12:54:04 PM  
.... now I miss my cat :(
 
2010-01-03 12:54:07 PM  
This happened to me with a kitten - I had no way to go get her as I was in the hospital, but I called the SPCA every day. When they found her, they assured me that because I was staying in contact and they KNEW she had a home, she'd be there when I was released.

I got out of the hospital four days later, went to the SPCA before I ever even went home, and they had adopted her out less than an hour after talking to me on the phone and telling me they would hold her until I could drive over from the damn hospital. They "couldn't", by which I mean didn't give a damn and REFUSED to, do anything about it. I wound up going home, on the tail end of a bout of pneumonia, and bawled my eyes out for a week before ending up BACK in the hospital. I believe to this day that the stress and grief of the whole experience had a lot to do with the relapse.

This is why the SPCA will never get a dime of my money or an hour of my volunteer time, and the smaller local rescues/shelters will get all I can feasibly give them.

/if you live in Minnesota and have a ~10 year old calico that you adopted around Thanksgiving, give Lucky the Antigravity Kitten a hug for me...
 
2010-01-03 12:54:28 PM  
t2.gstatic.com

Woof!
 
2010-01-03 12:55:23 PM  
I 'rescued' dogs and cats with my ex, my current SO, friends that do as well and the SPCA is like the farking DMV. I thought putting a chip in the critters was supposed to be a good idea.
 
2010-01-03 12:57:41 PM  
In fairness to the dog's owners, there have been cases of pound employees giving found animals to friends, knowing someone is trying to get them back.
 
2010-01-03 01:00:12 PM  
"By law, we're only required to hold the dog for 72 hours."

Yes, this is all the SPCA's fault. Let's focus on that.

And if at all possible, let's work PETA into this somehow.
 
2010-01-03 01:00:24 PM  
If the family did actually call the SPCA and they actually ignored these calls, then whoever the brass is at that local SPCA should be added to George Carlin's list of people that should be thrown screaming from a helicopter.

/stupid bureaucratic rules
 
2010-01-03 01:02:10 PM  
My dog Ripley, she once got out of our fenced yard (still no idea how - the fella thinks it was the neighbor's spawn) and after driving the 'hood and not finding her, I called the humane society. I barely got out "black and white half..." and she cut me off telling me no, she wasn't there. Okay, it was right before closing so the next morning I went in and there she was...I was told by the guy volunteering that they brought her in almost 2 hours before I had called (thank goodness, a kind soul picked her up quickly) the day before.

I couldn't understand it - the place had a ton of dogs for adoption, why not at least LOOK to see if one of them already HAS a home?

BTW, she was microchipped. No answer from them on why they didn't just check it...didn't care too much at the time, I was so happy to have found her.
 
2010-01-03 01:04:03 PM  
TNel: Not a surprise at all. The SPCA never calls anyone back you have to go and look. Also they say them scan for chips but I've heard stories that they don't do it all the time, but don't have any first hand experience.

They do not [scan implanted chips] from personal experience. Or call the number on the farking tag he was wearing.

/Huskies are farking Houdinis
 
2010-01-03 01:04:07 PM  
I wish I was as perfect as half the people around here. Not everyone who loses a pet is some kind of animal abusing scumbag or a person devoid of common sense. People sometimes mess up. Animals sometimes do unpredictable shiat. There are many precautions you can take, most of which just aren't perfect or foolproof. Some pets and their owners are unfortunately unlucky.

/Cue Welcome to Fark picture
 
2010-01-03 01:04:32 PM  
I got my dog from the SPCA. They're not the most credible people all the time, depending on the location. We happened to have a good one, but I've heard real horror stories about others.

These people didn't neuter their dog because he was a country dog and had been used for breeding a couple of times. They just sound like old-fashioned people who do things the way we all used to, which isn't so great but isn't evil, either. They should have had him licensed, of course, but...

That place was closed over the weekend and still got all that work done before an adoption on Thursday? They rushed the process like mad, and while they *may* have followed the letter of the law, it doesn't sound like they're being very ethical about it all. If those people really made those calls, there's a record of it somewhere. And the fact that they called the "dog catcher" and the radio station shows they were doing what they knew to do to get the dog back.

When I find a stray or a hurt animal, I call the township about it first, not some charity.
 
