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(Sgt Shultz)   Need a last minute gift idea? How about sending a loved one to a re-creation of a German POW Camp   (powescapes.com) divider line 59
    More: Strange, World War Two, prisoner of war camp, german pow camp, gifts, mistreatment, Nazism  
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5879 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Dec 2009 at 4:38 AM (5 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



59 Comments   (+0 »)
   

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2009-12-14 11:02:39 PM  

Sounds like fun.

i236.photobucket.com
 
2009-12-14 11:14:01 PM  
if I had the money, i'd totally do that.

so...farkers...anyone want to contribute money to putting my ass into a POW camp?
 
2009-12-14 11:16:33 PM  
That sounds like a much better present than the "Bob Crane- Midnight Encounters" kit.
 
2009-12-14 11:23:28 PM  
Personally, I'd rather just have a gift card to a local fast food place.

img16.imageshack.us
 
2009-12-15 01:14:47 AM  
toys.about.com
/sorry, couldn't find a photo of the gas version
 
2009-12-15 02:35:41 AM  
From the old photos it looks like it'd be a good weight-loss program.
 
2009-12-15 02:56:08 AM  
dahmers love zombie: Personally, I'd rather just have a gift card to a local fast food place.

Just when I thought it was safe to TFark while drinking, this comes along.

/window seat, please.....with meal
 
2009-12-15 04:42:19 AM  
Will you keep her if I only pay half?
 
2009-12-15 04:43:05 AM  
dahmers love zombie: Personally, I'd rather just have a gift card to a local fast food place.

farm3.static.flickr.com

something ain't right about this
 
2009-12-15 04:45:45 AM  
also

farm3.static.flickr.com

he's thinking Arby's
 
2009-12-15 04:46:43 AM  
So it goes.
 
2009-12-15 04:50:05 AM  
You'll have to take a number.
 
2009-12-15 04:53:33 AM  
For the same $3500 that you could hand over to these clowns for this ghey war-porn disneyland, you could start a tour in Berchtesgarten, travel through Nurnberg and Munich to Warsaw, travel into Ukraine to places like Lviv and Kiev, enter Russia and see Kursk and Volgograd (stalinrgad), from there (a long ride) to krakow and auschwitz, and finish your tour in berlin. The amount of time you spend on sleeper trains will give you plenty of time to read, and, if you book Platzkartny throughout the ex-USSR portions, this will be as much of a POW experience.

But of course, then you won't have a certificate of completion of some half-day course in Nazi helmets and headgear like these clowns are proposing.
 
2009-12-15 05:19:38 AM  
www.blog.kz

This is what I'm getting people for Xmas this year.
 
2009-12-15 05:23:56 AM  
Something doesn't sit right with these guys. Sure, they seem authentic enough, but I have trouble believing this is as good as is hyped.
 
2009-12-15 05:31:37 AM  
Thanks mendewes. Came for Vonnegut. Fark never disappoints!
 
2009-12-15 05:32:25 AM  
In Poland?

I bet that's popular with the locals.
 
2009-12-15 05:46:21 AM  
I kind of hope this catches on. Seriously.

If only so they eventually open an Andersonville version in America, whose army I will then infiltrate like many women of that era (including one reputed ancestor of mine,) did. Bound chest, cut hair, the whole nine yards. Re-enactors allow us girls about as much as the original Union Army did (if you pass, you pass, pretty much,) and I would think it'd be rather more of a challenge to keep character for a week-long experience.

And I'll bring my own uniform, thank you very much.
 
2009-12-15 05:56:23 AM  
I knew a gentleman who survived a german pow camp. Based on conversations with him about the experience - you have to be crazy to want to experience the event. As they marched to the west to avoid the advancing russians, the germans shot stragglers. Thanks but no thanks.
 
2009-12-15 06:05:53 AM  
oy vey.
 
2009-12-15 06:15:34 AM  
Is it last minute already? Shiat!
 
2009-12-15 06:20:32 AM  
aearra: I knew a gentleman who survived a german pow camp. Based on conversations with him about the experience - you have to be crazy to want to experience the event. As they marched to the west to avoid the advancing russians, the germans shot stragglers. Thanks but no thanks.

Well, prisoners in Germany were treated with widely varying conditions. The concentration camps were used not only for exterminating "cleansed" Jews but Russian "Slavs" as well. Captured troops were often in brutal conditions but fortunately short of outright extermination camps.

