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(Telluride Watch)   If you are visiting Telluride and look way up in the mountains above town and see something that looks like a real machine gun nest, rest assured, that's exactly what it is   (telluridewatch.com) divider line 78
    More: Interesting  
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19553 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Dec 2009 at 1:49 PM (4 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2009-12-26 12:37:06 PM
Certainly something to take into consideration before planning an armed robbery.
 
2009-12-26 01:51:33 PM
z.about.com
 
2009-12-26 01:54:11 PM
The article resizing due to photo captions is damn annoying.


That, and...

www.lolcat.net
 
2009-12-26 01:56:04 PM
An automatically started fadeout slideshow is bad enough. But resizing the textbox underneath for every picture, thereby moving the text you are actually reading, is just too damn much.

Whatever idiot built this, and their boss, needs to DIAF.
 
2009-12-26 01:57:04 PM
looks like they did .
 
2009-12-26 02:00:59 PM
I'm pretty sure we were one of those jeeps full of tourists he was speaking about near the end. Except we were in a rented Buick and had no business being on the dirt road to Telluride.
 
2009-12-26 02:01:00 PM
I hate you, SUBBY
 
2009-12-26 02:01:12 PM
Is the sniper nest manned by Claudine Longet?
 
2009-12-26 02:01:18 PM
I found an abandoned machine gun nest once. The parents had left three hungry baby machine guns behind. I took them home and nursed them back to health, and when they grew up, I set them free. They mowed three of my neighbors down in cold blood as they flew away.

Charity has a price.
 
2009-12-26 02:01:32 PM
labor strife from 115 years ago...in 1904

obviously, not a math major
 
2009-12-26 02:06:05 PM
Bad article. Do not read.
 
2009-12-26 02:09:23 PM
merlinsbeardBad article. Do not read.

Do Cannot read
 
2009-12-26 02:14:24 PM
Boritom: I found an abandoned machine gun nest once. The parents had left three hungry baby machine guns behind. I took them home and nursed them back to health, and when they grew up, I set them free. They mowed three of my neighbors down in cold blood as they flew away.

Charity has a price.


Awwww...



/They are so cute when they are just out of the comoline
 
2009-12-26 02:18:16 PM
Why is this news? EVERYONE knows they nest this time of year!
 
2009-12-26 02:23:00 PM
Sally Puff? heh heh....
 
2009-12-26 02:26:27 PM
Approves.

blogs.ajc.com

Get me some strikebreakers! Like we used to have in the 30s.
 
2009-12-26 02:28:51 PM
did anyone mention the crappy formatting of the article and that it's damned hard to read?
 
2009-12-26 02:29:09 PM
When I set up my hobby farm, I'm going to make a fake anti-aircraft missile launcher built around my satellite TV dish. Right next to my fake holodeck computer arch/garden trellis.

/geek out
 
2009-12-26 02:32:56 PM
For those of you complaining that you can't read it.

IMOGENE PASS - Colorado tourism promoters extol our scenery, our fall colors, and our snow-capped peaks, but nobody mentions our historic machine gun nest above 13,000 feet. At the top of Imogene Pass between Telluride and Ouray, a machine gun emplacement and a small wooden fort survive as silent testimony to workers' struggles and as a legacy to labor.

A century ago millions were made in the San Juan Mountains in gold and silver mines, but not by miners. The early days of pick and pan prospecting had given way to deep shaft industrial mining, and miners traded their lungs and brawn for a few dollars a day to work under increasingly dangerous conditions. As more miners and mill workers died from cave-ins, explosions from dangerous gases, and silicosis in their lungs, they demanded better working conditions and something we take for granted - the eight-hour workday.

Fierce competition between capitalist mine owners and immigrant mine workers resulted in increasing tension and calls for unionization. In Telluride in 1903 the mine workers went on strike and Gov. James Peabody, in collusion with the wealthy mine owners, called out the Colorado National Guard.

Montrose resident MaryJoy Martin has chronicled the rise of the Western Federation of Miners and its hero Vincent St. John in her book The Corpse on Boomerang Road, which may become a major motion picture (now under option). She writes vividly of Bulkeley Wells, a captain in the Colorado National Guard who took command of Troop A, First Squadron Cavalry, comprising cowboys, Wells' employees at the Smuggler-Union Mining Co., and a few union-hating locals.

Martin insists that in our tourist-based economy of today we not forget the labor struggles of the past. So I hiked with her to the top of Imogene Pass to see physical proof of labor strife from 115 years ago.