2010-01-03 01:05:38 PM  
Two assholes here.

For one, the original dog owner sounds like they didn't do things exactly right. There's no excuse for not tagging/licensing the animal.

But I know from experience that some SPCA shelters don't exactly make an effort to find the previous owner, and intentionally make it as difficult as possible for lost pets to be recovered. I saw this as an SPCA shelter I (very briefly) volunteered at.

"72-hour hold" is often taken quite literally, with the pet already being shown to potential adoptive families within minutes of intake (especially if they are apparently well socialized and no apparent medical problems), and walked out the front door with a new owner at exactly the 72-hour mark. Worse: some of these same agencies will close their shelter for the weekend, but allow the animal to go out to a remote "adoption site" (such as a pet store or weekend event) and allow people to "hold" the animals. At this same shelter where I saw the above, the "lost pets" hotline answering machine was, I'm not kidding, never checked and the voice mail messages deleted without any action. Typically, the roster at the "lost pets" desk was updated irregularly, and often days old, so even if you got a live person they wouldn't always have an accurate idea of what was in the shelter. I even suspected that one of the intake volunteers was "disposing" of tags on "found" pets surrendered to the shelter.

This was a shelter I "volunteered" for for exactly two shifts. I was disgusted.

/Did I point out that this particular shelter only made $8/day on a "lost" pet that was claimed (per city ordinance), but made $80-$150 for an adoption?
//I never let my cat out again for the remainder of my stay in that one-horse town
///Cool story, bro.
 
2010-01-03 01:05:39 PM  
Mietsko: Is there some reason these idiot people did not physically go down to the center to try to see if the dog was there? If your calls are not answered its time to escalate your approach, I do not think these people did what was necessary to find their dog; thus they don't deserve him back.

try not to loose your next dog.


FTA, the area has no shelter. All the animals are fostered out. There was no place for the family to go. The only way to find where the dog might be would be to contact the SPCA and find out where a dog matching that description was fostered. No return call, so they couldn't.

Animal laws are weird that way. It is a living creature and its ownership can be removed from you in 72 hours, even with due diligence?

If my car is stolen and they find it 6 months later, it is still my car.

While registration and licensing is nice, it doesn't prove love of an animal. Most of that crap is just creative taxation anyway. I have a chipped animal myself, but the chip just spits out a number, not information. So if it isn't looked up in the right database, (of which there are MANY) it doesn't do much good.
 
2010-01-03 01:06:52 PM  
Submittard:
Adopted less than 72 hours after arrival
SPCA failed to return calls

Article:
Dog held for the required 72 hours.
Owner called SPCA 10 days after losing dog.
Dog had no collar or license.
 
2010-01-03 01:07:04 PM  
This is why I tag my cats. I also dress them in embarrassing outfits so they don't leave the house.

i46.tinypic.com
 
2010-01-03 01:07:07 PM  
Philip J. Fry:
"If you loved your dog half as much as we do he wouldn't have gotten out! Now we will punish you and you're family."


That's kind of an awkward time to tell someone that you consider them family.
 
2010-01-03 01:09:15 PM  
Friskya: And this is why you actually GO to the responsible authority and LOOK for your pet yourself. If you can't be bothered to do that, what the hell are you doing with a pet, anyway? You had 3 farking days!

Mietsko: Is there some reason these idiot people did not physically go down to the center to try to see if the dog was there? If your calls are not answered its time to escalate your approach, I do not think these people did what was necessary to find their dog; thus they don't deserve him back.

try not to loose your next dog.


FTFA:

"The Antigonish area doesn't have a shelter to keep the animals. They're all fostered out and I believe we went beyond the test of reasonability in this case," she said.


How do you go down to the shelter if there isn't one?
 
2010-01-03 01:09:27 PM  
It does seem that they could have put a bit more effort into finding the dog.
We have 2 rescue dogs. It is not uncommon for dogs to wander from a new home. This is why they should be wearing collars with phone numbers on them.
 
2010-01-03 01:09:34 PM  
My dog ran off New Year's Eve because of the fireworks going off--who knew that when fireworks are going off outside the house, the place to escape them is far, far away from home?--but she found her way home by the next morning. I was awake most of the night thinking of all the things I'd have to do to get her back, and that's if someone didn't steal her. She wasn't wearing a collar because she got it caught in the fence a few days ago.