Many were held in far better conditions though, and allowed to receive packages and letters from home and had a system of script currency for prisoners alone. Airmen were often held in luxury resorts, relatively speaking, as were officers. Oflag IV-C was a prison camp in a farking castle for officers who were basically "given the run of the place" on sort of an honor system, not far from Hogan's Heroes at all. They were able to mount a legendary series of escape attempts due to lack of restrictions on their activities, the guards even letting escape plans go on for awhile to distract them. They build a whole farking glider plane in the attic, the basis of the movie The Birdmen.

And they didn't even shoot people caught on escape attempts. It was kind of a professional respect, and at worst they usually got a few months of solitary confinement when recaptured.

It's kinda hard to reconcile this picture of Nazi captivity with the concentration camps and other POWs being starved or driven to death.
 
2009-12-15 06:38:00 AM  
aearra
I knew a gentleman who survived a german pow camp. Based on conversations with him about the experience - you have to be crazy to want to experience the event. As they marched to the west to avoid the advancing russians, the germans shot stragglers. Thanks but no thanks.

I've known a few too. Tattoos on wrists, underarms, thighs and the inside of lips. Never a place that needs to be revisited "for an experience". I really hate that this is Poland.
 
2009-12-15 06:48:19 AM  
I dunno. Any POW camp recreation sounds in pretty bad taste. Battle re-enactors and re-enactments I get. This... not so much.

Well, I guess I'll hold out for the Bataan Death March Experience. "Simulated" starvation, tropical disease and getting stabbed by a bayonet for lagging behind.
 
2009-12-15 06:58:01 AM  
I once played one of the off-stage Nazis who break down the hidden door at the end of the stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank. We had two wooden crash boxes: one full of broken glass, the other full of metal and ceramic tile. We had to sound like really scary Nazis so that the actors on stage could fully react to our supposed presence. "Juden! Juden!" *Ka-Crash* We were just stage hands and we needed a lot of practice. So much practice, in fact, that we started to get pissed off at the director. She kept telling us we had to be louder, crashier, and scarier.

We started to hate this part of rehearsal. Every day. "Louder! You must sound like angry Nazi soldiers! You are furious at those hiding!" By the first night's performance, we detested our roles. All three of us. We knew for sure that we would fail. The real actors would hate us for not being scary enough, and the play would be judged based on its last moments--our poor performance. We waited in the wings doing our other tasks throughout the performance. We were on a slow burn. Trapped in this situation, we started to hate everyone around us, the life of the theater, ourselves. When we got our cue at the end of the play, I thought for a flashing moment that we would kill each other with those crash boxes. Our throats and voices became hell corridors. The crash boxes became the focus of everything we had ever detested in life. I sprained my leg. Josh broke a toe. We split the wood on one of the stair runners. And for a few moments we were those monsters of the mid-20th century, breaking down the bookcase and door that hid an innocent family.

Reports from the rest of production were delightful. The audience actually jumped in their seats and looked like they might move away from our general direction off stage. The actors? Well, they knew how pissed we were. Their performance at the end was excellent, but I'm not sure it was all performance.
 
2009-12-15 07:05:16 AM  
My grandpa was a bomber pilot in WWII. He was shot down over Poland I believe, and captured. He spent 3 years in a POW camp. It was actually the same one that The Great Escape was planned from. He was one of the guys who jumped on the pommell horse while they dug.

He died about 7 years ago. I asked him about the war all the time, and about how it was in the camp. He said the guards weren't exactly nice, but they would say a terse "hello" in German if you talked to them.

I don't think he told me all there was though, because a famous story in our family is that my grandma reached over him one night while he was sleeping and he started strangling her, dreaming that he was back in the POW camp and someone was trying to steal his food.

Man I wish he was still around. Small but tough guy, very happy all the time, and a kind person.

/there's something in my eye
//you couldn't pay me enough to go to this "vacation"
 
2009-12-15 07:09:47 AM  
August11: I once played one of the off-stage Nazis who break down the hidden door at the end of the stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank. We had two wooden crash boxes: one full of broken glass, the other full of metal and ceramic tile. We had to sound like really scary Nazis so that the actors on stage could fully react to our supposed presence. "Juden! Juden!" *Ka-Crash* We were just stage hands and we needed a lot of practice. So much practice, in fact, that we started to get pissed off at the director. She kept telling us we had to be louder, crashier, and scarier.