In her book, Martin writes that Wells declared martial law in Telluride with "mass deportations on special trains, false criminal charges, beatings, threats, and arrests without due process. No one could leave the county without official permission." As illegally deported miners trickled back into Telluride over Imogene Pass, National Guardsmen under Wells' command built a wooden sentry post or redoubt complete with a small stove, flagpole, and a stone sniper or machine gun nest with a Colt rapid-fire machine gun. He named it Fort Peabody after the governor. It's still there today.

The wood has weathered considerably in the high altitude winds and shifting stone walls have shrunk the sentry post, but probably 60 percent of the original historic material exists. When Martin and I climbed into the tiny sleeping quarters we could see remnants of the metal heating stove, and names of National Guard troopers carved with 1904 dates on the back wall. She wrote the nomination to have Fort Peabody listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Approved by the National Park Service, the site represents labor history in the West, and next summer the U.S. Forest Service and San Miguel and Ouray Counties will cooperate on stabilizing Fort Peabody and interpreting its vivid history.

Started in November 1903, workers completed the post in the freezing weather of February 1904. Historical archaeologist Jon Horn explains, "Even after the Telluride strike was finished in 1904, Wells continued to station his own men at the post as late as 1908 to deter the flow of union sympathizers into the region. Fort Peabody has been ravaged by the elements for over 100 years, but remains as the only post in Colorado built specifically to control union activists."

Linda Luther-Broderick, Open Space and Recreation Coordinator for San Miguel County, notes that "the repair-in-place would use as much existing material as possible. Work will be done to Secretary of Interior Standards and the project will include some re-building of the walls of the gun battery and replicating dry laid methods on existing stone walls." The project excites Harry Bruell of the Southwest Conservation Corps in Durango, which runs young crews that do conservation work on public lands. Bruell states, "Fort Peabody is an amazing slice of Southwest Colorado's unique and fascinating history. The Southwest Conservation Corps is interested in participating in the project both for the exciting historic preservation work as well as the intriguing educational opportunities that it would offer the crew." Bruell adds, "This is a piece of history that most people do not know about, but it tells an important story about the history of the region and fabric of our mountain communities." Though bent, even the old metal flag post may still be there.

I've stood in the sentry post and looked out across the San Juan Mountains and thought about the National Guardsmen and the long, star-filled nights at 13,365 feet. In the cold wind I added a cap and gloves and walked down to the sniper post or machine-gun nest, which is just a hole really, surrounded by stacked stones carved out of a north-facing loose scree slope. The sentry post commands a 180-degree view of Imogene Pass and the dirt road going east to Ouray or west to Telluride. As I stood in the hole, Jeeps full of tourists traveled both ways below me providing a perfect angle of fire for an automatic weapon.

Martin believes, "Labor history has been totally ignored in the United States and it's a dramatic history in Colorado. People should know that a governor had the gall to permit a border patrol station to prevent workers from entering a Colorado county." I agree. It's time to stabilize the site and install interpretive signage so that future visitors may know what sacrifices workers endured a century ago. Next summer I want to help. I want to carry some of the framing lumber and pound a nail or two.

Perhaps signs will explain that bully Bulkeley Wells, a coward like most bullies, committed suicide during the Great Depression. As for union organizer Vincent St. John, who dedicated his life to better working conditions for the laboring man, he went to federal prison under false charges.



Andrew Gulliford is a professor of Southwest Studies and History at Fort Lewis College. He can be reached at gulliford_a(at)fortlewis.edu.
 
2009-12-26 02:34:11 PM
I'm sorry I couldn't read the article over how awesome the slideshow resizing the article every 3 seconds was.
 
2009-12-26 02:36:46 PM
Curious: did anyone mention the crappy formatting of the article and that it's damned hard to read?


It took me a few minutes to figure out there was a stop button before I could finnish the article.
 
2009-12-26 02:36:55 PM
Giltric: I'm sorry I couldn't read the article over how awesome the slideshow resizing the article every 3 seconds was.

There is a "stop" tab.
/but yes, the article was a bore.
 
2009-12-26 02:38:52 PM
resizing captions annoyed me for a short time, then i noticed the most amazing thing.... a STOP button under the picture.
 
2009-12-26 02:38:52 PM
rtfa

i108.photobucket.com
 
2009-12-26 02:39:28 PM
To those who are smart enough to find Fark and click on a link, but unable to read it due to poor photo management, simply click the STOP button. Then you will be able to read the article without remembering your hangover from 1999.
 
2009-12-26 02:40:07 PM
Valarius For those of you complaining that you can't read it.

Lol. I thought that was the only reason it got greened.
 
2009-12-26 02:41:51 PM
I especially like that the "Stop" button also moves around with the different pictures making for a sort of video game to get it to stop.
 
2009-12-26 02:42:17 PM
I bet a person with a hell of a lot of money could build a castle on top of a similar location fully decked out with a tower and a cannon. Except for the cold it would be great to have views like that.
 