She has two different-colored eyes, but if somebody decides they want a nice new dog, all the looking in the world isn't going to help.
 
2010-01-03 01:10:39 PM  
Duelist: Mietsko: Is there some reason these idiot people did not physically go down to the center to try to see if the dog was there? If your calls are not answered its time to escalate your approach, I do not think these people did what was necessary to find their dog; thus they don't deserve him back.

try not to loose your next dog.

FTA, the area has no shelter. All the animals are fostered out. There was no place for the family to go. The only way to find where the dog might be would be to contact the SPCA and find out where a dog matching that description was fostered. No return call, so they couldn't.

Animal laws are weird that way. It is a living creature and its ownership can be removed from you in 72 hours, even with due diligence?

If my car is stolen and they find it 6 months later, it is still my car.

While registration and licensing is nice, it doesn't prove love of an animal. Most of that crap is just creative taxation anyway. I have a chipped animal myself, but the chip just spits out a number, not information. So if it isn't looked up in the right database, (of which there are MANY) it doesn't do much good.


So how did the family who adopted the dog, see and adopt the dog? somehow there is a way to locate this animal. I see your point however.
 
2010-01-03 01:11:39 PM  
I am going to burn my local SPCA to the ground. I adopted a dog they said was spayed, but in fact wasn't. Now I'm trying to figure out to do with the litter of puppies I'm going to have on my hands in a couple of months.
 
2010-01-03 01:11:49 PM  
Philip J. Fry: Adopting out your lost pet is the only punitive action the SPCA can take against you.

"If you loved your dog half as much as we do he wouldn't have gotten out! Now we will punish you and you're family."


I don't think they are doing it on purpose. They are mostly volunteers working on a shoe string budget. They see too many pets abandoned and many of the animals will have to be put down. If they don't answer the phone it probably means they lack the staff to cover the lines all the time.

You have to go and look yourself. There are not enough resources to keep all the homeless pets alive, much less to track down all the old owners. You have to make an effort.

People who love animals enough to volunteer hate seeing abandoned pets put down. If a pet appears to be abandoned and no owner shows up to claim it, the best thing for it is to get it a new home. That isn't a judgment on the old owner. It's trying to make sure the animal is not killed. Even in the no-kill shelters, the SPCA doesn't have the resources to care for all animals until they find the owners and make sure the animal is not wanted. There are simply too many pets without homes for most shelters to keep all animals indefinitely.

I would suggest that the old owner should contact the new owner to nicely assert legal rights to the animal and offer a "reward" for the trouble. Whoever doesn't keep this dog should adopt a new one. It's sad, but at least this dog is wanted, and there are many dogs who need homes.

/If this bothers you, donate to a nice no-kill shelter
//Do not donate to PETA--they usually kill the animals right away without giving the owners a chance to find the lost pet or trying to get them adopted
 
2010-01-03 01:14:26 PM  
My dog is tagged, chipped and registered with the State and the Humane Society. If you find my dog, then decide to either keep or "adopt" her out to another family, expect to have a .45 slug enter your skull at 900 feet per second.

Tags are easy to "lose" and collars can magically disappear. Not every dog is chipped in exactly the same spot (or even chipped at all), so it's easy to say "we didn't find one." But by God, if anybody tries to pull this on me, they will not be long for this world.

In my mind, dognapping deserves the same penalty as kidnapping: cranial ventilation.

You fark with my pack, I fark with you, personally.

/goes off to play with his Akita
 
2010-01-03 01:14:31 PM  
Don't have to read the article to realize the people at the SPCA were not happy with these dog owners. It's a tough job, not many people can even do it.
 
2010-01-03 01:16:08 PM  
Philip J. Fry:
If you loved your dog...

Great, now I've got that damn Futurama episode in my head. Starting to cry as I type this....
 
2010-01-03 01:16:30 PM  
Mietsko: Is there some reason these idiot people did not physically go down to the center to try to see if the dog was there? If your calls are not answered its time to escalate your approach, I do not think these people did what was necessary to find their dog; thus they don't deserve him back.

try not to loose your next dog.


Apparently that's what you have to do, but some cities may have multiple shelters and why shouldn't the SPCA bother to call back and say "Why yes we do have a dog that appears to match the description you left on my voice mail."?