We started to hate this part of rehearsal. Every day. "Louder! You must sound like angry Nazi soldiers! You are furious at those hiding!" By the first night's performance, we detested our roles. All three of us. We knew for sure that we would fail. The real actors would hate us for not being scary enough, and the play would be judged based on its last moments--our poor performance. We waited in the wings doing our other tasks throughout the performance. We were on a slow burn. Trapped in this situation, we started to hate everyone around us, the life of the theater, ourselves. When we got our cue at the end of the play, I thought for a flashing moment that we would kill each other with those crash boxes. Our throats and voices became hell corridors. The crash boxes became the focus of everything we had ever detested in life. I sprained my leg. Josh broke a toe. We split the wood on one of the stair runners. And for a few moments we were those monsters of the mid-20th century, breaking down the bookcase and door that hid an innocent family.

Reports from the rest of production were delightful. The audience actually jumped in their seats and looked like they might move away from our general direction off stage. The actors? Well, they knew how pissed we were. Their performance at the end was excellent, but I'm not sure it was all performance.



Wow, that's actually kinda fascinating to read. I wonder if other actors who have portrayed Nazis, etc go through something like that. Very interesting, I'm glad you shared that.
 
2009-12-15 07:17:51 AM  
Take that holocaust deniers!
 
2009-12-15 07:29:31 AM  
sure haven't: August11: I once played one of the off-stage Nazis who break down the hidden door at the end of the stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank. We had two wooden crash boxes: one full of broken glass, the other full of metal and ceramic tile. We had to sound like really scary Nazis so that the actors on stage could fully react to our supposed presence. "Juden! Juden!" *Ka-Crash* We were just stage hands and we needed a lot of practice. So much practice, in fact, that we started to get pissed off at the director. She kept telling us we had to be louder, crashier, and scarier.

We started to hate this part of rehearsal. Every day. "Louder! You must sound like angry Nazi soldiers! You are furious at those hiding!" By the first night's performance, we detested our roles. All three of us. We knew for sure that we would fail. The real actors would hate us for not being scary enough, and the play would be judged based on its last moments--our poor performance. We waited in the wings doing our other tasks throughout the performance. We were on a slow burn. Trapped in this situation, we started to hate everyone around us, the life of the theater, ourselves. When we got our cue at the end of the play, I thought for a flashing moment that we would kill each other with those crash boxes. Our throats and voices became hell corridors. The crash boxes became the focus of everything we had ever detested in life. I sprained my leg. Josh broke a toe. We split the wood on one of the stair runners. And for a few moments we were those monsters of the mid-20th century, breaking down the bookcase and door that hid an innocent family.

Reports from the rest of production were delightful. The audience actually jumped in their seats and looked like they might move away from our general direction off stage. The actors? Well, they knew how pissed we were. Their performance at the end was excellent, but I'm not sure it was all performance.


Wow, that's actually kinda fascinating to read. I wonder if other actors who have portrayed Nazis, etc go through something like that. Very interesting, I'm glad you shared that.


Hitler Auditions (new window)
 
2009-12-15 07:30:18 AM  
symonsez.files.wordpress.com

SUUUUBBYYYYYY!!!!
 
2009-12-15 07:34:39 AM  
SirEattonHogg: I dunno. Any POW camp recreation sounds in pretty bad taste. Battle re-enactors and re-enactments I get. This... not so much.

Well, I guess I'll hold out for the Bataan Death March Experience. "Simulated" starvation, tropical disease and getting stabbed by a bayonet for lagging behind.


Wuss, you need to get the elite package. Where they string you up by your wrists while they take turns stabbing you to death. Or have a tank run over you. Or my favorite, where they ride past you and lop your head off.

Don't go cheap, you want the full experience.
 
2009-12-15 07:40:40 AM  
SpiderQueenDemon: I kind of hope this catches on. Seriously.

If only so they eventually open an Andersonville version in America, whose army I will then infiltrate like many women of that era (including one reputed ancestor of mine,) did. Bound chest, cut hair, the whole nine yards. Re-enactors allow us girls about as much as the original Union Army did (if you pass, you pass, pretty much,) and I would think it'd be rather more of a challenge to keep character for a week-long experience.

And I'll bring my own uniform, thank you very much.


That's hot!
 
2009-12-15 07:43:28 AM  
The Army sent to to something like this once. I think I'll pass.
 