2009-12-26 02:42:27 PM
They should use that machine gun nest to shoot the web page developer
 
2009-12-26 02:45:52 PM
lecas: resizing captions annoyed me for a short time, then i noticed the most amazing thing.... a STOP button under the picture.

But thats like an extra step......do any of us really have time for extra steps?
 
2009-12-26 02:46:06 PM
acanuck

Hey, whats up with your profile screen?
 
2009-12-26 02:53:26 PM
i271.photobucket.com
 
2009-12-26 02:55:05 PM
Being a print journalism and English literature major, I've also slightly edited this story for my taste.


IMOGENE PASS - Colorado tourism promotes scenery, fall colors and snow-capped peaks, but nobody mentions the historic machine gun nest at the top of Imogene Pass. Located between Telluride and Ouray, a machine gun emplacement in a small wooden fort survives as silent testimony to the struggles of workers and labor.

A century ago millions were made in the San Juan Mountains in gold and silver mines. The early days of prospecting by hand had given way to deep-shaft industrial mining, and miners used their lungs and brawn to work under increasingly dangerous conditions for a few dollars a day. As more miners and mill workers died from cave-ins, gas explosions and silicosis, they demanded something we take for granted: better working conditions and the eight-hour workday.

Fierce competition between capitalist mine owners and immigrant mine workers resulted in increasing tension and calls for unionization. In 1903, the Telluride mine workers went on strike. In response, Govenor James Peabody called out the Colorado National Guard.

Montrose resident MaryJoy Martin has chronicled the rise of the Western Federation of Miners, and their hero Vincent St. John, in her book The Corpse on Boomerang Road. She writes of people like Bulkeley Wells, a captain in the Colorado National Guard who took a few cowboys, mining employees and union-hating locals and turned them into Troop A, First Squadron Cavalry. They were instrumental in cracking down on mine labor.

Martin insists that in Colorado's tourist-based economy of today, her readere should not forget the labor struggles of the past. So I hiked with her to the top of Imogene Pass to see the physical remains of labor strife from 115 years ago.

In her book, Martin writes that Wells declared martial law in Telluride with "mass deportations on special trains, false criminal charges, beatings, threats, and arrests without due process. No one could leave the county without official permission." As illegally deported miners trickled back into Telluride over Imogene Pass, National Guardsmen under Wells' command built a wooden sentry post or redoubt complete with a small stove, flagpole, and a machine gun nest with a Colt rapid-fire machine gun. He named it Fort Peabody after the governor. It's still there today.

The fort's wood has weathered in the high altitude and harsh winds. Shifting stone walls have shrunk. Only 60 percent of the original historic material remains intact. When Martin and I climbed into the tiny sleeping quarters, we could see the wood stove and the names of National Guard troopers carved on the back wall. Martin pushed the nomination to have Fort Peabody listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Approved by the National Park Service, next summer the U.S. Forest Service and San Miguel and Ouray Counties will collaberate to restore Fort Peabody and record its vivid history.

From November 1903 to Febrary 1904, workers fought freezing weather to build the post. Historical archaeologist Jon Horn explains, "Even after the Telluride strike was finished in 1904, Wells continued to station his own men at the post as late as 1908 to deter the flow of union sympathizers into the region. Fort Peabody has been ravaged by the elements for over 100 years, but remains as the only post in Colorado built specifically to control union activists."

Linda Luther-Broderick, Open Space and Recreation Coordinator for San Miguel County, notes that "the repair-in-place would use as much existing material as possible. Work will be done to Secretary of Interior Standards and the project will include some re-building of the walls of the gun battery and replicating dry laid methods on existing stone walls." The project excites Harry Bruell of the Southwest Conservation Corps in Durango, responsbile for much of the conservation work done in public lands.

"Fort Peabody is an amazing slice of Southwest Colorado's unique and fascinating history," says Bruell. "The Southwest Conservation Corps is interested in participating in the project both for the exciting historic preservation work as well as the intriguing educational opportunities that it would offer the crew." Bruell adds, "This is a piece of history that most people do not know about, but it tells an important story about the history of the region and fabric of our mountain communities. Though bent, even the old metal flag post may still be there."

Standing in the sentry post, looking over the San Juan Mountains, I thought about the National Guardsmen and the long, star-filled nights at 13,365 feet. I walked down to the machine-gun nest, which is just a hole surrounded by stacked stones carved out of a north-facing loose scree slope. The sentry post commands a 180-degree view of Imogene Pass and the dirt road going east to Ouray or west to Telluride. As I stood in the hole, the view provided a perfect angle of fire against the cars full of tourists traveling below me.