If they really cared about animals and their owners they would. Instead they collect fees for adopting it out. And is it really good to give a pet "needles" if you have no idea of its medical history?

How many rabies shots can a dog get before it adversely affects its health?
 
2010-01-03 01:17:24 PM  
Tali: This happened to me with a kitten - I had no way to go get her as I was in the hospital, but I called the SPCA every day. When they found her, they assured me that because I was staying in contact and they KNEW she had a home, she'd be there when I was released.

I got out of the hospital four days later, went to the SPCA before I ever even went home, and they had adopted her out less than an hour after talking to me on the phone and telling me they would hold her until I could drive over from the damn hospital. They "couldn't", by which I mean didn't give a damn and REFUSED to, do anything about it. I wound up going home, on the tail end of a bout of pneumonia, and bawled my eyes out for a week before ending up BACK in the hospital. I believe to this day that the stress and grief of the whole experience had a lot to do with the relapse.


Really? I will never "get" animal people.
 
2010-01-03 01:17:36 PM  
Pet 'rescue' organizations can get a bit self-righteous. That's putting it mildly. Then again, some are awesome. Petfinder.com should have a comment posting feature.
 
2010-01-03 01:17:40 PM  
Alonjar: KiwDaWabbit: I saw a notice of a lost cat the other day. It made me sad because it has barely cracked zero for the past few days and won't for the next week. It froze to death if anything.

/Cool story etc.

Aw.. thats sad, but honestly cats can survive in pretty cold temperatures, they have fur and tend to look for shelter(which a lot of times is a heat source, like your house heating under your deck).

Pretty much if your cat goes missing, one of two things happened: A) Some random person decided to "adopt" the "stray" and took your cat, or B) It got hit by a car.

When I lost my cat, I went with option A.


Cats are pretty resilient. Last week I found a cat hiding behind my hottub. Took two fark'n hours to get it to come out (the fact that my dog initially found it and spent a good 10 minutes barking at it didn't help). The cat was chipped and my vet got it back to the family which ended up being only a couple of blocks away.

/not the first time
 
2010-01-03 01:17:43 PM  
Aunt Crabby:
I don't think they are doing it on purpose. They are mostly volunteers working on a shoe string budget.

Not always. The shelter I volunteered at was well funded, getting both funds from the city and from private donations. Yes, there was a lack of volunteers (which may have created some of the situations described), but it is worth noting that the shelter administrator made $160k/year, the staff veterinarian over $100k, and other paid positions at the shelter were often more than you'd make elsewhere in the community.

But they depended on volunteers for the majority of the front-line work. People didn't volunteer at the shelter because the environment was depressing.

God forbid the shelter administrator take a $20k/year cut in pay to hire a part-time intern just to answer the "lost pets" desk.
 
2010-01-03 01:24:40 PM  
img684.imageshack.us
 
2010-01-03 01:26:46 PM  
Chagrin: Submittard:
Adopted less than 72 hours after arrival
SPCA failed to return calls

Article:
Dog held for the required 72 hours.
Owner called SPCA 10 days after losing dog.
Dog had no collar or license.



The article isn't clear in this regard, but the sentence "By the time Ms. Mccullough made contact with the SPCA in Antigonish on Dec. 29, the dog was in a new home," implies that it took 10 days for her to get an SPCA rep to actually talk to her.

The implication in the article is that she called and emailed during the 72-hour period, but no one would respond to her: But the family "looked everywhere for him," she said. "We called the radio station and then we emailed and telephoned the SPCA but didn't get any response." It took the SPCA until the 29th to actually talk to the owner.

Again, I'll admit the article may not spell it out for you, but I gotta say: work on your goddamn reading comprehension skills before you claim omniscience, farktard.
 
2010-01-03 01:29:55 PM  
Hey look it's BLAME THE VICTIM!!!


Friskya: And this is why you actually GO to the responsible authority and LOOK for your pet yourself. If you can't be bothered to do that, what the hell are you doing with a pet, anyway? You had 3 farking days!

Friskya: And this is why you actually GO to the responsible authority and LOOK for your pet yourself. If you can't be bothered to do that, what the hell are you doing with a pet, anyway? You had 3 farking days!
 