2009-12-15 07:49:22 AM  
Yeah, but the local giftshop is awful. All these lampshades and gloves. I did buy a small German vacuum cleaner for $5. The guy said it will get the dust out of ANYTHING.
 
2009-12-15 07:55:55 AM  
StarshipPooper
Wuss, you need to get the elite package. Where they string you up by your wrists while they take turns stabbing you to death. Or have a tank run over you. Or my favorite, where they ride past you and lop your head off.


Sounds kinky!
 
2009-12-15 08:23:55 AM  
August11: I once played one of the off-stage Nazis who break down the hidden door at the end of the stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank.

cdn.stereogum.com

Andy?
 
2009-12-15 08:27:15 AM  
August11: I once played one of the off-stage Nazis who break down the hidden door at the end of the stage adaptation of The Diary of Anne Frank. We had two wooden crash boxes: one full of broken glass, the other full of metal and ceramic tile. We had to sound like really scary Nazis so that the actors on stage could fully react to our supposed presence. "Juden! Juden!" *Ka-Crash* We were just stage hands and we needed a lot of practice. So much practice, in fact, that we started to get pissed off at the director. She kept telling us we had to be louder, crashier, and scarier.

We started to hate this part of rehearsal. Every day. "Louder! You must sound like angry Nazi soldiers! You are furious at those hiding!" By the first night's performance, we detested our roles. All three of us. We knew for sure that we would fail. The real actors would hate us for not being scary enough, and the play would be judged based on its last moments--our poor performance. We waited in the wings doing our other tasks throughout the performance. We were on a slow burn. Trapped in this situation, we started to hate everyone around us, the life of the theater, ourselves. When we got our cue at the end of the play, I thought for a flashing moment that we would kill each other with those crash boxes. Our throats and voices became hell corridors. The crash boxes became the focus of everything we had ever detested in life. I sprained my leg. Josh broke a toe. We split the wood on one of the stair runners. And for a few moments we were those monsters of the mid-20th century, breaking down the bookcase and door that hid an innocent family.

Reports from the rest of production were delightful. The audience actually jumped in their seats and looked like they might move away from our general direction off stage. The actors? Well, they knew how pissed we were. Their performance at the end was excellent, but I'm not sure it was all performance.


I wonder if making you that angry was the director's goal all along? A kind of enforced method acting, perhaps?
 
2009-12-15 08:36:42 AM  
I started thinking of that film "Hostel"..

Sounds like they basically run a sadist camp. I wonder if it'll be done in English?

It would be interesting to interview someone who goes through this thing, assuming they survive it.

"meh, it wasn't so bad for those POWS.. I went through it.. no biggie."
 
2009-12-15 08:40:30 AM  
Pseudowolf:
I wonder if making you that angry was the director's goal all along? A kind of enforced method acting, perhaps?


I've thought a lot about that. She was a great director. I think she is directing ads in NYC these days.
 
2009-12-15 08:41:58 AM  
All fun and games until someone breaks out the nerve gas./not laughing
 
2009-12-15 08:50:12 AM  
xanadian: SUUUUBBYYYYYY!!!!

I came here for this. Leaving satisfied.
 
2009-12-15 08:52:16 AM  
"Our staff will not break character"

Sounds like a fun lawsuit waiting to happen.
 
2009-12-15 09:43:29 AM  
Count me in, can I bring some Xanax for those long boring nights?
 
2009-12-15 09:47:31 AM  
If only there were some kind of place, maybe a camp, you could go to if you have trouble concentrating.
 
2009-12-15 09:49:13 AM  
/Stands in corner, admiring the festivities
 
2009-12-15 09:53:18 AM  
scrumpox: If only there were some kind of place, maybe a camp, you could go to if you have trouble concentrating.

I guess you don't want to buy a ticket.
 
2009-12-15 10:01:53 AM  
I've been to Dachau, not signing up for this thing ever. This is stupid and just plain disrespectful. You cannot pretend to have "lived through the concentration camps of WW2" based of this service if it is remaining legal and anything less than state sponsored genocide.

Instead of this buy them the book "The White Hotel."
 
2009-12-15 10:11:21 AM  
And they can dig 3 tunnels...and call them...Tom, Dick and Harry


//this is for the 50
 
2009-12-15 10:14:26 AM  
As a Brit, I have to say...

"I'm going to Butlitz" (new window)
 
2009-12-15 10:30:12 AM  
This sounds great. I didn't have any idea what to get the mother in law.
 
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