Martin believes, "Labor history has been totally ignored in the United States and it's a dramatic history in Colorado. People should know that a governor had the gall to permit a border patrol station to prevent workers from entering a Colorado county." I agree. It's time to stabilize the site and install interpretive signage so that future visitors may know what sacrifices workers endured a century ago. Next summer I want to help. I want to carry some of the framing lumber and pound a nail or two. I want my labor to endure like theirs did.


Andrew Gulliford is a professor of Southwest Studies and History at Fort Lewis College. He can be reached at gu­l­l­i­ford­_a[nospam-﹫-backwards]si­wel­tro­f­*ed­u.
 
2009-12-26 02:56:57 PM
Impudent Domain: Is the sniper nest manned by Claudine Longet?


+10. Nice reference, even though half the kids here won't have a clue.
 
2009-12-26 02:58:04 PM
Valarius 2009-12-26 02:55:05 PM
Being a print journalism and English literature major, I've also slightly edited this story for my taste.


IMOGENE PASS - Colorado tourism promotes scenery, fall colors and snow-capped peaks, but nobody mentions the historic machine gun nest at the top of Imogene Pass. Located between Telluride and Ouray, a machine gun emplacement in a small wooden fort survives as silent testimony to the struggles of workers and labor.

A century ago millions were made in the San Juan Mountains in gold and silver mines. The early days of prospecting by hand had given way to deep-shaft industrial mining, and miners used their lungs and brawn to work under increasingly dangerous conditions for a few dollars a day. As more miners and mill workers died from cave-ins, gas explosions and silicosis, they demanded something we take for granted: better working conditions and the eight-hour workday.

Fierce competition between capitalist mine owners and immigrant mine workers resulted in increasing tension and calls for unionization. In 1903, the Telluride mine workers went on strike. In response, Govenor James Peabody called out the Colorado National Guard.

Montrose resident MaryJoy Martin has chronicled the rise of the Western Federation of Miners, and their hero Vincent St. John, in her book The Corpse on Boomerang Road. She writes of people like Bulkeley Wells, a captain in the Colorado National Guard who took a few cowboys, mining employees and union-hating locals and turned them into Troop A, First Squadron Cavalry. They were instrumental in cracking down on mine labor.

Martin insists that in Colorado's tourist-based economy of today, her readere should not forget the labor struggles of the past. So I hiked with her to the top of Imogene Pass to see the physical remains of labor strife from 115 years ago.

In her book, Martin writes that Wells declared martial law in Telluride with "mass deportations on special trains, false criminal charges, beatings, threats, and arrests without due process. No one could leave the county without official permission." As illegally deported miners trickled back into Telluride over Imogene Pass, National Guardsmen under Wells' command built a wooden sentry post or redoubt complete with a small stove, flagpole, and a machine gun nest with a Colt rapid-fire machine gun. He named it Fort Peabody after the governor. It's still there today.

The fort's wood has weathered in the high altitude and harsh winds. Shifting stone walls have shrunk. Only 60 percent of the original historic material remains intact. When Martin and I climbed into the tiny sleeping quarters, we could see the wood stove and the names of National Guard troopers carved on the back wall. Martin pushed the nomination to have Fort Peabody listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Approved by the National Park Service, next summer the U.S. Forest Service and San Miguel and Ouray Counties will collaberate to restore Fort Peabody and record its vivid history.

From November 1903 to Febrary 1904, workers fought freezing weather to build the post. Historical archaeologist Jon Horn explains, "Even after the Telluride strike was finished in 1904, Wells continued to station his own men at the post as late as 1908 to deter the flow of union sympathizers into the region. Fort Peabody has been ravaged by the elements for over 100 years, but remains as the only post in Colorado built specifically to control union activists."

Linda Luther-Broderick, Open Space and Recreation Coordinator for San Miguel County, notes that "the repair-in-place would use as much existing material as possible. Work will be done to Secretary of Interior Standards and the project will include some re-building of the walls of the gun battery and replicating dry laid methods on existing stone walls." The project excites Harry Bruell of the Southwest Conservation Corps in Durango, responsbile for much of the conservation work done in public lands.

"Fort Peabody is an amazing slice of Southwest Colorado's unique and fascinating history," says Bruell. "The Southwest Conservation Corps is interested in participating in the project both for the exciting historic preservation work as well as the intriguing educational opportunities that it would offer the crew." Bruell adds, "This is a piece of history that most people do not know about, but it tells an important story about the history of the region and fabric of our mountain communities. Though bent, even the old metal flag post may still be there."