BWC
2010-01-03 01:29:59 PM  
Aunt Crabby:I would suggest that the old owner should contact the new owner to nicely assert legal rights to the animal and offer a "reward" for the trouble. Whoever doesn't keep this dog should adopt a new one. It's sad, but at least this dog is wanted, and there are many dogs who need homes.

FTA: While Ms. Williams said she has great sympathy for the family, she said the dog's new owners have the right to anonymity and enjoyment of their new pet.

Contact them how?
 
2010-01-03 01:31:27 PM  
feedle: Aunt Crabby:
I don't think they are doing it on purpose. They are mostly volunteers working on a shoe string budget.

Not always. The shelter I volunteered at was well funded, getting both funds from the city and from private donations. Yes, there was a lack of volunteers (which may have created some of the situations described), but it is worth noting that the shelter administrator made $160k/year, the staff veterinarian over $100k, and other paid positions at the shelter were often more than you'd make elsewhere in the community.

But they depended on volunteers for the majority of the front-line work. People didn't volunteer at the shelter because the environment was depressing.

God forbid the shelter administrator take a $20k/year cut in pay to hire a part-time intern just to answer the "lost pets" desk.


Welcome to the world of non-profit management. The people who actually do the work are working for free or minimum wage in a grossly understaffed environment, while the head administrator, who contributes nothing, gets a bonus for keeping costs down.
 
2010-01-03 01:31:32 PM  
TrashcanMan: Hey look it's BLAME THE VICTIM!!!


Friskya: And this is why you actually GO to the responsible authority and LOOK for your pet yourself. If you can't be bothered to do that, what the hell are you doing with a pet, anyway? You had 3 farking days!

Friskya: And this is why you actually GO to the responsible authority and LOOK for your pet yourself. If you can't be bothered to do that, what the hell are you doing with a pet, anyway? You had 3 farking days!


The idiot who didn't tag their dog, didn't go look for the dog, didn't chip their dog, and let the dog get out is not a victim.
 
2010-01-03 01:31:57 PM  
My dog got out of his invisible fence once (collar broke) one night and ended up in the local pound. I called soon as they opened and confirmed that he was there then drove down there and picked him up. Had to pay a $50 fine and sign some shiat. Everybody there was staring at me like I was some sort of scumbag.

Not sure what I would have done if they had given him away. Probably find out who handles adoptions, follow them home and beat the ever loving snot out of them :/

/cue cool story tough guy mashup.
 
2010-01-03 01:34:07 PM  
Alonjar: KiwDaWabbit: I saw a notice of a lost cat the other day. It made me sad because it has barely cracked zero for the past few days and won't for the next week. It froze to death if anything.

/Cool story etc.

Aw.. thats sad, but honestly cats can survive in pretty cold temperatures, they have fur and tend to look for shelter(which a lot of times is a heat source, like your house heating under your deck).

Pretty much if your cat goes missing, one of two things happened: A) Some random person decided to "adopt" the "stray" and took your cat, or B) It got hit by a car.

When I lost my cat, I went with option A.


There are a few other explanations for when cats go missing. One is that it got locked in somebody's garage. An acquaintance lost his cat and went up and down the alley calling it thru garage doors. At one he got an answer. The owner of the place was away on vacation, but fortunately a neighbor had a key so he rescued it.

Another possibility is that the cat is wounded or sick. Cats go hide when they're in distress, so it's important to try to find them. I had a cat that suddenly stopped coming inside except in the middle of the night to eat, then she would disappear again. This went on for a couple of weeks, then she started coming back in. Years later when I had her x-rayed for something, the vet found a bb embedded in her back. It dawned on me then that the disappearing episode was when she had been shot and was hiding in pain. I knew just the little neighborhood shiat who had probably done it too. Fortunately for him he had moved by then.

There's also the chance that some kid nabbed it and took it God knows where. My father was driving home one day and spotted some kid sitting at a bus stop holding my dad's cat, waiting for a bus. My dad took the cat back home, but it might have ended up across town.

When I was a kid, one of our cats disappeared and we couldn't find it. Five years later it showed up again, kind of beat up but otherwise ok. He lived with us for years afterward. Never did find out where he had been for all that time.

All this is why I only have indoor cats now. The world is too dangerous to let them run around outside.
 
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