Standing in the sentry post, looking over the San Juan Mountains, I thought about the National Guardsmen and the long, star-filled nights at 13,365 feet. I walked down to the machine-gun nest, which is just a hole surrounded by stacked stones carved out of a north-facing loose scree slope. The sentry post commands a 180-degree view of Imogene Pass and the dirt road going east to Ouray or west to Telluride. As I stood in the hole, the view provided a perfect angle of fire against the cars full of tourists traveling below me.

Martin believes, "Labor history has been totally ignored in the United States and it's a dramatic history in Colorado. People should know that a governor had the gall to permit a border patrol station to prevent workers from entering a Colorado county." I agree. It's time to stabilize the site and install interpretive signage so that future visitors may know what sacrifices workers endured a century ago. Next summer I want to help. I want to carry some of the framing lumber and pound a nail or two. I want my labor to endure like theirs did.


Andrew Gulliford is a professor of Southwest Studies and History at Fort Lewis College. He can be reached at gulliford_asiweltrofedu.
 
2009-12-26 02:59:00 PM
The biggest thing I took from this article is that we do not commemorate our struggles to unionize, though its as much a part of our history as settlers, pioneers and Cowboys.
 
2009-12-26 03:00:52 PM
Sounds like GM could have learned a few things from those guys. Would have made cutting medical and pension for their retirees a whole lot easier.

/Also, bring back the Corvair.
 
2009-12-26 03:00:52 PM
rev. dave: I bet a person with a hell of a lot of money could build a castle on top of a similar location fully decked out with a tower and a cannon. Except for the cold it would be great to have views like that.

Ever visit Castle Argyle is Scotland? There's a fake castle ruin ona nearby hilltop to give the "new castle" some authenticity. (Or that's what the guy driving the bus told me.)
 
2009-12-26 03:02:12 PM
lecas: resizing captions annoyed me for a short time, then i noticed the most amazing thing.... a STOP button under the picture.

If I have to hunt down a stop button to make a news article actually readable, whomever built it failed.
A picture slideshow is supposed to enhance, not take over.
 
2009-12-26 03:04:28 PM
Valarius
Being a print journalism and English literature major

You is a "print journalism"?
 
2009-12-26 03:05:20 PM
YouPeopleAreCrazy: supposed to enhance, not take over

like a vibrator
 
2009-12-26 03:06:19 PM
The full article, for those who don't wish to go through the insanity that is trying to read with a auto-resizing caption space constantly farking up the experience:

-------------------------------------

IMOGENE PASS - Colorado tourism promoters extol our scenery, our fall colors, and our snow-capped peaks, but nobody mentions our historic machine gun nest above 13,000 feet. At the top of Imogene Pass between Telluride and Ouray, a machine gun emplacement and a small wooden fort survive as silent testimony to workers' struggles and as a legacy to labor.

A century ago millions were made in the San Juan Mountains in gold and silver mines, but not by miners. The early days of pick and pan prospecting had given way to deep shaft industrial mining, and miners traded their lungs and brawn for a few dollars a day to work under increasingly dangerous conditions. As more miners and mill workers died from cave-ins, explosions from dangerous gases, and silicosis in their lungs, they demanded better working conditions and something we take for granted - the eight-hour workday.

Fierce competition between capitalist mine owners and immigrant mine workers resulted in increasing tension and calls for unionization. In Telluride in 1903 the mine workers went on strike and Gov. James Peabody, in collusion with the wealthy mine owners, called out the Colorado National Guard.

Montrose resident MaryJoy Martin has chronicled the rise of the Western Federation of Miners and its hero Vincent St. John in her book The Corpse on Boomerang Road, which may become a major motion picture (now under option). She writes vividly of Bulkeley Wells, a captain in the Colorado National Guard who took command of Troop A, First Squadron Cavalry, comprising cowboys, Wells' employees at the Smuggler-Union Mining Co., and a few union-hating locals.

Martin insists that in our tourist-based economy of today we not forget the labor struggles of the past. So I hiked with her to the top of Imogene Pass to see physical proof of labor strife from 115 years ago.

In her book, Martin writes that Wells declared martial law in Telluride with "mass deportations on special trains, false criminal charges, beatings, threats, and arrests without due process. No one could leave the county without official permission." As illegally deported miners trickled back into Telluride over Imogene Pass, National Guardsmen under Wells' command built a wooden sentry post or redoubt complete with a small stove, flagpole, and a stone sniper or machine gun nest with a Colt rapid-fire machine gun. He named it Fort Peabody after the governor. It's still there today.

The wood has weathered considerably in the high altitude winds and shifting stone walls have shrunk the sentry post, but probably 60 percent of the original historic material exists. When Martin and I climbed into the tiny sleeping quarters we could see remnants of the metal heating stove, and names of National Guard troopers carved with 1904 dates on the back wall. She wrote the nomination to have Fort Peabody listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Approved by the National Park Service, the site represents labor history in the West, and next summer the U.S. Forest Service and San Miguel and Ouray Counties will cooperate on stabilizing Fort Peabody and interpreting its vivid history.

Started in November 1903, workers completed the post in the freezing weather of February 1904. Historical archaeologist Jon Horn explains, "Even after the Telluride strike was finished in 1904, Wells continued to station his own men at the post as late as 1908 to deter the flow of union sympathizers into the region. Fort Peabody has been ravaged by the elements for over 100 years, but remains as the only post in Colorado built specifically to control union activists."

Linda Luther-Broderick, Open Space and Recreation Coordinator for San Miguel County, notes that "the repair-in-place would use as much existing material as possible. Work will be done to Secretary of Interior Standards and the project will include some re-building of the walls of the gun battery and replicating dry laid methods on existing stone walls." The project excites Harry Bruell of the Southwest Conservation Corps in Durango, which runs young crews that do conservation work on public lands. Bruell states, "Fort Peabody is an amazing slice of Southwest Colorado's unique and fascinating history. The Southwest Conservation Corps is interested in participating in the project both for the exciting historic preservation work as well as the intriguing educational opportunities that it would offer the crew." Bruell adds, "This is a piece of history that most people do not know about, but it tells an important story about the history of the region and fabric of our mountain communities." Though bent, even the old metal flag post may still be there.

I've stood in the sentry post and looked out across the San Juan Mountains and thought about the National Guardsmen and the long, star-filled nights at 13,365 feet. In the cold wind I added a cap and gloves and walked down to the sniper post or machine-gun nest, which is just a hole really, surrounded by stacked stones carved out of a north-facing loose scree slope. The sentry post commands a 180-degree view of Imogene Pass and the dirt road going east to Ouray or west to Telluride. As I stood in the hole, Jeeps full of tourists traveled both ways below me providing a perfect angle of fire for an automatic weapon.

Martin believes, "Labor history has been totally ignored in the United States and it's a dramatic history in Colorado. People should know that a governor had the gall to permit a border patrol station to prevent workers from entering a Colorado county." I agree. It's time to stabilize the site and install interpretive signage so that future visitors may know what sacrifices workers endured a century ago. Next summer I want to help. I want to carry some of the framing lumber and pound a nail or two.

Perhaps signs will explain that bully Bulkeley Wells, a coward like most bullies, committed suicide during the Great Depression. As for union organizer Vincent St. John, who dedicated his life to better working conditions for the laboring man, he went to federal prison under false charges.

Andrew Gulliford is a professor of Southwest Studies and History at Fort Lewis College. He can be reached at g­u­l­lif­ord_­a[nospam-﹫-backwards]si­w­elt­rof*e­du.
 
2009-12-26 03:07:57 PM
LOL! I think bad web formatting has just accidentally created a new mini-meme. Sorry for the (third?) unneeded repost of the story.
 
2009-12-26 03:10:39 PM
FeatheredSun 2009-12-26 03:06:19 PM
The full article, for those who don't wish to go through the insanity that is trying to read with a auto-resizing caption space constantly farking up the experience:


That's ok, I don't think anyone outside of Colorado gives a flying fark about any got-damned machine gun nest.
I read the first paragraph and started dry heaving.
 
2009-12-26 03:11:17 PM
MONSTERTRUCK: Valarius
Being a print journalism and English literature major

You is a "print journalism"?


Actually, it was "Print Journalism, newspaper emphasis" back when newspapers and magazines weren't crashing like a ton of bricks.

"Print Journalist" is how professors describe students who have "a perfect face for radio and a perfect voice for writing."
 
2009-12-26 03:11:50 PM
I'm part of the net generation. We can read sites with randomly re-sizing text captions. In fact, we prefer it.

/We can also hear super-high-frequency sounds that you can't.
 
2009-12-26 03:21:49 PM
There were some editing problems in my last post, so I corrected them. Here is the correctly edited article:

------------------------------------------------
IMOGENE PASS - Colorado tourism promoters extol our scenery, our fall colors, and our snow-capped peaks, but nobody mentions our historic machine gun nest above 13,000 feet. At the top of Imogene Pass between Telluride and Ouray, a machine gun emplacement and a small wooden fort survive as silent testimony to workers' struggles and as a legacy to labor.

A century ago millions were made in the San Juan Mountains in gold and silver mines, but not by miners. The early days of pick and pan prospecting had given way to deep shaft industrial mining, and miners traded their lungs and brawn for a few dollars a day to work under increasingly dangerous conditions. As more miners and mill workers died from cave-ins, explosions from dangerous gases, and silicosis in their lungs, they demanded better working conditions and something we take for granted - the eight-hour workday.

Fierce competition between capitalist mine owners and immigrant mine workers resulted in increasing tension and calls for unionization. In Telluride in 1903 the mine workers went on strike and Gov. James Peabody, in collusion with the wealthy mine owners, called out the Colorado National Guard.

Montrose resident MaryJoy Martin has chronicled the rise of the Western Federation of Miners and its hero Vincent St. John in her book The Corpse on Boomerang Road, which may become a major motion picture (now under option). She writes vividly of Bulkeley Wells, a captain in the Colorado National Guard who took command of Troop A, First Squadron Cavalry, comprising cowboys, Wells' employees at the Smuggler-Union Mining Co., and a few union-hating locals.

Martin insists that in our tourist-based economy of today we not forget the labor struggles of the past. So I hiked with her to the top of Imogene Pass to see physical proof of labor strife from 115 years ago.

In her book, Martin writes that Wells declared martial law in Telluride with "mass deportations on special trains, false criminal charges, beatings, threats, and arrests without due process. No one could leave the county without official permission." As illegally deported miners trickled back into Telluride over Imogene Pass, National Guardsmen under Wells' command built a wooden sentry post or redoubt complete with a small stove, flagpole, and a stone sniper or machine gun nest with a Colt rapid-fire machine gun. He named it Fort Peabody after the governor. It's still there today.

The wood has weathered considerably in the high altitude winds and shifting stone walls have shrunk the sentry post, but probably 60 percent of the original historic material exists. When Martin and I climbed into the tiny sleeping quarters we could see remnants of the metal heating stove, and names of National Guard troopers carved with 1904 dates on the back wall. She wrote the nomination to have Fort Peabody listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Approved by the National Park Service, the site represents labor history in the West, and next summer the U.S. Forest Service and San Miguel and Ouray Counties will cooperate on stabilizing Fort Peabody and interpreting its vivid history.

Started in November 1903, workers completed the post in the freezing weather of February 1904. Historical archaeologist Jon Horn explains, "Even after the Telluride strike was finished in 1904, Wells continued to station his own men at the post as late as 1908 to deter the flow of union sympathizers into the region. Fort Peabody has been ravaged by the elements for over 100 years, but remains as the only post in Colorado built specifically to control union activists."

Linda Luther-Broderick, Open Space and Recreation Coordinator for San Miguel County, notes that "the repair-in-place would use as much existing material as possible. Work will be done to Secretary of Interior Standards and the project will include some re-building of the walls of the gun battery and replicating dry laid methods on existing stone walls." The project excites Harry Bruell of the Southwest Conservation Corps in Durango, which runs young crews that do conservation work on public lands. Bruell states, "Fort Peabody is an amazing slice of Southwest Colorado's unique and fascinating history. The Southwest Conservation Corps is interested in participating in the project both for the exciting historic preservation work as well as the intriguing educational opportunities that it would offer the crew." Bruell adds, "This is a piece of history that most people do not know about, but it tells an important story about the history of the region and fabric of our mountain communities." Though bent, even the old metal flag post may still be there.

I've stood in the sentry post and looked out across the San Juan Mountains and thought about the National Guardsmen and the long, star-filled nights at 13,365 feet. In the cold wind I added a cap and gloves and walked down to the sniper post or machine-gun nest, which is just a hole really, surrounded by stacked stones carved out of a north-facing loose scree slope. The sentry post commands a 180-degree view of Imogene Pass and the dirt road going east to Ouray or west to Telluride. As I stood in the hole, a couple of guys (they were up to no good) started making trouble in our neighborhood. I got in one little fight and my mom got scared - she said "You're moving in with your auntie and uncle in Bel-Air. I whisted for a cab and when it came near, the license plate said "fresh" and it had dice in the mirror! If anything I could say that this cab was rare, but i thought "nah, forget it" -
yo holmes, to Bel-air! I pulled up tp a house about seven or eight, and I yelled to the cabbie "yo holmes, smell you later!" I looked at my kingdom - i was finally there - to sit on my throne as the prince of Bel-air!
 
2009-12-26 03:26:32 PM
There were some editing problems in FeatheredSun's weiners, so I corrected them. Here is the correctly edited article:

------------------------------------------------
IMOGENE PASS - Colorado tourism promoters extol our scenery, our fall colors, and our snow-capped peaks, but nobody mentions our historic machine gun nest above 13,000 feet. At the top of Imogene Pass between Telluride and Ouray, a machine gun emplacement and a small wooden fort survive as silent testimony to workers' struggles and as a legacy to labor.

A century ago millions were made in the San Juan Mountains in gold and silver mines, but not by miners. The early days of pick and pan prospecting had given way to deep shaft industrial mining, and miners traded their lungs and brawn for a few dollars a day to work under increasingly dangerous conditions. As more miners and mill workers died from cave-ins, explosions from dangerous gases, and silicosis in their lungs, they demanded better working conditions and something we take for granted - the eight-hour workday.

Fierce competition between capitalist mine owners and immigrant mine workers resulted in increasing tension and calls for unionization. In Telluride in 1903 the mine workers went on strike and Gov. James Peabody, in collusion with the wealthy mine owners, called out the Colorado National Guard.

Montrose resident MaryJoy Martin has chronicled the rise of the Western Federation of Miners and its hero Vincent St. John in her book The Corpse on Boomerang Road, which may become a major motion picture (now under option). She writes vividly of Bulkeley Wells, a captain in the Colorado National Guard who took command of Troop A, First Squadron Cavalry, comprising cowboys, Wells' employees at the Smuggler-Union Mining Co., and a few union-hating locals.

Martin insists that in our tourist-based economy of today we not forget the labor struggles of the past. So I hiked with her to the top of Imogene Pass to see physical proof of labor strife from 115 years ago.

In her book, Martin writes that Wells declared martial law in Telluride with "mass deportations on special trains, false criminal charges, beatings, threats, and arrests without due process. No one could leave the county without official permission." As illegally deported miners trickled back into Telluride over Imogene Pass, National Guardsmen under Wells' command built a wooden sentry post or redoubt complete with a small stove, flagpole, and a stone sniper or machine gun nest with a Colt rapid-fire machine gun. He named it Fort Peabody after the governor. It's still there today.

The wood has weathered considerably in the high altitude winds and shifting stone walls have shrunk the sentry post, but probably 60 percent of the original historic material exists. When Martin and I climbed into the tiny sleeping quarters we could see remnants of the metal heating stove, and names of National Guard troopers carved with 1904 dates on the back wall. She wrote the nomination to have Fort Peabody listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Approved by the National Park Service, the site represents labor history in the West, and next summer the U.S. Forest Service and San Miguel and Ouray Counties will cooperate on stabilizing Fort Peabody and interpreting its vivid history.

Started in November 1903, workers completed the post in the freezing weather of February 1904. Historical archaeologist Jon Horn explains, "Even after the Telluride strike was finished in 1904, Wells continued to station his own men at the post as late as 1908 to deter the flow of union sympathizers into the region. Fort Peabody has been ravaged by the elements for over 100 years, but remains as the only post in Colorado built specifically to control union activists."

Linda Luther-Broderick, Open Space and Recreation Coordinator for San Miguel County, notes that "the repair-in-place would use as much existing material as possible. Work will be done to Secretary of Interior Standards and the project will include some re-building of the walls of the gun battery and replicating dry laid methods on existing stone walls." The project excites Harry Bruell of the Southwest Conservation Corps in Durango, which runs young crews that do conservation work on public lands. Bruell states, "Fort Peabody is an amazing slice of Southwest Colorado's unique and fascinating history. The Southwest Conservation Corps is interested in participating in the project both for the exciting historic preservation work as well as the intriguing educational opportunities that it would offer the crew." Bruell adds, "This is a piece of history that most people do not know about, but it tells an important story about the history of the region and fabric of our mountain communities." Though bent, even the old metal flag post may still be there.

I've stood in the sentry post and looked out across the San Juan Mountains and thought about the National Guardsmen and the long, star-filled nights at 13,365 feet. In the cold wind I added a cap and gloves and walked down to the sniper post or machine-gun nest, which is just a hole really, surrounded by stacked stones carved out of a north-facing loose scree slope. The sentry post commands a 180-degree view of Imogene Pass and the dirt road going east to Ouray or west to Telluride. As I stood in the hole, a couple of guys (they were up to no good) started making trouble in our neighborhood. I got in one little fight and my mom got scared - she said "You're moving in with your auntie and uncle in Bel-Air. I whisted for a cab and when it came near, the license plate said "fresh" and it had dice in the mirror! If anything I could say that this cab was rare, but i thought "nah, forget it" -
yo holmes, to Bel-air! I pulled up tp a house about seven or eight, and I yelled to the cabbie "yo holmes, smell you later!" I looked at my kingdom - i was finally there - to sit on my throne as the prince of Bel-air!
 
2009-12-26 03:28:44 PM
wooden sentry post or redoubt complete with a small stove, flagpole, and a stone sniper or machine gun nest with a Colt rapid-fire machine gun.

As opposed to those pussy slow-fire machine guns.
 
2009-12-26 03:30:37 PM
@way south

you mean COSMOLINE?
 
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